Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms
February 15, 2011 10:06 AM   Subscribe

Ken Robinson: Changing Education Paradigms "In this talk from RSA Animate, Sir Ken Robinson lays out the link between 3 troubling trends: rising drop-out rates, schools' dwindling stake in the arts, and ADHD."
posted by pick_the_flowers (14 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite

 
Thus former unschooler says yes, wonderful, of course, how obvious.

Which means none of it will ever, ever happen.
posted by The Whelk at 10:18 AM on February 15, 2011 [3 favorites]


love the factory system analogy

Also from the fine animators at RSA:

First Tragedy, Then Farce - Slavoj Zizak

Crises of Capitalism - David Harvey

The Empathic Society - Jeremy Rifkin

Where Good Ideas Come From - Steven Johnson

Language as a Window into Human Nature - Steven Pinker

There are others, many of which should be available on the RSA website
posted by narcotizingdysfunction at 10:20 AM on February 15, 2011 [3 favorites]


I saw Ken Robinson speak live in this last year and he is positively inspiring. The addition of the animation is actually a surprisingly nice touch. It enhances the message very effectively.
posted by Joey Michaels at 10:52 AM on February 15, 2011


love the factory system analogy

agree. I'm not sure about his conclusions though.

For example, the atomization of people: Ultimately people are going to be atomized in interviews, when they give presentations, when they have an idea and want to explore it. The importance of working individually is undeniable.
posted by esprit de l'escalier at 10:53 AM on February 15, 2011


Crises of Capitalism - David Harvey
The Empathic Society - Jeremy Rifkin


Seconding how great these are, especially the Harvey one. IMO it's one of the best videos on the internet, and everyone should watch it. (This sounds like hyperbole but it isn't.)

I've seen the one in the OP and I recall it being good too.
posted by manguero at 11:32 AM on February 15, 2011 [2 favorites]


Video of Sir Ken Robinson delivering the full talk (55:20)
posted by yaymukund at 1:17 PM on February 15, 2011


Double.
posted by Rhomboid at 2:40 PM on February 15, 2011


For example, the atomization of people

point well taken, particularly with the example of when someone has an idea and wants to explore it.

That said, I don't think interviews and presentations are atomizing in the same way -- in my experience, success in interviews and presentations is all about gauging other people's thoughts, anticipating responses, and tailoring words and behaviours to specific social situations.
posted by narcotizingdysfunction at 4:35 PM on February 15, 2011


I'm not sure what to take away from this, as a person nearing the end of her education. Divergent thinking seems to be the thing he's mourning, but on the other hand it doesn't look like something I can get people to pay me money to do.
posted by Phalene at 9:51 PM on February 15, 2011


Many interesting thoughts, and a good speaker. (And the animation is fun!)

The map of ADHD diagnoses is very surprising - when is that data from?

But really, to test his claim about ADHD being connected to increased standardized testing and decreased time with the arts, we'd want to see the map of school arts budgets across the same states, and to see the data on how those states are using standardized tests. (I'd want to see the maps of where pharmaceutical companies spend their marketing and doctor-wooing money, and where insurance companies will/won't cover the drugs, as well.)
posted by LobsterMitten at 12:00 AM on February 16, 2011


Phalene, I wouldn't be so sure that you won't be paid for divergent thinking! Education isn't something that ends when you leave formal education, it's a paradigm - I think that's the greater point.
posted by pick_the_flowers at 12:01 AM on February 16, 2011


Not a fan.
His claims about ADHD fall apart when you know the evidence, he knows he is being sloppy.
We all know we want an increased emphasis on the Romantic side of education, but giving these kinds of talks isn't really helping, IMHO.
Check this link out for a more fleshed out, better written criticism than mine.
posted by cogpsychprof at 8:24 PM on February 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


That's a great article, cogpsyprof. It's well-written and very convincing.
posted by esprit de l'escalier at 1:58 PM on February 17, 2011


No. It's not.
posted by jaronson at 10:19 AM on February 19, 2011


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