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PS3 Hypervisor Bible
February 24, 2011 11:16 AM   Subscribe

At the behest of Sony, German police have raided the home of Linux developer graf_chokolo, a prominent member of the PS3 scene. In response, graf_chokolo has released what's being called the PS3 Hypervisor Bible.

graf_chokolo had promised that he'd release all of his PS3 hypervisor knowledge if he was pursued like George Hotz. (previously)
posted by jeffburdges (73 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite

 
Easily the worst thing they could have done.
posted by eyeballkid at 11:22 AM on February 24, 2011


Sony is so dumb, they are really dumb.

(As for Geohot, I know I shouldn't be surprised, but I really wish so many hacker heroes weren't also immature assholes.)
posted by kmz at 11:25 AM on February 24, 2011


I'm curious. From reading this (and, I am NOT part of that world) it appears that this fellow was reverse engineering/hacking proprietary software in a manner that violated copyright, he was caught, and, as a result released it to others?

If that's the case, why would this be OK to do (I'm assuming, based on some of the comments linked to, that he has a lot of support?). Unless we're looking at a celebration of anarchy, why should he be considered a hero?
posted by tomswift at 11:27 AM on February 24, 2011


MESS WITH THE BEST, DIE LIKE THE REST!!!
posted by Fizz at 11:27 AM on February 24, 2011 [11 favorites]


The documents and tools released are excellent, btw.
posted by jaduncan at 11:28 AM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


If that's the case, why would this be OK to do

Think of it as the government denying your ability to work on your car, and he's uploaded a repair manual.

Illegal != Wrong
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 11:29 AM on February 24, 2011 [47 favorites]


actually, i quite liked the geohot rap number. Skillz. ;]
posted by pucklermuskau at 11:29 AM on February 24, 2011


I have no comments on the legality of what the PS3 "hacking" community is doing, but graf_chokolo's threat to release the whowhatzit if he was targeted by police action seems sort of silly. This isn't a spy novel - either release it or don't.
posted by muddgirl at 11:30 AM on February 24, 2011


Oh, and if people want to read more/get them, the released files are here.
posted by jaduncan at 11:31 AM on February 24, 2011


I'm curious. From reading this (and, I am NOT part of that world) it appears that this fellow was reverse engineering/hacking proprietary software in a manner that violated copyright, he was caught, and, as a result released it to others?

Because hacking by itself cannot violate copyright. Copyright is an entirely different thing. Once you own something, you can do with it as you please. (Well, mostly, but it's still not a violation of copyright.)
posted by JHarris at 11:31 AM on February 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


Reverse engineering is not illegal in most countries.
posted by schmod at 11:32 AM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


> I have no comments on the legality of what the PS3 "hacking" community is doing, but graf_chokolo's threat to release the whowhatzit if he was targeted by police action seems sort of silly. This isn't a spy novel - either release it or don't.

My understanding was that he was using it as a sort of insurance policy, rightly or wrongly. What other hedge would he have against a major player like Sony (other than not bothering in the first place)?
posted by Burhanistan at 11:33 AM on February 24, 2011


Why do German police wear windbreakers with "POLICE" on them in English? A google image search does not show any examples of the Engish word being used on any German police assets.
posted by George_Spiggott at 11:35 AM on February 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


And, also, I'd be a bit more sympathetic toward Sony if they hadn't been complete asses about running custom code on the PS3, which was actually a feature that they advertised, supported, and then arbitrarily removed via a software update.

Had they not done that, it's unlikely that any of these things would have happened. Nobody would have cared about reverse-engineering the hypervisor.
posted by schmod at 11:35 AM on February 24, 2011 [19 favorites]


It pretty much is a spy novel at this point. Government agents, acting as puppets to mysterious corporate overlords, violate an individual's privacy on grounds of questionable legality as he investigates a technology, all as an attempt to keep a secret.

All it needs is a ski chase scene.
posted by adipocere at 11:35 AM on February 24, 2011 [42 favorites]


Reverse engineering is not illegal in most countries.

Reverse engineering typically violates the user agreement, but then again, the user agreements are questionably legal.
posted by Mister Fabulous at 11:35 AM on February 24, 2011


> Why do German police wear windbreakers with "POLICE" on them in English?

Made in China?
posted by Burhanistan at 11:36 AM on February 24, 2011 [6 favorites]


No, my point was that that image on the forum is presumably provided by the poster for illustrative purposes, but he doesn't say so, and one supposes that the reader is meant to get the impression that that's an actual picture of the raid.
posted by George_Spiggott at 11:37 AM on February 24, 2011


tomswift: "I'm curious. From reading this (and, I am NOT part of that world) it appears that this fellow was reverse engineering/hacking proprietary software in a manner that violated copyright, he was caught, and, as a result released it to others?"

Reverse engineering software is not the same as "violating copyright". Sometimes people who want to violate copyright build on the effort of legitimate reverse engineering.

Besides, any legal framework under which I can purchase a physical good and then not be allowed to do with it as I please (so long as I'm not harming others) is..morally questionable..at best.
posted by wierdo at 11:37 AM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


Older versions of the PS3 allowed you to run Linux, meaning you could do anything you wanted with the computer hardware you had purchased. Later, Sony decided to remove this feature. This guy's primary role is to re-enable people to do whatever they want with the hardware they purchase. Piracy is a side-effect. Should he be punished for the side-effect?
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 11:38 AM on February 24, 2011 [9 favorites]


Why do German police wear windbreakers with "POLICE" on them in English?

English has long been recognized internationally as the official language of oppression.
posted by loquacious at 11:39 AM on February 24, 2011 [53 favorites]


Why do German police wear windbreakers with "POLICE" on them in English?

They don't - German police gear have POLIZEI on the back. If you see otherwise, it's a not a photo of German police.
posted by cmonkey at 11:39 AM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


English has long been recognized internationally as the official language of oppression.

Also of stock art.
posted by jaduncan at 11:39 AM on February 24, 2011 [27 favorites]


Skillz.

I wouldn't call casual homophobia "skillz".
posted by kmz at 11:39 AM on February 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


I sure do love this inert blinking box that sits under my TV. I'm glad I can blithely ignore the fact that it is capable of doing any number of amazing things, if only this damn End User License Agreement didn't prevent me from trying to explore it's inner workings. And it was only $500!
posted by tmt at 11:40 AM on February 24, 2011


Have you been raided, cmonkey?
posted by joost de vries at 11:40 AM on February 24, 2011


Older versions of the PS3 allowed you to run Linux, meaning you could do anything you wanted with the computer hardware you had purchased. Later, Sony decided to remove this feature.

And that's "remove the feature from PS3s that have already been sold," not just "in future models." Normally, I'm about as unsympathetic to hackers and pirates as can be, but Sony really shit the bed here.
posted by Amanojaku at 11:42 AM on February 24, 2011 [10 favorites]


And if you think the PS3 is just a toy and expecting to run custom code on it is unrealistic, ask the US Air Force.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 11:42 AM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


What he was doing would almost certainly have been illegal in the U.S. under the DMCA. I have no idea what its legal status in Germany is. Anyone know? (Like many people here, I consider it ludicrous that such a thing would be illegal, but I'm still curious.)
posted by Zed at 11:42 AM on February 24, 2011


My understanding was that he was using it as a sort of insurance policy, rightly or wrongly. What other hedge would he have against a major player like Sony (other than not bothering in the first place)?

Again, no comments about whether it's right or wrong, just whether it's practical. Sony already thinks that he's done something wrong. Is the threat of doing more things that Sony considers illegal really an insurance policy? It's not like Sony's going to be, "oooh, nooo! Don't infringe on our copyright any more! Your threat of further self-incrimination will totally keep us from trying to bust you!"

(NOT that I think what graf_chokolo is doing is illegal - just that Sony clearly does)
posted by muddgirl at 11:43 AM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


If that's the case, why would this be OK to do

Because an EULA isn't a contract*.

* by reading, agreeing or disagreeing with this comment, the end user of this website agrees to paypal mhoye five million dollars and any internal organ that mhoye may or may not need at any point now or in the future upon request.
posted by mhoye at 11:44 AM on February 24, 2011 [8 favorites]


"Reverse engineering a hypervisor" is just what I always thought hacking would sound like in the future.
posted by Aizkolari at 11:45 AM on February 24, 2011 [28 favorites]


Thanks, folks, for your insight on this. I appreciate it.
posted by tomswift at 11:45 AM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


It might be practical if large corporations began to pick up on the inadvisability of going after technically skilled people with Dropboxes full of documents ready to be disgorged into various torrents at the lapse of various deadman's switches. Corporations are slow to learn, but even they can pick up on "little secret" versus "big secret."

This sort of thing is one of our few hedges against unilateral power arrangements favoring corporations.

I keep coming back to the IRC logs between representatives of Anonymous with various employees of HBGary and HBGary Federal. One existed as some kind of plausible deniability for the other. "See, we're just a parent corporation, we're not really responsible for this one bad actor. Please don't dump our emails." was the logic we heard. And in court, that kind of shell game would have been okay — if things didn't turn out so well, well, we're not responsible ... and if they turn out great, profit! Contracts! They can't really lose.

The courts are already sewn up in corporate favor. Short of revoking corporate personhood and a reversal of rulings like Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, actual humans stand very, very little chance of standing up to these non-human entities and this is, sadly, one of the only methods available.
posted by adipocere at 11:56 AM on February 24, 2011 [13 favorites]


Corporations are building their fortunes in the modern economy on the work (and creativity) of people like this. The logical action would be to hire him.
posted by sonic meat machine at 11:57 AM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


The EUCD is designed to tackle issues of copyright protection security breaks, but Sony's issue may be the reverse engineering (and possibly academic research, if they can swing it) exemption. This will be a big fight if it comes to court.
posted by jaduncan at 11:57 AM on February 24, 2011


Sony used to be known for the quality of the equipment they made. Now they're known for being assholes. So sad, yet totally preventable.
posted by tommasz at 12:00 PM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


I've been to Pac Mall in Toronto during a raid by the RCMP.

The agent yelled at us and basically said we were shit out of luck about getting cheap American films that day. We responded that we weren't here for fucking American films. They left the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean DVDs alone.

I wondered how it was that they discriminated like that. Violation is violation no? I suppose it's who makes the complaint. I wondered what cops were doing about human trafficking, corporate corruption, etc. and how resources were focused. Why the raids, seemingly, at the behest of corporations? Is it just simply because they have the money and influence to use the legal system as much as they can whereas those who have been shipped around the world to be sold do not?
posted by juiceCake at 12:05 PM on February 24, 2011 [5 favorites]


At the behest of Sony, German police have raided...

I'm surprised Sony didn't just pay a bit extra and have him declared an enemy combatant. Then they could have whisked him away in complete secrecy. Oh, wait, that's just the American government that does that.
posted by blue_beetle at 12:06 PM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


In response, graf_chokolo has released what's being called the PS3 Hypervisor Bible.

Maybe his lawyer advised him to do this, but it doesn't seem like the smartest thing to do. Perhaps better to have waited until being threatened with an actual sentence before releasing the info. More leverage over Sony and its local authorities in Germany.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 12:06 PM on February 24, 2011


Zed, the detailed law under the EUCD is below (I'm afraid I'm a bit more limited on German law specifically). The crucial question here is if stopping arbitary code running can be said to itself be something to stop copyright infringement. With my law hat on (I am not offering legal advice here) I would imagine that this fight is winnable for either party, but this runs up against the implied definition of circumvention for the purposes of 6(1) as defined in Art 6(2)(b-c), which requires the ability to breach copyright as opposed to running alternate OSes. Courtroom fight for perception of intent and primary use, I'd guess.

----

Article 6

Obligations as to technological measures

1. Member States shall provide adequate legal protection against the circumvention of any effective technological measures, which the person concerned carries out in the knowledge, or with reasonable grounds to know, that he or she is pursuing that objective.

2. Member States shall provide adequate legal protection against the manufacture, import, distribution, sale, rental, advertisement for sale or rental, or possession for commercial purposes of devices, products or components or the provision of services which:

(a) are promoted, advertised or marketed for the purpose of circumvention of, or

(b) have only a limited commercially significant purpose or use other than to circumvent, or

(c) are primarily designed, produced, adapted or performed for the purpose of enabling or facilitating the circumvention of,

any effective technological measures.

3. For the purposes of this Directive, the expression "technological measures" means any technology, device or component that, in the normal course of its operation, is designed to prevent or restrict acts, in respect of works or other subject-matter, which are not authorised by the rightholder of any copyright or any right related to copyright as provided for by law or the sui generis right provided for in Chapter III of Directive 96/9/EC. Technological measures shall be deemed "effective" where the use of a protected work or other subject-matter is controlled by the rightholders through application of an access control or protection process, such as encryption, scrambling or other transformation of the work or other subject-matter or a copy control mechanism, which achieves the protection objective.
posted by jaduncan at 12:13 PM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


It's ridiculous that there's even a question about whether or not it's legal to reverse engineer a consumer electronic device that you legally own. And I still don't understand how Sony thought that removing OtherOS support would make it less likely for people to hack the PS3.

Sony: "Hey hackers, buy our PS3 and run whatever you want on it!"
Hackers: "Thanks, this is great!"

[over the years many homebrew non-gaming uses for PS3 are developed, a thriving dev community forms, no software hacks are created to allow pirated games]

Geohot: "Hey, I figured out a way to theoretically run custom firmware on the PS3. Just a proof of concept though."
Sony: "Oops, sorry hackers, we're taking away your OtherOS option in the next firmware update. All of the software you developed for our hardware is now useless and you can all go punch sand."
Hackers: "FFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUU"
posted by burnmp3s at 12:20 PM on February 24, 2011 [14 favorites]


Hackers: "FFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUU"

7/12 done right. Learn it, meme boyz.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 12:24 PM on February 24, 2011 [10 favorites]


Because hacking by itself cannot violate copyright. Copyright is an entirely different thing. Once you own something, you can do with it as you please. (Well, mostly, but it's still not a violation of copyright.)
Well, there are restrictions on what you can do if your tools can be used to violate copyright. But that's not what happened with geohot, the tools he released did not enable you to violate copyright directly; it would take a significant amount of extra work to do that. There DMCA has a bunch of provisions that allow you to do various amounts of hacking and trying to break crypto for 'research' purposes.

But these guys are not being charged with crimes, they're being sued. What I don't understand is why Sony is able to send police to execute their subpoenas as if they were warrants. That just seems like bullshit.
posted by delmoi at 12:24 PM on February 24, 2011 [4 favorites]


Thanks, jaduncan.
posted by Zed at 12:26 PM on February 24, 2011


I wish this had been posted sooner. The links to the Hypervisor Bible have been taken down and jaduncan's torrent link has no seeders. I don't think I would have understood much of it any way but I've been following this stuff whenever it has been coming up here on the blue. I don't even own a Playstation 3 but I really enjoy reading about reverse engineering. Any one got any other links to it?
posted by coolxcool=rad at 12:29 PM on February 24, 2011


It would have been cool if they'd stopped people listening to the free Justin Beieieber tapes they shipped with their Walkmans after a couple of months, but they did this instead.

Stupidly, Sony saved a fortune using the GNU toolchains in the PS devkits. And they way they thanked that community? Fools.
posted by davemee at 12:29 PM on February 24, 2011 [1 favorite]


The links to the Hypervisor Bible have been taken down and jaduncan's torrent link has no seeders.

You might be able to grab it from one of the links found in this google search.
posted by hippybear at 12:36 PM on February 24, 2011


coolxcool=rad, if you really turn up blank you can memail me.
posted by jaduncan at 12:39 PM on February 24, 2011


Thanks Hippybear.
posted by coolxcool=rad at 12:43 PM on February 24, 2011


Guys, guys, guys. I think we're missing the point.

Something exists called a hypervisor. WHOOOOOO.
posted by thsmchnekllsfascists at 1:11 PM on February 24, 2011 [3 favorites]


Something exists called a hypervisor.

I think I had one in the 80's, too. It was dayglo orange, and it was totally rad.
posted by mrgoat at 1:18 PM on February 24, 2011 [5 favorites]


So, he got busted and automatically released "The Hypervisor Bible" which is a new William Gibson novel, and now we're all living in said novel. Did I read this right?
posted by memebake at 1:23 PM on February 24, 2011 [2 favorites]


dislike the sony do i.
posted by quonsar II: smock fishpants and the temple of foon at 1:32 PM on February 24, 2011


But I don't want to live in a William Gibson novel!
I mean, I didn't even know there was a choice! No one told me where to sign up. If I can do so retroactively then anything by P.G.Wodehouse, please.
posted by JHarris at 1:38 PM on February 24, 2011 [5 favorites]


IANYL. This is not legal advice, and the law isn't really settled yet. However, I believe that reverse engineering the PS3 software for the purpose of inteoperability, e.g. homebrew software, is legal in the EU.

The EUCD (aka Infosoc directive) does not apply to computer programs, copyright in which were already harmonised in the directive 91/250/EC on the legal protection of computer programs (now reprinted as amended in 2009/24/EC).

Article 1.2b of the EUCD:
(2. Except in the cases referred to in article 11, this Directive shall leave intact and shall in no way affect existing Community provisions relating to:
(a) the legal protection of computer programs;
Now, it has been argued that the EUCD anti circumvention provisions may still be applied to video games, as those consist of not only computer software but also other assets such as graphics and music.
In my opinion that's wrong, especially when considering recital 50 of the EUCD preamble:
(50) Such a harmonised legal protection does not affect the specific provisions on protection provided for by Directive 91/250/EEC. In particular, it should not apply to the protection of technological measures used in connection with computer programs, which is exclusively addressed in that Directive. It should neither inhibit nor prevent the development or use of any means of circumventing a technological measure that is necessary to enable acts to be undertaken in accordance with the terms of Article 5(3) or Article 6 of Directive 91/250/EEC. Articles 5 and 6 of that Directive exclusively determine exceptions to the exclusive rights applicable to computer programs.
Now, what does the computer program directive say? The pertinent part is the reverse engineering provisions in article 6:
Article 6
Decompilation
1. The authorisation of the rightholder shall not be required where reproduction of the code and translation of its form within the meaning of points (a) and (b) of Article 4(1) are
indispensable to obtain the information necessary to achieve the interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, provided that the following conditions are met:
(a) those acts are performed by the licensee or by another person having a right to use a copy of a program, or on their behalf by a person authorised to do so;
(b) the information necessary to achieve interoperability has not previously been readily available to the persons referred to in point (a); and
(c) those acts are confined to the parts of the original program which are necessary in order to achieve interoperability.
2. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not permit the infor­mation obtained through its application:
(a) to be used for goals other than to achieve the interoper­ability of the independently created computer program;
(b) to be given to others, except when necessary for the inter­operability of the independently created computer program;
or
(c) to be used for the development, production or marketing of a computer program substantially similar in its expression, or for any other act which infringes copyright.
[...]
So, the reverse engineering and decompilation of the PS3 software is legal. The EULA isn't relevant here because you cannot forbid reverse engineering by contract (article 8). This covers only the reverse engineering, not creation of custom firmware, which may be forbidden by specific contractual provisions. Since contract law is not harmonised that means that your position as a consumer will depend on which member state you're in.

The next step of posting the "Hypervisor Bible" may be illegal if not allowed by article 6.2. This depends on either the "Hypervisor Bible" containing any material that infringes Sony copyright, or, as has been argued, that the computer software directive actually creates some kind of sui generis right protecting "interoperability information".

There are a few European cases involving pertaining to modchips allowing pirated games. As I understand it, the Geohotz exploit did not as such enable piracy, even if it could be used by someone else to develop tools to enable piracy. As far as I know, the legality of a pure "jailbreak" tool that only allows homebrew software without directly facilitating piracy has not been tested in a European court case thus far.

In the British case Sony v. Ball, [2004] EWHC 1738 (Ch), as well as Nintendo v. Playables, [2010] EWHC 1932 (Ch), the court concluded that modchips circumventing DRM on video games were illegal under the national implementations of both the computer software directive as well as the EUCD.

Meanwhile, a French court came to the opposite conclusion in Ministère Public v. SARL Divineo et al, TGI Paris, 31e ch., 3 déc. 2009, N° d'affaire : 0824995002 (French), regarding flash carts for the Nintendo DS. In that case, the court concluded that the EUCD protection of technological measures could not forbid actions necessary to achieve interoperability that are legal under the computer software directive. A similar judgment has been handed down in Italy regarding PS2 modchips, Tribunal of rehearing of Bolzano – Order Dec. 31, 03.
posted by delegeferenda at 1:39 PM on February 24, 2011 [29 favorites]


Excellent stuff, delegeferenda
posted by r_nebblesworthII at 2:34 PM on February 24, 2011


coolxcool=rad: "I wish this had been posted sooner. The links to the Hypervisor Bible have been taken down and jaduncan's torrent link has no seeders. I don't think I would have understood much of it any way but I've been following this stuff whenever it has been coming up here on the blue. I don't even own a Playstation 3 but I really enjoy reading about reverse engineering. Any one got any other links to it"

Usenet FTW.
posted by wierdo at 2:35 PM on February 24, 2011


muddgirl writes "Again, no comments about whether it's right or wrong, just whether it's practical. Sony already thinks that he's done something wrong. Is the threat of doing more things that Sony considers illegal really an insurance policy? It's not like Sony's going to be, 'oooh, nooo! Don't infringe on our copyright any more! Your threat of further self-incrimination will totally keep us from trying to bust you!'

"(NOT that I think what graf_chokolo is doing is illegal - just that Sony clearly does)"


Alternatively Sony doesn't actually think this is illegal rather Sony thinks they can threaten to ruin the hacker's life with legal bills and stress and thereby get him and future others to stop working on this project.
posted by Mitheral at 3:13 PM on February 24, 2011 [9 favorites]


Either way, I can't see how releasing this in any way is a wedge against Sony - IME they will assume that's already in wide distribution, even if they can't prove it. Publicly distributing it just gives them some act to point to and say, "See, this guy is dangerous!"

I'm not saying graf_chokolo shouldn't have released the Hypervisor thingy - I'm saying he shouldn't have thought it was an actual threat to Sony. Release it if it helps the community, or don't release it.
posted by muddgirl at 3:19 PM on February 24, 2011


""Alternatively Sony doesn't actually think this is illegal rather Sony thinks they can threaten to ruin the hacker's life with legal bills and stress and thereby get him and future others to stop working on this project."

Which is why his form of retaliation is perfectly appropriate. If Sony wants to be extralegal, why not him too?
posted by ocschwar at 3:21 PM on February 24, 2011


If Sony wants to be extralegal, why not him too?

What is extra-legal about it? I fail to see how he's doing anything wrong, even with releasing his information.
posted by JHarris at 5:20 PM on February 24, 2011


muddgirl writes "I can't see how releasing this in any way is a wedge against Sony"

It's not so much a directed wedge against Sony as a, words are failing me, demonstration of reality. Just like a being poisonous doesn't help a frog that has already been eaten; releasing the information could be seen as providing a general disincentive for corporations. The flip side of Bell claiming for the purposes of Knight Lightning's arrest warrant that the memorandum "Control Office Administration of Enhanced 911 Services for Special Services and Major Account Centers" was worth $80K when any schmo off the street could order a more detailed copy for $13.
posted by Mitheral at 5:38 PM on February 24, 2011


I'm sure graf_chokolo knows more about the German DMCA than anyone here, maybe more than Sony and his town's police, but maybe he wants the fight too.

I suspect this hypervisor release costs him nothing legally, as he's already done all the circumvention, but maybe it'll gain him good will that'll translate into more donations for legal fees.
posted by jeffburdges at 6:49 PM on February 24, 2011


thsmchnekllsfascists: "Guys, guys, guys. I think we're missing the point.

Something exists called a hypervisor. WHOOOOOO."

That's the thing that Geordi LaForge had, right?

posted by symbioid at 7:40 PM on February 24, 2011


"Reverse engineering a hypervisor" is just what I always thought hacking would sound like in the future.

It's one step down from "hacking the gibson".
posted by A Thousand Baited Hooks at 1:07 AM on February 25, 2011


Sony’s War On Makers, Hackers, And Innovators
posted by jeffburdges at 5:19 AM on February 25, 2011


Why do German police wear windbreakers with "POLICE" on them in English?

Something they picked up from the School of the Americas gift shop on graduation weekend?
posted by wenestvedt at 5:52 AM on February 25, 2011


Something they picked up from the School of the Americas gift shop on graduation weekend?

Totally an airport present.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 8:54 AM on February 25, 2011


For those interested in the file, this forum page has some links. The rapidshare link worked for me.

I haven't unpacked the file yet, but the sha1 hash matches the one listed here.

508 ~/dl$ shasum coolstuff.rar; du -h coolstuff.rar
f8df8a5d6abefd20ce02efe883d22fe90cc11845 coolstuff.rar
164M coolstuff.rar

posted by ryanrs at 9:13 AM on February 25, 2011


They don't - German police gear have POLIZEI on the back. If you see otherwise, it's a not a photo of German police.
posted by cmonkey at 11:39 AM on February 24 [1 favorite +] [!]


Correct. This article also about a game-console related police raid in 2009 also uses the same picture.
posted by Authorized User at 12:15 PM on February 25, 2011


Judge Lets Sony Unmask Visitors to PS3-Jailbreaking Site
posted by homunculus at 10:52 AM on March 5, 2011


PS3 Hacker Flees the Long Arm of Sony for South American Freedom
posted by homunculus at 12:34 PM on March 23, 2011


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