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And so it begins
September 12, 2001 9:53 AM   Subscribe

And so it begins - "Federal police are reportedly increasing Internet surveillance after Tuesday's deadly attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Just hours after three airplanes smashed into the buildings in what some U.S. legislators have dubbed a second Pearl Harbor, FBI agents began to visit Web-based, e-mail firms and network providers, according to engineers " How do you think the attacks of the 11th will affect civil liberties?
posted by jed (11 comments total)

 
I hope, optimistically perhaps, that it has been discussed enough in the past 24 hours to stay at the forefront of our minds, rendering any attempts to curttail our civil liberties unsuccessful.

PS - I do not consider heightened airport security as an affront to our Civil Liberties.
posted by glenwood at 10:03 AM on September 12, 2001


Hmm, I wonder what all the folks that remember World War II and what it was like at home during that time would say to that, on both Pearl Harbor and Civil Liberties.
posted by memorydream at 10:05 AM on September 12, 2001


People would probably not protest FBI snooping so much if we did not need to guard our privacy so tightly, if we did not have to worry about medical records being used against us by employers or insurance companies. Stop the War on (some) Drugs and the FBI can read all of my email in our War on Terrorism.
posted by mischief at 10:11 AM on September 12, 2001


Hmm, I wonder what all the folks that remember World War II and what it was like at home during that time would say to that, on both Pearl Harbor and Civil Liberties.

I'm pretty sure I know what Japanese-American citizens interned in camps during the war would say.
posted by feckless at 10:30 AM on September 12, 2001


This article sure doesn't seem like a sign that things are going in the right direction.
posted by jjg at 10:52 AM on September 12, 2001


World War II caused severe limitations to ones civil liberties -- but it was considered necessary for the war effort. Once the war ended, these civil liberties were reinstated and in fact, enhanced.

For example, the story of Rosie the Riveter prompted the escalation of women in the workplace.

Japanese-American internment was a sad chapter in American history... but I would like to think that such irrational security measures as interring a people based on ethnicity or religion would not happen today.

However, if at war, I would gladly have my internet privileges limited in the interests of security -- or would you rather your own posts about the state of your community and of recent news be used by the enemy?

Note: I said if at war. Upon the arrival of peace, I also fully expect that my civil liberties be reinstated, just as they were at the end of World War II.
posted by linux at 10:56 AM on September 12, 2001


Technically we have bee in a state of war since World War II, that order was never lifted.
posted by memorydream at 11:01 AM on September 12, 2001


"Japanese-American internment was a sad chapter in American history." so was our revolting against King George a sad chapter in history, but it had a more then less positive effect-in context to what i said, the internment of quakers(for which a relative was held during revolution) The proud Japanese suffered as did the proud Japanese Americans, no AMERICANS, they are Americans. (they did not intern the civies that lived in Hawaii did they) We suffer justice if that face of injustice recants and tells the victim that it is wrong, that wrong was done and that it will do its utmost to restore honor(if it can be done) that is the country for which i live, the country that my ancestors came here too from a time both far and nigh. So my real name is larry, im half Irish half, english american, im poor, i have faults and i have seen things that even foreigners would repel from.(dad youz to say "standard by measure") Many here have seen faces of war and the product of historical hatred festooning on your soil for nay 2000 years. the land on which i rent, was farm land 8 years ago and home to no one(s) before that for eons, (ask tocqueville about michigan) the farmer sold the top soil and here we sit. I jutted into mefi as a newbie with a persona of red buttons meets carl sandburg on someone elses fictional high. and the skit was maintained so as to repel any honor by earning it. "there is no honor amogst theives" WHO SAID THAT? well it was a theif i can assure you. I/m gonna go now and i wont say sorry and as with most of acts, they end. i love this place and mostly the one who has been silent which is so uncharacteristic.( like something i would do:) a few of factories that fueled my town look like the tractor works, Stalingrad, circa 1942(little exaggeration) But i stay silent, except here. i thought i could stay away from people yet come to know them through the newest medium since guttenburg(for us in the west) It just is not....yet(nor so). the events are staggering yet, i hear little now and this is probably the last i say through his stuttering jumble bug prop sui nondeplume. call me larry.(this will never happen again, space wise, please move on)((and please, hold applause till the end of the performance, these folks have worked really hard-hi mom.(whom is probably tripping in Cannes, reaffirming her belief that europe is "nice"(so im actually worried, as this dead terrorist may target civies abroad and my stepdad looks like frikking enginneer america from 90 yards. i saw the building smoke when i woke and just went to work and listened,i am not suprised, i am sad. I believe the blog can show your lives, our selfs and that the personal diatribe should be allowed from time to time, heres my ticket. my friend is right. there is no more anonimity.by the way, hear about the two englishman who lived on a desert isle yet spoke nay a word too another? "no" they had not been properly introduced.LOLOLOL:"{this is no reflection-FIRST PERSON to mefi as this statement is of course my personal feelings, not to subject at hand and oh yes, im laughing (good maslow laughs|)at the future comments as i bet that my own slam could outdistance even our esteemed Kaf or the dreaded fester- so please, hears a rock, i got my glock back-which tells me that shitz changed jack you know }
love and practicum
lws.
posted by clavdivs at 12:16 PM on September 12, 2001


The problem is terrorism threats can always be used to excuse surveillance and liberty-restriction--the "war" never ends. To even characterize the situation as a War on Terrorism creates an open-ended license to impose restrictions.
posted by aflakete at 12:29 PM on September 12, 2001


An interesting, and pretty chilling, perspective from London.
posted by arco at 12:45 PM on September 12, 2001


Chalk another point up to the terrorists. They keep gaining as long as we give in to fear and allow an opportunistic government to take rights they couldn't take under different conditions.

This article sure doesn't seem like a sign that things are going in the right direction.

That article is from February. I don't believe anyone has ever seen the text within image format of "encryption" used for criminal purposes. Its pretty academic.
posted by skallas at 4:15 PM on September 12, 2001


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