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March 6, 2011 12:42 PM   Subscribe


 
Mariella Frostrup? Really?
posted by chavenet at 1:23 PM on March 6, 2011


That has to be the worst photograph ever. You can tell by the expressions who are the visitors and their guide, and who have had to deal with the rapes on the way to collect firewood. It hurt.

.



[on feminism; dunno if I ever was one, was more of a humanist - people should be free to live their life as they see fit rather than being burdened by the mores, the prejudices and the strictures of their society. live and let live]
posted by infini at 1:25 PM on March 6, 2011


Instead, people ask why there isn't an International Men's Day – the only response to that being that it happens on the other 364 days of the year.

Actually, I think that such a day would be a fine idea, but would be unlikely to satisfy the sort of people who ask for it. There's a lot wrong with the notion of Manliness; real men are killers, philanderers, and disdainful of affection[tvtropes warning]. A day to show how little all of that has to do with being a male human would be a good thing to have.

It's not exactly a high priority, compared with women's rights, but it's a thing.
posted by LogicalDash at 2:01 PM on March 6, 2011 [3 favorites]


Ugh. Did she have to mention Bono? Damon Albarn's pretty alright though.

Seriously this is great: At female gatherings all over sub-Saharan Africa you'll find enthusiasm and eager signatories to the cause.

Especially as, here in the U.S., you'd have a heck of a time finding a woman willing to even call herself a feminist. And we have comparatively little to lose.

Why the "Really?", chavnet? I don't know Mariella Frostup at all, but she seemed okay in the article you linked to.
posted by Jess the Mess at 2:04 PM on March 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


Agreed, LogicalDash. I remember how when Susan Faludi's Stiffed came out she was roundly criticised by many of the same feminists who loved Backlash. They seemed to take it as "Oh let's feel sorry for the poor men". But I thought she had an interesting and important point to make. The masculine mystique seems to me to be merely the flip side of the feminine mystique and it needs to be be dealt with as well if we want to achieve true equality.
posted by Jess the Mess at 2:11 PM on March 6, 2011


[on feminism; dunno if I ever was one, was more of a humanist - people should be free to live their life as they see fit rather than being burdened by the mores, the prejudices and the strictures of their society. live and let live]

Feminism is a subset of humanism. You can be both; I'd recommend it.
posted by LogicalDash at 2:24 PM on March 6, 2011 [3 favorites]


Any time I hear her name I cant help but think of Coupling.
posted by scalefree at 2:42 PM on March 6, 2011


Well, as a longtime Viz. and Private Eye reader, I have a hard believing anyone takes her seriously. But I very well may be wrong, and certainly her charity work is noteworthy.
posted by chavenet at 2:55 PM on March 6, 2011


Any time I hear her name I cant help but think of Coupling.

Yes, exactly. It's actually nice to find out she does something more than show up in masturbation fantasies! I rather like what she's doing here, particularly that she specifically rebukes a couple of the sillier stereotypes and doesn't seem to adopt that attitude of "we're so much better in the West and now we are helping our backwards sisters."

There's a lot wrong with the notion of Manliness

The insight here is exactly why there a number of Women's Studies Departments have become Gender Studies Departments (though some, as at my school, have split the difference to become Women's and Gender Studies Departments).

The masculine mystique seems to me to be merely the flip side of the feminine mystique and it needs to be be dealt with as well if we want to achieve true equality.

As goals, these things are inter-related but still separate. Equality is the only ethical goal, but in and of itself it doesn't do much to transform how patriarchies construct conceptions of masculinity and femininity. At the same time, any transformation that doesn't proceed on the basis of recognizing the gendered distribution of rewards, punishments, resources and power doesn't have much content.

Which is why, infini, humanism is not enough. Long, painful experience has shown that even the most sincere efforts rooted in humanism end up reproducing gender hierarchies unless these are brought front and center by feminists.
posted by williampratt at 4:24 PM on March 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


Early on, by the time I'd jumped the barriers and hurdles to complete a science education and finally reach engineering college in my late teens, I discovered that simply existing and attempting to work and become a professional was going to be a feminist stance against a patriarchal society hellbent on marrying me off to an unknown stranger by age 22 so that I could dutifully provide daughter in law duties to the extended family. I figured that if I managed to grow up without breaking my neck and keeping myself unbowed, I'd have fought the fair fight.

I am.

That is my contribution to my younger sisters.
posted by infini at 3:08 AM on March 7, 2011


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