Join 3,421 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Japan hit by another earthquake
April 7, 2011 8:22 AM   Subscribe

A tsunami warning has been issued for north-eastern Japan after an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.4.

Per Reuters: "Tokyo Electric says its engineers at Fukushima Daiichi plant have evacuated after tsunami warning." However, NISA reports that the Onagawa nuke plant in Miyagi-ken has lost 2 of 3 external power grids.
posted by pleasebekind (76 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
What utter shit! At least there's some advance warning this time. Fingers crossed.
posted by Krazor at 8:23 AM on April 7, 2011


NHK English said this quake was 40 KM below the seabed. I'm hoping that we will see a very small and inconsequential wave this time, if any.
posted by Burhanistan at 8:24 AM on April 7, 2011


Somebody's got it out for those guys.
posted by goethean at 8:26 AM on April 7, 2011


wtf, Mother Earth??
posted by scaryblackdeath at 8:27 AM on April 7, 2011 [3 favorites]


Maybe this one will put everything back together? *sobs*
posted by Salvor Hardin at 8:28 AM on April 7, 2011 [10 favorites]


Oh god. The Big One last month was 30 km deep, but was also a 9.0, so who knows. I did hear on the radio that there was no tsunami warning for Hawaii or for the West Coast of the U.S., so I hope this means it won't be too bad or bad at all in Japan.
posted by rtha at 8:29 AM on April 7, 2011


Is this a separate earthquake or in the same foreshock/aftershock chain as the original one?

Crossing some fingers for Japan. They need a break over there.
posted by immlass at 8:29 AM on April 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


The quake is actually an aftershock from last month's quake. So I guess you could say it was expected.
posted by KokuRyu at 8:29 AM on April 7, 2011


CNN reports it as "the biggest quake since the March 11 earthquake"
posted by pleasebekind at 8:31 AM on April 7, 2011


Somebody's got it out for those guys.

I read somewhere that the period between, say, 1950 and 2000 was actually a period of relatively low seismic activity in Japan, and this is one of the reasons why things like nuclear power plants were built in areas with lots of earthquakes. Basically, people forgot.
posted by KokuRyu at 8:32 AM on April 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


At the risk of sounding alarmist, isn't the lack of comparable seismic activity in California starting to be disturbingly conspicuous?
posted by jefficator at 8:32 AM on April 7, 2011 [12 favorites]


USGS site shows the biggest quakes occuring in that area. There was a 6.6 on March 22.

Shit, its half-past midnight in Japan! Not an optimal time to get people to evacuate.
posted by vacapinta at 8:32 AM on April 7, 2011


It was pretty rough, but not all that bad really.
The difference in scale from 3/11 is significant.
posted by nightchrome at 8:33 AM on April 7, 2011


"Bad news goes about in clogs, Good news in stockinged feet." - Welsh Proverb

An aftershock generates a breathless FPP, while yesterday's news of the successful plugging of the radioactive leak passes unheralded.
posted by fairmettle at 8:36 AM on April 7, 2011


Last I read, the tsunami warning is for 1 meter.
posted by royalsong at 8:37 AM on April 7, 2011


NHK World English stream at LiveStation
posted by ZeusHumms at 8:37 AM on April 7, 2011


Fucking Godzilla is probably drunk and passed out on Mothra's couch again. This shit would NOT stand in the old days.
posted by spicynuts at 8:40 AM on April 7, 2011 [2 favorites]


At the risk of sounding alarmist, isn't the lack of comparable seismic activity in California starting to be disturbingly conspicuous?

There's no risk. You sound alarmist.
posted by eyeballkid at 8:42 AM on April 7, 2011 [8 favorites]


"Bad news goes about in clogs, Good news in stockinged feet." - Welsh Proverb

There's a reason for that—good news tends not to require corrective action.
posted by maniabug at 8:42 AM on April 7, 2011 [6 favorites]


An aftershock generates a breathless FPP, while yesterday's news of the successful plugging of the radioactive leak passes unheralded.

There's actually a couple of open threads at the moment discussing the leak. I don't know, I would consider the announcement yesterday more about spin and smoke and mirrors than an actual accomplishment. There is highly radioactive water contaminating the Daiichi react installation just a few meters from the sea. The radioactive water is preventing restarting cooling systems. This means they have to keep dumping water on some of the reactors and fuel pools with a fire hose or whatever. This water comes into contact with core elements. It creates more highly radioactive water, which prevents the restarting of cooling systems. It's a loop. Besides, there are doubts that all the leaks have been plugged, as water levels in the trenches etc are going down again.

In short, TEPCO is only giving out information that they want to give out.
posted by KokuRyu at 8:42 AM on April 7, 2011 [16 favorites]


At the risk of sounding alarmist, isn't the lack of comparable seismic activity in California starting to be disturbingly conspicuous?

Well, neither is exactly "California," but there was a 3.6 of the coast of Oregon this morning, and a 6.5 off Veracruz, Mexico this morning as well.
posted by rtha at 8:46 AM on April 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


An aftershock generates a breathless FPP, while yesterday's news of the successful plugging of the radioactive leak passes unheralded.

False dichotomy. There is an open thread about the Fukushima Daiichi plant for news updates. This is a something new.
posted by googly at 8:46 AM on April 7, 2011 [6 favorites]


USGS downgrades the earthquake to 7.1 (from 7.4), but JMA still has it at 7.4. No reports of damage or casualties so far.
posted by pleasebekind at 8:48 AM on April 7, 2011


Basically, people forgot.

No way. They put short term private gain first, because they knew long term the public would pay for any damages. That simple. Same problem everywhere, including global warming.
posted by stbalbach at 8:50 AM on April 7, 2011 [9 favorites]


I remember when this kind of crap was just fiction.

In lighter news, I've learned from Wikipedia that Japan Sinks was parodied in a 2006 movie titled Everything Other Than Japan Sinks, and that's pretty funny.
posted by Faint of Butt at 8:50 AM on April 7, 2011 [2 favorites]


All Tsunami alerts lifted/canceled in Japan.
posted by stbalbach at 8:56 AM on April 7, 2011


According to NHK World all the tsunami alerts and advisories have been canceled.
posted by royalsong at 8:56 AM on April 7, 2011


"... but stay away from the shore just in case."
posted by nomisxid at 8:57 AM on April 7, 2011


Main concern right now would be anyone asleep on the shoreside... except all those towns were completely wiped out and nobody is sleeping there now. I think the effect of this will be minimal. The power in Tohoku was cut by the earthquake (with a big light show from the power station!), but the nuclear plant in Miyagi is okay. I'm going to bed now.

Of course, when I posted a similar message in the 9.0 earthquake thread we had not yet seen the footage of the tsunami blasting towns to bits. So I wouldn't judge yet, just hope for the best.

Unrelated tsunami link: Ancient People Are Still Awesome: Centuries-Old Japanese Tsunami Warning Markers Saved Lives
posted by shii at 8:58 AM on April 7, 2011 [9 favorites]


At the risk of sounding alarmist, isn't the lack of comparable seismic activity in California starting to be disturbingly conspicuous?

There's no risk. You sound alarmist.

It may or may not be alarmist or conspicuous, but the fact remains that California is overdue for a big one or more than one big one. The Fort Tejon quake was in 1857. There hasn't been a comparable one in southern California since (other than the Sylmar and Northridge quakes, which were smaller in magnitude). The San Francisco earthquake was in 1906. Assuming that a big one won't happen, at least not in our lifetime, is a gamble that most Californians take every day.
posted by blucevalo at 9:00 AM on April 7, 2011 [3 favorites]


Oh, nobody linked the light show yet.

I was watching NHK for the past hour, they interviewed many people in Sendai and other cities, the cut power may be a little trouble but no reports of damage to any buildings -- although this was a big one to be sure!
posted by shii at 9:03 AM on April 7, 2011


R.e. California, my dad just casually mentioned the other day something I've never known about him - he was born during the Long Beach Earthquake of 1933. The hospital bed my grandmother was on actually rolled around the room while she was giving birth due to the quake. Crazy.
posted by freecellwizard at 9:07 AM on April 7, 2011 [3 favorites]


Unrelated tsunami link: Ancient People Are Still Awesome: Centuries-Old Japanese Tsunami Warning Markers Saved Lives

A friend of mine is from Sendai in Miyagi, and her mother lives near the airport in Natori. There's actually a shrine in the neighbourhood called "wave divider". People who sheltered at the shrine during 2 similar-sized tsunamis 80 and 110 years ago were saved as the waves broke on the rock hill behind the shrine. Apparently the same thing happened this time.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:08 AM on April 7, 2011 [12 favorites]


No way. They put short term private gain first, because they knew long term the public would pay for any damages. That simple. Same problem everywhere, including global warming.

It can be both. The article shii linked about tsunami markers makes a point about how very few people are alive who were present for past big, destructive tsunamis, and so the impact of those stories and experiences of those people is being lost.

I'm not saying that the attitude of "I'll build my house closer to the harbor, so it will take me less time to get to my fishing boat," (for instance) is not in play, but that's simply not the only factor.
posted by rtha at 9:21 AM on April 7, 2011


> At least there's some advance warning this time.

I'm curious about this, because many tsunami videos I've seen shows a lot of people gathered around high ground (and the roofs of sturdy buildings), waiting for the water to roll in. That would imply there was some measure of warning, even if it was insufficient to evacuate everybody with mobility problems.

The casualty rates, as horrible as they are, seem very low if entire cities had been blindsided by the tsunami.
posted by ardgedee at 9:27 AM on April 7, 2011


100-foot waves were beyond the experience of most living people. Obviously people tried to get to high ground, but many folks would have misjudged the power of this tsunami.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:32 AM on April 7, 2011


Wait, what the hell is that light show shii linked?
posted by maryr at 9:39 AM on April 7, 2011


At least there's some advance warning this time.

I'm curious about this, because many tsunami videos I've seen shows a lot of people gathered around high ground (and the roofs of sturdy buildings), waiting for the water to roll in. That would imply there was some measure of warning, even if it was insufficient to evacuate everybody with mobility problems.


Or it's what has been hinted in this discussion with the tsunami markers. For those who are aware of their ancestors' warnings of seeking higher ground after an earthquake to be safe from a potentially created tsunami, perhaps simply experiencing a particularly large earthquake is the ONLY warning they need to seek that higher ground.
posted by johnstein at 9:40 AM on April 7, 2011


On shii's video, you can see the tsunami warning system in action (map of japan with flashing borders). Watching live NHK back when the first major aftershocks were still coming in, I watched the whole sequence of automated warning of impending earthquake, the automatic mapping of potential tsunami danger areas, and the all clear announcement. It's really kind of surreal to see how much advance notice of the quake itself they can provide. I would hope that most coastal people assume tsunami after any shaking, get to higher ground, and then wait for the all clear.
posted by nomisxid at 9:51 AM on April 7, 2011


Wait, what the hell is that light show shii linked?

Looks like a transformer fire.
posted by delmoi at 9:58 AM on April 7, 2011


blucevalo, it's obvious from the data that the California fault lines are finally settling down. Longer and longer periods between quakes means there's no danger, quakes are clearly a thing of the past and the sunshine state can rest easy. 100 years is a long time in geological time spans, right?
posted by Crash at 10:01 AM on April 7, 2011


100 years is a long time in geological time spans, right?

Well, it's definitely a long time to go between hamburgers.
posted by freecellwizard at 10:15 AM on April 7, 2011 [4 favorites]


[please take your complaints about how MeFi handles these sorts of posts directly to MetaTalk, thank you]
posted by jessamyn at 10:35 AM on April 7, 2011 [5 favorites]


Wait, I thought Florida was the Sunshine State.
posted by rtha at 10:52 AM on April 7, 2011


Golden State. California is the Golden State.
posted by linux at 11:00 AM on April 7, 2011


Basically, people forgot.

Pretty much.
posted by rodgerd at 11:13 AM on April 7, 2011


quakes are clearly a thing of the past and the sunshine state can rest easy. 100 years is a long time in geological time spans, right?

In fact, the danger of an earthquake in California has decreased quite a lot in the last hundred years. You'll note that San Francisco did not burn down during the Loma Prieta earthquake. Even the death toll in Japan, high as it is, is nothing like the misery in Haiti. These very divergent outcomes are affected by government far more than by geology.

But geology favors California, too. We have strike-slip faults, so our earthquakes produce mostly side-to-side lateral motion. We don't have the subduction faults that generate the large vertical displacements that produce tsunami. And although those types of earthquakes can occur in Washington and Alaska, the resulting tsunamis only affect the most northern part of California, which is sparsely populated.

There are good reasons to believe California will never see the destruction that happened in Japan. Even Japan probably won't see similar destruction again, as their building and zoning laws are no doubt being changed in the wake of this disaster. We might not be able to predict earthquakes, but we can certainly mitigate their danger.
posted by ryanrs at 11:22 AM on April 7, 2011 [3 favorites]


although those types of earthquakes can occur in Washington and Alaska,

Phew! Good to hear my British Columbia is safely nestled between those 2 places, comfortably away from those subduction faults.
posted by Hoopo at 11:29 AM on April 7, 2011 [3 favorites]


I believe that's correct, no megathrust earthquakes for you! You'll note that neither the 1946 Vancouver Island Earthquake nor the 1949 Queen Charlotte Earthquake generated large tsunamis. Unfortunately, like the northern tip of California, you're close enough to the Cascadia subduction zone to catch its effects.
posted by ryanrs at 12:00 PM on April 7, 2011


Japan Tsunami Warnings From Ancestors Were Forgotten
posted by The Emperor of Ice Cream at 12:45 PM on April 7, 2011


(If you chase the vias on the tsunami-marker articles you end up at copies of this AP article by Jay Alabaster)
posted by hattifattener at 1:03 PM on April 7, 2011


Fukushima plant evacuated after new earthquake

(Btw, a few weeks from now marks the 25th anniversary of Chernobyl)

In related news, tests confirm contaminated fish; Tokai mayor slams Tepco, government.
posted by The Emperor of Ice Cream at 1:11 PM on April 7, 2011


Earthquake catfish prints
posted by various at 1:17 PM on April 7, 2011 [7 favorites]


various: that Earthquake catfish prints would be worthy of its own FPP.
posted by hippybear at 1:42 PM on April 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


For those not following the previous thread on the Fukushima Daiichi Accident the IAEA released this update following the latest aftershock... all bolding mine.

##########################################################

IAEA Update: New earthquake in Japan (7 April, 17:30 UTC)

The IAEA confirms that an earthquake occurred in Japan at 14:32 UTC 7 April. The IAEA International Seismic Safety Centre has rated it as a 7.1 magnitude, revised from an initial 7.4 magnitude. The epicenter of the earthquake was 20 km from the Onagawa nuclear power plant and approximately 120 km from the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power plants.

The IAEA has been in contact with NISA and can confirm the status of the following nuclear facilities:

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
NISA confirms that no changes have been observed at the on-site radiation monitoring posts. The injection of water into the reactor pressure vessels of Units 1, 2 and 3 was not interrupted.

Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant
NISA confirms that no changes have been observed of the readings at the on-site radiation monitoring posts.

Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant
All reactors have been in cold shutdown since the 11 March earthquake.

NISA has confirmed that two out of the three lines supplying off-site power to the site were lost following the 7 April earthquake. Off-site power continues to be supplied through the third line.

Cooling of the spent fuel pool was temporarily lost, but has subsequently been restored.

No change has been observed in the readings from the on-site radiation monitoring post. The status of the plant is currently being checked.

Tokai Daini Nuclear Power Plant
Tokai Daini nuclear power plant remains in cold shutdown since the 11 March earthquake. No abnormality has been observed.

Higashidori Nuclear Power Plant
NISA has confirmed that the Higashidori NPP was shutdown and in a maintenance outage at the time of the 7 April earthquake. Off-site power has been lost. Emergency power supply to the site is operating. All the fuel had been removed from the reactor core and stored in the spent fuel pool. Cooling of the spent fuel pool is operational.

Tomari Nuclear Power Plant (in Hokkaido)
At the time of the 7 April earthquake Tomari Unit 1 and Unit 2 were in operation. Following the 7 April earthquake, the Hokkaido Electric Power Company reduced the generating power to 90% of capacity.

Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant
NISA confirms that Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant and uranium enrichment facility lost off-site power. Emergency power supply to the site is operating.

The IAEA will issue further information as soon as it becomes available.

##########################################################

EOL
posted by PROD_TPSL at 2:16 PM on April 7, 2011


Ummm.... oops... save for the stripped BOLD tags. For extra BOLD texture, please see this post.
posted by PROD_TPSL at 2:18 PM on April 7, 2011


A tsunami warning has been issued for quake-ravaged north-eastern Japan after an earthquake with a devastating magnitude of 7.4.

Per Reuters:
"The evil Tokyo Electric says its stoic engineers at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant have evacuated after deadly tsunami warning."

There. Now it's up to the measured, objective standards of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 4:18 PM on April 7, 2011


Tokyoite here. I had a nice, two-week vacation back home in the States and just arrived back in Tokyo about 72 hours ago. Great that I made it back in time for this one! It was about 11:45 at night, I was deep asleep, as was my wife, and this quake was very strong and quite long, a minute or more. Woke us up completely. Windows were rattling like crazy. No damage, though. We're so jet-lagged we went directly back to sleep afterwards.

God DAMN I am sick of earthquakes. A lot of people--here in Tokyo anyway--kinda sorta felt like the aftershocks were tapering off to insignificance; this big one was the only one I'd felt in 72 hours. Looks like they'll be around for another week or so. (I'm guessing, IANAS).
posted by zardoz at 5:12 PM on April 7, 2011


obiwanwasabi writes: There. Now it's up to the measured, objective standards of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Yeah, news outlets are known to use hyperbolic language in order to sell papers/gain viewership, etc. Why, I had NO IDEA! Shocked, I am! But now we're adding our own hyperbole to hyperbole-less news reporting? Perhaps you should consider a career as an ABC journalist!

But I'll tell you one thing: I'm getting well sick of people pointing to these familiar, age-old tabloid news tactics as if that somehow means that ALL danger is being blown WAY out of proportion. As if anyone with legitimate fears and concerns is, because someone put one too many exclamation points in a pullquote, therefore a panicky, paranoid, tinfoil-hat-wearing fearmonger. Just because some journalist in Australia or wherever used a little too much headline-ese does not mean "there's nothing to see here people, move along". Although with the way people have been pointing accusing fingers at journalists and editors since this thing happened, you'd think the real crisis here is in sensationalist reporting of what's really just a very minor, insignificant little problem over there at little old Fukushima. Well, that's certainly what the nuclear power industry and its most fervent supporters would have us believe, anyway.

But besides that, regarding the bold additions you made to bring the news quotes up to Australian Broadcasting Corporation standards, north-eastern Japan IS quake ravaged. Or, hadn't you noticed? And the Fukushima plant IS crippled. Or perhaps there is some more accurate or more elegantly nuanced term you'd prefer? And though it is a bit childishly simplistic a term to use in most any context, TEPCO, with their long history of lies and obfuscation, IS pretty damn close to evil. And by the way, I'm curious, as to that last one: do you have any link you can provide us that shows TEPCO described by the ABC as "evil" in any actual news (not editorial or blog post) context? I'd be curious to see that.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 5:45 PM on April 7, 2011


Man, those catfish prints are incredibly cool and interesting.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 6:02 PM on April 7, 2011


zardoz: You've been chilling overseas this whole time and you are sick of earthquakes? Imagine how the rest of us feel.
posted by nightchrome at 6:42 PM on April 7, 2011


A lot of people--here in Tokyo anyway--kinda sorta felt like the aftershocks were tapering off to insignificance; this big one was the only one I'd felt in 72 hours. Looks like they'll be around for another week or so.

You can expect the aftershock sequence to continue for months. Of course in Tokyo you won't feel most of them.

Here in NZ we're still feeling aftershocks from the Sept & Feb quakes [another one just over an hour ago].
posted by HiroProtagonist at 7:20 PM on April 7, 2011


nightchrome: yeah, I know, I'm lucky 1) I'm not up north and 2) got a two-week break from it all. Just before I left for vacation I was at my wit's end, and obsessed about the big Tokai hitting Shizuoka (which seems to be not a factor now). Feeling much better about things now. I have much respect for those of you who have stayed in Japan this whole time, especially those of you up north. I guess you just adapt to the aftershocks or go nuts.

What drives my anxiety is my maybe-safe, maybe-not-safe apartment building. It was built right at the time that the earthquake-proof construction mandates were put into effect, and the real estate guy said it was safe in an earthquake, but who the hell really knows?

I don't post this stuff to get pity; I post it because it's therapeutic. Isn't that what Mefi is all about? ;)
posted by zardoz at 7:37 PM on April 7, 2011


hattifattener: I didn't link that because it has the offensive title "Japan Tsunami Warnings From Ancestors Were Forgotten", which is false; kids learn this stuff in school, as it says. Actually, I'll add that to the Journalism Wall of Shame.
posted by shii at 7:51 PM on April 7, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oh, do take a pill, flapjax.

You talk of tabloid media tactics, and say that this is expected. Well, I'm talking about my country's national, public broadcaster, an institution with a long history of even-handed, just-the-facts reporting that seemed to go down the tubes some time around the Queensland floods, when it suddenly found itself desperate to attract an audience to its newly launched 24 hour television news service and decided the best way to do that was to adopt the tactics of the gutter press. Out the door went trusted journalists giving measured, objective responses to the big issues, and in came a pack of people who look more at home on Today Tonight. That's all I was talking about, not whatever the hell it is you were going about.

north-eastern Japan IS quake ravaged. Or, hadn't you noticed?

No, I'm retarded. I hadn't noticed. I mean, I saw the BBC and Al Jazeera saying that a tsunami had hit northern Japan and that many thousands of people were dead, but it wasn't until the ABC started clogging our screens with their best efforts at headline hyperbole that it actually sunk in.

"The Beeb says 10,000 dead."
"Is that bad?"
"I don't know. Wait - the ABC says they're not just dead, they're QUAKE RAVAGED."
"OH. MY. GOD."

Oh wait - that's bullshit. We're smart enough to know that a big tsunami that killed many, many thousands of people is not a good thing, and we can tell that just from somebody saying 'A tsunami has killed many thousands of people in northern Japan', which is how the ABC of a few years ago would have reported it.

do you have any link you can provide us that shows TEPCO described by the ABC as "evil" in any actual news (not editorial or blog post) context? I'd be curious to see that.

You'd also be curious to see The Aristocrats, then. Shall I spell it out for you? In calling attention to the ABC's recently declining standards of journalism and increasing propensity to use language more suited to The Sydney Morning Herald, I used language more suited to The Sydney Morning Herald. Next time I'll put a disclaimer on it, and a link to a full explanation.

So thanks for the lecture. You can take your little red wagon out of my face, now, because I wasn't looking at it in the first place.
posted by obiwanwasabi at 9:34 PM on April 7, 2011


You'd also be curious to see The Aristocrats, then. Shall I spell it out for you? In calling attention to the ABC's recently declining standards of journalism and increasing propensity to use language more suited to The Sydney Morning Herald, I used language more suited to The Sydney Morning Herald. Next time I'll put a disclaimer on it, and a link to a full explanation.

No, no. Not necessary. "I can't find a link", or "no, the ABC didn't actually say that" will suffice quite nicely, thank you. You'll excuse those of us not familiar with the ABC, however, for assuming that your putting words in their mouth was not, well, your putting words in their mouth. I think I can be forgiven for assuming that that was something actually did come out of their mouth.

And I have no idea what The Aristocrats is, either. Nor am I especially curious about it.

Anyway, I see you have a problem (to put it mildly) with ABC. I never watch it, and I know nothing about it. But if the ABC in particular has you that worked up, perhaps you should stick to getting information from other sources, and also consider not adding your own hyperbole to news reports that didn't have it in the first place! It would seem that, according to yourself, your much-loathed ABC is doing quite enough of that already.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 10:15 PM on April 7, 2011


Reporting from Morioka, Iwate prefecture again. I'm glad to hear from the other Japan-based people. The quake was real strong up here, it lasted about a minute and the shaking was different this time; instead of swaying back and forth like the big one on the 11th it shook violently up and down, and the power died halfway through. Electricity just came back on for most of the downtown area, but more rural areas are still in the dark. Water, gas and phone service are mostly normal. I was out walking around earlier and all the stores are stripped bare again with lines outside, just like it was on March 12th. All local and high-speed trains are out of service but the Tohoku expressway and the airports seem to be fine.
I am fucking sick of the shaking though, it's slowly driving me crazy. This weekend I'm making arrangements so I can pick up and leave the country if I need to. I guess it's more for my own sanity than anything, but it can't hurt to be prepared.
posted by azuresunday at 10:49 PM on April 7, 2011


azuresunday, that's as solid a reason to leave the country as I've ever heard. Come over to Kyushu if you want a shorter break; there are no earthquakes here.
posted by shii at 11:10 PM on April 7, 2011


Come over to Kyushu if you want a shorter break; there are no earthquakes here.

Having made a couple of trips down to Awajishima (near Kobe) over the past month, I can testify to the benefits of getting even just a few days respite from the relentless stress of the aftershocks and the worrisome presence of Fukushima plant to the north of Tokyo. Recommended for anyone that can possibly do it. You'll get back to Tokyo with your psychological batteries at least a little recharged.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 11:18 PM on April 7, 2011


I wish I had better news, but the seismologist on TV just now said that the aftershocks will continue for three months to a year. And I thought another month was being pessimistic; turns out that was wildly optimistic.

Living anywhere other than eastern Japan is looking better and better.
posted by zardoz at 1:18 AM on April 8, 2011


but the seismologist on TV just now said that the aftershocks will continue for three months to a year


*facepalm*
posted by azuresunday at 5:50 AM on April 8, 2011


And I have no idea what The Aristocrats is, either.

Well, to start off with, an Australian family walks into a talent agency. It's a father, mother, son, daughter and the daughter's wallaby. The father says to the talent agent, "We have a really amazing act. You should represent us."
posted by KokuRyu at 6:35 AM on April 8, 2011 [3 favorites]


Kind of late to this thread, but the 9.0 quake had aftershocks of 7.9 and 7.7. (Which are major quakes in their own right.) However 9.0 is 100s time more powerful than 7.4.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 7:26 AM on April 8, 2011


another aftershock of 7.1 this morning. Tsunami warning issued. BBC World News reports that power to the Fukushima reactor has not been cut off, so there is no report of irregularity or damage.
posted by dubold at 1:39 AM on April 11, 2011


Man, they've been coming fast and furious for the past couple hours. Never seen anything like this, I mean the frequency of occurrence. Getting kinda nerve wracking, for sure.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 2:45 AM on April 11, 2011


Come over to Kyushu if you want a shorter break; there are no earthquakes here.

But all those active volcanoes can be a bit of a drag.
posted by armage at 3:42 AM on April 11, 2011


« Older Of the two hundred and forty photographs Horace Wa...  |  The Ship Captain’s Medical Gui... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments