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I'm in love. What's that song?
April 16, 2011 9:49 AM   Subscribe

Color Me Obsessed is a new documentary about legendary Minneapolis rock band The Replacements. It features over 140 interviews with rockers, journalists and fans (including Colin Meloy, Craig Finn, Tommy Ramone and Robert Christgau) but not one note of the Mats music. Director Gorman Bechard has been documenting the making of the film on his blog and screening it in select cities.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn (63 comments total) 32 users marked this as a favorite

 
Fuckin.
A.
posted by jonmc at 10:01 AM on April 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


I saw this at the Wisconsin Film Festival and I thought it was pretty great. The director said there was one big Replacements fan that he couldn't get an interview scheduled with: Pat Sajack.
posted by Hlewagast at 10:09 AM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


The film's poster is all kinds of wonderful. Kudos to the designer, Sarah Hajtol.
posted by davebush at 10:10 AM on April 16, 2011


I wish I had some heartfelt story about how The Replacements changed my life but it's pretty much what you expect. Heard about them through The Hold Steady and realized that they were even better. Listen to Bastards Of Young and Color Me Impressed and I Will Dare and Alex Chilton and Within Your Reach and instantly feel better. There's a quote about them I can't seem to source, but it goes something like 'Being a heartfelt fuckup is endearing when you're a teenager but not so much when you're an adult'.
There was some medicore urban fantasy novel set in Minneapolis - War for the Oaks - and it had a busker playing a Replacements song. Always wondered if they were recognized like that in their own time.
I hope this comes to Sydney. They usually have a music documentary program at the Sydney Film Festival.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 10:20 AM on April 16, 2011


A doc about the Replacements without any Replacements music? Wow. I guess the clearances were too prohibitive, which is too bad. I mean, I could fire up the music in my head while watching, but still ..... not quite the same .....
posted by blucevalo at 10:23 AM on April 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


People talk about the 80s. Supposedly, Michael Jackson was the King of Pop and Ronald Reagan was the President.

Nope. In the 80s, there was The Replacements. The girls in line at the movies were singing "I'm in love, with that song" a week after Alex Chilton was released. (Okay, it was Berkeley.)

That was the 80s.
posted by benito.strauss at 10:27 AM on April 16, 2011 [7 favorites]


but not one note of the Mats music

They could always just use a bunch of slowed-down, cleaned up Husker Du. I doubt anyone would notice.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:34 AM on April 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


Maybe music history, especially if you didn't live through it, is like one of those weird quantum things where the future changes the past. The music I listen is made by people who seem to have only listened to Springsteen and the Replacements in the 80s. The music I don't is made by people who seem to have only listened to Depeche Mode or Flock of Seagulls. It's way more complicated than that in reality (pretty sure everyone listened to Micheal Jackson) but you can pick and choose your own 80s, same way the 50s and 60s I like bares little relationship to reality.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 10:35 AM on April 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


Heard about them through The Hold Steady and realized that they were even better.

Thank you for making me feel old.
posted by jonmc at 10:37 AM on April 16, 2011 [12 favorites]


Also Gorman Bechard wrote the novel The Second Greatest Story Ever Told in which the 'Mats play a modest role.
posted by jonmc at 10:39 AM on April 16, 2011


Thank you for making me feel old.

Oh yeah? I first heard found out about them going when I found a copy of Tim among my dad's old records. When he was throwing them out. When I was in college. Ten years ago.

The film's poster is all kinds of wonderful. Kudos to the designer, Sarah Hajtol.

This poster? Surely there's some other poster that I've missed. That poster?
posted by wreckingball at 10:51 AM on April 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


wreckingball: I first heard of them when I was 14, in 1984. I am old.
posted by jonmc at 10:52 AM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]




They had better albums than Don't Tell a Soul and better songs than "I'll Be You" (though it is a damn fine song) but when it came out we were still so high from Tim, Let It Be and Pleased To Meet Me that we were just happy to have new movement from the 'placemats. At the after party for my undergraduate theatre production, somebody put on a mix tape that featured that song - then new - and my best friend Anthony and I sang the lyrics back to back in the middle of the dance floor. I seem to remember that there were other people there, but at that moment, there was only he and I, two inseparable friends - and even if the lyrics weren't really about being two guys who were so close that they really could be each other, that's how we took it.

A month or so later, the 'Mats are playing at Colby College, so we trundle into my beat up, white Sunbird and drive the hour or so to get there. Bob Stinson was long gone, so Slim Dunlap was playing guitar. The Replacements were notorious, of course, for playing either very tight shows or drunken disasters of shows, both of which were apparently worth being at. This was a tight show and, when they launched into "I'll Be You," Anthony and I screamed it back at them. To be fair, we screamed back almost everything they sang at them.

Two of my best memories of college, there. Anthony is just about the only person I'm still in contact with and when I write my version of Springsteen's glory days, I'm going to follow Tom Petty's example and steal some lyrics directly from "I'll Be You."

Unrelated to Anthony, but related to The 'Mats, our here in Hawaii, there is a tradition of showing birth-marriage photos of the bride and groom at the reception. We each had to pick a song that "defined" us and our relationship to accompany our "solo" pictures. Mine was "I Will Dare."

Paul, Tommy, Bob, Chris and even Slim and Steve? I fucking love those guys. They've made my life better (and sometimes bearable) with their music. I'm 43 and they can make me ache like a teenager again every time I pop on "Little Mascara," "Unsatisfied" or "Can't Hardly Wait."

Yeah, yeah, yeah, both my and you favorite band sucks. The Replacements would be the first band to agree with you, but they were wrong and so are you.
posted by Joey Michaels at 10:57 AM on April 16, 2011 [7 favorites]


"I Hate Music" was my high school best friend, sitting on the hood of his car, drinking beer in the moonlight and shooting rats in the kudzu with a pellet gun.

"Kiss Me On The Bus" was my first serious girlfriend, New York City rain dripping down her face, laughing and high and we're on our way to MOMA and a stroll through Central Park.

"Here Comes A Regular" is waking up with a hangover and a dented fender and being terrified, terrified, terrified, and ashamed.

"Shiftless When Idle" is 120 MPH on Highway 459 through the brand-new stretch with my Honda CRX hugging the curves and nosing right into the line.

"Waitress in the Sky" is filling that same car with dogs and coolers and tackleboxes and my pal Marty and heading out to fish in a cool pre-dawn mist.

Yeah. The 'Mats WERE the 80s. There were bands I listened to more, there were bands I liked more, but there were few bands whose songs bring back specific memories so sharply.

"I ain't got no idols,
I ain't got much taste
I'm shiftless when I'm idle
And I got time to waste
YEAH"

Westerberg's songs are models of economy and word choice -- those boys "playin' makeup, wearin' guitar": genius. "Sanitation expert and a maintenance engineer, garbageman, janitor, and you, my dear": nuclear-grade snark.

My theory is that he was scared. For whatever reason, Westerberg didn't want to be carved on rock's Mount Rushmore with Dylan and Springsteen. Because as a songwriter, he's up there. But he didn't want it. Wonder why?

Enough rambling. I want to see this documentary.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 11:10 AM on April 16, 2011 [12 favorites]


The music I listen is made by people who seem to have only listened to Springsteen and the Replacements in the 80s. The music I don't is made by people who seem to have only listened to Depeche Mode or Flock of Seagulls.

As you say, it's complicated. I listen to both. Both types of music existed and thrived, and all types of people listened to both, not to mention a shitload of other music that it's no longer cool to admit having liked (forget liked -- loved) and which nobody, and I mean nobody, hip or unhip, steals or borrows or samples now.
posted by blucevalo at 11:14 AM on April 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


In fact, I listened to a beautiful Left of the Dial radio station that gleefully played "Blasphemous Rumours" right smack-up next to "I Will Dare," thought nothing of it, and left you to decide: Am I bewildered by this? Am I offended? Or is it just so fucking wonderful and exhilarating that I don't give a damn?

"On and on and on and on, what side are you on?"
posted by blucevalo at 11:25 AM on April 16, 2011


Yes, that poster.
posted by davebush at 11:29 AM on April 16, 2011


Love these guys — Got into them because of an old AOL message board user who'd chosen "Westerberg" as his handle.

The rereleases from a couple years back are pretty damn nice sounding too.
posted by klangklangston at 11:31 AM on April 16, 2011


I saw them at CBGB. I don't think they finished a single song, they would start to play a request that was called out, then stop after few chords, and try to start a Beatles cover or some such, and that would fall apart after a few chords. The whole thing was pretty shambolic, and also pretty entertaining.
posted by StickyCarpet at 11:37 AM on April 16, 2011


LiB: Ironically, I found out about The Hold Steady several years ago from an acquaintance because I was bitching that nobody was making music like The Replacements anymore. But yeah, The 'Mats are better.
posted by KingEdRa at 12:05 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Love them, but my only live experience with them is best forgotten. June 13 1991, opening for Elvis Costello at Kingswood Music Theatre (near Toronto). They didn't care. The crowd filing in looking for their seats didn't care. Westerberg was mocking the whole scene. I think they improvised some Queen song on a whim. Then they were gone.
posted by davebush at 12:06 PM on April 16, 2011


StickyCarpet: You might be interested in the confiscated-audiotape live album, "The Shit Hits The Fans."
posted by rhizome at 12:08 PM on April 16, 2011


I've posted before about how much I love the 'Mats but I've never found a copy of that fan album. I can't tell you how psyched I am to see this. The Replacements got me through the 80's. Not whole, but through anyway.
posted by Tacodog at 12:34 PM on April 16, 2011


The director never planned to use any music, archival footage, photos or even interviews with the band, so no, it wasn't the cost of the licenses. So it wouldn't be a VHS Behund the Music?
posted by Ideefixe at 12:46 PM on April 16, 2011


One's favorite rock bands should probably be the Beatles and the Stones, and so mine are, I suppose. Still, when asked, and to be completely honest, the Replacements are my favorite band.
posted by makabampow at 1:15 PM on April 16, 2011


Nobody ever got what it meant to actually be a teenager the way Westerberg did. Although I'm getting further and further away from my teenage years, I can still remember them well enough to remember the first time I heard "Sixteen Blue" and how much it meant to me: "Your age is hardest age/Everything drags and drags..."
posted by Rangeboy at 2:03 PM on April 16, 2011


A few years ago, an old friend of mine was at his regular watering hole in Minneapolis--a dive called U Otter Stop Inn--when a disheveled man in his mid 40s stumbled in and sat down next to him. The man ordered a shot, cast a few sideways glaces at my friend, downed the shot and said, "You think Westerberg's lost it again?"

I love Minneapolis.
posted by TrialByMedia at 2:18 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Whoops, meant to only link to the bar photo. Didn't see the person's family pics below.
posted by TrialByMedia at 2:20 PM on April 16, 2011


Westerberg's songs are models of economy and word choice

This. Also the sloppy ragged sound that was actually really really tight and precise, but mostly this. "Feelin' like a hundred bucks" in "Alex Chilton" - that is a real poet's care, that word choice. You don't feel like a million bucks, you're not some Elton John wannabe. You look cool, got a buzz goin', you feel like you've got enough cash in your pocket for a good wild weekend. Like a hundred bucks.

Fantastic songwriter, perfect band.
posted by gompa at 2:20 PM on April 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


Also, everybody gotta go, otto otto, everybody gotta go, otto toe.
posted by jonmc at 2:38 PM on April 16, 2011


When I was younger the 'mats could do no wrong. Even Westerberg's All Shook Down is a spotty but gorgeous record.

Tim is a perfect perfect perfect, from start to finish, collection of music. To me that was the moment they turned from drunken whatcrazyshitaretheygoingtodonow? band to a musical force to be reckoned with.
posted by eyeballkid at 2:40 PM on April 16, 2011


I started college in fall of '85, met my roommate, who was from Minneapolis, and within two days, the 'Mats were my favorite band. I think it went that way for a lot of us back then.

"Hey Merle, got any ludes on ya? Two left. Whaaaaaat?"
posted by AJaffe at 2:42 PM on April 16, 2011


One of the closest things I have to a regret is that we didn't buy Blackberry Way studio when it was on the market a few years back (with most of the original equipment included, and Mr. Padraigin a sound engineer). We just weren't ready to leave California at the time.

Now I do live in Minneapolis, and I'm sorry I can't say that I live in the house where they recorded "Let It Be", but I do have an autographed promo poster for that album hanging in my dining room, anyway. Nobody, but nobody, does wordplay like Paul Westerberg.
posted by padraigin at 2:42 PM on April 16, 2011


I wonder if Prince and the Mats ever hung out. IIRC, Prince owns one of Chris Mars' paintings.
posted by jonmc at 2:43 PM on April 16, 2011


I doubt they ever hung out per se, but Prince was well known to lurk in the corners of First Ave watching the local rock heroes.
posted by padraigin at 3:03 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


One of the closest things I have to a regret is that we didn't buy Blackberry Way studio when it was on the market a few years back

I know the guy who bought it! That fact totally blows my mind.

I've actually kind of struggled to think of something to add to this thread, because my Replacements love goes so far as to be almost irrational. And I didn't want to just drop in here and babble.

But here's one 'Mats-related thing worth mentioning: in '97 or '98, my shitty alt-country band played a show with a band fronted by this really tough-looking, hard-rocking chick. After they finished their set, I went over to say "nice job," and she casually mentioned that she was Bob Stinson's ex-wife. I just about shit my pants, and I spent years being stoked about my low Replacements-degrees-of-separation was (and then, a few years later, it got lower when I got to talk to Slim Dunlap for a while about the Tragedy of Carl Perkins).
posted by COBRA! at 3:14 PM on April 16, 2011


I remember seeing them on SNL back in the mid 80s and everyone but Bob switched clothes with each other. I'd link to it, but Viacom hates everyone and wants to squeeze all the joy out of life.
posted by cropshy at 3:24 PM on April 16, 2011


I wonder if Prince and the Mats ever hung out.

I don't think so, but there's an oft-repeated (and probably apocryphal) tale that one night the boys got trashed and decided to steal all their master tapes from their record label to prevent them from ever being released on CD. They did so, then threw them in the Mississippi River in the hopes that Prince would find them and rescue them, in Westerberg's words, "like Moses."
posted by Rangeboy at 3:28 PM on April 16, 2011


I got through the entire 80s in NYC never knowing the replacements existed, and I listened to Springsteen. But I was mainly a headbanger going to a school in the heart of Brooklyn disco Disco. I suspect the uncrossable line between the metalheads & the punk/alternative crowd kept me from hearing them. Then once I discovered thrash, little else got through for years.

Quite fond of "Alex Chilton" these days, and I find it pleasantly multi-layered to hear a band that so many people gush over doing the "Dude, you gotta hear this song" thing in song.
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey at 3:40 PM on April 16, 2011


the sloppy ragged sound that was actually really really tight and precise

Nailed it. Thanks.
posted by davebush at 3:47 PM on April 16, 2011


"Runnin' 'round the house, Mickey Mouse and the Tarot cards.
Falling asleep with a flop pop video on.
If he was from Venus, would he meet us on the moon?
If he died in Memphis, then that'd be cool, babe."

It was the the way he sang "flop pop video on" that hooked me to the Replacements.
posted by Bighappyfunhouse at 4:35 PM on April 16, 2011


The closest I came to seeing The Replacements was being offered a free ticket to Guns N Roses three years ago, but I was in the wrong state.
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 5:17 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


It's a spring day, and I have just reconnected with my high school boyfriend, the one who will always remind me of Lloyd Dobler. His life is good. I am happy for him. My life is good. I am driving the mom-mobile to my son's karate lessons, and as we pull into the parking lot, the opening notes of "Within Your Reach" ring out in my car. And I smile at this perfect moment of memory, of turning the future up, loud, and of knowing that I want exactly what I have right now. Thanks, guys.
posted by MonkeyToes at 5:35 PM on April 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


Hell, even the 'Mats cover band I saw here was one of the best show experiences I've had. I'm hardcore jealous of people who were able to see the real thing (well, when they weren't too drunk to play).
posted by klangklangston at 5:38 PM on April 16, 2011


My only live experience was a free show Paul put on at Portland's Music Millennium. My wife and I were standing at the edge of the crowd when Paul, escorted by his entourage, walked right in front of us. One of his stage hands brushed by me and I squeed to my wife, "I touched Paul's roadie!"
posted by Tacodog at 7:40 PM on April 16, 2011


Every once in a while that bum you saw out of the corner of your eye around Uptown was actually Bob Stinson. Happened so many times among my friends that it became a standard joke, until we didn't see him around for a long time and found out he had died. :(
posted by kuppajava at 7:45 PM on April 16, 2011


Here's Wilco covering "Color Me Impressed" live.

One of my favourite live recordings ever. Unfortunately, the only YouTube version I could find cuts off the excellent slurring-drunk intro, wherein Jeff Tweedy proudly announces, "Everything we do is based on the Replacements. It's okay." And then they just rock the hell out of it.

This was Wilco at its sloppy-tight drunk-bar-band best. Stick with it for the great bit where they can't figure out how to end the song so they segue into "I Wanna Be Sedated" instead (which this YouTube version also inexplicably edits out) and Tweedy can't remember which verse he's on and eventually they just sort of stumble into a final chord.

I saw 'em at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto on (I think) this tour - the Being There tour - in '97, and it was the closest I would ever come to seeing the Mats themselves. Also still the best live show I've ever seen.
posted by gompa at 8:02 PM on April 16, 2011


Agreed - Paul's an incredible songwriter and lyricist:

My theory is that he was scared. For whatever reason, Westerberg didn't want to be carved on rock's Mount Rushmore with Dylan and Springsteen. Because as a songwriter, he's up there. But he didn't want it. Wonder why?

He's clearly deeply ambivalent about success - he even addresses this explicitly:

"One foot in the door, the other one in the gutter
The sweet smell that they adore, I think I'd rather smother" (I Don't Know)
posted by chbrooks at 8:04 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


I saw them open for Elvis Costello at Madison Square Garden in what 1990? Tommy came out and yelled "Hello Madison Square Garbage!" They rushed through every song, sounded like everything was double speed. There were two headbanger looking dudes in front of me who would get up and play air guitar whenever there was a solo. And some really cute girls across the aisle, 7 or 8 of them, looked like cheerleaders, who knew every word to every song, and stood up and danced when Paul sang the line "And we're goin' after some lip-sync chicks." But honestly, it wasn't that great a show, except just to see them. I got a cool t-shirt -- "The Replacements, Coming Soon To Your Happy Town"

I had seen them even closer once before, by accident, probably in 84 or so. I had a friend who worked for Marriot and he got major discounts at their hotels, so we drove up from Virginia and stayed at the Marriot Marquis in Times Square as often as we could. It was only 50 bucks a night. We asked the waiter one night what was a good club to check out and he directed us to the China Club (we had been to the Tunnel the night before. Anyone remember the Tunnel?). Well turns out China club was like trying to get into Studio 54. We had never seen a velvet rope before. And as we were standing there, Tommy, Chris and Bob (no Paul)walked out of the club, right past me, and into a cab. I looked around like did anyone else just see that? But no one else had a clue who they were. We never did get into the club. It was freezing outside, so we walked back to the hotel. Unsatisfied.
posted by puny human at 8:12 PM on April 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Saw them open for Petty & the Heartbreakers at the AJ Palumbo Center in Pittsburgh in... '89, I think. Raggedy; Paul (I think it was Paul) shouted into the mike at the end of the show that everyone should come back to the hotel for a party.

Got into the band with "Pleased to Meet Me" (really, no one's mentioned "Skyway" yet? Really?), went back and got "Tim," and liked "Don't Tell a Soul" to the extent that it was a sort of soundtrack to those late '80s/early '90s cold fall nights, driving through the Northside, listening to "Achin' to Be" or "We'll Inherit the Earth" - a perfect melancholy.
posted by kgasmart at 8:29 PM on April 16, 2011


And Boink, which I only had on cassette, is a perfect album. Their best.

recreated here through the magic of youtube:

Color Me Impressed

White and Lazy

Within Your Reach

If Only You Were Lonely

Kids Don't Follow

Nowhere Is My Home

Take Me Down to the Hospital

Go
posted by puny human at 8:38 PM on April 16, 2011


I was a big fan at the time of the midwestern postpunk music that included the Mats and Husker Du and Naked Raygun and etc., born 1966, and seeing this trailer makes me sad. The Mats especially really blew it. Two LPs worth of good music if you put it all together, and a lot of crap. Generally pretty shitty live. Irresponsible fuckups and then maudlin afterwards. Sorry Ma and Let it Be were very promising but still immature, and then Tim was a very disappointing album and then it just got worse. This scene gave rise to Nirvana and grunge and that turned out pretty shitty too. It should have been the best rock of the 1990s and they pissed it all away. Just think, the most successful commercially was Soul Asylum. That just says it all right there. It's depressing to look back.
posted by GentleReader at 8:51 PM on April 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


I bet every time Paul hears a Goo Goo Dolls song, he dies a little inside.
posted by Tacodog at 9:10 PM on April 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


"The closest I came to seeing The Replacements was being offered a free ticket to Guns N Roses three years ago, but I was in the wrong state."

I just like to pretend that Tommy never met Axel Rose. Works better for me that way.

But there is a weird, personal synergy to this. In high school around '89 or so I have vivid memories of playing two cassettes to death on my Walkman taking the DC metro home. One was a Replacements mix-tape that drew heavily from "Sorry Ma" and "Stink." The other was "Appetite for Destruction."

Go figure.

Also, another vote for "All Shook Down" being a great "forgotten" album. It's basically Paul's first solo album.
posted by bardic at 10:33 PM on April 16, 2011


Also, "Buck Hill" is an amazing deep track.
posted by bardic at 10:35 PM on April 16, 2011


Art Brut have a great song about The Replacements. Their own 'Alex Chilton'

This scene gave rise to Nirvana and grunge and that turned out pretty shitty too.

You can hear echoes of the Mats in Green Day and the Hold Steady and maybe even a bit in guys like Against Me! and Hot Water Music. All that heart on your sleeve sloppy punk
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 10:48 PM on April 16, 2011


This thread is making me cry. The 'Mats have been my favorite band for years; I'm thrilled that this movie has finally come out and can't wait to see it at the Mpls showing.
posted by Judith Butlerian Jihad at 1:54 AM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Are we sharing 'Mats connections now?

I've probably posted mine here before. In 1987, the Replacements played a gig in Seattle with the Young Fresh Fellows (I think it was at the Moore Theatre, July 5). It was sort of sloppy, and they played part of it from the orchestra pit, but it was fun. Afterwards, they all ended up at a house party at the Dredge House, the house where several members of the local band Prudence Dredge lived. (I was in the band at the time but didn't live in the house.)

Slim was playing cards in one room with a bunch of folks. Tommy was wandering around hitting on girls. I don't recall what Chris was doing or if he was there. Paul, however, was sitting at the piano and a few of us were singing songs with him. I wish I could remember what we were singing. I think there might have been a few standards in the list. Anyway, that was a fine moment in my life. Singing with Paul Westerberg. :)

A few years later there was a PopLlama Picnic at... Volunteer Park, maybe? Something like that. The Posies played, maybe the Young Fresh Fellows were there. And Paul Westerberg was sitting cross-legged on the grass near the right side of the stage. He was fairly anonymous that day, and I didn't want to bug him. He sat by himself for much of the show. A friend of mine did go talk to him for a while.
posted by litlnemo at 1:40 PM on April 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


wherein Jeff Tweedy proudly announces, "Everything we do is based on the Replacements. It's okay."

God, that makes sense.
posted by interrobang at 9:10 AM on April 18, 2011


this was always my favorite bootleg -- The Replacements :: Shit, Shower & Shave (1989)

Does anyone know who the artist was who did the cover for Tim? Google fails me.
posted by puny human at 11:01 PM on April 19, 2011


I bet every time Paul hears a Goo Goo Dolls song, he dies a little inside.

Doesn't everyone?
posted by Sys Rq at 11:03 PM on April 19, 2011 [2 favorites]


A kind mefite has memailed me the answer to my Tim cover art question. The artist was Robert Longo. --

"In the 1980s, Longo directed several music videos, including New Order's "Bizarre Love Triangle", Megadeth's "Peace Sells" and "The One I Love" by R.E.M. He is responsible for the front covers of Glenn Branca's The Ascension from 1981 and The Replacements' 1985 album Tim,[4] while his work has inspired others such as Circlesquare's music video "Dancers".[citation needed]

He also directed the cyberpunk movie Johnny Mnemonic, starring Keanu Reeves, Dolph Lundgren and Takeshi Kitano, and a short film named Arena Brains. "
posted by puny human at 3:50 PM on April 21, 2011 [1 favorite]


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