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April 17, 2011 6:42 PM   Subscribe

In 1946 Charlie Wohlford, leveraging his reputation for repairing Canadian loggers' boots to better than new, founded Dayton Boots. The company emphasized quality and grew largely on word of mouth. In 2010 they hired Rethink Canada for an ad campaign. The result was interesting.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker (81 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite

 
Forgot to ad the via.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 6:43 PM on April 17, 2011


I love the nails one.
posted by DU at 6:46 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Ha. Those are damn fine ads.
posted by kafziel at 6:50 PM on April 17, 2011


I LOL'd at "free beatdown for every maple syrup joke."
posted by localroger at 6:50 PM on April 17, 2011


These are damn effective ads. By no means do I need new boots yet I'm sorely tempted.
posted by Skorgu at 6:56 PM on April 17, 2011


Nice, but... um... They no longer make the type of boots pictured in the ads, so...?

(Besides, my grandad's from Sorel, Quebec.)
posted by Sys Rq at 7:00 PM on April 17, 2011


I'm going to make a wild guess here and bet that Dayton Boots decided not to use these ads. Right?
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 7:04 PM on April 17, 2011


I like advertising that dares to believe it's not the 1950s any more, but isn't attempting to prove it by risking offense of any demographic other than the prudish. Another interesting ad campaign (Not actually sure whether these were ever run as ads): "Meat will make you happy."
posted by ardgedee at 7:07 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Offensive and patronizing like a middle-aged white Republican trying to use a hip-hop vernacular.
posted by orthogonality at 7:14 PM on April 17, 2011 [9 favorites]


Woah, those are bad, bad, bad. They aren't edgy by any means. They just look rushed and lazy, really. And what orthogonality said.
posted by Corduroy at 7:18 PM on April 17, 2011


Your saw would go right through those boots, you should get some Husqvarna corks/caulks instead, IMO.
posted by acheekymonkey at 7:24 PM on April 17, 2011


Yeah, what logger is going to pay $400 for this poseur/fetish wear bullshit?
Reminds me of those handpainted axes that some hipster is selling in Williamsburg.
posted by Flashman at 7:29 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I'm with ortho. Painfully unhip. The first one seems like a ripoff of Canadian Club's campaign.
posted by dobbs at 7:32 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'm going to make a wild guess here and bet that Dayton Boots decided not to use these ads. Right?

No, they did.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 7:35 PM on April 17, 2011


Yeah, what logger is going to pay $400 for this poseur/fetish wear bullshit?

Sorry Flashman, but the boots are great. It's the ad campaign that sucks.
posted by dobbs at 7:36 PM on April 17, 2011


Apparently Timberland already used the "From a simpler time when men were men. And so were the women." line in an ad (via).
posted by ChrisHartley at 7:39 PM on April 17, 2011 [3 favorites]


>Yeah, what logger is going to pay $400 for this poseur/fetish wear bullshit?

I’m not sure you’re thinking of the right boots. Daytons are about as no frills, functional, manly footwear as I can imagine.
posted by bongo_x at 7:40 PM on April 17, 2011


I love irreverent, slightly bawdy humor. I do.

But holy purple buckets, I cannot wait for this style of "edgy, clever, so politically incorrect!" ad to die, die, die.

It was kind of funny the first few campaigns, when it was still fresh, but it is seriously everywhere and really stale and lazy. It's also not an easy type of humor to pull off - you have to have the correct instincts about JUST where the line is, or you will taint your brand and risk really offending customers (There is a certain Twin Cities restaurant in which I have vowed to never set foot because of a series of billboards in this style that, rather than being edgy and funny, just came off as being gross and racist.)

I have seen people struggling to write similar campaigns, and it was a hot mess of sad.
posted by louche mustachio at 7:49 PM on April 17, 2011 [3 favorites]




I’m not sure you’re thinking of the right boots. Daytons are about as no frills, functional, manly footwear as I can imagine.


These are poseur boots. No steel toe offerings, no actual OSHA (or the Canadian equivalent) specs anywhere on the site, 350 dollars(!) for working man's boots is ridiculous.

Every testimonial refers either to some nostalgia factor or makes mention of how good they look.
posted by Chrischris at 7:50 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Good boots are worth $400. Shitty ads, though...
posted by seanmpuckett at 7:50 PM on April 17, 2011


Well, for one thing these ads are clearly not aimed at the type of guy who actually does hard work for a living, they're aimed squarely at ironic, urban, flush and brand-aware hipsters. This company has decided to abandon its original constituency and chase a more profitable demographic.
And I just don't see anything in their product range, which range ranges from $379 to over $500, that would be useful - or even legal, not being CSA-approved - to somebody actually working in the industry.
posted by Flashman at 7:51 PM on April 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


350 dollars(!) for working man's boots is ridiculous.

Not really. Good hand tools are expensive too. If they're really good, though, they last.
posted by kenko at 7:55 PM on April 17, 2011



Your saw would go right through those boots, you should get some Husqvarna corks/caulks instead, IMO.


I can easily imagine The Kids discovering Husqvarna logging boots.
posted by palmcorder_yajna at 7:57 PM on April 17, 2011 [5 favorites]


Jesus this is a tough crowd.
posted by tula at 7:59 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


REDWINGS FTW
posted by battleshipkropotkin at 8:01 PM on April 17, 2011 [3 favorites]


Good hand tools are expensive too. If they're really good, though, they last.

I don't have problem with that price-point, really, except for the lack of actual work-useful features. 350 dollar boots should have steel toes, a steel (or kevlar) shank, goretex-lined for waterproofing, cushioned for long period of standing on concrete floors, and (depending on the intended use) thinsulate lined to keep your feet warm. These boots have not one of these features.

As for hand tools in general, when you get to top of the line (Snap-on, for instance), the company will replace or repair your tool(s) for life. If they can't fix it, they'll bring a brand new tool to your place of employment and hand it to you, free of charge and with no questions asked. You are therefore buying a lifetime commitment from them, rather than just a well-made tool.
posted by Chrischris at 8:03 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Jesus this is a tough crowd.

You should see what happens when they start talking about Palestine, weightlifting, or lolcats.
posted by WalterMitty at 8:03 PM on April 17, 2011 [4 favorites]


I like those Husqvarna boots. The pseudo-retro ads, not so much. Like others have said, I feel like I've been seeing them for a few years now, and this is just more of the same. (Clearly, I am beyond basic hipster into a transcendent realm of jaded coolness.)
posted by Forktine at 8:06 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Ugh. I don't understand how people enjoy advertising, especially cheesy, played out stuff like this.
posted by snofoam at 8:10 PM on April 17, 2011


To add a little (recent) historical perspective. I went to high school in Vancouver in the 80's. Circa 1983 Daytons was a generic term for shit kicker boots worn by scrubs, burnouts, rockers, whatever, your vernacular maybe varied. The kids in Iron Maiden t-shirts long greasy hair and plaid lumberjack jackets underneath a jean jacket with a hand stenciled Black Sabbath logo on the back created with markers stolen from the high school art room. I'm almost certain they weren't triple digits back then, or maybe they lost many pairs through shoplifting.

Fast forward a decade and the fashionable crowd are wearing Dayton's with Armani suits in the only fashion forward thing that has ever happened in Vancouver. They disappeared as quickly as the arrived, 'cause lets face it, it looked pretty fucking stupid.

Haven't been a factor in Vancouver since then, except their iconic sign on East Hastings.
posted by Keith Talent at 8:12 PM on April 17, 2011


Jesus this is a tough crowd.

That's what He said.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:16 PM on April 17, 2011 [10 favorites]


In addition, Ken Lum's East Van cross, a piece of public artwork here in Vancouver placed on a major thoroughfare into the east side is of the same aesthetic as the resurgence of Dayton Boots.

The cross was a fixture on the shop class binders of a certain subset of student (again the rocker, burnout, skid, whatever you called them in your town,) for the last fifty years, his re-imagining it has imbued it with a certain gentrified hipster charm.
posted by Keith Talent at 8:18 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


louche - which restuarant, out of curiosity?
posted by kavasa at 8:19 PM on April 17, 2011


There is a certain Twin Cities restaurant in which I have vowed to never set foot because of a series of billboards in this style that, rather than being edgy and funny, just came off as being gross and racist.

“Cheaper than a Bangkok Brothel,” “The Asian community went crazy over that one,” Roberts chuckles. “So we followed it up with ‘Mommy, Mr. Whiskers Didn’t Come Home Last Night.’ Then every TV station in town was photographing the hairy-legged, Birkenstock-wearing women and bedwetting men with their picket signs that said ‘Down with Chino Latino.’ And we got millions of dollars’ worth of free advertising.”
posted by orthogonality at 8:27 PM on April 17, 2011


I'm sorry, but "We helped your granddad get laid" paired with an image of a single lumberjack with big manly boots just made me think "ooh, how butch!" This image just sealed the deal.
posted by hydrophonic at 8:27 PM on April 17, 2011


So, what are those little horizontal bars? Some sort of watermarking?
posted by kafziel at 8:28 PM on April 17, 2011


Jesus this is a tough crowd.

There is some backstory to the criticisms. Daytons are sort of notorious in BC. They aren't really work boots, unless your work is selling crank, or bouncing at a strip club. They do go nicely with your Canadian tuxedo. So perhaps their image needed some polishing.

Also, it's using the working man angle. Like Harley Davidson benefiting from the dangerous image of the motorcycle gang in it's appeal to professionals in their mid-life crisises, Dayton is using the legacy of logging to sell those boots. Until recently, BC = forestry.

It's also about standards. Those ads make them seem like tough work boots. The most important thing for me in the bush, after tobacco, was my footwear. If I had worn Daytons in the bush, I wouldn't have toes right now.

Now, cowboy boots you should spend at least $500 on, but that's a different story.
posted by acheekymonkey at 8:31 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


You are therefore buying a lifetime commitment from them, rather than just a well-made tool.

Well, sure, and I would expect something similar from really expensive work boots, too (at least up to the level of repairs).
posted by kenko at 8:33 PM on April 17, 2011


Relevent?
posted by Confess, Fletch at 8:34 PM on April 17, 2011



I can easily imagine The Kids discovering Husqvarna logging boots.
b

Come to think of it, I can easily imagine myself wearing those. I've been trying to find a good pair of rain boots for a while, and those look like they'd meet nearly all my criteria, while costing at least ~$50 less than anything else I'd considered. (I wasn't specifically thinking about getting orange ones, but since I wear almost nothing that isn't black, neutral blue, brown, or gray, I don't think that'd be a problem. It actually might be sort of great.)

The real problem is that I'm a biology grad student. My department is full of all different sorts of scientists-- physiologists and ecologists; phylogenists and paleontologists; and I'm one of the cell-and-molecular folks. Which means I'm a person who expressly does not need elite forest gear, in a department full of people who do. Which in turn means that those would look not just stupid on me but uniquely stupid.

So no sporty, tangerine-colored. back-lacing, waterproof, buttstomper boots for me, alas.
posted by palmcorder_yajna at 8:36 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


You should see what happens when they start talking about Palestine, weightlifting, or lolcats.

Who you callin' they hombre? We have met the hipper-than-thou snarker, and he is us. He is we. He is moi.
posted by tula at 8:44 PM on April 17, 2011


palmcorder_yajna:

If you don't use the corks/studs (and it doesn't sound like you would need to) it makes walking in Husqvarnas a little weird. But you would look badass.
posted by acheekymonkey at 8:45 PM on April 17, 2011


So it's just boots then?
'Cause I've been looking for some made in North America shoes for a while, but they seem harder to come by than boots.
posted by madajb at 9:05 PM on April 17, 2011


My Daytons saved my toes in my motorcycle accident, though any boots probably would have. Luckily i got a discount, because they're pretty scuffed up now.
posted by captaincrouton at 9:06 PM on April 17, 2011


Yeah, Dayton's are the Real Deal for fetishwear, tho not as big a name as, say, Wesco or Dehner. Or so I hear. Cough.
posted by Slap*Happy at 9:15 PM on April 17, 2011


So it's just boots then?
'Cause I've been looking for some made in North America shoes for a while, but they seem harder to come by than boots.


Made In North America boots are hard to come by? Hrm. Well, I'm pretty fond of my Danner boots, which are made in Portland, OR.

They don't seem to make shoes, however. What specifically are you looking for?
posted by hippybear at 9:17 PM on April 17, 2011


I love boots. Flashman, you're mistaken about what working people are willing to spend on a pair of boots, especially loggers. I love my Wesco logging boots. Price them or a pair of White's smokejumpers. The Daytons are quite affordable in comparison.
posted by Shike at 9:19 PM on April 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I love my Wesco logging boots.

Those look like awesome boots.
posted by kenko at 9:24 PM on April 17, 2011


Oh, yeah. "Good" work boots START at about $200-250/pair and go up from there. I've known guys who have gotten boots built by hand from scratch for themselves, which was NOT a cheap thing.

The difference in wear between a $75 pair of boots and a $250 pair is huge and easy to tell after even 6 months of steady wear, and you easily get more than the cost difference out of better boots.

Now, which pair of boots is better or whatever... I'm sure there's a formalized set of opinions out there someplace. Big butch black workboots are great things regardless.

Oh yes. Yes they are.
posted by hippybear at 9:24 PM on April 17, 2011


Obligatory Discworld quote:

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years time, while a poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socio-economic unfairness.

- Terry Pratchett, Men At Arms

Other than this, I have no dog in this fight. I wear government issue steel toed boots when I fly (thanks taxpayers!) and thought the ads were funny but did not rush out to buy new boots.
posted by macfly at 9:32 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


tula: "Jesus this is a tough crowd"

MetaFilter: we put the "FU" in fuck you

Note: not saying that to you, tula
posted by bwg at 9:33 PM on April 17, 2011


Made In North America boots are hard to come by? Hrm. Well, I'm pretty fond of my Danner boots, which are made in Portland, OR.

They don't seem to make shoes, however. What specifically are you looking for?


Nah, boots are easier than shoes.

Basically I just want your standard, study brown shoe. Perhaps not as shiny and without having to go the custom route.

I don't need insulated soles, or steel toes which tend to go along with Made in North America shoes, since the target market often seems to be working folk.
posted by madajb at 9:49 PM on April 17, 2011


I found this on their website:
"Do you have a CSA approved work boot?
For Spring and Summer of 2008 we plan to introduce a CSA approved steel-toe work boot collection."

Hasn't seemed to have happened though.
posted by Harpocrates at 9:50 PM on April 17, 2011


I can easily imagine The Kids discovering Husqvarna logging boots.

Hey, those are cool. But do they come in any color other than orange? My hair is dyed blue, and I don't want to look all Portal 2.
posted by zylocomotion at 9:52 PM on April 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


So has anyone actually tried their caulk boots? How's the ankle support, weight of the sole, etc? I'm in need of a new pair as we speak.
posted by mannequito at 10:30 PM on April 17, 2011


I went to high school in Vancouver in the 80's. Circa 1983 Daytons was a generic term for shit kicker boots worn by scrubs, burnouts, rockers, whatever, your vernacular maybe varied.

So true, I went to highschool in a redneck logging town in BC and it was the same thing. The locals started wearing them with sweatpants around 1984 which was something I could never figure out, they looked so stupid with anything other than jeans. When I think of that time that particular town the image of a dude in navy sweat pants with his 'Daytons' is what stands out.

Unfortunately.
posted by Phlegmco(tm) at 10:55 PM on April 17, 2011


The Wesco boots look great. Too bad there isn't a sizing chart for stock boots on their site.
posted by maxwelton at 12:05 AM on April 18, 2011


Those are some fine-lookin' boots.
posted by tumid dahlia at 1:09 AM on April 18, 2011


These fuckers from Chippewa have lasted me most of my life it feels like. Love em. Also, Red Wings, except both they and Chippewa have sadly moved some of their manufacturing out of the U.S for the cheaper trendier crap.

But these Dayton boots are also amazing looking.

In terms of the price. It makes no sense to think of them that way. These kinds of boots wear well, keep your feet healthy and dry and last for fucking ever.

Best boots I ever had were a pair of Brahma Engineer boots. Amazing. Canadian as well I guess. But I think they're gone or they name was bought out or some crap like that.
posted by Skygazer at 1:09 AM on April 18, 2011


Madajb -

- Allen Edmonds
- Alden

Neither brand is cheap, but they are quality product and will last years and years with some care. Made in the USA.
posted by Slap*Happy at 4:17 AM on April 18, 2011


Hmm, let me guess; this ad campaign is a prelude to taking production offshore?
posted by scruss at 4:24 AM on April 18, 2011


Redwings value line or whatever they're calling it is not great, glued on soles and such that can't be reconditioned, but otherwise they're still pretty solid. A decent pair of Redwings will set you back about $200 or so. Considering that you generally should have two pairs to rotate between, that's a lot of money on footwear.
posted by electroboy at 6:22 AM on April 18, 2011


Chrischris writes "These are poseur boots. No steel toe offerings, no actual OSHA (or the Canadian equivalent) specs anywhere on the site, 350 dollars(!) for working man's boots is ridiculous."

It's CSA. There isn't much need for web sites to have specs as they are categorized by type though I imagine most people making steel toes will make that information available someplace. And decent work boots start at $200 and go up, way up, from there. Not to defend their offerings but $350 while not a bargain isn't outrageous either.
posted by Mitheral at 7:30 AM on April 18, 2011


Well, I'm pretty fond of my Danner boots, which are made in Portland, OR.

Hell yes, Danner boots are great. I found a pair at Goodwill for $12 and I'm sending them off to get resoled (and maybe re-lined, I'll trust their judgement). I needed the cheapest pair of boots I could find to take a motorcycle safety class, and I had no idea what I was buying. Super tough and comfortable (but maybe that's because they were previously broken in), and fairly waterproof. I've used them for a few years now and there's just absolutely no sole left on them, so it's time to send them in.
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 7:34 AM on April 18, 2011


This thread is nearly as wanktastic (and educational) as the font threads. I love Metafilter and all of its impassioned boot fanatics.
posted by emjaybee at 8:39 AM on April 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


Brown shoes
don't make it.
posted by charlie don't surf at 8:48 AM on April 18, 2011


Neither brand is cheap, but they are quality product and will last years and years with some care. Made in the USA.

Thanks.
Yeah, I've come across both of those in my searches. Unfortunately, neither of them are sold anywhere near my town.

I'll have to try to keep an eye out the next time I'm in the big city. heh.
posted by madajb at 9:01 AM on April 18, 2011


palmcorder. what you need is boring ass work boots. i like servus or xtratuf prene boots, but you can probably get away with bogs or muck boots or whatever. due to my experiences in holesmanship i have well developed opinions on the matter of excellent boots, and also hook ups on where to get them on the cheap. because i am authentic. that makes me cool.

YAY
posted by beefetish at 9:30 AM on April 18, 2011


ps danners rock, not a lot of boot manufacturers make work shoes lasted for women!
posted by beefetish at 9:31 AM on April 18, 2011


Whites Boots and Shoes doesn't have any clever advertising bu they do make great boots. Here's the Centennial Walker. The picture in the listing shows the shoe with vibram soles but you can get them with standard flat soles too. The Semi-Dress in another option.
posted by X4ster at 10:41 AM on April 18, 2011


palmcorder_yajna: about rain boots, have you considered XTRATUF's?

re: Danner's; another loyal fan here. I had Dave Page's re-sole mine.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 12:45 PM on April 18, 2011


Danners are great. I wore a pair of Ft Lewis Go Devils for years, and one of the best things about them is that they are waterproof right up to the top, so I could go to the edge of the lake, and walk in standing there, ankle deep, throwing bread crumbs to baby ducks, inspiring all sorts of little kids with their non-waterproof tennis shoes to try to follow my example.

Parents hated me.

Now I mostly wear black Red Wing lineman boots, because they are indestructible and look nice all polished up (or dirty and beat to hell, it's that kind of boot that can pull off either look effortlessly.)
posted by quin at 12:50 PM on April 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


Some of these boots if used for work they're either tax deductible or you get a discount off the tax at purchase, or sometimes, even a union or a company will help you pay for them. (That means they have to meet certain safety standards as well in terms of acid and oil resistance, for example).

So not only do these boots keep manufacturing in the country, but they pay union wages so other unions support them.

In regards to steel toes, I used to wear them religiously but stopped when someone pointed out that in some cases, like a car running over your foot, or something else massively heavy dropping on your toe, it is better not to have the steel protection as that steel shell can compress and just clean cut your toes off. I'm not sure on how credible that is, I suppose it depends on the sort of impact. I guess if you have no intentions of having traffic or other heavy machinery going over your foot, you're probably in the clear.

I would definitely wear them for a motorcycle, thought if I remember correctly the steel toe can get pretty cold in harsh weather. But I guess the heat coming off a motorcyle probably compensates for that.

In the 80s and 90s, when a mosh pit was my concern, steel toes saved my foot from a lot of unnecessary pain from all the stomping and pushing.

One other thing is that, I'm fairly certain wearing Engineer boots everyday and using them to do too much walking can, over time, take a toll on your knees, and I'm fairly certain they're the reason I needed knee surgery for a torn medial meniscus. (The meniscus, is a flexible flap of cartilage behind the patella (kneecap) that gives protection between the femur (thighbone) and tibia (shin bone), it's like a rubber pad and it wears out naturally, but heavy footwear and compressing the knee to harshly while bending can make it pop out between kneebone joint like a rubber band and once that happens it begins to tear bit by bit, until one day running up the stairs you will hear a POP and fell like you've just been shot in the leg and you will issue forth a string of curses and beg the powers that be anything they desire if they will make the pain stop, Goddamn it stop!! You lose all ability to bend or straighten out the knee and every movement becomes excruciating. After surgery and PT all is fairly well again. Except that NFL career I never cared about, is almost certainly never going to happen. Aw shucks.)

I've been looking for good tanker boots, but can't seem to find a pair I really like or Made in the U.S, that have a good reputation. This is the closest I've come upon. But they get crap reviews for crap material. But that strap look is awesome.

Here are some more badass American made work boots: Thorogood Boots.

HAs anyone mentioned Carolina Boots? Not bad. They're do in a pinch, and I think still make some of their boots in the U.S., but they're on a lesser level of quality than Chippewa, Red Wing, or I suppose Dayton or Wesco (though I've never had a pair of either of those brands).
posted by Skygazer at 2:19 PM on April 18, 2011


Skygazer, I suspect that what you want is the Dehner tank boot--scroll down past the suede one. I had forgotten how sweet these look.
posted by Frowner at 2:51 PM on April 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


I have a pair of Carolina's that replaced my Danners as winter boots. Mainly because they really are just poor-man's Danners; they use all the same materials, have mostly the same specs, but cost about a third as much.

They aren't as good, but they are still damn good. I've had no complaints (once I found an insert that gave a bit more support, they are a bit lacking in this area, but I always found Danners to have that same problem.)
posted by quin at 2:55 PM on April 18, 2011


I love Metafilter and all of its impassioned boot fanatics.

A 3 kilogram pair of steel-reinforced boots is a vital part of my EDC.
The hard part for me was finding a pair that would align properly with the hem of my trenchcoat.
posted by Flashman at 3:06 PM on April 18, 2011


Back in the day, I wore Pierre Paris boots and they were great. Then Dayton bought out Pierre Paris and they weren't great any more. Dayton made biker boots then (1970s) but that's the only boot they made that's useful. (And everybody else makes those, too.) I've still got a pair of Paris boots around, resoled vibram instead of corks. I don't wear 'em much any more, but they are still the best footwear I've ever owned.

(How much do folks that argue $500 is too much for work boots pay for their running shoes? I drew a line in the sand years ago, $40 max for runners -- I mean, the things are made of cloth and rubbber, for God's sake, and put together by machines and child slave labor, $10 would be a fair price but people pay hundreds. /hurfdurf)
posted by CCBC at 3:30 PM on April 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


Skygazer writes "In regards to steel toes, I used to wear them religiously but stopped when someone pointed out that in some cases, like a car running over your foot, or something else massively heavy dropping on your toe, it is better not to have the steel protection as that steel shell can compress and just clean cut your toes off. I'm not sure on how credible that is, I suppose it depends on the sort of impact. I guess if you have no intentions of having traffic or other heavy machinery going over your foot, you're probably in the clear."

Any impact that will crush a steel toe is going to crush your toes. In most industries those are pretty rare occurrence; it's much more likely for a stack of 2X4s or a paving stone or a loaded pallet to fall on your feet as these are the kinds of things people are carrying or moving around. For the little it's worth this was covered on mythbusters.

Also I'm not sure a car running over your foot will damage a steel toe. There is only around 1000 lbs per wheel that is spread out over the whole contact patch of the tire and it's not an impact loading.
posted by Mitheral at 5:11 PM on April 18, 2011


I'll try it out and get back to you.
posted by Skygazer at 5:26 PM on April 18, 2011























No, of course I'm not going to try it.

But, look if a steel toe gets flattened on ones toes, what was just a momentary burst of extreme pressure becomes a steel vise of extreme pressure with a steel edge to it cutting right through the toes.

Fuckin' OW!
posted by Skygazer at 5:34 PM on April 18, 2011


Sure, but the likelihood of that scenario is far, far, FAR smaller than the usual dropped-something-heavy-on-it "hey, awesome, my foot's not squished!"
posted by Sys Rq at 5:40 PM on April 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


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