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Happy Mother's Day, from the songwriters of the world
May 8, 2011 12:09 AM   Subscribe

Happy Mother's Day from Buck Owens, Randy Newman, John Lennon, Merle Haggard, Elvis Presley and LL Cool J
posted by flapjax at midnite (49 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
Oops. Meant to hit Preview but hit Post instead. I knew that would happen someday. Those damn buttons are too close to each other, and too similar looking. (yeah, I know, take it to MeTa, right?)

There were supposed to be more links. Maybe I'll add a few soon...
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:11 AM on May 8, 2011


Feel free. Or should I say "Momma said add more links!"
posted by oneswellfoop at 12:12 AM on May 8, 2011


Sophie Tucker
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:14 AM on May 8, 2011


PJ Harvey

And I think I'll leave other links to all y'all mother-lovin' Mefiers out there...
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:19 AM on May 8, 2011


okay, here's David Allen Coe (written by Steve Goodman)
posted by oneswellfoop at 12:30 AM on May 8, 2011


Big Deadhead here who never saw Merle's original rendition of Mama Tried. Trying to reconcile the two gentlemen sitting and playing guitar with Jerry is mind boggling. Merle is a badass.

Happy Mother's Day, Mom!! and all mothers everywhere!
posted by JohnnyGunn at 12:45 AM on May 8, 2011


Big Deadhead here who never saw Merle's original rendition of Mama Tried.

Heh heh. Glad I could be of service, JohnnyGunn. But you Deadheads, bles your hearts, y'all really do need to go a little deeper every now and then, and check out the musical roots of your San Francisco. Cause they really do have their feet planted very firmly in the soil of Americana. But something about the Deadheads, man, so many of 'em just kinda start and stop with the Dead, listening over and over to the Dead's and only the Dead's versions of many American roots music classics. Like, folks who have 17 different live versions of "I Know You Rider" or "Goin' Down the Road Feeling Bad" but have never heard a single bluesman sing the lines "my mind was wandrin' like the wild geese in the west", or "goin' where the water tastes like wine"... I've always thought that was just a little tragic.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:51 AM on May 8, 2011 [5 favorites]


Whoops. "...your San Francisco" should read "...your San Francisco heroes".
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:52 AM on May 8, 2011


More mom music...

Waylon & Willie

Pink Floyd

The Shirelles, for all you pygmy monkey mommas out there...

Fountains of Wayne (doesn't have to be your OWN mom, right?)

and, of course, ABBA (Oh wait, they're just saying "Mamma Mia" as an interjection? That's a relief; I thought they were getting a little bit Oedipal...)
posted by oneswellfoop at 12:55 AM on May 8, 2011


Slade
posted by stifford at 1:05 AM on May 8, 2011


I normally do venture out beyond the Dead. Hey, I became a big Johnny Cash fan after I followed up on where Big River came from. I always thought of the Dead as a great cover band. Jerry's grass is blue too. But, you are right, I need to put my 200+ concert recordings aside, turn my satellite from 32 (now 23) and listen.

Maybe it would be a great FPP for the originals covered by the Dead?? Hint, hint.
posted by JohnnyGunn at 1:06 AM on May 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


Jerry Jeff Walker

obviously, The Mamas and the Papas

The Ronettes (what do you mean, 'wrong holiday?')

and Anita Renfroe (Classical) (HipHop)
posted by oneswellfoop at 1:08 AM on May 8, 2011


Whodini
Mr. T
posted by p3t3 at 1:14 AM on May 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


For all disco mama's:
Hamilton Bohannon - Singing A Song For My Mother (1973)
The Intruders-I'll Always Love My Mama
posted by ouke at 1:33 AM on May 8, 2011


Queen

Genesis
posted by KingEdRa at 1:50 AM on May 8, 2011


Ray Wylie Hubbard explains the story behind redneck mothers
posted by hortense at 2:04 AM on May 8, 2011


ouke you already posted the Intruders, but I must highlight the most beautiful Mother's Day lyrics ever...

Hmm, A mother's love's so special
It's something that you can't describe
It's the kind of love that stays with you
Until the day you die
She taught me little things
Like saying hello, and thank you, please
While scrubbing those floors on her bended knees

posted by readery at 4:41 AM on May 8, 2011


For reality's sake, let's include the not-quite-so-love letter to a mother-in-law from Ernie K-Doe.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 5:04 AM on May 8, 2011


A real tearjerker from C.W. McCall.
posted by contraption at 5:32 AM on May 8, 2011


Oh wait, they're just saying "Mamma Mia" as an interjection? That's a relief; I thought they were getting a little bit Oedipal...

Wouldn't that be Oedimal?

/i got nothin
posted by randomkeystrike at 6:04 AM on May 8, 2011


There is also The Mama's Boys version of Mama Weer All Crazy Now, which I always preferred to the original Slade version, and the dreadful Quiet Riot version.
posted by COD at 6:13 AM on May 8, 2011


Mother's Mother.

Bill Withers
posted by DigDoug at 6:18 AM on May 8, 2011


OMG I just posted that Mr. T video on my boys' facebook pages, thank you p3t3!
posted by headnsouth at 6:33 AM on May 8, 2011


Mother's not dead, she's only a-sleepin'
Stanley Brothers
posted by lost_cause at 7:05 AM on May 8, 2011


But you Deadheads, bles your hearts, y'all really do need to go a little deeper every now and then, and check out the musical roots of your San Francisco heroes.

It's not that Deadheads don't venture deeper to see the roots of the music, it is just that the Dead did it so much better...at least in the opinion to this Deadhead mom.
posted by murrey at 7:43 AM on May 8, 2011 [1 favorite]


it is just that the Dead did it so much better

Well, you're certainly entitled to your opinion!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 7:44 AM on May 8, 2011


Another forgotten classic from Kevin Coyne: "Anyone who is familiar with my records - I hope there are one or two of you - knows that I often sing of my mother. This one is called 'Right On Her Side.' The big fat woman is always right... And I love her."
posted by koeselitz at 7:49 AM on May 8, 2011


I had forgotten how great Mama Said Knock You Out is. I've never really liked the chorus, but the rhymes are really fabulous. And the beat is great.
posted by OmieWise at 7:58 AM on May 8, 2011


I had forgotten how great Mama Said Knock You Out is.

I agree. But one thing's gotta be said: LL was so channeling Chuck D on that one.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:16 AM on May 8, 2011


I'm talking about phrasing.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:16 AM on May 8, 2011


Goldie (music video)
It should be noted that this is the video edit of the Mother VIP (Vocal Mix) (7:24) [YT], which is a truncated remix of the original hour long track.
posted by filthy light thief at 8:27 AM on May 8, 2011


And another update on Goldie's epic 60 minute voyage of a song/tribute, from this 2009 interview with the Guardian: Now he wants to reconfigure it as a stage show "with DJs, holograms, videos, actors, dancers, an orchestra on stage, more like an assault on your mind. I think it will be a triumph."

It's all for you, Mom!
posted by filthy light thief at 8:31 AM on May 8, 2011


I think it will be a triumph.

Triumph of the ill.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:42 AM on May 8, 2011


Gleonard Danzig loves his MOOootheAAAAAAA
posted by cortex at 9:51 AM on May 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


From Italy with amore Luciano or if you prefer, Andrea
posted by francesca too at 10:19 AM on May 8, 2011


Since Oedipus Rex has been mentioned, how about a little Tom Lehrer.
posted by CheeseDigestsAll at 11:09 AM on May 8, 2011


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6rKrO5iLZs. IPad fail.
posted by CheeseDigestsAll at 11:12 AM on May 8, 2011


Dean Martin.
posted by mazola at 11:19 AM on May 8, 2011


Bobbie Gentry sings about a mother who gives her daughter a chance for a new life.
posted by Toothless Willy at 12:34 PM on May 8, 2011


Lucero, "Mom"

mama, your boys might make some mistakes
but we know where we're from
and we know how we were raised
so don't you think twice about where we are tonight,
no matter how far from home
we'll be back along, just a matter of time.

home, might scatter and fade,
with time all things must change
the road, it might take its own course
but, I intend, mama, we're still your boys

mama there's times where we'll make some mistakes,
we know how you've worked and we know how you've prayed,
so don't you think twice bout where we are tonight
no matter what becomes of us
you gave us enough,
know that we've tried.

home, it might scatter and fade
with time, all things must change
the road, it might take its own course
but i intend, mama, we're still your boys.

and your mother was 16
when she married the man that she loved
now she gave you everything
and you gave it all back to us

mama, you know we might make some mistakes
if we should falter, it's us should be blamed
don't you think twice, we're alright
learned it long time ago, we keep it close
you're with us tonight

home, it might scatter and fade,
with time all things must change,
the road it might take its own course
but I intend, mama, we're still your boys.

posted by BitterOldPunk at 2:12 PM on May 8, 2011


The Mountain Goats

our mother has been absent ever since we founded Rome.
but there's going to be a party when the wolf comes home.



Social Distortion

and there's a messed up Decemberists' song I'm not linking
posted by Lovecraft In Brooklyn at 5:02 PM on May 8, 2011


In memory of my mom, I'll link Robert Plant Big Log, because whenever I would play that album she would tell me how much she liked it. I used to put it on mix tapes for her. Even 30 years later I remember being in the car with her and it coming on the radio and she would say, "Oh I like that, who is it?" My mom was funny. She liked everything from reggae to synthpop.

I miss my mom.
posted by puny human at 7:11 PM on May 8, 2011 [2 favorites]


1) Chixdiggit Where's Your Mom

2) Prefering the Dead's watery version of "Mama Tried" to the original, defining version may be a sign of having trucked a little too far down the golden road to unlimited devotion.
posted by jeffen at 10:01 PM on May 8, 2011


2) Prefering the Dead's watery version of "Mama Tried" to the original, defining version may be a sign of having trucked a little too far down the golden road to unlimited devotion.

Heh. I wasn't gonna say it, but...
posted by flapjax at midnite at 10:44 PM on May 8, 2011


Johnny Paycheck : I'm The Only Hell My Mama Ever Raised
posted by puny human at 8:14 AM on May 9, 2011 [1 favorite]


y'all really do need to go a little deeper every now and then

flapjax, you really need to stop acting as if we're all ignorant about music but you're the resident Mefi Music Expert. I live in Nashville where I'm surrounded by people who are real music encyclopedias, and believe me, I can tell that you're not on their level, so stop looking down on everyone. People are much more likely to talk about music with you if you don't act like it's a contest, and if they think they can disagree with you without being insulted.
posted by Toothless Willy at 9:59 AM on May 9, 2011


People are much more likely to talk about music with you if you don't act like it's a contest

Toothless Willy, over the course of hundreds of music posts (ones that I've made myself as well as posts by others) here at Metafilter, I've engaged in countless interactions with hundreds of Mefiers. The vast majority of them very friendly and rewarding interactions. I've also made it a point to thank many, many posters of music-related FPPs and comments, often expressing appreciation not just for a good post, but for turning me on to some musician I'd never heard of. And though I might've butted heads or offended someone once or twice here on something music-related (god, show me anyone at Mefi who hasn't ever done that) I'm very much not under the impression that people are somehow avoiding talking about music with me due to some perceived sense that I'm an imperious know-it-all or something. However, if there are droves of Mefiers not engaging me here because of some such perception, well, I'd have no way of knowing that. Of course, neither would you, unless you've undertaken some kind of independent flapjax at midnite poll among a cross-section of members..

The particular instance, in this thread, of my expressing an opinion about the listening habits and perceptions of Deadheads was one that few would disagree with, I think. But anyway, just like anyone else here, I'm perfectly entitled to expressing personal opinions now and again, about music or whatever else. And anyone is welcome to disagree with me. No problem. But you'll also note that the tone of my comment was gentle and friendly, overall, and even the Deadhead upthread* who was the initial spur for the comment which you've selectively quoted above agreed with me. And he took the comment in the essentially friendly spirit in which it was offered and expressed. You seem to be the only one unhappy with it!

flapjax, you really need to stop acting as if we're all ignorant about music

As explained above, I don't "act" like that. This is a serious misperception on your part that a careful study of my contributions here over the course of hundreds of music posts will disavow you of. But, hey, after such review, if you still hold to the opinion that I really act as if you're "all ignorant about music", well, all I can say is you're more than welcome to avoid reading my posts and comments.

*"the Deadhead upthread", nice one, eh?
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:17 PM on May 9, 2011


I am the Deadhead from up thread. I return in defense of flapjax at midnite. First, I did not read that statement as a personal attack or any way to intimidate me or even trying to talk down to me. But, I am used to statements like those about being a Deadhead. Heck, my brother still asks me when they are going to stop tuning up when he listens to any of their live stuff. He is amazed at a 20 minute tune up on a Dark Star.

But I suspect that this response is a built up accumulation of frustration on your part about your perception of flapjax's attitude in music threads. I have never seen flapjax claim to be the all knowing music source here on the Blue. Clearly he has a love for music as well as a darn deep knowledge of musicians. I too have friends who know more about the history of music than does flapjax. To me, flapjax's posts are simply him trying to share a diverse taste in music with fellow mefites. He certainly digs deep in doing research and finding obscure clips or remembering songs from long ago that I have long since forgotten. Maybe it is me, but I don't come to the Blue to get an encyclopedic knowledge of music, rather I come to learn a thing or two about an artist I have either never heard or have long since forgotten about. I come to be entertained too.

Finally, quite frankly, flapjax does not need me to defend him. Besides doing a darn good job of that himself above, the tape tells the tale. His threads are well participated in, favorited and diverse.

So rather than defend flapjax, I will defend being a Deadhead.

For the record too, I branch out a lot from the Dead, but I always come home. When I am driving 4 hours to see relatives, I will pop in a bootleg show and listen start to finish (even to drums-->space while I hope for an awesome simultaneous mellow and rowdy Wheel into GDTRFB-->NFA--> St. Stephen).

Putting aside the other Jam Bands I listen to, I love Johnny Cash, I have a deep collection of the Blues, was a big fan of southern rock growing up and love to listen to Jazz when I can. I am even known to put on the Frank Sinatra station once in a while. One of my favorite CDs of all time is Robert Randolph live at the Wetlands. I am also a big fan of the North Mississippi All-Stars as well as Tea Leaf Green and other current bands.

Being a Deadhead has spurned me to listen to a lot of different music. The Dead are the world's best cover band (my opinion, no need to rebut). Any band can try to sound like the original. The Dead always tries to interpret a song and adapt it to their own style and the taste of their fans.

I look forward to flapjax's future post about all the songs the Dead has covered from Chuck Berry to Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Neil Young, various traditional songs, blue grass and reggae (Peter Tosh, Bob Marley) too. I also think he will include other bands doing covers of Dead songs. Keller Williams doing songs is awesome. Susan Vega has covered the Dead as has Burning Spear.

Maybe he doesn't quite get the subtle differences in versions of Chinacat-Rider from 1972 and 1977, but not many do or care. To me, the beauty of listening to the Dead comes when my teenage son is in the car and listening to channel 23 with me when he says, "Jeez dad, Jerry sounds terrible, what year is this, 1985?" or some other such comment. I am also old enough and saw them so long ago that listening to the music is more than just the music to me. It is about the memories of the great times they facilitated for me and my friends. The music was great. The road trips to see them even greater. When I finally met Phil Lesh and then Bob Weir several years later the first thing I said to them was thanking them for the good times they created for me. I don't recall too much about 1979, but I can tell you all about the Nassau Coliseum shows I saw that year.



Broken heart don't feel so bad; you ain't got half of what you thought you had...

The kids they dance and shake their bones and the politicians throwing stones... or the official video.
posted by JohnnyGunn at 9:51 PM on May 9, 2011 [2 favorites]


Thanks so much for your kind and thoughtful comment JohnnyGunn. I really appreciate it. i hope that you won't mind that for me, you'll always be "the Deadhead upthread"!

I too was a big Dead fan in the mid to late 70s, as a teenager and a young man. Saw three of their show during those years, and listened to their records a lot. For me the Dead were one of the earliest inklings I had of the idea that musicians could just get up on stage and improvise, without prior ideas about what they would do, without structure. Didn't take me too long after that to discover free jazz (stuff from Coltrane, The Art Ensemble of Chicago, the New York loft scene people, etc.) and free improvisation as practiced by early European avant-gardists (Evan Parker, Derek Bailey, etc.), much of which I subsequently gravitated to in a stronger way than the Dead's explorations. But I'll always be indebted to the Dead for first opening up that conceptual curtain for me.

I also think they had a hella good run as songwriters, and I'm still very much into many of the tunes from albums like Workingman's Dead, Skull and Roses, American Beauty, Europe 72, up through Mars Hotel and Wake of the Flood. For me they kinda started going to seed in the songwriting department after that, and I have to admit I pretty much stopped paying attention altogether by the early/mid 80s. But I am far from a Dead-hater, and at their best they were, well, at their best! And that was good enough!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 2:12 AM on May 10, 2011


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