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Do the feet touch the ground?
September 16, 2011 1:39 PM   Subscribe

The Zoöpraxiscope was an invention by Eadweard Muybridge, an English landscape and travel photographer, and eccentric.
He was the man who made Pictures move and was commissioned to try and capture the movement of horses and later produced his famed studies on movement which are now being collected online;
Male nudes and Female nudes. (previous) NSFW.
posted by adamvasco (6 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite

 
We had this as a book when I worked at Borders. I wanted it to try to teach myself to draw, but if I remember correctly the book was not a cheap one.

The images are cool in their own right.

It's always disconcerting to me to see images of people that are long gone from this world looking so alive and vibrant.
posted by cjorgensen at 2:18 PM on September 16, 2011


Recommended reading: the brilliant Rebecca Solnit's River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.

Thanks for the post!
posted by trip and a half at 2:28 PM on September 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Stephen Herbert has The Compleat Muybridge site.
posted by Ideefixe at 2:36 PM on September 16, 2011


Horses in the air. Feet on the ground. Never seen, never seen this picture before. And this is artificial moonlight. An artificial sky.
posted by crunchland at 2:51 PM on September 16, 2011


You know, I always thought that the dieresis/umlaut was a bit much in English (the New Yorker uses it for words like coöperation, it indicates that the second o is a short, rather than the two together being long as in "zoom"), but I've never seen it on a word I didn't know before. I would have pronounced it incorrectly in my head otherwise.
posted by HotPants at 4:14 PM on September 16, 2011


Here's some more at Archive.org.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 6:48 PM on September 16, 2011


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