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An online course in (really) small engine repair
November 17, 2011 1:39 PM   Subscribe

A tiny V-12. This video shows the machining, assembly, and running of a very, very small 12-cylinder engine.
posted by FishBike (46 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite

 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo1yOfLM8N4 - this guy (is it the same guy) has the whole car :)
posted by zeoslap at 1:45 PM on November 17, 2011


Ooops - linked
posted by zeoslap at 1:48 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I didn't see an ignition system. How does the fuel ignite?
posted by Keith Talent at 1:49 PM on November 17, 2011


Amazing!

I keep thinking it would be neat to have a small metal lathe in my shop but whenever I go out to the Internet and ask the question "what would I do with a metal lathe" the answer is usually "You can build parts for your metal lathe!"

It sure looks like fun though.
posted by bondcliff at 1:49 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


tantos horas de trabajo!
posted by nathancaswell at 1:52 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I didn't see an ignition system. How does the fuel ignite?

How does any fuel ignite when there's no spark plug? Compression.
posted by Talez at 1:53 PM on November 17, 2011


It starts functioning at 8:15, if you are in a hurry.
posted by Renoroc at 1:56 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


What a soundtrack!
posted by jpdoane at 2:00 PM on November 17, 2011


Wonderful! Now do I want to see it in the world's smallest Spitfire, or the world's smallest E-Type?
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 2:01 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I didn't see an ignition system. How does the fuel ignite?
It could be a diesel.
posted by delmoi at 2:04 PM on November 17, 2011


I didn't see an ignition system. How does the fuel ignite?

I gather from running some of the recent Youtube comments through Google Translate that it runs on compressed air, so there's no fuel or ignition. Which is slightly less neat than I thought it was originally.
posted by FishBike at 2:04 PM on November 17, 2011


Is that the Iron Chef music?
posted by pompomtom at 2:05 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I gather from running some of the recent Youtube comments through Google Translate that it runs on compressed air, so there's no fuel or ignition. Which is slightly less neat than I thought it was originally.

Yeah, which really means it doesn't really "run" at all, but is rather "run by" a compressor. Still, I'm a sucker for the tiny machining.
posted by monju_bosatsu at 2:06 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Pffft. Only two valves per cylinder!
posted by Burhanistan at 2:08 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


No variable valve timing either.
posted by Capt Jingo at 2:12 PM on November 17, 2011


Yeah, I was wondering about how the valves were timed since it just look like they were screwed down but then realized it was more just a mock-up. Still very neat to look at, however.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:13 PM on November 17, 2011


For those of you disappointed at the lack of internal combustion:

http://www.zercustoms.com/news/Worlds-smallest-V12-engine-video.html
posted by CaseyB at 2:17 PM on November 17, 2011 [6 favorites]


Yeah, I was wondering about how the valves were timed

It has dual camshafts running pushrods. From what I could see, the rocker arms and valves all worked.
posted by Slap*Happy at 2:26 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Astonishing that he uses slotted-head screws.
posted by three blind mice at 2:27 PM on November 17, 2011 [8 favorites]


> has dual camshafts running pushrods. From what I could see, the rocker arms and valves all worked.

They were moving, but not "working" as an actual combustion engine would.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:27 PM on November 17, 2011


Astonishing that he uses slotted-head screws.

Not if he made the screws.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 2:28 PM on November 17, 2011


Also, from the sound of it, those valves need adjusting.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 2:29 PM on November 17, 2011


Yes, it is powered by compressed motor, and it is a naval engine.

His explanation is that it is designed to be exhibited in a museum. Looking at other videos and related stuff, it looks like Patelo builds this for naval engineering education.

The most surprising thing is the comments. Except for a single comment, every commenter is politely congratulating Patelo on his work, using the formal 'usted'.

The only treadshitting comment losely translates to "fuking master of shroomheads".
posted by Ayn Rand and God at 2:29 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


pffff....12 cylinders....I bring you eighteen
posted by Confess, Fletch at 2:31 PM on November 17, 2011


The first clue that it wasn't going to be a functional internal-combustion engine was when he made the connecting rods from brass. Later pictures of the cylinders look like they're brass, too. I didn't see any piston rings, either, so it wasn't going to get very hot.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 2:32 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I read that as "A Tiny V-1" and thought this would be an awesome rocketry video. Poo.
posted by Abehammerb Lincoln at 2:32 PM on November 17, 2011


I read that as "A Tiny V-1"...

I thought V-2, myself, in a size perfect for office use: I aim for the stars but hit the next cubicle.
posted by y2karl at 2:42 PM on November 17, 2011 [7 favorites]


For those of you disappointed at the lack of internal combustion:

http://www.zercustoms.com/news/Worlds-smallest-V12-engine-video.html
posted by CaseyB at 5:17 PM on November 17 [+] [!]

Is it weird that, even though he did nothing with that motor other then rev the engine, every time he hit the throttle and revved it up I cheered a little bit on the inside?
posted by midmarch snowman at 2:54 PM on November 17, 2011 [3 favorites]


Thisis one of those MeFi posts that makes me feel like a slacker and an idiot.
posted by sfts2 at 3:46 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Not if he made the screws.

A fair point, but he uses what appear to be #2 hex heads on the rocker arms which would have made more sense for mounting those cylinder heads.
posted by three blind mice at 3:57 PM on November 17, 2011


If you like this sort of thing, check out the guy who made is own completely operational scale model of a Ferrari, with a working flat-12. It even sounds like a Ferrari.
posted by Wild_Eep at 4:02 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


but whenever I go out to the Internet and ask the question "what would I do with a metal lathe" the answer is usually "You can build parts for your metal lathe!"

For a few iterations, sure. Like, OK, sitting right here on my desk is an R-8/JT#6 arbor. There's noting impressive about it and since I aimed low, it's probably just mild steel, but I could buy it for like $15, so what the hell. But then you get into things like a collet chuck and all the sudden you're looking at $200 for the el-cheapo model, plus a backplate and the work involved in getting the backplate and the chuck to meet up with one another such that the chuck is almost perfectly centered and pretty soon you're thinking, "Yowza! That's real money for what is essentially a toy! Hell, it wouldn't be that much harder to just make my own from scratch."

And if you're really motivated you recreate the entire industrial revolution in your back yard.

The best summary of this I've ever heard came from a comment in a blog: "The skills we acquire fixing stuff that we don’t care about serve us well when we have to fix something that actually matters."
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 4:26 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


My old man, ex merchant navy fitter makes live steam model railway engines - I am constantly amazed at the precision and beauty that he's able to conjure out of metal and skill. He's almost eighty and still builds the most exquisite, satisfying machines. These skills aren't taught any more - it's a pity.

I will send his this link. thanks for posting
posted by the noob at 4:42 PM on November 17, 2011


Very disappointed that this is not gas powered.
posted by goethean at 4:45 PM on November 17, 2011


Mr. Noob- might you be able to share some pics of his work?
posted by drhydro at 4:46 PM on November 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


Now he needs to install it in a tiny XJS and let the whole thing catch on fire like most of the real ones did (like mine).
posted by punkfloyd at 5:14 PM on November 17, 2011


A-ha-ha-ha. You might think my threats are empty, my dear world leaders! But I assure you, I am in possession of a weapon deadly beyond your wildest dreams. Behold, gentlemen: my Miniaturizing Nerd! And if you think I not willing to make good on my threats to reduce your countries to adorably-sized, fully-functional scale replicas, then you will learn not to doubt my hobbycraft! Sweeden will be first! READY THE MINIATURIZING NERD!
posted by bicyclefish at 5:34 PM on November 17, 2011


I can watch machining videos for hours. In fact, I have. I'm saving up for a good lathe and I'm just about ready to take the plunge.

If you really like wordless craftsmanship, check out "myfordboy". If you like a little less machining and a lot more talking, try mrpete222, aka tubalcain.
posted by DU at 5:45 PM on November 17, 2011


This is really very beautiful, but here is the engine for your tiny Spitfire.
posted by gamera at 5:51 PM on November 17, 2011


There's plenty you can make on a lathe other than parts/tools for the lathe. It's just that that's what all lathe owners have in common. Some of them make tiny models, some of them make toys, some of them make car parts, some of them make pens, etc, etc. But they ALL have a lathe. So articles and discussions about what to make inevitably gravitate towards this commonality.
posted by DU at 6:11 PM on November 17, 2011


Holy shit...
posted by c13 at 6:41 PM on November 17, 2011


That tiny crankshaft is awe-inspiring.
posted by mr_crash_davis at 7:24 PM on November 17, 2011


OMG! The rocker arm assemblies!

*swoon*
posted by mr_crash_davis at 7:29 PM on November 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


Fabuloso. This kind of reminds me of Yung C. Park, who makes very small aluminum airplane replicas.
posted by sneebler at 7:59 PM on November 17, 2011


Very cool. It reminds me of Claude Paillard hand making vacuum tubes (pt 1, pt 2).
posted by jwells at 4:26 AM on November 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


If you like this sort of thing, check out the guy who made is own completely operational scale model of a Ferrari, with a working flat-12 yt . It even sounds like a Ferrari.

Phphpht, Wild_Eep. I had a friend in college who built a Fiat Spider from parts off old Fiat Spiders. And had it working!

Almost.

True Fact: even in the original engineering drawings, the Spider is pictured resting on concrete blocks.
posted by IAmBroom at 12:47 PM on November 18, 2011


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