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"Something here isn't right."
November 29, 2011 3:46 PM   Subscribe

Page 23. [SYLT] Apparently, life isn't as perfect as you would assume for the immaculate models living inside the IKEA catalog. With this amusing short, Jeroen Houben, Tim Arts and Stefan van den Boogaard show us the real-life drama that goes on beyond what we can see from the outside. The four minute short won the juryprize and audience award at the 48 Hour Film Project in Utrecht (Netherlands). [Via: Adverblog]
posted by Fizz (20 comments total) 29 users marked this as a favorite

 
This reminds me of goddamn Ikea Heights.
posted by The White Hat at 3:59 PM on November 29, 2011 [5 favorites]


That was pretty awesome.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 4:09 PM on November 29, 2011


Very good.
posted by Awakened at 4:29 PM on November 29, 2011


Superb. Slick and creepy. (Talented bunch.)
posted by Jody Tresidder at 4:49 PM on November 29, 2011


This is the way SLYT's should be. Thanks for sharing!
posted by nat at 4:51 PM on November 29, 2011


Well that was delightfully creepy.
posted by stoneweaver at 6:07 PM on November 29, 2011


For anyone who might have wondered, What if The Truman Show had been only four minutes long and Christof had won?
posted by Mike D at 6:21 PM on November 29, 2011 [2 favorites]


That was good, but I don't get it. Why is she signing up if there's no compensation? And if she's been forced into it, as her fearful face implies, why would he have to remind her there's no compensation.
posted by DU at 6:27 PM on November 29, 2011 [1 favorite]


Superb.
posted by infini at 6:35 PM on November 29, 2011


I'm with DU, that made no sense. As if it was the middle four minutes of a much longer film. Actually, maybe if it isn't, it should be. Like Cashback which started off as a short, and then grew into a feature film, with the original film included more or less unchanged.
posted by adamt at 7:17 PM on November 29, 2011


Why is she signing up if there's no compensation? And if she's been forced into it, as her fearful face implies, why would he have to remind her there's no compensation.

Because people are seduced into thinking this is something they want, while at the same time anxious that they might not actually want it? ( a guess).
posted by sweetkid at 8:58 PM on November 29, 2011


Why is she signing up if there's no compensation?

I imagine that it's something like working for HuffingtonPost..
posted by fredludd at 9:04 PM on November 29, 2011 [7 favorites]


If you want to see an enigmatic furniture catalog that hints at mysterious goings-on, check out Blue Dot.

Here's a representative catalog page; was this man playing the accordion a minute before? If so, what event has led him to be locked outside his house?

A blog entry at the Walker Art Center on the production and aesthetic of the catalog.
posted by Hither at 9:59 PM on November 29, 2011 [3 favorites]


I urge the followers of the link to set aside some time to actively listen to it and do nothing else. It's for your own good, kids.
posted by toastchee at 6:17 AM on November 30, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oopsie that was for the Coltrane discussion. heh
posted by toastchee at 6:18 AM on November 30, 2011


Why is she signing up if there's no compensation?

Because she gets to live at IKEA! She gets to be perfect, like the people in the catalogue, for a whole year!
posted by Casuistry at 6:21 AM on November 30, 2011


Why is she signing up if there's no compensation?

Exposure. Free room and board. It looks glamorous.
posted by jocelmeow at 12:38 PM on November 30, 2011


I'm with DU, that made no sense. As if it was the middle four minutes of a much longer film.

I think by the time I was in middle school I had a somewhat firm handle on what the short form narrative entails. The lack of context is kind of the point. Think of Mad Libs, but better. Maybe try to add your own and see where that gets you? I'll get you started: Plato's allegory of the cave, and sweetkid's idea about seductive consumerism.
posted by P.o.B. at 2:22 PM on November 30, 2011


That was great, thanks for posting it. The facial wrinkles on the main guy's face are amazingly perfect, and I love the streeeetch sound effect.
posted by LobsterMitten at 3:29 PM on November 30, 2011


That was indeed awesome, all the much cooler for me that it came of of Utrecht which was my very first IKEA experience (you never forget your first time). Minor nitpick, she didn't call him an "asshole" but rather a "ball(sac)."

See also Mrs. Primate's favoriate: the adventures of Gary and Elaine in Catalog Living.
posted by digitalprimate at 5:56 AM on December 1, 2011


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