chicken and rice recipe
December 5, 2011 9:12 PM   Subscribe

Now you can make the famous NYC halal style Chicken and Rice at home.
posted by AceRock (93 comments total) 136 users marked this as a favorite

 
That looks damn good.

If I hadn't just made some bao zi I would be all over this.
posted by Malice at 9:25 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


needs more Manhattan chicken and rice links.
here's the street meat cart stream (lots of chicken and rice news ) from an awesome authentic Midtown Manhattan lunch blog:
http://midtownlunch.com/category/food-type/street-meat/

here is their 2008 lamb and rice vs chicken and rice showdown.

ah, memories of the Big Apple.
posted by Bwithh at 9:25 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


*drool*

For the full effect, I just need a few of those flimsy white styrofoam contains, cans of coke in a sink full of ice, and each family member in line outside the kitchen with $5 in hand. Also, they're only allowed to eat out on the front stoop.
posted by gwint at 9:28 PM on December 5, 2011 [3 favorites]


I thought I was hardcore, but the white sauce at the 53rd and 6th cart turns my stomach.
posted by mullacc at 9:29 PM on December 5, 2011


This will not end well. Some things are sacred.
posted by dixiecupdrinking at 9:30 PM on December 5, 2011


Those yelp reviews are nuts, waiting 20-45 minutes for chicken and rice? Now Kati rolls, that's a different story.
posted by nathancaswell at 9:33 PM on December 5, 2011


Once I was stuck in NYC by myself in the middle of the day and I only had a 30min break between meetings so I went down the street trying to find a hot dog or something quick and decided to try a halal cart based on the awesome smells. It was the best meal of the entire trip and I try to stop at one for lunch each time I'm in NYC.

This is great, I've always wondered what was in the white sauce, seems deceptively simple from the recipe.
posted by mathowie at 9:33 PM on December 5, 2011


Eek! Excited! (Lamb is better though...)
posted by the young rope-rider at 9:34 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


I could go for some of that right now. Recipe filed for reference, thanks.
posted by arcticseal at 9:34 PM on December 5, 2011


(This guy is my favorite, I really hope he's weathered the OWS stuff.)
posted by dixiecupdrinking at 9:35 PM on December 5, 2011


This is great, I've always wondered what was in the white sauce

I'd pretty much guessed the rest of it, but missed the mayonnaise. Seems obvious in hindsight, but I was blindsided by the ethnicity thing, and was wondering if it was labni - it needed something to totally fatty up the yoghurt.
posted by UbuRoivas at 9:47 PM on December 5, 2011


Fuck, now I want both chicken and rice and Kati rolls. And lunch is like 13 hours away.
posted by nathancaswell at 9:50 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


I have never, ever had this, but now I want it. WANT. I have chicken thighs in the freezer and a big bag of Basmati, so I know what supper is going to be tomorrow.

(Curious Artificer, it would probably be OK with chicken breast, but thighs are richer and more strongly flavoured. I've learned not to substitute breast meat in recipes like this.)
posted by maudlin at 9:51 PM on December 5, 2011


I'm not sure what makes this recipe particularly important, but I'd make and eat the heck out of it. I bet if I wrapped it up in a pita it would basically be a gyro.
posted by Apocryphon at 10:06 PM on December 5, 2011


I'm a vegetarian, but once in a moment of hungry desperation I tried a halal cart's alleged biryani rice with great skepticism...and it was way, way better than I expected.
posted by threeants at 10:23 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


Ah, overlooked this when I first posted the link to the Midtown Manhattan lunch blog above, but here is their post exploring the phenomenon of 53rd & 6th halal chicken and rice street carts
http://midtownlunch.com/2007/11/15/debunking-the-myths-of-the-most-famous-chicken-rice-intersection-in-new-york-city/
posted by Bwithh at 10:24 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oh yes. I think I have everything to make that but the chicken and the mayo, which can be obtained easily enough.

I am gonna make it and I am gonna eat it. Om nom.
posted by louche mustachio at 10:25 PM on December 5, 2011


Halal cart-style, that is. There's no such thing as "halal style" dishes, really.

/pedant
posted by Burhanistan at 10:37 PM on December 5, 2011


I thought I was hardcore, but the white sauce at the 53rd and 6th cart turns my stomach.

Same. I've tried street meat a few times and it always kicks my ass. Last time I got 60% dark meat and 40% gristle. Street carts are good for coffee and the occasional pastry and that's it for me.
posted by 2bucksplus at 10:42 PM on December 5, 2011 [2 favorites]


Not the same at home. You need a can of crab juice to wash it down.

Also somebody to say "where you been boss, you been vacation?" even though you are there every day.
posted by Ad hominem at 11:03 PM on December 5, 2011 [15 favorites]


I'm 100% certain that not all the halal carts use yogurt in their white sauce. In fact, I'm pretty sure the majority of them just use mayo. Separates the gross from the great, I think.
posted by danny the boy at 11:16 PM on December 5, 2011 [1 favorite]


Are New Yorkers so delicate that they can't handle garlic sauce? What's this "white sauce" crap? And where's the tahini?

I'm so spoiled for amazing Lebanese in Calgary. And Ottawa is twice as good.
posted by ethnomethodologist at 11:20 PM on December 5, 2011 [5 favorites]


And Ottawa is twice as good.

Maroush! Maroush! The best Middle Eastern fare!
posted by Hoopo at 11:37 PM on December 5, 2011 [3 favorites]


Here's what it looks like at Astoria's favorite, 34th and Steinway.
posted by muckster at 12:03 AM on December 6, 2011


What's this "white sauce" crap?

Thats exactly what I was thinking. what the hell is "White Sauce". And Mayonnaise mixed with yoghurt - thats just disgusting.

garlic sauce or Tzatziki / cacik sounds better.

actually I expect that the kart recipe is really just using greek-style yoghurt which is about 20% fat, mixed with a bit of garlic and or cucumber. Mayonnaise has no place in that dish.
posted by mary8nne at 12:16 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


garlic sauce or Tzatziki / cacik sounds better.

Yeah I'll second / third all this. A roux is a "white sauce". This food is supposed to have garlic sauce, not this weird bogus mayonnaise-based thing. Is such a blasphemy common in Middle Eastern / Mediterranean food in the States?
posted by Jimbob at 12:32 AM on December 6, 2011


That white sauce recipe is pretty much blue cheese dressing without the blue cheese.

That is just what cart guys call it, they say "white sauce or hot sauce"

Take it up with the cart guys if you don't think it is authentic enough.
posted by Ad hominem at 12:34 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


Just to be clear, there are hundreds or thousands of these carts. There is one operating 24/7 across the street from my apartment. There are so many the daily show did a satirical piece.

I can run downstairs and ask the guy what is in the sauce, there is not much if any garlic or cucumber in it.

Anyway it isn't middle eastern food, it is New York food. Kind of like how Carmine's isn't Italian food but New York food.
posted by Ad hominem at 12:56 AM on December 6, 2011 [3 favorites]


Anyway it isn't middle eastern food, it is New York food.

This is an interesting philosophical point. Let us consider it further, seeing as comments on this points are, let's face it, going to be 99% "Yum!". The post is framed as "recreate authentic New York halal-cart food!". I read the recipe, and thought "Oh man, this is a really tasty sounding Middle Eastern snack."

I've never been to New York, never seen one of these carts of which you speak, so I can't judge how "authentic" it is in that context. Eaten plenty of Lebanese-Australian, Persian-Australian, Turkish-Australian food, though, and this recipe is definitely coming from the same place.

Except for that sauce... but then again, I guess it's that sauce that makes it New York.

Anyway let us make peace, and start gathering ingredients.
posted by Jimbob at 1:06 AM on December 6, 2011 [5 favorites]


I guess it's that sauce that makes it New York.

Yeah, that's why the mayonnaise was so unexpected, yet so obvious now. Where you'd expect tahini, substitute mayo. For chilli, substitute sriracha. For echidna eggs, substitute HFCS. To wash it down, theres PBR instead of Fourex Gold.
posted by UbuRoivas at 1:12 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


See this is where cultural imperialism just goes too fucking far. There's no substitute for echidna eggs.
posted by Jimbob at 1:17 AM on December 6, 2011 [3 favorites]


That's why there are no bush tucker carts in NYC. Also, no source of witchetty grubs.
posted by UbuRoivas at 1:31 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


It seems about right. Here is the thing, there are thousands of carts selling chicken and rice. They all operate out of garages that are chock full of other carts. There are probably examples of a family that owns one cart but there are probably also examples of guys who have been in the business for years and owns 20 sells the same stuff from all of them.

I have no doubt that the vast majority of the food is pre-prepared in huge batches from the cheapest ingredients available. Chicken and rice costs $5 with a free can of soda for gods sake. If the guys can mix up a sauce out of 10 gallon jars of mayo they get a a food wholesaler they are going to go for it. Especially since everyone knows white people like mayo.

Now I'm not saying it actually has mayo in it, but it does not seem outlandish to me in the least.
posted by Ad hominem at 1:33 AM on December 6, 2011


New York food tip: the reason they hand you a straw with your soda in New York and almost no other place in America is that the rat turds get lodged in the groove at the top of the soda can.
posted by wcfields at 1:48 AM on December 6, 2011 [3 favorites]


Went and got some, guy said "white sauce?" I asked him what was in it he gave me a look like what the hell do you what from me then said "yogurt, milk and some sort of vegetable like lentils" so inconclusive at best.
posted by Ad hominem at 1:54 AM on December 6, 2011


That's why there are no bush tucker carts in NYC. Also, no source of witchetty grubs.

No, but maybe soon there will be Don Bugito.
posted by XMLicious at 2:29 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


I never understand the cultural imperialism argument; you realize that this dish hasn't been made for all time the same way, right? At some point in the past someone's grandmother probably said to the first person who put garlic sauce on it:

You're making this with garlic sauce? That's not how you do it, you have to serve it with *insert complicated and perhaps extinct sauce or spice combo*

Recipes evolve, people invade and they get melded with another culture and that's no reason to stick your nose up at how declasse it is, especially if you haven't had NYC street white sauce. Shit's good.
posted by Rodrigo Lamaitre at 4:10 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


Yeah so maybe it has mayo in it - maybe not.. The pics i"ve seen on the net of it actually don't look that good anyway. Cheap crappy chicken some rice and covered in 'white sauce'.

I usually prefer Hainan Chicken and Rice myself... mmm
posted by mary8nne at 4:12 AM on December 6, 2011


If Japan has taught me anything, it is that for any X there is nothing wrong with putting mayonnaise on X.
posted by mek at 4:19 AM on December 6, 2011 [4 favorites]


You need kosher salt to make halal chicken.
posted by Obscure Reference at 4:32 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


Sigh, wish that my city allowed more food trucks and carts. Well, and that we had immigrants to run them.
posted by octothorpe at 4:37 AM on December 6, 2011


For echidna eggs, substitute HFCS. To wash it down, theres PBR instead of Fourex Gold.

DIE HIPSTER SCUM.

Echinda's eggs have a leathery texture and make a great streetfood sna...oohh my face. god my face!
posted by lalochezia at 5:07 AM on December 6, 2011



New York food tip: the reason they hand you a straw with your soda in New York and almost no other place in America is that the rat turds get lodged in the groove at the top of the soda can.

Hardly. Have you seen rat turds? They're big. At least NYC rat turds are. There is no way they could get lodged in that tiny little crevice. Mouse turds, maybe.

The tops of soda cans the world over are a convenient resting place for all kinds of gross stuff, even just regular street dust. The idea that someone would willingly put that to their mouth without a wash first squicks me out no end. It's the equivalant of making out with the sidewalk.
posted by newpotato at 5:07 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


Guess what we're having for dinner. Yum. Thanks!
posted by kinnakeet at 5:08 AM on December 6, 2011


I make my own halalesque cart chicken all the time, but I use cumin as the main spice.
posted by DMelanogaster at 5:19 AM on December 6, 2011


the reason for the mayo is because Garlic sauce is a much less stable emulsion.
posted by JPD at 5:26 AM on December 6, 2011


Sigh, wish that my city allowed more food trucks and carts. Well, and that we had immigrants to run them.

D.C. recently opened up the number of licenses for food trucks, meaning that we've endured a deluge of new food trucks. The bizarre thing, though, is that a ton of them are staffed by these fully English fluent white people, which is fine, but is a totally different experience.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 5:40 AM on December 6, 2011


Well, one big reason that there's no Lebanese garlic sauce is that the people running the carts aren't Lebanese. They're usually Pakistani or Bangladeshi. This is, as people have pointed out, a purely New York food, the creation of street-level capitalism: lots of imitation and occasional pockets of invention. You want garlic sauce? Go to a Lebanese place -- we've got them here.

I'm disappointed the Serious Eats doesn't include a hot sauce recipe -- that's where the innovation usually happens. My favorite one comes from a cart run by a family of Pakistanis from Trinidad, usually parked around 6th Ave. and 43rd St. It's tamarind-based, spicy as hell, and amazing.
posted by neroli at 6:02 AM on December 6, 2011 [4 favorites]


My favorite one comes from a cart run by a family of Pakistanis from Trinidad, usually parked around 6th Ave. and 43rd St. It's tamarind-based, spicy as hell, and amazing.

Well I've got my lunch figured out.
posted by modernserf at 6:11 AM on December 6, 2011


I'm not much for the food those carts serve, it's like a salt spike driven into my heart, but I'll patronize any business that routinely calls me "boss" and sometimes even "professor." Flattery will get you everywhere, Mr. Halal Cart Man, sir.
posted by Ice Cream Socialist at 6:25 AM on December 6, 2011


They all operate out of garages that are chock full of other carts. There are probably examples of a family that owns one cart but there are probably also examples of guys who have been in the business for years and owns 20 sells the same stuff from all of them.

No, not always. Here's another way it works: The cart has a food vendors license, and then it parks itself somewhere and does 24 hour business, so that it never has to move. They make peace with the neighbors, and once they're in for 3 or 4 years the spot is locked down.

They start maybe with this recipe, it is popular, and they do large gross numbers on a slim margin. Then they sell the license, location, and cart, based on those numbers for well over $200,000. The new operator rides on their clientele, but switches to powdered garlic, etc.

It would be interesting to see a series of recipes depicting the progressive money grab that occurs in such cases.

dixiecupdrinking is right about Zak's down near Zuccotti, they have not degraded, and remain excellent. The one at Chambers and West Broadway was two years of bliss, before the change of owners and recipes.

And with the white sauce, I ask for it to be put on the bottom of the container, that way I can more easily control how much mayo I want to eat as I go along.
posted by StickyCarpet at 6:30 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


What the fuck? I went to bed and all the Aussies got home from work and started talking smack about white sauce? Get outta here!!
posted by dixiecupdrinking at 6:35 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


mek: If Japan has taught me anything, it is that for any X there is nothing wrong with putting mayonnaise on X.

Truth.

And if Puerto Rico has taught me anything, it is that for any fried X there is something horribly wrong with putting mayo-ketchup on X, but do it anyway, because that is tasty.
posted by yeolcoatl at 6:58 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


> The idea that someone would willingly put that to their mouth without a wash first squicks me out no end.

This times infinity. Unless you're getting that beverage can directly from a factory wrapped case then it goes under the faucet (maybe even a touch of soap) before it touches the lips.

What's also horrible is when counter clerks at convenience stores put their dirty money handling fingertips DIRECTLY ON the part of the can that you're supposed to drink from. There should be a national campaign about this menace.
posted by Burhanistan at 6:59 AM on December 6, 2011


You germaphobes make me want to go around licking door knobs just to freak you out.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 7:01 AM on December 6, 2011 [22 favorites]


I'll have to ask the guy who I get my lunch from at least once a week (freshly sliced lamb FTW!) if mayonnaise is the main ingredient in his white sauce. From a respectable distance of course.
posted by JaredSeth at 7:04 AM on December 6, 2011


Now I'm craving chicken & rice with that delicious white sauce, eeeeeeeee.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero at 7:35 AM on December 6, 2011


I sincerely doubt that the rice at the Halal carts uses broth or butter. More like canola oil and commercial bouillon. But I'm thrilled to make something like it at home. I have fond memories of eating at these carts back when I got my first job at 44th and 6th. In such a ritzy area, these carts are often the only good places a broke person can eat. And they really aren't very cheap for street food.
posted by melissam at 7:40 AM on December 6, 2011


The pics i"ve seen on the net of it actually don't look that good anyway. Cheap crappy chicken some rice and covered in 'white sauce'.

Obviously you've never been to the corner of 53rd and 6th after 8 p.m. Had it last night. Leftovers waiting for me now in the fridge. So very excited. Lunch might get bumped forward a half-hour or so ...

The stuff you get elsewhere in the city I can generally take or leave, although I do end up eating generic chicken-and-rice on occasion since a middling-but-tasty five-dollar lunch in, say, the Financial District is nothing to sneeze at.
posted by Joey Bagels at 7:44 AM on December 6, 2011


I have never had any of this particular street fare. I have smelled it. I have drooled over it. I have glanced at it hungrily at that very intersection. But I also fear it. Of course if it caused gastric distress, it wouldn't be popular, right? Right?

Yeah... I'm gonna have to try it.
posted by Splunge at 7:51 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


My favorite one comes from a cart run by a family of Pakistanis from Trinidad, usually parked around 6th Ave. and 43rd St. It's tamarind-based, spicy as hell, and amazing.

I'm gonna need to know exactly which cart this is in order to have a proper lunch today.
posted by good day merlock at 7:54 AM on December 6, 2011


Here's what it looks like at Astoria's favorite, 34th and Steinway.

If you're going to talk about halal carts in Astoria, it's blasphemy not to mention King of Falafel. They won last year's Vendy award. By far the best chicken platter I've ever had, and the best falafel balls. They've also kindly posted their falafel recipe, which I've yet to try.
posted by jessssse at 7:58 AM on December 6, 2011


I'm gonna need to know exactly which cart this is in order to have a proper lunch today.

They've historically been on 43rd, just east of 6th Ave. -- they were on the south side of the street for a while, then moved to the north side. But they weren't around the last time I looked, about a month ago. Hope they've returned. Here's the ongoing commentary from Midtown Lunch.
posted by neroli at 8:15 AM on December 6, 2011


I started reading this and was hungry and then I started reading about the soda can tops and started getting queasy. Always rinse and wipe the top!
posted by spec80 at 8:29 AM on December 6, 2011


You germaphobes make me want to go around licking door knobs just to freak you out.

Count bills ... Lick finger ... Count bills ... lick finger ... repeat ...
posted by jgaiser at 8:29 AM on December 6, 2011


Oh man. I used to go to one around 23th-25th and 6th. Now I'm in Los Angeles, where there's a delicious taco truck outside my office every day, but... I'd honestly trade it for a Halalmobile. My guy used to make a criss-crossed latticework of white and hot sauces across the top, and I'd almost break down in tears at its sheer beauty. Can't believe there are haters.
posted by jake at 8:35 AM on December 6, 2011


A roux is a "white sauce"

No, it's a thickening agent made out of flour heated in oil or fat. You can use it as part of a sauce, but it would actually pretty nasty as the sauce tiself. Also it's not necessarily white either; a lot of cooking calls for roux as brown as chocolate, which is simply heated longer and is a major pain in the ass to not burn.
posted by Hoopo at 9:16 AM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


Kwik-Meal Cart at 45th and 6th Avenue. Mohammed's got the best tzatziki bar none. It's like he's playing a different sport than the rest of these yokels. The rest leave my stomach hurting.
posted by benbenson at 9:26 AM on December 6, 2011


53rd and 6th? Those guys are amateurs. The best cart in the city, and one that I've been frequenting for almost a decade, is on 5th Ave and 30th Street, SE corner, after 6PM.

This recipe looks authentic enough, but really, where's the hot sauce?
posted by monospace at 10:12 AM on December 6, 2011 [2 favorites]


Seriously. As a person who retches violently at the merest mention of mayo, I'm well inured to requesting that mysterious white sauces be left off my food, but I always ask the cart guy to make up for it with extra hot sauce. Oh, and I'm a lamb partisan as well.

I always skip the wilted little side salad because while I'll happily shove street meat in my face, honestly, there are limits.
posted by superfluousm at 10:56 AM on December 6, 2011


5th Ave and 30th Street

I ate at the one near the MOMA, probably because the internet told me to. 53rd & 5th, I think. Really long queue; took something like half an hour. Or is that just for tourists?
posted by UbuRoivas at 11:06 AM on December 6, 2011


You germaphobes make me want to go around licking door knobs just to freak you out.

Here in my office, where a single standard-sized bar of soap in the men's room can last up to 6 months, you would be licking a lot of secondhand junk sweat. Have at it!
posted by elizardbits at 12:02 PM on December 6, 2011


I'm no germophobe, but shared bars of soap are where I draw the line - soap is only a detergent, allowing oils to be washed away. It has no antiseptic properties whatsoever.
posted by UbuRoivas at 12:06 PM on December 6, 2011


Okay I am making this right now (just poured the marinade over the chicken).

Huge mea cupla; I'm going with the official mayonnaise-based sauce, because to be honest, I'm hopeless at making garlic sauce.

New York here I come!
posted by Jimbob at 2:42 PM on December 6, 2011


I made pita the other day I know what I'm making for supper. I'm just debating whether to use Kewpie, dutch mayo, or it I should make some from scratch to add to the white sauce. Next time I'll try it with garlic sauce and tahini.

And there's a hole in the wall on Robson Street in Vancouver that makes this dish. I know where I'm going to stop for lunch next week ...
posted by squeak at 3:33 PM on December 6, 2011


Awesome. I'm going to hit up the cart again tonight.

Another thing I used to get from him is hotdogs cut in half lengthways and blackened on the grill, served with grilled onions and yellow mustard. Don't even know where the guy came up with that one.
posted by Ad hominem at 3:34 PM on December 6, 2011


hotdogs cut in half lengthways and blackened on the grill, served with grilled onions and yellow mustard.

Yellow mustard on sausage and peppers (and onion) is a baseball game vendor staple, at least at Fenway. Probably a bastardized version of that.
posted by nathancaswell at 3:40 PM on December 6, 2011


I'm horrified/extremely proud at how many of the carts mentioned in this thread I've had food from.
posted by Amanojaku at 3:42 PM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


My food-cart guy (11th and 1st) used to be awesome. Super-friendly, generous, always made things fresh, and if you caught him at the right time, he'd throw in a couple falafel balls for free.

The guy who replaced him, on the other hand doesn't make anything as "fresh" as the old guy, and is stingy with all the ingredients, so none of it tastes as good. He's also really lazy, so he gets visibly annoyed when you ask for things like jalapenos or extra sauce. :(
posted by !Jim at 4:29 PM on December 6, 2011


Is it impolite to burp?
posted by squeak at 7:38 PM on December 6, 2011


I made this tonight. It was delicious.
posted by thivaia at 9:02 PM on December 6, 2011 [1 favorite]


Jimbob, tell us how the recipe turns out. I considered it for dinner but thought I might wait and see if it traveled well to Aussie ingredients.
posted by bystander at 10:02 PM on December 6, 2011


Any OWS news immediately brought to my mind the chicken and rice cart at Wall St and William.

Also, Chicken and Meat.
posted by eddydamascene at 10:52 PM on December 6, 2011


Can anyone tell me whether this recipe would replicate the spices Symeon's uses for their chicken?

My old neighbors at my old house gave me a sack of that stuff to put on chicken, and the day I used up the last of it I stood by my grill with tears welling up.
posted by wenestvedt at 10:52 AM on December 7, 2011


I have no idea what Symeon's uses, but I know a commonly uncommon ingredient in mysteriously delicious chicken spice blends is sumac.
posted by mek at 3:21 PM on December 7, 2011


Dear god. I made this tonight; it was incredible. Everyone went in for multiple serves. Thought I'd made more than enough for leftovers for lunch tomorrow; I thought wrong.
posted by MarchHare at 12:35 AM on December 8, 2011


Finally got around to making this for supper tonight. Pretty good! And easy peasy. All the discussion here of the mutant awesome melting pot of food cart foods made me miss NYC; haven't managed to visit in a long time, sadly, and this particular white sauce thing I'm not familiar with. When I made it to the letter in the spirit of "this isn't an Old World thing, it's a mutant NYC thing" I was a little taken aback at first, as yeah, it's pretty damn gross (at first when I was tasting to adjust seasoning the sugar hadn't dissolved, gross, and yeah, wow mayo) in that weirdly delicious way that's kinda unnerving. I think I will definitely try it with an Old World-y approach next time to compare, with some or all of the suggestions being flung about (sumac is my favorite chicken marinade spice so that's likely, plus maybe cinnamon or ras el hanout, and yeah, a garlicky tziki-ish sauce maybe, and I didn't have harissa for once on hand tonight so I subbed sambal oelek, yum). But this is good in yeah, a wonderfully evocative-of-street-food way for sure. It even has a vaguely chemical flavor, the sauce...that sounds gross but I have some affection. Will probably make again, either way.
posted by ifjuly at 4:06 PM on December 13, 2011


I made this tonight (in Australia), but chickened out on the white sauce, and instead used aioli with added parsley.

Very tasty, and was amazed by how good the rice turned out (probably the best rice I've ever made) despite being simple to prepare.

I wasn't able to find a Harissa-style hot sauce, so went with siracha.

All in all, very tasty!
posted by spongeboy at 3:05 AM on December 14, 2011


chickened out on the white sauce

heh.
posted by UbuRoivas at 3:57 AM on December 14, 2011


Made it almost exactly to the recipe, only I don't have any oregano growing right now & couldn't be arsed buying any, so that's the only thing I missed.

For non-USians: I'd recommend skipping the sugar, which is completely unnecessary. Ms Ubu also questions the presence and/or quantity of mayo, and I'd tend to agree.

Even with the sugar & mayo, I'd rate it a good 4.5 out of 5, definitely a "would make / eat again" recipe.
posted by UbuRoivas at 2:02 AM on December 15, 2011 [1 favorite]


I also made this last night and had the leftovers for lunch. I think the rice would be nicer with some more spices, maybe cinnamon and cardamom.

I used white wine vinegar in the white sauce instead of white vinegar (is that like malt vinegar? or that non-brewed condiment gunk?) and found it a bit much, like 2 teaspoons instead of tablespoons would be better. And I also agree about the mayo.

Was yummy.
posted by jiroczech at 8:16 AM on December 15, 2011


I just made this, using the exact recipe. Pretty fucking brilliant :d
posted by danny the boy at 9:21 PM on December 22, 2011 [1 favorite]


I used white wine vinegar in the white sauce instead of white vinegar (is that like malt vinegar? or that non-brewed condiment gunk?) and found it a bit much, like 2 teaspoons instead of tablespoons would be better.

White vinegar is just 5% acetic acid in water, no more, no less. Wine vinegar or cider vinegar can be 6-7% so yes, less is appropriate when substituting. But there's a lot of flexibility in this recipe, I added lemon juice on top of vinegar and it tasted great to me.
posted by mek at 3:08 AM on December 23, 2011


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