Layaway In A Manger
December 16, 2011 1:16 PM   Subscribe

From Michigan to Nebraska, from Washington State to North Carolina, anonymous donors have been paying off "layaway" tabs for holiday-shopping families.
posted by Potomac Avenue (82 comments total) 7 users marked this as a favorite

 
This sounds as dubiously unlikely as the inevitable spontaneous "Starbucks paying it forward" lineup story we'll see on Monday, or maybe Tuesday if any real news happens on Monday.
posted by Keith Talent at 1:20 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


Is "lawaway" in quotes intentional for some reason or just a typo?
posted by pracowity at 1:21 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


This is a wonderful kindness - and something I'll look into doing myself - but I wish that we as a nation didn't lean so heavily on private charity/generous people to compensate for inequality, layoffs, poverty, injustice - there simply aren't enough generous people. And although I understand why folks prioritize kids - and I'd totally prioritize someone with kids over someone like me who is healthy, youngish, college-educated and childless - I wish that people didn't feel that they can only justify charity by pointing to children in need. Needy people are needy people.
posted by Frowner at 1:21 PM on December 16, 2011 [36 favorites]


I can't speak to the truthfulness of these stories, but I can tell you that in Eastern North Carolina we call Washington, NC (where the NC one happened) "little Washington" so that people don't confuse a town of 9,000 people with our nation's capitol.

I can just see the possible confusion:

"So, I went up Washington to go to Hardees...
YOU DROVE EIGHT HOUR TO GO TO HARDEES???
No, no little Washington"
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:25 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Thanks for the links to multiple news stories. The first few times I heard/read this story the only retailer mentioned was K-Mart, which started to make me suspicious of it's origin. At least seeing another retailer (WalMart) mentioned gives my hardened cynical heart a glimmer of hope that it could be true.
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 1:31 PM on December 16, 2011


Is "lawaway" in quotes intentional for some reason or just a typo?

It's kind of a weird word that non-Americans might not know and I wanted to differentiate that inside the quotes is a link to an article about the return of layaway to stores other than Kmart this year.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:31 PM on December 16, 2011


I think s/he was pointing out the typo.
posted by Doofus Magoo at 1:33 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


What a boon for humanity. Thank god consumption and consumerism can march on unfettered.
posted by humboldt32 at 1:33 PM on December 16, 2011 [5 favorites]


Slack: In the NPR link (the words 'paying off', they're updating with more confirmations that this indeed happening around the country in all kinds of stores. And to me it sounds like a good idea, I may go do this myself.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:34 PM on December 16, 2011


I think s/he was pointing out the typo.

DOH

posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:35 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


What a boon for humanity. Thank god consumption and consumerism can march on unfettered.

If that falls, all we have left is being assholes on the internet!
posted by chundo at 1:35 PM on December 16, 2011 [23 favorites]


Great! I'm going to go buy a METRIC F*CKTON OF STUFF on layaway now, because I bet someone will pay it off for me! Yay!
posted by The otter lady at 1:35 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


cool, now we can get rid of social security and unions! huzzah!
posted by facetious at 1:37 PM on December 16, 2011 [16 favorites]


Actually, I saw this idea in a book published years ago -- a book of "ideas if you want to do a random act of kindness". This was put forth as a way of "making a family's Christmas a little better".

I actually think it's kind of sweet (I can see the naysayers' abjurations against consumerism, but on the other hand -- do YOU want to lecture the single mom about consumerism when all she wants to do is get each of her three kids a teddy bear and some blocks or something?), but I've got no idea why it's suddenly a "thing" now.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 1:41 PM on December 16, 2011 [7 favorites]


I like the idea that W/K-Mart keeps records of marital status of their layaway customers and makes that data available to other customers.
posted by Keith Talent at 1:44 PM on December 16, 2011 [5 favorites]


Aww, how sweet, what a christmassy way to legalize gamboling on credit!
posted by jeffburdges at 1:45 PM on December 16, 2011


Aww, how sweet, what a christmassy way to legalize gamboling on credit!

Is this a typo? I am in love with the idea of gamboling on credit.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:48 PM on December 16, 2011 [28 favorites]


I think it's a nice gesture but I don't understand how you are allowed to pay another customer's debts? Doesn't that require access to pretty private records?
posted by Foci for Analysis at 1:49 PM on December 16, 2011


all the bah-humbugers have apparently always been crotchety adults and have never been a kid hoping that the paycheck in december is big enough that your presents make it under a tree.

as a kid we had the kindness of our church to thank a few times for us getting christmas at all. the fact that some people get that relief without having to play the game of the pious just fills me with joy.

i see this reaction to a lot of good news, "well it's not enough." sure, maybe not, but it is something. what have you done to help someone you'll never meet? random acts of kindness are awesome and people should be encouraged to do them.
posted by nadawi at 1:51 PM on December 16, 2011 [33 favorites]


I ♥ THE 1%
posted by hermitosis at 2:00 PM on December 16, 2011


As someone who grew up poor enough that our church once took up a secret collection to buy snow tires for our aging station wagon, this story warms my heart.

I heard it on the ride to work this morning and it brought a tear to my beady little grinch eyes.
posted by gauche at 2:05 PM on December 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


I think it's a nice gesture but I don't understand how you are allowed to pay another customer's debts? Doesn't that require access to pretty private records?

Actually, no. The person who's paying just gives the employee some money, and the employee picks an account at random to put it on. Or, they look for one with kids clothing and toys on it, with the supposition that it's a family the payor is helping out.
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 2:06 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


I can't believe layaway still exists. It seems so olden-timey.
posted by something something at 2:07 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


It's kind of a weird word that non-Americans might not know

We call it "layby" in Australia.
posted by robcorr at 2:10 PM on December 16, 2011


Which newspaper columnist was it who every year at Christmas would talk about how sometimes you just have to give charity the untied way; not worry about effectiveness, or who to help, just take slightly more money than you can afford out of the atm and hand it out to the first needy persons you find?

Because that's what this reminds me of. Doesn't change anything about the realities of living in the US, doesn't overthrow the system, completely ineffective but fsck me if it doesn't make a lot of families happy with Christmas.

These random acts of kindness are important too.

Incidently, any non-American who doesn't know what a layaway is doesn't know their Isley Brothers classics.
posted by MartinWisse at 2:11 PM on December 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


I can't believe layaway still exists.

It went away for a while (except for at K-Mart for some reason), but now it's making a comeback. Sign of the times.
posted by Gilbert at 2:18 PM on December 16, 2011 [4 favorites]


Layaway went out of fashion with the aggressive push of consumer credit cards. It's coming back in response to all of the card cancelling and limit lowering over the past few years.
posted by ceribus peribus at 2:29 PM on December 16, 2011 [5 favorites]


Tis the season for holiday bonuses for good little PR firms.
posted by formless at 2:30 PM on December 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


Inspired by this article, after a homeless dude complimented the sound of my bicycle bell in the alley behind the Church St. Safeway I gave him 2 packs of cigarettes and a bottle of Michter's Rye that I had bought for myself. I also gave him the bell and helped him put it on his shopping cart.

If you read about ransom strangers giving the poorest of the poor what they really want and not what they need, it happened.
posted by Ayn Rand and God at 2:39 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


I think it's the one percent trying to get off cheap without being seen to have any heart.
posted by spitbull at 2:41 PM on December 16, 2011


Congratulations, I am now convinced that there is officially no act of good in the world that somebody here will not explain why they are better than. I'm particularly impressed by all of you who have also managed to prove that there is no subject that cannot be changed to "the 1%".

Where do you even go for an encore once you've sneered at people anonymously buying children Christmas presents? Maybe next we can do why Médecins Sans Frontières are actually crypto-fascists, or perhaps why Mr. Rogers was really a tool of international bankers.
posted by strangely stunted trees at 2:48 PM on December 16, 2011 [29 favorites]


ransom strangers

This thread has the best typos ever.
posted by yoink at 2:49 PM on December 16, 2011 [8 favorites]


I love such random acts of kindness. If I had lots of $$$, I would love to do stuff like this.

And for the cynics: hey, sometimes a good deed is - and should be accepted as - simply a good deed that brightened someone's day/week/holiday.

And FWIW - we had one of those "Mystery Santa" thingies here in Montana this week, too (Missoula).
posted by davidmsc at 2:52 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


Is your neighborhood infested by lawyers? They get Lawaway, the lawyer-repellant spray in a handy can. Works against shysters, ambulance chasers, even software patent attorneys. From the people that brought you Raid : Jehova's Witness Formula.
posted by w0mbat at 2:54 PM on December 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


No matter what, these folks will have the warm feeling that comes with knowing they've made a difference in the world. May [insert deity here] bless them this holiday season.
posted by reenum at 2:59 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


MartinWisse, that is Jon Carroll from the San Francisco Chronicle who does a column each year on the Untied Way.
posted by agatha_magatha at 3:08 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


[fixed typo, carry on]
posted by jessamyn at 3:14 PM on December 16, 2011


fixed typo

Boo!
posted by yoink at 3:17 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


I think it's a very sweet gesture and have serious doubts that it's one percenters doing it.
posted by deborah at 3:36 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


*finds silver lining*

*begins search for dark cloud*
posted by Dark Messiah at 3:40 PM on December 16, 2011 [8 favorites]


You know, I can see the dark and cynical side of everything anymore (the last 50 years have given me plenty of practice), but this is nice. Maybe acts like this are patronizing, but I'm willing to give the Secret Santas the benefit of the doubt.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 3:41 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


I think this is sweet and hope that it is true.

That's really all that needs to be said.
posted by Senor Cardgage at 4:11 PM on December 16, 2011


I heard about this on Google+ yesterday. This afternoon I stopped by the only big box store in our area and asked if they did layaway. They did. I asked if there was anyway to tell me if there were any that had kids clothes or toys. There was. I paid off one of them. I'm so far away from the 1% that they don't even let me in their gated community...but I remember what it was like to be really poor. Hungry poor. We don't have to really sacrifice much to be able to really make another family have a better holiday. It's my tip of the hat to Dickens. Occupy Christmas!
posted by dejah420 at 4:26 PM on December 16, 2011 [31 favorites]


God, I make so many typos that I feel obligated to comment.

And I have to admit that the first time I heard about this, I did get a little weepy. I simply attributed it to the sappiness that comes with middle age, as I start producing less male hormones and all. But if this is some weird meme of kindness, it couldn't come at a better time.

Thanks, dejah420. And anyone else who might do this.
posted by Toekneesan at 5:14 PM on December 16, 2011


have
posted by Toekneesan at 5:17 PM on December 16, 2011


Peoples' intentions are lovely. It's absolutely wonderful to go out and try to do something selfless.

Isn't layaway predatory, though? How is it any different from payday loans, or rent to own? Isn't it a scheme to take money out of the pockets of the poor and the stupid?
posted by Old Man McKay at 5:21 PM on December 16, 2011


No interest on layaway. But you don't get the stuff till it's paid for.
posted by Toekneesan at 5:22 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'd imagine that rent-to-own schemes might be popping up more in response to the anti-bank sentiments than anything else. I'm not exactly sure how they're predatory, since it's basically the same concept as paying 175 grand interest on a 100 grand loan.

Also, I enjoyed the Yahoo link the most. Right up until I was prompted to [See also: 5 Super Stocking Stuffers for Under $10] mid-story. Seems like capitalism can sneak up and bite you when you least expect it.
posted by Blue_Villain at 5:26 PM on December 16, 2011


rent to own ends up costing you two or three times the amount of something when you're all done. layaway is just "hold onto this for me please." it's pretty different. it certainly is something poor people do, but it's not predatory.
posted by nadawi at 5:28 PM on December 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


oh, i guess kmart now charges $5, but since they also lock in sales prices, it's still not rising to the level of payday loans.
posted by nadawi at 5:30 PM on December 16, 2011


A woman, described only as "being in her 30s," walked up to the layaway desk, pushing a shopping cart full of toys she planned to donate.

"This lady came up randomly and said, 'Can I, you know, pay off some people's layaway?'" said Dannell Goddard. Goddard works at Kmart in the layaway department. She told 24 Hour News 8 that when she first heard the request, she was a bit confused.

"I was like, 'Well, are you trying to pick them up? 'Cause you can't pick them up if you don't have an ID," Goddard said. "And [the mystery woman] replied, 'Nope, I just want to help people.'"

The woman looked through several of the about 800 layaway contract tickets at the store. She randomly picked and paid the bill on three of them. She paid about $500 between all three of them and left a $10 balance on each of the accounts.
The woman's only requirement was that there were toys in the layaway orders.

"It was really crazy the way she did it. She was so excited and so happy to do it," said Goddard. "She had a great heart, and I told her that I felt like she had a great heart, and she said she doesn't want to take appreciation for it. She just felt that she was blessed and she wanted to bless others."—Reporter Dani Carlson, WoodTV.com
posted by Toekneesan at 5:42 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


Best Christmas memory ever was when my roommate and I, back in our cynical and brokeass college days did this on the spur of the moment while wandering through his place of employment (KMart of all places). Christmas suddenly felt like Christmas again even though we scrambled like mad to come up with January's rent. Going to figure out how to make this happen again this year because I've pretty much hated every Christmas since.
posted by Fezboy! at 5:52 PM on December 16, 2011 [5 favorites]


METRIC F*CKTON

Caution, this unit has not been carefully defined by the ISU. Always be sure to insist on the Full Metric F*ckton!
posted by Twang at 6:18 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


I had a decent hit on a lottery ticket this morning. (Yay me.) Someone's getting a payment on their account tomorrow.
posted by wallabear at 7:18 PM on December 16, 2011 [5 favorites]


Alright, I was all set to finish this thread with the cynical PR comment above, but upon hearing personal comments from MeFi members that they've done this themselves.

Well...

You bastards made my damn grinch heart grow three sizes today.
posted by formless at 7:20 PM on December 16, 2011


Seeing Wal Mart commercials advertising nothing but "layaway -- now for the holiday season!" is the most depressing thing I've seen this Christmas.
posted by feloniousmonk at 7:27 PM on December 16, 2011


If I had lots of $$$, I would love to do stuff like this.

Not everyone has $20, but this is the kind of thing where even $20 can make a big difference.
posted by Miko at 7:52 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


My first job was at a small shop that sold mens suits and women's dresses of the sort women wore on Sunday with church hats. I gained a lot of respect for those women who came in to pay two or more dollars at the end of every long work week until the outfit was theirs. Sometimes when times were really tight they'd ask if they could pay fifty cents and still keep the layaway and sometimes they asked me to bring their dress out from the back so they could see some detail of color or style which clearly gave them heart. When Aretha Franklin sang at Barack Obama's inauguration wearing that unbelievable hat, I could hear the sigh of several million women who knew all about layaway.
posted by Anitanola at 8:06 PM on December 16, 2011 [16 favorites]


Touching, really. But the cold little lump of coal that lives in my chest is telling me that some big boss store workers have already set up layaway accounts for their housemates, so when the next wave of do-gooders come in, they know just the perfect "single mom" to help.
posted by Scram at 8:48 PM on December 16, 2011


Please search your local Christmas Bureau if you want help local families in need at this time of year.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 9:00 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


Please search your local Christmas Bureau if you want help local families in need at this time of year.

Right... or donate to your local foodbank or rescue mission or battered persons shelter...

But this is a different idea for christmas helping, and shouldn't be discounted as a way to play anonymous holiday surprise creator if someone is so moved. All these are methods to help others during this time of year, and they all serve different parts of the community and thus are all valuable and valid.
posted by hippybear at 9:14 PM on December 16, 2011 [3 favorites]


If it's metric, it should be fucktonne.
posted by Meatbomb at 9:52 PM on December 16, 2011


Agreed. I wouldn't have thought of doing this if the story hadn't come out. I've given to my charities for the year. This is just a nice thing to do, and I'm happy to do it.

Not to discount PareidoliaticBoy's suggestion, thank you for that. Just another option.
posted by wallabear at 9:58 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


All these gestures have immense value.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 10:16 PM on December 16, 2011 [2 favorites]


I think it's awfully nice and in the supposed spirit of the season. That said, those that need help the most can't even begin to afford layaway.
posted by _paegan_ at 10:55 PM on December 16, 2011 [1 favorite]


one of the many problems with our system is that people a couple steps above "needing it most" but still a million floors below 'comfortably living" have very little in the way of assistance. this seems like a great way to help some of those folks out. you don't have to do the best or help the worst, being pretty good, helping those that'd appreciate it is enough sometimes.
posted by nadawi at 12:09 AM on December 17, 2011 [5 favorites]


Aww, how sweet, what a christmassy way to legalize gamboling on credit!

Presumably, the person who's paying off the layaway is the gamboller here, but how do you know they money they're using to do this is funded by credit?

(Poster doesn't mean gambling, surely? There's no gambling here?)
posted by PeterMcDermott at 1:54 AM on December 17, 2011


Christmas Bureaus don't seem to saturate North America. I had never heard of it, and PareidoliaticBoy's link leads to a list of Bureaus in Canada. By searching I found a concentration of them in the US in Texas and some mentions of NE and NC. I am sure there are more but couldn't find a listing anywhere. I don't think there are many if any in the Northeast, since I've never run across them. However we have lots of charitable organizations which are old and deeply established so maybe that's why.

Most communities have no shortage of places to donate. I still like the layaway idea because (a) it catches lower--income people who are not necessarily on the social service rolls which is how other organizations identify their groups, and (b) it's a total surprise, which is a huge part of what makes Christmas joyful and which totally disappears when your resources are limited and you focus on the kids. DOing this wouldn't be at all mutually exclusive to food pantry donation or any other charitable effort.

ALso, the typical plug for donating food and shelter goods and stuff at times of year other than Christmas. Food stocks run really low by June and July because people aren't thinking 'holiday can drive!'
posted by Miko at 5:25 AM on December 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


This idea is taking off in that way that only viral ideas can. Even The Consumerist is noting how it is spreading.
posted by hippybear at 8:24 AM on December 17, 2011


I had no idea that the Christmas Bureau was just a Canadian thing. You guys are missing out, I have been delivering hampers every Christmas Eve for them for about 20 years, and it is absolutely the best experience of the holidays for me. Carry on, then.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 8:51 AM on December 17, 2011


We have many similar things, just not under the name Christmas Bureau. And there are some in the US so we're not all missing out. I suspect it's one of those things that takes some good volunteer energy to run a local chapter, and where there are a lot of existing/older/established charities doing the same thing the energy is probably going to those already so there's less impetus to start something new.
posted by Miko at 9:34 AM on December 17, 2011


From the Consumerist article linked above:
After her own layaway account had been paid off, one woman pledged to use the money she had been saving to pay off a someone else's instead.
Okay, that's just neat.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:53 AM on December 17, 2011 [4 favorites]


I can understand the cynicism. This is barely going to make a dent in the needs in the working class, a group that desperately needs government and private sector action to prevent the US from falling into some sort of Dickensian hellhole over the coming decade. And it would be much, much better if they were dropping $5000 on local food pantries, or on domestic violence shelters, or on libraries.

That said, reading this all makes me happy, because I've watched Americans turn more and more greedy in my lifetime, defending their personal avarice behind compassion fatigue and victim blaming. It says that maybe there is still a desire to do good under all that entitlement and wealth.
posted by dw at 10:54 AM on December 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'm the "Gail" mentioned in the Consumerist story linked upthread. (It's such a small world, isn't it?) The original Consumerist post gave us the idea, so we didn't think of this all on our own.

To the cynics etc.: We are hardly members of the 1% but we were taught by our parents to make regular donations to causes we believe in. The local food banks received large (for us) donations this year because we know the need is so great.

Here's what inspired us to pay down people's layaways. The day before, my husband lost his wallet. Someone turned it in, anonymously, with all the (not very much) money, IDs, and credit cards intact. What a relief! So we paid it forward, and are glad we did. We assume it touched the families directly affected; we know it had a positive effect on the store clerks and shoppers who witnessed it.
posted by DrGail at 11:43 AM on December 17, 2011 [14 favorites]


And it would be much, much better if they were dropping $5000 on local food pantries, or on domestic violence shelters, or on libraries.

I'm not even sure of that, because food aid at least is much steadier and more reliable than aid for gifts for loved ones, and like all charity it's not a zero-game. Giving a little here can make people want to give more over there (helping is a little addictive). All those things you list are necessities, but among them all, which is it that stands a chance of making you feel like a human being who can think of others and be generous, especially where kids are concerned? There have been years when I couldn't give much and years where I couldn't give anything beyond family, and it stings when someone offers you a gift and you simply cannot reciprocate. Giving is connected to dignity. Being able to give a gift is a powerful psychic boost, and when you think of the effort it takes to show up at the store every week for months and pay $2 or $6 toward something for a Christmas gift, you can tell it means a great deal to the people concerned.
posted by Miko at 2:54 PM on December 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


All those things you list are necessities, but among them all, which is it that stands a chance of making you feel like a human being who can think of others and be generous, especially where kids are concerned?

I don't disagree. People want a personal and tangible connection between what they give and the person or people they help. We want to feel better like our dollar actually DID something. It's an ego boost.

I look at it from an economic perspective: Giving a food bank a check does a lot more than some about-to-expire cans of cream of celery soup and water chestnuts. From an emotional perspective, though, the feeling that someone's going to see PAID IN FULL stamped on a layaway receipt because you paid it for them is much, much greater than knowing your $1000 went to buy a set of books you vaguely know about to be read by a bunch of people you have no names for. And while I happily pony up the money every year to buy more books for our insanely underfunded library, I can't argue with the emotional impact taking that money over to the KMart up the road would have.
posted by dw at 3:59 PM on December 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I see your point - and you can do both, of course.
posted by Miko at 4:47 PM on December 17, 2011


People want a personal and tangible connection between what they give and the person or people they help. We want to feel better like our dollar actually DID something. It's an ego boost.

Absotively. When people tell me that driving around all day on Christmas Eve delivering hampers is some noble stuff, I tell 'em that getting to show up at a stranger's door on Christmas Eve with candy-canes and oranges and shortbread and turkey and presents is actually pretty damn selfish.

The look on the kid's faces (who have often been told that "Santa can't come this year") is precious.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 6:46 PM on December 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I'm leaving the country tomorrow, so I won't have a chance to do this or I totally would.

It reminds me of when I was a kid and we go to Ames (back when Ames still existed!) and pick out a kid's name from a Christmas tree. The kid was just a regular kid in our town whose parents couldn't afford presents - kind of a Toys for Tots direct matchup - and my mom would let me pick out that kiddo's Christmas presents.

It felt both really good that I was able to help another kid and really sad that not every kid's parents could afford presents on their own. It definitely made me wish we could pick ALL THE NAMES from the tree and buy ALL THE PRESENTS.

It may have made me more grateful for my gifts - except for that Christmas when my grandmother gave me a shoehorn, that was just a crap gift.
posted by sonika at 7:40 AM on December 18, 2011


I'll clarify my earlier comment on gambling : Imagine if department stores anonymously paid off some tiny fraction of layaway bills, basically like forgiving some bills but pay taxes on the amount as income to prevent their identity being known. You're moving towards an addictive payout structure that turns layaway into gambling.
posted by jeffburdges at 9:02 AM on December 18, 2011


This is not going to turn layaway into gambling.
posted by Miko at 1:41 PM on December 18, 2011 [2 favorites]


Someone's not in the holiday spirit. Have a little nog, grab that page of lyrics, and bring your skates. There's still time.
posted by Toekneesan at 2:32 PM on December 18, 2011 [2 favorites]


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