Tags:


Natural Twenty
December 17, 2011 4:44 PM   Subscribe

Offbeat Bride presents: How to make your own Dungeons & Dragons chocolate dice mold.
posted by griphus (25 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite

 
I am so going to make my own mold. I don't think it will be of dice, though those are pretty great.
posted by the young rope-rider at 5:00 PM on December 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


I rolled u a natural 20 but I eated it. :(
posted by BitterOldPunk at 5:14 PM on December 17, 2011 [12 favorites]


These are fun! Food coloring plus white chocolate would be cool.
posted by ian1977 at 5:47 PM on December 17, 2011


Look at the rounded edges on those dice! That's a great plan if you want to make chocolates that unfairly kill characters because they can't roll saving numbers! In all seriousness, if you're going to spend over $100 to do this project, I suggest you go ahead and shell out the extra couple bucks per set for GameScience dice to make your molds that come with instant bragging rights and great pre-recorded patter.
posted by Edogy at 5:55 PM on December 17, 2011 [3 favorites]


If it's not D10 roll and keep, I don't even want to be invited to that wedding. Bah, humbug.
posted by WidgetAlley at 6:12 PM on December 17, 2011


i dunno guys this seems like a lot of work to eat chocolate

i mean the chocolate, it's right there

and you can eat it

i'm just saying
posted by mightygodking at 6:23 PM on December 17, 2011 [8 favorites]


TABLE 13-3: RANDOM CHOCOLATE TYPES
01-40: Milk
41-50: White
51-60: Dark
61-70: High cacao
71-75: With peanuts
76-80: With almonds
81-90: Cordial
91-92: Orange
93-94: Raspberry
95-96: With nougat
97-98: Chocolate creme
99: Novelty
100: Cursed! It's carob!

posted by JHarris at 6:44 PM on December 17, 2011 [27 favorites]


This is awesome and I know people who need to see it and make chocolate dice.
posted by immlass at 6:50 PM on December 17, 2011


Intrigued by the idea and blown away by the execution. That is GREAT.
posted by Durn Bronzefist at 7:23 PM on December 17, 2011


I have a small question that seems a bit essential... How do you get the chocolate to fill a two-part flat mold like this? I see the photo of the chocolate dice, so it's clearly possible, but how?
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 7:30 PM on December 17, 2011


Also, why does the photo of the chocolate dice seem to show a bunch of chocolate covered red plastic dice?
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 7:32 PM on December 17, 2011


So, I'm going to be the first geek to point this out? Alright, then....

They aren't D&D dice. They are polyhedral dice.
posted by GavinR at 7:43 PM on December 17, 2011 [2 favorites]


41-50: White

White chocolate isn't cursed? It's not even chocolate!
posted by lumensimus at 7:55 PM on December 17, 2011


They aren't D&D dice. They are polyhedral dice.

I was thinking about that, but the ones they're using (d4, d6, d8, d10, d12, d20) are the standard D&D set.
posted by griphus at 8:05 PM on December 17, 2011


Er, both d10 and 10x d10s (or whatever the ones going from 10-100 instead of 1-10 are called.)
posted by griphus at 8:07 PM on December 17, 2011


Joakim Ziegler, if you read through the comments down the bottom, she explains how she joins the two molds together while the chocolate is still warm enough to stick the two sides together but not runny enough to, um, run between the molds. And she explains the colour thing too.
posted by malibustacey9999 at 8:52 PM on December 17, 2011


If you're interested in casting stuff, I have had really good luck getting materials from Smooth-on (here I have linked to the food grade silicone) and Polytek (who sent me a whole bunch of free stuff when I ordered from them.) Both companies also have good instructional guides and DVDs.
posted by louche mustachio at 8:59 PM on December 17, 2011 [1 favorite]


I've had great luck with polytec product as well for both solid form (3rd molds of obects like seashells and rock formations), as well as sculpted items. Some of my soap molds are 4+ years old, have had dozens and dozens of pours and they're still going strong. Haven't gotten tacky or sticky like some molds get with age. I also like the two polymer mold material that you knead together to form a silly putty type material...can't think of the brand offhand, but anyone can memail me and I'll find my instructable files and look it up.
posted by dejah420 at 12:53 AM on December 18, 2011


Didn't I just see this on kickstarter???

It seems like a set of chocolate dice is worth $15 ... probably more than the actual plastic version.

Someone is making a good profit here.
posted by jannw at 1:36 AM on December 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


Hrmm. I'm running an evil campaign for my players right now, can I get a recipe to make dice out of actual mold??
posted by Drumhellz at 1:53 AM on December 18, 2011


Jannw: the kickstarter project is by a different person, who has to be dang pretty frustrated that Ariel Segall's DIY tutorial about how to the dice yourself has gone viral. (Source: this Reddit thread.)

[full disclosure: I'm the publisher of Offbeat Bride]
posted by arielmeadow at 9:10 AM on December 18, 2011 [1 favorite]


jannw: "Didn't I just see this on kickstarter???

It seems like a set of chocolate dice is worth $15 ... probably more than the actual plastic version.

Someone is making a good profit here.
"

They're making an okay profit. Chocolate is undoubtedly more expensive than plastic, and the process seems pretty labor intensive. But $15 for a set of artisan chocolates sounds fair to me.
posted by Deathalicious at 9:14 AM on December 18, 2011


Hi! Give kudos from me to whomever did the sparkly shoe post. I actually watch Offbeat Bride for non-wedding related clothing stuff!

Most people would probably prefer to just buy the dice, even though the tutorial is great, because where the heck do you store a chocolate dice mold? Maybe that's my tiny apartment and low patience level talking. I think the kickstarter guy will do fine, too.
posted by the young rope-rider at 9:14 AM on December 18, 2011


jannw writes "It seems like a set of chocolate dice is worth $15 ... probably more than the actual plastic version."

Cost of materials is a lot more on the chocolate version; plastic dice have a few cents worth of plastic in them.
posted by Mitheral at 9:14 AM on December 18, 2011


But $15 for a set of artisan chocolates sounds fair to me.

Especially considering the permits and business expenses that go into doing it for other people vs your pals.
posted by the young rope-rider at 9:16 AM on December 18, 2011


« Older As Doctors Use More Devices, Potential for Distrac...  |  "A Maryland boat was sent to t... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments