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Pointless? Hardly.
January 10, 2012 2:26 PM   Subscribe

These boots were not made for walking. (NSFW because, well, vice.com but the article is innocuous)
posted by unSane (28 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
Previously mentioned here.
posted by critzer at 2:33 PM on January 10, 2012


Pair those with a Jack Parow hat and you've got it made.
posted by griphus at 2:34 PM on January 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


Those boots may or may not be made for walkin' but they damn sure weren't used for drivin' the trucks in some of those pictures.
posted by TedW at 2:39 PM on January 10, 2012


Martín Cerda Cruz, of the Barrio Apache Hyphy crew.

SUPER-GENRE-MEZCLA!
posted by filthy light thief at 2:43 PM on January 10, 2012


These are new? I see women wearing them on the subway all the time.
posted by Splunge at 2:58 PM on January 10, 2012


Yo ye pharoahs, let us walk
Through this barren desert, in search of truth
And some pointy boots, and maybe a few snack crackers.
posted by kcds at 2:58 PM on January 10, 2012 [4 favorites]


This is keeping somebody at zappos.com up at night.
posted by sswiller at 3:21 PM on January 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


Griphus, add some corpse paint and I'm in...
posted by schyler523 at 3:23 PM on January 10, 2012


Last, last October I visited Japan and noticed young men sporting long pointy shoes.

Not that long and pointy. But pretty long and pointy.

According to my hosts, the belief was that the long pointy shoes made their wearers appear taller. Certainly made their feet look longer.
posted by notyou at 3:32 PM on January 10, 2012


These boots were not made for walking.

Maybe not the way you walk.
posted by StickyCarpet at 3:33 PM on January 10, 2012


I'm entirely sure why, but those remind me of penis gourds.
posted by Shike at 3:42 PM on January 10, 2012


NSFW because, well, vice.com

I presume that's the cool new initialisation for narcissistic, solipsistic futile wankers?
posted by howfar at 3:43 PM on January 10, 2012


...not entirely sure.
posted by Shike at 3:43 PM on January 10, 2012


Finally! A completely bizarre, insanely unlikely and laughably absurd fashion trend that is NOT from Shibuya or Harajuku. What a relief!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 3:52 PM on January 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


The link was Not Suitable For Walking?
posted by PeterMcDermott at 3:56 PM on January 10, 2012


Nonsense, this isn't Mexican at all!

It was obviously invented in Finland.

Supporting evidence, care of the Leningrad Cowboys:


(Link, rather than IMG tag, here.)
posted by cstross at 3:57 PM on January 10, 2012


Pair those with a Jack Parow hat and you've got it made.

That Jack Parow? Didn't he used to be with Die Antwoord?
posted by PeterMcDermott at 4:01 PM on January 10, 2012


The latest collection from Don Martin footwear.
posted by MegoSteve at 4:11 PM on January 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


Jack Parow was featured on a Die Antwoord album but has primarily been a solo artist...
posted by schyler523 at 4:18 PM on January 10, 2012


I believe the Leningrad Cowboys brought that style to Mexico. In 1989.
posted by Xoebe at 4:24 PM on January 10, 2012


froot boots and cowboy boots have a radioactive baby
posted by telstar at 4:31 PM on January 10, 2012


Long toed boots and shoes were periodically popular in Europe in the 12th and 13th century. Sometimes the points were so long they had to be connected by a string to the upper part of the leg. In her book The Distant Mirror, Barbara Tuchman observed that the long toes were associated with periods of moral looseness and got longer as the morals got looser. Then, when kings or princes who were more strict in their moral codes came into power, one of the first thing they did was ban the long toed boots. What does this have to do with anything? F*** if I know.
posted by charlesminus at 4:52 PM on January 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


Needs more bells and motley.
posted by SPrintF at 5:25 PM on January 10, 2012


As a youth (yout) in South Philly we wore pointy shoes and called them "Rat Stabbers". Perhaps they have an Armadillo problem...
posted by shnarg at 5:56 PM on January 10, 2012


This, I... What?

But really? I like this picture Shaved head? check. Nice bangs? Check. Machete? Check. I want to marry her.
posted by symbioid at 6:39 PM on January 10, 2012


Sometimes the points were so long they had to be connected by a string to the upper part of the leg.

Knee-bound poulaines may be a rumour without a leg to stand on. From Medieval Dress for the Beginner: Footwear:
There is a popular belief, spread regularly by the modern media, that "in the Middle Ages, pointed toed shoes were so long that they had to chain them to their knees". While (some) people in the Middle Ages wore their pointed shoes long, and it is conceivable that a few excessive style trailblazers may have worn them that long, at this point I know of no contemporary evidence that it was so.

The earliest I can suggest appears in John Stow's 1598 The survey of London containing the original, increase, modern estate and government of that city, methodically set down : with a memorial of those famouser acts of charity, which for publick and pious vses have been bestowed by many worshipfull citizens and benefactors : as also all the ancient and modern monuments erected in the churches, not only of those two famous cities, London and Westminster, but (now newly added) four miles compass (p.131) where he says:

"In Distar Lane, on the North side thereof, is the Cordwainers or Shoemaker's Hall, which company were made a brotherhood or fraternity in the 11th of Henry IV. Of these Cordwayners I read, that since the fifth of Richard II. (when he took to wife Anne, daughter to Veselaus, King of Boheme), by her example the English people had used piked shoes, tied to their knees with silken laces, or chains of silver or gilt, wherefore in the fourth of Edward IV. it was ordained and proclaimed, that beaks of shoone and boots, should not pass the length of two inches, upon pain of cursing by the clergy, and by Parliament to pay 20 shillings for every pair. And every cordwainer that shod any man or woman on the Sunday, to pay 30 shillings."
A tax upon them!
posted by cenoxo at 7:12 PM on January 10, 2012


My first thought was of this
posted by XMLicious at 8:23 PM on January 10, 2012


cenoxo, thank you. I've been casually looking for evidence to nail that myth's coffin shut for years.
posted by IAmBroom at 1:08 PM on January 11, 2012


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