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Is There a Reason You Are Trying to Give Yourself More Work?
February 21, 2012 8:12 PM   Subscribe

No one ever listens to Worf. Worf gets DENIED again and again on Star Trek TNG.
posted by sweetkid (83 comments total) 56 users marked this as a favorite

 
Is it because he's Vulcan?
posted by DonnyMac at 8:19 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


He's Klingon, but he doesn't move much. He's STATIC KLINGON.
posted by evilmidnightbomberwhatbombsatmidnight at 8:21 PM on February 21, 2012 [31 favorites]


"No."
posted by radiosilents at 8:21 PM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


I like to think my double post within minutes is from the universe where Worf received 9th place in the Bat'leth tournament on Forcas III.
posted by yellowbinder at 8:21 PM on February 21, 2012 [37 favorites]


You think Worf had it bad? Imagine being his kid. Then you have the guy who is told no telling you no and the cycle of abuse repeats itself.
posted by cjorgensen at 8:22 PM on February 21, 2012 [7 favorites]


It really is a wonder he never went all Walter White on DS9.
posted by yellowbinder at 8:23 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


Human racists.
posted by ColdChef at 8:25 PM on February 21, 2012


Worf is the worst security officer ever. He's reckless, impulsive, and always recommends the wrong course of action. His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?
posted by Afroblanco at 8:26 PM on February 21, 2012 [39 favorites]


SILENCED ALL HIS LIFE
posted by Hardcore Poser at 8:26 PM on February 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


Speciests?
posted by DonnyMac at 8:26 PM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


I can't believe this is 15 minutes long. How depressing. Poor Worf. =(
posted by curious nu at 8:30 PM on February 21, 2012 [12 favorites]


I was expecting more of a rapid-fire rejection, like so many sitcoms these days with the "speed dating montage". But a lot of these had Warf spending a time explaining his feelings or rationalising his aggression with a lot more restraint than I actually remember from the show. Isn't it odd how you rarely feel sympathetic to his cause? Or how many times you thought "you know, the Enterprise wouldn't be in this mess if they'd just listened to Warf and fired photon torpedoes instead of whatever it was that they did"?
posted by Metro Gnome at 8:30 PM on February 21, 2012 [3 favorites]


His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?

The Federation values diversity.
posted by Nomyte at 8:32 PM on February 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


And Worf gets hurt continuously: he's died, got paralyzed, almost got hit by some big trashcan in Cargo Bay 3, and OMG I have TNG memorized!
posted by sfkiddo at 8:32 PM on February 21, 2012 [16 favorites]


At least he didn't die, go be in a horrible movie or two, and come back as a Romulan.
posted by cjorgensen at 8:34 PM on February 21, 2012 [17 favorites]


My heart broke about three minutes in. Poor Worf!
posted by running order squabble fest at 8:34 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


He's reckless, impulsive, and always recommends the wrong course of action. His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?

Being consistently incorrect is almost as valuable as being consistently correct. If you listen to Worf's advice, and then always do the exact opposite thing, you will prosper.

He would make someone on Earth fabulously rich -- call him, get his advice on the stock market, and leverage up betting against his suggestion. You could be Warren Buffett wealthy probably within months.
posted by Malor at 8:37 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?
The Enterprise is really a sailing ship. That's why it pulls up alongside enemy ships so they can blast at each other with large and small arms and attempt boardings. In that context, Worf isn't so bad.
posted by planet at 8:37 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


You know, I always preferred watching the show with the idea that Worf is this huge thundering dork, like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is, he's like just a weirdo Civil-War Reenactor Klingon who got the job due to seniority and cause he's actually quite skilled, but completely lacks anything resembling a social sense.
posted by The Whelk at 8:41 PM on February 21, 2012 [129 favorites]



Worf is the worst security officer ever. He's reckless, impulsive, and always recommends the wrong course of action. His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?


This is just not true! In quite a few of these cases, had Picard or Riker followed Worf's advice, there would have been no episode because, for instance, Geordi wouldn't have been held captive by the Pakleds, or Crusher wouldn't have been kidnapped by the terrorists. He is perhaps overly cautious and paranoid, but often his recommendations would have kept everyone safe.
posted by chrchr at 8:44 PM on February 21, 2012 [30 favorites]


Why don't we make apple juice, and fax it to each other?
posted by infinitewindow at 8:46 PM on February 21, 2012 [36 favorites]


In some of these, Worf's concern is proven justified by the end of the episode.

In at least one, he persuades the captain to change his mind in the line immediately following what is shown in this compilation: 3:20-3:36, Worf has asked Picard to be his cha'DIch when he goes before the Klingon High Council. Picard initially declines thinking Worf is asking only out of formality (which is all you see here). Worf informs him that his request is sincere and there is no one better on board to serve in the role, and Picard accepts.
posted by DevilsAdvocate at 8:46 PM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


You know, I always preferred watching the show with the idea that Worf is this huge thundering dork, like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is, he's like just a weirdo Civil-War Reenactor Klingon

Yeah, and it gets worse. He actually speaks Klingon!
posted by No-sword at 8:47 PM on February 21, 2012 [11 favorites]


like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is

Or, since he was raised by humans he has this romanticized view of Klingons, not having grown up among Klingons and seeing all their flaws.

Also, a lot of Vulcans don't act all that logically.

TVTropes: My Species Doth Protest Too Much
posted by DevilsAdvocate at 8:51 PM on February 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


Worf only goes to Klingon bars and listens to Klingon music cause he is SO TOTES DEDICATED KLINGON 4 LIFE. You know he has a tumblr about it.
posted by The Whelk at 8:56 PM on February 21, 2012 [7 favorites]


Worf is the worst security officer ever. He's reckless, impulsive, and always recommends the wrong course of action. His job is to keep the Enterprise safe, yet enemies teleport onto the bridge ALL THE DAMN TIME. How does he keep his job?

Because his SECRET job description is Master of Exposition. In the context of an episode: a dilemma will present itself. Worf will shout hot-headedly "Captain, why don't we just..." and then Patrick Stewart or the guy with the beard will deny him (see OP), and then, crucially, explain the reasoning for their stance, thereby laying out all the factors at play for the viewer's enlightenment.

An exchange WITHOUT MoE Worf would look like this:
*dilemma presents itself*
Captain: "Here's what we're doing"
Crew: "Yes sir."
Viewer left in the dark.

Thank you, Worf. Thank you for the moronic interjections that help us all understand.
posted by gonna get a dog at 9:00 PM on February 21, 2012 [41 favorites]


I'm pretty sure Worf only uses tlhambIla', the Kronos-based ripoff.
posted by No-sword at 9:02 PM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Worf represents the limbic system—full of passion, fear, anger, suspicion. He acts only upon those instincts. But Picard is fully a man of the frontal lobe, the executive center, acting on information from all sources in a calm and calculated manner. Human society in the future has learned to let the frontal lobe lead with rational action, and have profited enormously in doing so. But still, it must continually silent and reject the urges from more primitive parts of the brain that cry out for spontaneous action—the primordial echos of an age long passed.
posted by dephlogisticated at 9:11 PM on February 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


…MoE Worf…

Luckily, the Internet stops at chibi Worf.
posted by Nomyte at 9:13 PM on February 21, 2012 [4 favorites]


You know, I always preferred watching the show with the idea that Worf is this huge thundering dork, like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is, he's like just a weirdo Civil-War Reenactor Klingon who got the job due to seniority and cause he's actually quite skilled, but completely lacks anything resembling a social sense.

Wait, isn't this basically canon?
posted by brennen at 9:14 PM on February 21, 2012


That's nothing like Cannon.
posted by mazola at 9:24 PM on February 21, 2012


That is totally canon. In DS9 when his dorky son Alexander grows up to be an even dorkier Klingette, there's like two damn episodes about Worf justifying his own feelings of distress about Alexander not fitting in with his peers and then ending up as the class clown. At the time he's being all engaged to Jadzia, who is of course stupidly perceptive about the whole thing and tries to get him to calm down, but it's blatantly clear that he sees far too much of himself in his son.
posted by Mizu at 9:26 PM on February 21, 2012 [3 favorites]


Oh, Worf!
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 9:27 PM on February 21, 2012 [14 favorites]


It helps if you think the Starfleet of TNG is just full of wonky do gooder types cause seriously why would you join Starfleet if not out of sense of utopian optimism and being slightly out of the normal social circles and then all the plot lines make a lot more sense.
posted by The Whelk at 9:31 PM on February 21, 2012 [3 favorites]


That and Starfleet is just a huge pretense to dole out holodeck time, which is the only reason anyone joins anymore.
posted by The Whelk at 9:35 PM on February 21, 2012 [8 favorites]


You know, I always preferred watching the show with the idea that Worf is this huge thundering dork, like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is, he's like just a weirdo Civil-War Reenactor Klingon.

That's always the read I had on Worf too. He's a weird character in that he was raised on Earth by human foster parents, so the Klingon culture that he defines himself by was pretty much the result of obsessive personal study. In one way this is an amazing accomplishment - he's a fluent speaker with an encyclopedic knowledge of history and myth, tournament-level capacity for martial arts, who even exerts meaningful influence on political affairs. It's like if one of the kids I knew in Canadian high school who really responded to manga and decided to "learn Japanese" turned up today as an insider in Japan's supreme court. But where other Klingons are gregarious extroverts, Worf has always been a retiring nerd. He appreciates blood wine for its vintage and bouquet but is never going to get wasted on it and boastfully slap another Klingon on the back, and the way it's played it sometimes seems that's the glue holding post-war Klingon identity together.

The federation has always come off as a "some species are more equal than others" kind of organization to me, though. Does no one care that the head doctor on the fleet's flagship is a blatant racist who belittles one of the most gifted scientists of the age as a "green-blooded bastard" all the time?
posted by metaman livingblog at 9:45 PM on February 21, 2012 [37 favorites]


I didn't watch the whole bloody 15 minutes of the video, but is there an in-joke, where the things just loops over itself?

It's the same 3 minutes again and again isn't it?

Isn't it?
Isn't it?
posted by alex_skazat at 9:56 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


gonna get a dog: exactly.

And the Worf gets pwned companion video shines a spotlight on another one of TNG's little plot cheats:

Everyone says that Worf is super tough and a fighter, but we rarely ever see much confirmation of it -- just silly spectacles of him doing a warrior's meditation or breaking something because he's so strong, or he says "die in battle" or snarls. Minimal time spent establishing that he's tough.

Then you introduce a threat. You don't have a lot of time to get the audience invested in the story, so they have to believe that this threat really is the one who could destroy the enterprise. So you have the enemy go and punch Worf, thus establishing that we as audience should be worried and stay tuned to this episode. Boom, narrative upgrade and shortcut to ratings.

Of course, every character is used like this sometimes. The disease too virulent and strange for Dr. Crusher to cure it; the villain to bold and brash for Riker to out man it; the creature too strange for Deanna to understand it. The classic that I can think of is the episode when Geordi told the holodeck to create Moriarty as a Sherlock Holmes villain capable of "outsmarting Data" -- not merely Holmes. So, the villain who is potentially smarter than Data -- that's how we know this threat is serious.*

But usually in those cases, the solution relies on that person who it challenges to solve it. So, Dr. Crusher eventually has an epiphany about the symptoms of the disease and the effects of a particular form of radiation from a rock found in only one solar system; Data pushes himself to new levels of intelligence and insight into human nature. Picard rises above Q's petty taunts to become an example of human development. They usually get some form of payback. But Worf -- does he get payback as often? Sometimes the stories are about him, but he's used more than anyone else as a punching bag for the villain so that someone else can save the day. Data can outsmart someone who can beat up Worf, but Worf can never beat up someone who can outsmart Data.

So, in other words, Why are they so mean to Worf?!

*I think that the Moriarty episode could also be seen not just as a competition of intelligence, but one of humanity. Data is essentially facing the Enterprise computer's ability to generate an artificial intelligence like his. Which can be more "human" -- human in the sense of innovative, spontaneous, creative -- could be said to be the true contest.
posted by Saxon Kane at 10:00 PM on February 21, 2012 [21 favorites]


Being consistently incorrect is almost as valuable as being consistently correct. If you listen to Worf's advice, and then always do the exact opposite thing, you will prosper.

Something I have learned from episodes of both Seinfeld and King of the Hill.
posted by Saxon Kane at 10:01 PM on February 21, 2012


They're so mean to Worf because Worf gets all the ladies.
posted by Mizu at 10:01 PM on February 21, 2012


Once when I was very high, my roommate and I watched several episodes of Speed Racer and noticed in every episode, Spritle and Chim Chim hid in the trunk of the Mach 5.

"You'd think they'd notice that after a while," I said, "and actually work it into their planning for a race. 'Gas? Check! Brake fluid? Check! Are my kid brother and his semi-sentient chimpanzee hiding in the fucking trunk? Ch...not so fast there, dumbass.'"
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 10:08 PM on February 21, 2012 [6 favorites]


There's a TNG novel (yes, I've read like three of them) that begins with Worf recommending they fire on an unknown ship, only to be denied by Riker or Picard, and naturally said unknown ship turns out to carry a novel-load of trouble. At the end of it, there's this dorky Superfriends-style "what have we learned today?" moment. Worf has the last word, to the effect of: "I have learned that if you people would let me shoot things when I want to, we would have far fewer problems on this ship."

And nobody says a damn thing, because they all know he's right.
posted by scaryblackdeath at 10:25 PM on February 21, 2012 [38 favorites]


TVTropes

Noooooooooo! Why did you link there?? I have things i need to do damn it... ;)
posted by usagizero at 10:29 PM on February 21, 2012 [4 favorites]


               CAPTAIN PICARD
    Ambassador, allow me to introduce my 
    Security Officer, Commander Worf, who 
    was once beaten up by an old woman.

               COMMANDER WORF
                (Sheepishly)
    Well, she was a monster at the time…

posted by ob1quixote at 10:31 PM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


I feel for him....
posted by Kronos_to_Earth at 10:34 PM on February 21, 2012


Captain, I recommend-

Shut your primitive, Klingon pie hole.
posted by airing nerdy laundry at 10:40 PM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Surely Klingons have gagh-holes. Klingons wouldn't eat anything as defenseless as pie.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 10:43 PM on February 21, 2012 [5 favorites]


I want to take Worf's tai chi class so bad.
posted by chrchr at 11:20 PM on February 21, 2012


Only red shirt that lives. He's doing something right.
posted by Smedleyman at 12:02 AM on February 22, 2012 [1 favorite]


There's a really weird moment at 14:42 where Riker looks directly at *us* as if to say, "Oh, that Worf!"
posted by drjimmy11 at 12:28 AM on February 22, 2012 [1 favorite]


Lest we forget, Worf was Kirk's (unsuccessful) public defender in Star Trek VI. The galaxy has been against him for decades.
posted by ShutterBun at 1:01 AM on February 22, 2012 [3 favorites]


Good God... he is ME. No one ever listens to me, either. And I have the same humongous cranium and backcombed hair. Maybe that's it. WHY DOES NO ONE LISTEN TO PEOPLE WITH MASSIVE FOREHEADS?

Bah.
posted by Decani at 1:08 AM on February 22, 2012 [7 favorites]


Once when I was very high, my roommate and I watched several episodes of Speed Racer and noticed in every episode, Spritle and Chim Chim hid in the trunk of the Mach 5.

I once wrote a play called boyELROY (I think it's going to be in the Vegas Fringe this year) which contains a scene in which Speed Racer notices a very bad smell coming from his trunk.
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 1:28 AM on February 22, 2012 [1 favorite]


My favorite part of this video is watching Worf's forehead get progressively smaller over the course of the series.
posted by malapropist at 2:01 AM on February 22, 2012 [3 favorites]


Word was really born too late for his ideal posting, if he'd been on moon base alpha then he would have always got to open fire on strange ships. Of course his weapons would always have been effective. Plus he would have been shot early on for looking foreign.
posted by biffa at 2:39 AM on February 22, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think it was the "Nitpicker's Guide" to Star Trek that pointed that no one ever gave Picard a straight answer. A typical com-badge exchange would be, "What is it? What's going on, Number One?" " I think you'd better take a look for yourself, Captain...."
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing at 3:34 AM on February 22, 2012 [9 favorites]


I feel like there's a video to be made of Alexander quietly leaving the room whenever one of Worf's workmates drops by.
posted by minifigs at 3:50 AM on February 22, 2012 [5 favorites]


After all that, is it any wonder that Worf has to find a happy place?
posted by KirkpatrickMac at 4:02 AM on February 22, 2012


...Worf is this huge thundering dork, like none of the other Klingon's are as concerned with tradition and honor as he is, he's like just a weirdo Civil-War Reenactor Klingon who got the job due to seniority and cause he's actually quite skilled, but completely lacks anything resembling a social sense.

So Worf is the Dwight Schrute of Starfleet. The enormous forehead confirms it.
posted by PlusDistance at 4:16 AM on February 22, 2012 [9 favorites]


Can you find a sappier Worf hypothesis?
posted by spitbull at 4:22 AM on February 22, 2012 [26 favorites]


Does YouTube limit the video length to 15 minutes? Because the sped-up video is really messing with my idea of what everybody's voices sound like. Riker's a bit fey, no?
posted by uncleozzy at 5:01 AM on February 22, 2012


Riker's a bit fey, no?

Yes.

Jonathan Frakes NEEDS that beard. Shaven Frakes reveals the fey.
posted by howfar at 5:51 AM on February 22, 2012 [2 favorites]


Worf is the Dwight Schrute of Starfleet.

Did I miss the episode where they put Worf's phaser in jelly?
posted by arcticseal at 6:19 AM on February 22, 2012


I feel bad for the guy, partly because I've been that guy in an organization. "Hey, maybe we shouldn't do something that's obviously a bad idea." "Pfft it'll be fine." Then something entirely predictable happens and everyone is all "How can this be?! Who could have foreseen?!" Me, you jackasses.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 6:39 AM on February 22, 2012 [14 favorites]


Also, in the clip at 3:36, Riker is basically agreeing with Worf. Although that possibly illustrates the deeper point here: even when Riker agrees with Worf, his tone of voice makes it sound like he's denying Worf's suggestion.
posted by DevilsAdvocate at 6:47 AM on February 22, 2012


Watching the video with YT captions on creates an experience not dissimilar to the Apple Juice Fax redub, but with a lot more mentions of someplace called Siesta Wharf.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 8:04 AM on February 22, 2012


Is there a compilation of people slowly walking toward the door in Picard's ready room, and inevitably turning around to have one last word with him? You could always see it coming. And so could the door, since it didn't even bother opening.
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing at 8:20 AM on February 22, 2012 [17 favorites]


This explains the worry lines on Worf's forehead.
posted by chavenet at 8:33 AM on February 22, 2012 [1 favorite]


Know what this really explains? Why Ron Moore threw down his pencil and went on to make Battlestar: Galactica.

Go ahead. Show me the YouTube video where it's apparent the BSG writers went to the same goddamn literary crutch over and over again to the point of absurdity.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 9:15 AM on February 22, 2012


Ron Moore first worked on DS9, though, which was much much better for actually giving Worf interesting character conflicts, rather than TNG's simple propensity to be all
Worf's Personality Is:
>:C
posted by Greg Nog at 9:44 AM on February 22, 2012 [2 favorites]


Jonathan Frakes NEEDS that beard.

I'm not sure how relevant this is, but I think now is a good time to link to Kate Beaton's guest Rikers: 1 2.
posted by grouse at 10:37 AM on February 22, 2012 [2 favorites]


Cool Papa Bell: Well, I don't think there's anything quite as obvious in BSG, but the show only lasted 4 seasons, not long enough to really put together such an impressive array of cliched actions regardless. But, BSG did have a lot of "Time to Get Tough, and So Say We All!" speeches from Adama as quick plot resolutions.
posted by Saxon Kane at 11:33 AM on February 22, 2012


Ron Moore first worked on DS9, though

Au contraire.
posted by Zozo at 1:03 PM on February 22, 2012


Lest we forget, Worf was Kirk's (unsuccessful) public defender in Star Trek VI. The galaxy has been against him for decades.

Actually, that was a different Worf, who was a (Klingon) Colonel in 2293, though both characters were played by Michael Dorn...

...and, I'll just go back to my corner now.
posted by xedrik at 1:48 PM on February 22, 2012 [5 favorites]


Surely Klingons have gagh-holes. Klingons wouldn't eat anything as defenseless as pie.

No, they have pie, it's just very Klingon pie.
posted by Jon_Evil at 1:49 PM on February 22, 2012


I'd like to see a supercut of every time somebody mentions what percentage of the shield is remaining in TNG. I'm pretty sure that's Worf's main responsibility in his job description: vocalizing the shield-o-meter readings. "Shields at 90%, captain." "Shields down to 20%." "Shields holding." They could have just displayed a progress bar in the corner of the main viewscreen, and freed him up to get more of his impulsive ideas rejected.
posted by steef at 2:03 PM on February 22, 2012 [8 favorites]


Zozo: I believe Greg Nog was using "first" according to def. 6 at the linked page.
posted by DevilsAdvocate at 3:18 PM on February 22, 2012


Go ahead. Show me the YouTube video where it's apparent the BSG writers went to the same goddamn literary crutch over and over again to the point of absurdity.

"god did it"
posted by speicus at 3:39 PM on February 22, 2012 [3 favorites]


I love the one where Riker, hanging upside down, nonchalantly denies Worf.
posted by Flunkie at 5:13 PM on February 22, 2012 [2 favorites]


Go ahead. Show me the YouTube video where it's apparent the BSG writers went to the same goddamn literary crutch over and over again to the point of absurdity.

"72 Hours Earlier".
posted by maledictory at 9:58 PM on February 22, 2012 [2 favorites]


Worf is the worst security officer ever. He's reckless, impulsive, and always recommends the wrong course of action.

Or, Worf is careful, suspicious, always recommends the course of action that prioritizes the safety of the crew over idle curiosity, and is constantly thwarted by his superiors who know, just know, that if it is as bad as Worf fears then at least Worf will give them time to figure out a new plan by putting his face where the phasers will be.

For all that TNG liked to boast about the new alliance between Federation and Klingon, the evidence of "equality" is in how they treat their lone Klingon officer: like a savage to be blithely tolerated. Let's just look at one example from the video. The Enterprise is about to host a Klingon party, and Picard orders Worf to greet them. Word requests that that duty be passed off to another, because his current status of disgrace in the Klingon Empire might be construed as insulting. That is basic diplomacy. The Klingons aren't going to ask why the person they're pretending doesn't exist hasn't come to meet them. But time and again, the humans of the Federation try to break Worf and turn him into a pissy homo sapiens.

Go back and look how many of the Enterprise's bullshit difficulties could have been avoided if they'd just raised shields and gone to yellow alert, like Worf said the first (and, admittedly, every) time. He's a great security officer. He's just surrounded by people who care more about proving to him that the Klingon way of life is barbaric rather than treat him like a competent and highly-trained security specialist.

CHEKOV: We do believe all planets have a sovereign claim to inalienable human rights.
AZETBUR: Inalien... If only you could hear yourselves? 'Human rights.' Why the very name is racist. The Federation is no more than a 'homo sapiens' only club.

posted by Errant at 4:27 AM on February 23, 2012 [15 favorites]


CHEKOV: We do believe all planets have a sovereign claim to inalienable human rights.
AZETBUR: Inalien... If only you could hear yourselves? 'Human rights.' Why the very name is racist. The Federation is no more than a 'homo sapiens' only club.


...moments before her father gets murdered by Klingon separatists disguised as Federation soldiers.

Stay classy, Klingons!
posted by ShutterBun at 7:43 PM on February 23, 2012 [1 favorite]


Totally random, but I always wondered if Dorn and Spiner thought that, despite having to spend more time in the makeup chair than the rest of the cast, it was worth it, considering they were surely hassled less often in public.

But apparently all the years of negating finally got to Dorn, as seen in this clip where he gives Stewart a beatdown on stage. Not sure what led up to it, though.

There are a bunch of other hilarious clips of the cast from various conventions, like when Stewart heckles Spiner, and several where Spiner heckles Stewart. It can be quite a time suck.
posted by TheSecretDecoderRing at 2:17 AM on February 25, 2012 [1 favorite]


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