Join 3,564 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


McDonalds: home of the McHotdog Mega Breakfast Sausage
March 13, 2012 12:07 PM   Subscribe

McDonalds menu items from around the world. And part 2.
posted by storybored (73 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
Most surprising item: pony.
posted by box at 12:18 PM on March 13, 2012


Most surprising item: pony.

Mmmmm. McFlicka with cheese!
posted by yoink at 12:19 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


I have had a McHomard and a taro pie. Both were quite tasty.
posted by MrMoonPie at 12:23 PM on March 13, 2012


You can get a Chicken McDo with Spaghetti in the Philippines.

"Every McDonald's commercial ends the same way, right? 'Prices and participation may vary.' I wanna open a McDonald's and not participate in anything. I wanna be a stubborn McDonald's owner. Cheeseburgers? Nope. We got spaghetti! And blankets!" - Mitch Hedberg
posted by griphus at 12:24 PM on March 13, 2012 [25 favorites]


Oh boo! I can't connect.

But Somen in Hawaii and Japan.

Smiles are free!
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 12:27 PM on March 13, 2012


Nah, man, they got the metric system. They wouldn't know what the fuck a Quarter Pounder is.
posted by Fizz at 12:27 PM on March 13, 2012 [3 favorites]


I love good food, and expensive meals like a true fancy lad. But there is a significant part of me that loves to go to foreign countries to eat their local potato chips and go to their local McDonald's. I always feel sheepish about this--and I never go because I really want a Quarter Pounder, or because I don't want the local food. It's just sort of awesome to have a McCurry or whatnot. Yum!
posted by Admiral Haddock at 12:29 PM on March 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


A few of these would do well in the US, I think. The potato and bacon pie, for instance, seems like just the kind of thing that would sell well here. Especially at the McDonald on Georgia Avenue in DC, by Howard University.

Yes, I think it would sell quite well there.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 12:29 PM on March 13, 2012 [6 favorites]


Also, I just had a small serving of tabouleh for lunch and scrolling through those pages was torture. I wanted to eat everything.
posted by Admiral Haddock at 12:30 PM on March 13, 2012


Every McDonald's commercial ends the same way, right? 'Prices and participation may vary.'

You laugh, or rather Mitch Hedberg does (did), but I worked at a Burger King that was owned by Marriott (who owned the whole travel plaza) and we hardly ever participated in promotions. You would be surprised how many people tell you they're going to sue because you're not going to give them two cheeseburgers for a buck or you don't have the new ChuckWagon(TM) Barbeque Sauce Whoppers. As a 17 year old kid, I mostly responded with "Ok."

This was also during the "Are you Herb?" promotion so for a while about eight billion times a day I would have to tell some trucker that no, indeed, I was not Herb, we were not participating in the "Are you Herb?" thing, and by asking me if I was Herb he was totally missing the point of the entire promotion anyway.

As much as I hated that job at the time I look back on it as a huge source of amusement in my life.
posted by bondcliff at 12:34 PM on March 13, 2012 [7 favorites]


McQueasy.
posted by Mister Fabulous at 12:39 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


The comments section is, as is always the case with such things, delightful.
posted by le morte de bea arthur at 12:43 PM on March 13, 2012


The links aren't working for me, but funny you should post this as I was just reading: Dunkin' aims at China with pork donuts, LeBron James.
posted by TurkishGolds at 12:44 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


10 years ago back when I was still eating fast food. I was visiting my family in India. McDonalds was still a relatively new thing in India so everyone was excited to take me out. What I found odd was that you would place your order and then have a seat. Your order was brought to you at your table. And they would also have a condiments only server whose job was to bring ketchup, mustard, etc. to the various tables. It was more of a diner style restaurant. And of course the 'Maharaja Mac' made with lamb. I mean that just sounds awesome when you order it.

Also on a side note. The Pizza Hut's in India had mustard on the table. All my Indian cousins would drown their pizza with mustard. Crazy.
posted by Fizz at 12:49 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Site seems to be dead. I hope it has the "corn pie" I saw in Bangkok. No, I didn't try it.
posted by MillMan at 12:49 PM on March 13, 2012


Shrimpburgers!
posted by Jode at 12:50 PM on March 13, 2012


Just like with the 101 kinds of Doritos and Kit Kat bars available outside of the USA, I don't understand why some of these aren't available in the States.

It's not the case that each one of these would be a sure fire hit, but from what I've seen of my friends' and family's flavor and texture preferences, there's no way some things like the chocolate orange pie, the bacon potato pie, and just about every burger wouldn't be huge sellers, at least as special offers if not full-time menu items.

Anyone with marketing insight know why they haven't tried some of these in the USA?
posted by lord_wolf at 12:53 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


I can remember being unusually excited about McDonalds Pizza back in the day. Or any pizza, for that matter. For a brief part of the 90s, large pizza restaurants were unusually popular in my neck of the woods. It's interesting how McDonalds responds to local market conditions like that.

If only they'd start selling donairs...
posted by i_have_a_computer at 12:53 PM on March 13, 2012


Many of those things look much better than the fare at the McDonalds where I work, which I end up eating at way too often (although they have some pretty good salads). Count me in with those who wish McDonalds would offer some of those in the states.
posted by TedW at 12:57 PM on March 13, 2012


Server fail. Was it good? Or just more free advertising for McDonald's?

Any McFlan?
posted by mrgrimm at 12:59 PM on March 13, 2012


Really want to see, but its all kinds of 404.
posted by jeffamaphone at 1:01 PM on March 13, 2012


Not to be "that guy" but if McDonald's could make money off of it in the States, they'd gladly serve us the stuff that seems so much more appetizing than the current menu. I'm afraid it's not the company who denies it but the taste of our fellow Americans.

And I say this as someone who, like Admiral Haddock, is fascinated by fast food in other lands. I'm glad someone else admitted it first, so I can feel okay admitting it. (I mean, not that I know him, but he is a highly ranked officer, so I feel like I'm in good company.)
posted by MCMikeNamara at 1:02 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


McSolidian
posted by Meatafoecure at 1:03 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


But there is a significant part of me that loves to go to foreign countries to eat their local potato chips

I love buying local potato chips, but it often burns me. Once I bought all the funny flavors of potato chips in a gas station in New Brunswick and they were all terrible. Ever since then I've been deeply suspicious of Canada.

10/15/93*: NEVER FORGET

*This date is almost certainly wrong
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:05 PM on March 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


Yeah, site is borked. (No one uses Coral Cache anymore?) Internet Archive link. (slow)
posted by xedrik at 1:06 PM on March 13, 2012


Bulgaroktonos

I grew up in the states and I'm now a Canadian citizen. When I first moved here in 2001 I freaked the out over the idea of Lays "Ketchup" potato chips. 0_o I still can't wrap my head around that flavour or why anyone would enjoy it. All my friends do.

And let's not talk about All-Dress.
posted by Fizz at 1:08 PM on March 13, 2012


I love buying local potato chips, but it often burns me.

I'd gladly suffer through experiences like your New Brunswick disappointment for the chance of finding another Walker's Roast Chicken, or Curry Twiglets.

I really don't eat much junk food or fast food. At home, I have potato chips once every three or four months. I could tell you the exact day I last had McDonald's (January 13, 2012). But it is such a treat. God, how I love it.

I'm going to Italy in July, and I'd welcome any junk food/fast food (e.g., France's Quick chain) recommendations you may have...
posted by Admiral Haddock at 1:11 PM on March 13, 2012


In Spain, they had a not-terrible version of gazpacho and a likewise not-terrible beer on tap, Estrella Damm. I lived on those two substances when I was stranded in the Madrid airport for a week a few years ago.
posted by koeselitz at 1:12 PM on March 13, 2012


What I found odd was that you would place your order and then have a seat. Your order was brought to you at your table. And they would also have a condiments only server whose job was to bring ketchup, mustard, etc. to the various tables. It was more of a diner style restaurant.

Not sure how exactly this tracks with your story, Fizz, but the very first McDonald's in Delhi (and possibly the whole country?) opened on Connaught Place while I was living in North India in 1999. They were doing North American style counter service, but they had a sort of greeter/guide at the door who would welcome you to the restaurant and explain how it worked - that you ordered your own food, carried it to your table on a tray, etc.

Our educated guess was that because they were charging high-end prices for the food, an Indian family would naturally expect that they'd be served at their table. Lavishly. I mean, the sort of people with the cash for McDonald's would have their own kitchen staff at home, and even the diviest little roadside dhaba has a couple of boys to run out and wipe down your table and bring you your food, right? So the greeter's job was to sort of explain McDonald's in the manner you would to participants in a costume party or theme night or something.

I wonder if they eventually just decided that the serve-yourself approach wouldn't fly in India and reconfigured into the approach you describe.
posted by gompa at 1:12 PM on March 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


Interesting gompa. I recall quite vividly being weirded out that was I being served fast-food. And it was at a McDonalds in Connaught Place.
posted by Fizz at 1:14 PM on March 13, 2012


Wow, no Royale with Cheese jokes yet?
posted by desjardins at 1:15 PM on March 13, 2012


Wow, no Royale with Cheese jokes yet?
*ahem
posted by Fizz at 1:16 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


MCMikeNamara: “Not to be "that guy" but if McDonald's could make money off of it in the States, they'd gladly serve us the stuff that seems so much more appetizing than the current menu. I'm afraid it's not the company who denies it but the taste of our fellow Americans.”

Well, I for one have really grown to love the taste of our fellow Americans. And you've got to hand it to McDonald's – sourcing their meat that way is a great way to cut down on homelessness around their locations and increase property values.
posted by koeselitz at 1:17 PM on March 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


Serious clone-stamped rice in the Hawaii Deluxe Breakfast
posted by scose at 1:18 PM on March 13, 2012 [3 favorites]


fascinated by fast food in other lands

Me too! I always feel mildly ashamed about it, but it's all part of the culinary exploration for me. I had a wicked-fantastic "pizza" in Cambodia (practically a cracker, with all manner of peculiar spicing), and the worlds worst "pizza" in Romania (ketchup instead of tomato sauce, barely hot, on a thick wad of bread).

Whenever I'm travelling I want to know what their "convenience foods" are, but I also want to know what their versions of of Western "convenience foods" are. So far it has never failed to be interesting, even if it has occasionally been borderline disastrous from an edibility standpoint.
posted by aramaic at 1:24 PM on March 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


Somebody in another thread about McDonalds' non-USA places said they should open up "McWorld" restaurants in appropriate cities in the States, offering the best of the best global McDonalds foods.
posted by Celsius1414 at 1:57 PM on March 13, 2012 [9 favorites]


And what do they call a Quarterpounder in the Netherlands? A Quarterpounder, 'cause fuck the metric system.

I was disappointed in the original links: no McKroket or any of the speciality milkshakes (speculaas, stroopwafel iirc).
posted by MartinWisse at 2:11 PM on March 13, 2012


McDonald's hasn't made it to Albania yet. Actually, none of the major Western chains have, although there's a KFC knockoff, AFC. And several places with Subway logos or knockoffs, although they're not actually Subways.

But there is a McDonald's knockoff chain. It has the restaurant layout, and the menus, and the look exactly right; it's remarkable, actually. It's so close, but they've chosen the unfortunate name* of Kolonat. They have a logo that's a yellow pseudo-K comprised of arcs, on a red background with white lettering on top. It's impressive how well they've translated the aesthetic and not just gone with "McDonells" or something, but this new, terrifying-in-English name.

I don't usually go for Western-style fast food when I travel, because there's always some sort of $1 street food that's amazing right next door. But I admit I had to try Kolonat when I saw their feature product; the Big Mac equivalent was the Skander Burger. (Skanderbeg is the single most important and revered hero in Albanian history; this is roughly the equivalent of selling an Abrahamburger Lincoln.) It was terrible, of course. I don't know what I was expecting, really.

*Albanian has a knack for unintentional hilarity; the word for "for sale" is "shitet", so there's all these beat-up old cars cars driving around with big signs announcing that they are shitet, and so on. And I have the mind of a twelve year old, so that never got old to me.
posted by Homeboy Trouble at 2:12 PM on March 13, 2012 [13 favorites]


Do you like the taste of the Spicy Chicken Sandwich at McD's?
Do you wish it were spicier?
Are you a vegetarian?

I just got back from India, and brother, let me tell you, those cats have it made. The paneer burger is holy-shit delicious, and I think I paid $4 or so for a large combo. Given the dearth of veg options here in the USA, I'm genuinely jealous.
posted by TheNewWazoo at 2:30 PM on March 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


I've said it once and I'll say it again:

1) start restaurant stateside serving McDonald's specialties from around the world.
2) ...
3) profit.
posted by nutate at 2:43 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


I moved to Germany two years ago and now I'm thinking I should visit my local McDonalds to try one of the weird German-only products.

The local McDo's has a deal called the Nighthammer (which vaguely means awesome-thing-for-the-end-of-the-night). It's a flat price deal for two Big Macs and fries and is only available after midnight... when you are drunk enough to eat McDonalds.
posted by sixohsix at 2:46 PM on March 13, 2012


A filet of fish in Singapore is exactly the same as one in New Zealand. However they have a delicious breakfast sandwich. Shenzhen in China did a chicken burger with a fantastic spicy sauce, and a drink that was kind of a root beer float with fizzy juice and something creamy that wasn't quite ice cream. I do like trying McDonalds around the world. Milan was the best purely because I could have a beer with my burger sitting across from the Duomo.

US McDonalds, despite being the home of the company, has the worst food and service I've had around the world - mind you, a McDonalds cheeseburger (hold the pickle) is consistently bad and delicious at the same time no matter where I go.
posted by tracicle at 2:50 PM on March 13, 2012


When I first moved here in 2001 I freaked the out over the idea of Lays "Ketchup" potato chips...I still can't wrap my head around that flavour or why anyone would enjoy it

I know right? No American would put this "ketchup" stuff on fried potatoes, it's quite simply a crazy combination of flavors!

Also, 6 years ago when I was in Japan none of these items were available there. What they did have was sour plum milkshakes (surprisingly not bad), teriyaki burgers (pork patty doused in teriyaki sauce on a bun, too rich and kinda nasty), "croquette" sandwiches (breaded patty of cheese or something with shrimp inside between steamed buns, which was not bad), and some kind of Big Mac with an egg, my recollection of that is fuzzy because it didn't appeal to me at all. I tried all the items that were differen tthan home once, then ate at the yakisoba place across from the McDonalds from then on. Even when you try new items from McDonalds, you still kinda know what to expect.
posted by Hoopo at 2:57 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


If I ruled the world we'd all be eating Abrahambuger Lincolns and washing them down with speculaas shakes.

Vote Danny The Boy 2012
posted by danny the boy at 3:00 PM on March 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


The paneer burger is holy-shit delicious, and I think I paid $4 or so for a large combo. Given the dearth of veg options here in the USA, I'm genuinely jealous.

Would you really trust a McDonald's here in the US to cook it properly and not slathered in beef fat?
posted by xedrik at 3:33 PM on March 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


Predictably, the Asian menu items look crazy delicious, but leave it to the Brits to fuck up both bacon and ketchup by putting them together between a hard roll. I'm an impoverished bachelor, and that's not even a sandwich that I would even think about making for myself, let alone pay someone else to prepare for me.
posted by Strange Interlude at 4:03 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


In America, we never run out of Maui Cheese Potatoes.
posted by Uppity Pigeon #2 at 4:08 PM on March 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


No Aussie Burger? Oh wait, they have a Kiwiburger and it seems to be exactly the same with a different, lesser sauce. Mmm beetroot. Years ago in Japan I had a McDonalds burger that was made with rice cakes instead of bread. It wasn't good.
posted by Wantok at 4:14 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Corn soup is a huge staple in Taiwanese McDonalds. Last I knew, 牛肉燴飯 beef with rice was also pretty huge.

As for snack foods, one of my favorites (both for humor value and for actual eating) is Lonely God.
posted by jiawen at 5:47 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


I remember traveling in Bangkok years ago and having a slight case of delhi-belly. As much as I had been enjoying the local food, a nice bland MCDonalds burger and fries really hit the spot.
posted by islander at 5:50 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Cheeseburgers? Nnnnnnope. We got spaghetti!
posted by duffell at 6:01 PM on March 13, 2012


I wonder if anyone offers the Pink McFlurry: a pulverized mechanically reclaimed meat and connective tissue shake with ammonia flavoring. Or is that just here? Because here they ruin it by pressing it into disks and frying it
posted by George_Spiggott at 6:58 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Double Beef Prosperity Burger

Oh my lord. Double Beef and Prosperity? The McD next door to my office does not offer this combo.

(Hold the onions. Thanks.)
posted by wallabear at 7:18 PM on March 13, 2012


but leave it to the Brits to fuck up both bacon and ketchup by putting them together between a hard roll.

I wouldn't use ketchup, but bacon butties are fantastic. Do not speak ill of bacon butties.
posted by Hoopo at 7:26 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Do you like the taste of the Spicy Chicken Sandwich at McD's?
Do you wish it were spicier?
Are you a vegetarian?


If you were a vegetarian why would you like a chicken sandwich?
posted by desjardins at 7:57 PM on March 13, 2012


Every day about 65 million people eat at a McDonald's restaurant somewhere in the world, more than ever before. The annual revenues of America's fast-food industry, adjusted for inflation, have risen by about 20 percent since 2001. The number of fast-food ads aimed at American children has greatly increased as well. The typical preschooler now sees about three fast-food ads on television every day. The typical teenager sees about five. The endless barrage of ads, toys, contests, and marketing gimmicks has fueled not only fast-food sales, but also a wide range of diet-related illnesses. About two thirds of the adults in the United States are obese or overweight. The obesity rate among preschoolers has doubled in the past 30 years. The rate among children aged 6 to 11 has tripled. And by some odd coincidence, the annual cost of the nation's obesity epidemic -- about $168 billion, as calculated by researchers at Emory University -- is the same as the amount of money Americans spent on fast food in 2011. -- Eric Schlosser, author, Fast Food Nation.
posted by crunchland at 7:57 PM on March 13, 2012


If you were a vegetarian why would you like a chicken sandwich?
posted by desjardins at 7:57 PM on March 13
I was not always a vegetarian, but Spicy Chicken Sandwiches were a guilty, guilty pleasure even when I did eat them.
posted by TheNewWazoo at 8:05 PM on March 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Many years ago I was traveling in England. As I roamed the streets of London, I wondered to myself what it was that really separated Americans from the English (besides, of course, an ocean and a common language). Then I saw a poster for the McBacon Sandwich, a menu item that as far as I could tell consisted of a bunch of bacon inside a bun. That's when I thought, this is what separates us...while Americans have no issue eating ridiculously bad food, we at least try to hide it a little bit. You know, with a leaf of iceberg lettuce or something. But the Brits? Naw, just throw that bacon between some bread and cheers then!
posted by mcstayinskool at 8:44 PM on March 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


Dude, where's the Bulgogi Burger? Very popular in South Korea.
posted by bardic at 9:40 PM on March 13, 2012


AnecdoteFilter: When I went to England back in the mid '90s, a friend and I decided to go check out the tower of London. Fun! Jewels! Graffiti from the mid 1500's! Sign me up!

So we get there and coincidentally it's raining like hell. And the line is literally out the door and down the street. So we decide to get out of the rain, and all we can find is literally the Tower of London McDonalds. Shit, it's raining like Noah should start building something, a literal downpour, so we go in.

I should preface this by saying that I am a 40 something man, and I've eaten at more than one three star Michelin restaurants, but goddamn if that Big Mac and fries on a cold Tuesday in '96 wasn't one of the most comforting meals I've ever had. It was like I was biting into an American dream.

Kirk, if you're still out there, I'd love to share a burger with you again.
posted by Sphinx at 12:28 AM on March 14, 2012


If you really want to appreciate the difference between American and English fast food, try out a Wimpies some time. They manage to make fast food well, slow.
posted by MartinWisse at 12:31 AM on March 14, 2012 [1 favorite]


Paneer tikka sandwich with raita in Subway UK. Blew my mind when I saw that. I mean, it's there on the menu in India; didn't realize UK also would take to it.

So there's KFC Chicken Rice in Malaysia, but that's assuming you don't get assaulted while ordering your food.
posted by the cydonian at 12:54 AM on March 14, 2012


only wanted to check if Prosperity Burger is represented. *checks* ah, yes....
posted by cendawanita at 2:02 AM on March 14, 2012


Shake Shake fries. You dump your fries into a bag, sprinkle seasoning on them, and shake. There are several different flavors including...salt and pepper.

HUBRIS, WHAT HAST THOU WROUGHT?
posted by tumid dahlia at 2:14 AM on March 14, 2012


Also...no McFeast (was once a superior Whopper but is now an inferior Quarter Pounder*) or McPrawns?

*Here in Oz you have to order the Quarter Pounder as the One-Tenth-of-a-Kilogramer otherwise they fling hot apple pie filling in your face and call you a "seppo-lover".
posted by tumid dahlia at 2:19 AM on March 14, 2012 [1 favorite]


but leave it to the Brits to fuck up both bacon and ketchup by putting them together between a hard roll

Leave it to the Americans to fuck up food the world over. HAMBURGER.
(Also, it's a soft roll, not that it makes an enormous amount of difference.)
posted by Quantum's Deadly Fist at 3:32 AM on March 14, 2012


leave it to the Brits to fuck up both bacon and ketchup -- Way back in the 80's, I went to England on a school trip. It was one of those 'meals provided' deals, and since I'd spent all my money just to go on the trip, venturing out to get my own meals wasn't an option. So the hotel restaurant meal one night was "barbecued chicken." It should have set off alarm bells, but even I was surprised when the plate was put in front of me.

A boiled chicken leg slathered with ketchup.
posted by crunchland at 5:34 AM on March 14, 2012


Shall I list all the terrible meals I've eaten in the US? Is that now the point of this thread?
posted by Quantum's Deadly Fist at 5:47 AM on March 14, 2012


Also, getting misty over long-defunct McDonald's menu items. McLean Deluxe, we hardly knew ye.
posted by box at 7:07 AM on March 14, 2012 [1 favorite]


?

What's wrong with a bacon butty anyway? Granted, brown sauce is best but ketchup is an adequate substitute.
posted by MartinWisse at 2:23 PM on March 14, 2012 [2 favorites]


I would murder/death/kill for that molten chocolate w/orange pie.
posted by deborah at 1:05 AM on March 15, 2012


The McBacon Sandwich took 13 years to get on the menu. Thirteen years. For a staple of British breakfasts, a bacon sandwich with brown sauce.

Americans, and in particular the Chicago head office just couldn't understand it.

It is truly amazing to me that McD's ever allowed any of the regional alternatives to be added. Ever.
posted by Hugh Routley at 1:52 PM on March 17, 2012


It is truly amazing to me that McD's ever allowed any of the regional alternatives to be added. Ever.


Well, that is how one of their most iconic products started.
posted by TedW at 4:56 AM on March 18, 2012


« Older Just the First Frame...  |  “For some reason, the GOP has ... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments