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BBQ Sauce Reviews
April 6, 2012 3:59 PM   Subscribe

BBQ Sauce Reviews
posted by Trurl (43 comments total) 26 users marked this as a favorite

 
I am pleased to confirm that the destination of the above link does indeed lead the Metafilter reader to BBQ sauce reviews.
posted by eschatfische at 4:04 PM on April 6, 2012 [6 favorites]


That is borderline pornographic.
posted by griphus at 4:07 PM on April 6, 2012


Does what it says on the jar of BBQ Sauce.
posted by nathancaswell at 4:09 PM on April 6, 2012


That is borderline completely pornographic.

Yum.
posted by Forktine at 4:10 PM on April 6, 2012


My whole face started watering when I saw the plate of cut up pork about halfway down the page.
posted by Lukenlogs at 4:10 PM on April 6, 2012 [2 favorites]


My favorite is Night of the Living BBQ sauce. I discovered it because it was the only one on the shelf without high-fructose corn syrup. It's plenty spicy; I used to use it for meatloaf.
posted by RobotVoodooPower at 4:13 PM on April 6, 2012


One of the bad things about living overseas: it's pretty much impossible for me to try any of these. One of the good things: learning how to make my own versions. I picked up Soaked, Slathered, and Seasoned a couple years ago, and found out making rubs and sauces (and brines, and glazes, and so much more) is really, really not that difficult.

Sites like this one give me ideas for new seasonings, and new sauces, which pretty much makes my morning.
posted by Ghidorah at 4:22 PM on April 6, 2012 [1 favorite]


Never put the sauce on the meat when grilling over high heat. The sugar will burn. Save the sauce for the very end on the grill if you must or slather it on after its off the grill for best results.
posted by Che boludo! at 4:25 PM on April 6, 2012 [2 favorites]


Never put the sauce on the meat when grilling over high heat.

Barbeque has so many regional variations. I'm from the "never cook the meat over high heat" part of the world. I recently moved from East Texas wet barbecue land to West Texas dry. Some of the most amazing BBQ I've had recently has been completely sauceless.

Also, of the central texas sauces reviewed, I agree with the reviewer. This must mean he's right.
posted by Mad_Carew at 4:29 PM on April 6, 2012


Some of the most amazing BBQ I've had recently has been completely sauceless.

Sounds like you've been eating here.
posted by BigSky at 4:36 PM on April 6, 2012


Also, of the central texas sauces reviewed, I agree with the reviewer. This must mean he's right.

Is there a regional section? This has renewed my quest to find Texas bbq sauce while I'm still transplanted here in California, as I can't find anything that reminds me of home.

I'm pretty close to just ordering some from Black's.

And maybe a couple of pounds of brisket too.
You want the lean or the fatty brisket?
Lean please. Plus an end if you got one.

posted by Big_B at 4:39 PM on April 6, 2012


This is important. I thought I hated barbeque sauce until I had the good stuff. I will be making frequent use of this website as I work to incorporate barbeque sauce into more and more parts of my life.
posted by invitapriore at 4:46 PM on April 6, 2012


> I recently moved from East Texas wet barbecue land to West Texas dry. Some of the most amazing BBQ I've had recently has been completely sauceless.

(high five) Barbecue sauce can be amazing, but never on actual barbecue (there was this woman in Rochester who's "Slammin' Sauce", only available at first at the local mom n pop butcher shop/mini grocery, we deemed "Miss Betty's Crack Sauce" the summer we slathered it on portobello "steaks" and things like that to accommodate my sister's then-boyfriend, a vegan). For barbecue, dry rub, baby, and rub it real good.

Thankfully I (by coincidence?) happened to move to one of the barbecue capitals of the country, and one that believes in 1) low n' slow only 2) dry racks are better than wet, woo.
posted by ifjuly at 4:59 PM on April 6, 2012


I will be making frequent use of this website as I work to incorporate barbeque sauce into more and more parts of my life.

Let's not get carried away, now. You really should be limiting BBQ sauce to the "preparing and eating food" part of your life.
posted by asnider at 5:08 PM on April 6, 2012


In the city where I used to live, there was a BBQ restaurant that had an absolutely awesome blueberry-chipotle sauce they put on their (dry-rubbed/smoked) ribs. Ever since I left I've been trying to recreate it for myself, and I finally figured out a way to start with a straightforward tomato-based BBQ sauce and add to it. I'm looking forward to trying a few of these as my base next time.

You really should be limiting BBQ sauce to the "preparing and eating food" part of your life.

IN BED!!
posted by Greg_Ace at 5:15 PM on April 6, 2012


This rub is a rub that I can recommend with no hesitation whatsoever!

I'd like to be alone, for a little while, with my rub. Thanks for understanding.
posted by SPrintF at 5:25 PM on April 6, 2012


Greg_Ace, are you talking about 12 Bones in Asheville by any chance? Dreamy dreamy place.
posted by ifjuly at 5:55 PM on April 6, 2012


Behold! I bring you fire from the heavens!

*Mix Open Pit BBQ Sauce with basic pizza sauce at a near one-to-one ratio, slightly favoring the Open Pit.
*Apply sauce liberally to waiting pizza crust. Cover with sheets of mozzarella.
*Do not add chicken. It may seem like a good idea, but the texture and adhesion problems are insoluble.
*Bake until the cheese just starts to color.
*Turn on the broiler for a minute or so to maximize caramelization.
*Enjoy.
posted by Iridic at 5:57 PM on April 6, 2012


I recently moved from East Texas wet barbecue land to West Texas dry. Some of the most amazing BBQ I've had recently has been completely sauceless.


Hmmmm sauceless BBQ. A true sign of a master.
posted by Che boludo! at 6:03 PM on April 6, 2012


Sadly, the blog has a bias against eastern NC barbecue sauce.
posted by needled at 6:05 PM on April 6, 2012


I find the idea of bottled NC (aka real) barbecue sauce bizarre. If you've got the time to cook a whole pig for 16 hours, can't you just buy the vinegar to put on it?
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 6:06 PM on April 6, 2012 [1 favorite]


You people. Can't you at least give hints for recipes for us heathens in non-BBQ country?
posted by stratastar at 6:27 PM on April 6, 2012 [1 favorite]


Do people cooking a whole pig buy and use bottles sauce?
posted by Che boludo! at 6:32 PM on April 6, 2012


Bulgaroktonos, I also find the idea of bottled eastern NC-style sauce bizarre, but the blog in question keeps referring to this style of sauce as "watery" and "thin," and fails to give both eastern and western NC barbecue sauces a fair shake. The reviewer appears to favor thick, gooey sauces.
posted by needled at 6:51 PM on April 6, 2012


(I admit to a hankering for a proper parrillada and chimichurri sauce now)
posted by needled at 6:53 PM on April 6, 2012


Thank you very much, Trurl. I often make my own, but this is a fine resource.
posted by Splunge at 6:56 PM on April 6, 2012


No Mambo sauce?
posted by gjc at 7:18 PM on April 6, 2012


> I've been to many a roast, and rarely seen a bottle of BBQ sauce. Hot sauce? Sure. Bottled mustard or vinegar? Yes. Powdered onion? Celery seed? Oregano? Allspice? Or maybe flaked corn husk? Sure, all of those. But I've also been to plenty where the bottle is the whole of it. Maybe with some jarred applesauce, maybe with some aged honey. I've even seen shelf-bought catsup added by people with serious intentions.

There are people who make a roast, maybe just a butt or side over slow heat, who use only bottled sauce, and call it authentic. I don't even care if they are "right" or "wrong" with the puritans -- The best BBQ captures all the flavor available, which has more to do with the person on the spit than the person with the whisk (don't let the person with the whisk go crazy).

Also, mustard-based is the only way to go and anyone who says different is a heathen.
posted by timfinnie at 7:30 PM on April 6, 2012


I dunno. BBQ sauce, in all three incarnations - sweet, tangy and mustard - is easy to make, and invites experimentation. You don't have to put in a lot of time and money to find a sauce that works for you. Same deal for rubs. (The big secret? Get one of those "bullet blenders.")

Now, if the site rated sauce recipes, I might be on board...
posted by Slap*Happy at 7:34 PM on April 6, 2012 [2 favorites]


Pfui. No Arthur Bryant's sauce. KC, here Ah come!
posted by drhydro at 8:37 PM on April 6, 2012


ifjuly, yes I am. And though I've got my own smoker and have come up with at least a decent approximation of their blueberry-chipotle rib sauce, I still miss it so.
posted by Greg_Ace at 8:43 PM on April 6, 2012


Man it's amazing what they can do with a whole shitload of salt and sugar these days.
posted by tumid dahlia at 8:44 PM on April 6, 2012


I also find the idea of bottled eastern NC-style sauce bizarre, but the blog in question keeps referring to this style of sauce as "watery" and "thin," and fails to give both eastern and western NC barbecue sauces a fair shake.

Yeah, I thought it strange to criticize Bone Suckin Sauce for being thin, but it was awarded 5 out of 5, and more importantly, reminded me to pick up a jar.
posted by BigSky at 9:39 PM on April 6, 2012


The best BBQ captures all the flavor available, which has more to do with the person on the spit than the person with the whisk

If you have a person on the spit, I'm not sure it matters what kind of sauce you are using.
posted by Forktine at 10:23 PM on April 6, 2012 [2 favorites]


Man it's amazing what they can do with a whole shitload of salt and sugar high fructose corn syrup these days. FTFY.
posted by exphysicist345 at 11:17 PM on April 6, 2012


Okay, read one page of that and now I have to go cook some meat.
posted by Grimgrin at 12:49 AM on April 7, 2012


On a related topic: can anyone recommend online sites with recipes for homemade barbecue sauces? My google attempts tend to turn up seo-optimizing websites and I worry that I may be missing some gems.
posted by sy at 5:46 AM on April 7, 2012


There is not a single review by BBQ. There are only reviews of BBQ. I sooooo wanted to know what BBQ thought.
posted by srboisvert at 6:07 AM on April 7, 2012


Scanning the front page, I see no mention of Memphis, and thus cannot take this site seriously.
I mean, some of these poor lost souls probably even think BBQ involves beef.
posted by grimjeer at 8:01 AM on April 7, 2012


Maybe it's because I'm not born and raised, just relocated to, but despite my overwhelming love of the pig I think Texas brisket is definitely a-ok too. Grew up eating my dad's version of both sorts, maybe that's why. He made the mistake of ordering brisket in Memphis while visiting once and of course being disappointed...he consoled himself with The Bar-B-Q Shop's Dancing Pigs sauce though.
posted by ifjuly at 8:11 AM on April 7, 2012


OK now I want a Hogzilla with lots of awesome Southern-style sides and am a day's drive away from Asheville. Bah.
posted by ifjuly at 8:12 AM on April 7, 2012


@sy -- The Bitten Word has three sauce recipes here . I made the mustard sauce and it came out well. At least to this North Westerner.
posted by faceonmars at 11:41 AM on April 7, 2012


Whoa, so I was clicking around, looking for a picture of a local barbecue place's sauce, when I found this thread—and when I clicked through to the review site, I did a double-take, 'cause today's reviewed sauce just happens to be from Pappy's Smokehouse, one of my hometown's top 'cue joints...and it got five stars. Pretty sweet.
posted by limeonaire at 2:15 PM on April 16, 2012


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