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Slanted and and and Enchanted
April 20, 2012 6:21 AM   Subscribe


 
I envy people into Pavement because they really seem to love them. I'm don't see the appeal but there is no doubt that they had to be one of the most influential indie rock bands of all time.
posted by josher71 at 6:28 AM on April 20, 2012


There were one of the few good things to come out of the festering hellhole that is Stockton, California.
posted by exogenous at 6:37 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Most indie rock is neither indie nor rock.
posted by jonmc at 6:42 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Wow! I was just listening to that yesterday. Awesome! Happy birthday, Slanted!
posted by koeselitz at 6:42 AM on April 20, 2012


jonmc: “Most indie rock is neither indie nor rock.”

Man, it would make me sad if jonmc of all people didn't appreciate the awesome rockness that is Pavement.
posted by koeselitz at 6:44 AM on April 20, 2012


Turned 20, eh? It's old enough to drink in Japan!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 6:44 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Sorry, koeselitz. Not my cup of tea.
posted by jonmc at 6:48 AM on April 20, 2012


I also have to say that I will be going out to my favorite record stores tomorrow in honor of International Record Store Day, and if IRSD and Slanted and Enchanted's birthday happen to align somehow, that will be all right with me, as I could use a second copy (mine is getting pretty worn.)
posted by koeselitz at 6:48 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]




"They called us the next Who. Then they called us the kings of 'lo-fi.' And Sebadoh was pissed! And The Grifters were pissed! And Pavement was pissed!"
- Robert Pollard, during the Guided By Voices farewell tour
posted by RobotVoodooPower at 6:53 AM on April 20, 2012 [6 favorites]


You now who else turns 20 (plus 103) today????
posted by spicynuts at 6:54 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Here's "Trigger Cut." Don't really know how to describe it but something happened to me when I heard this.
posted by escabeche at 6:55 AM on April 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


It's so freaking insistent.

posted by escabeche at 6:55 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


I like Pavement, but I can't listen to anything by them without thinking of the Beavis and Butthead episode where they were watching "Rattled By The Rush" and started yelling "Try harder, dammit! Try harder!"
posted by The Card Cheat at 6:56 AM on April 20, 2012 [4 favorites]


Here. That is all.
posted by roboton666 at 7:06 AM on April 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


You now who else turns 20 (plus 103) today????

Hmm... no, I don't. If it was just a few days earlier I'd have said Charlie Chaplin.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 7:16 AM on April 20, 2012


Pavement has been foisted upon me by a never ending stream of indie dudes who just adore Stephen Malkmus and assume that (1) I've never heard of them before and (2) that they're going to change my life. It's like music evangelism. Pavement is all right, but they're not really my jam, and telling me that I simply have to hear Gold Soundz or Cut Your Hair on vinyl or live or whatever to really get it, no, it's okay, I'm familiar. I'll pass.

I don't know, maybe I would have enjoyed them more had they not been so closely associated with a handful of music snob types? Maybe I should give them another shot?
posted by troika at 7:17 AM on April 20, 2012


Wow, how many people are going to come in here to tell us how they really don't like Pavement all that much?
posted by koeselitz at 7:18 AM on April 20, 2012 [6 favorites]


38.
posted by spicynuts at 7:21 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


AND YOU KNOW WHO ELSE 38 PEOPLE DON'T LIKE?
posted by nebulawindphone at 7:22 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Saw them open for Sonic Youth in 1992, juuuuuuuuuuust before S+E came out. They were a total epiphany. Sloppy, exuberant, catchy. Gary Young did a handstand while they played "Killing Me", Bobby N. was apparently so drunk he had to hold himself up with the mic stand while he screamed along with "Debris Slide". Little Debbie snack cakes and rubber bands (for your hair) were handed out by them before the show.

One of my best teenage memories. Went right out and picked up a 7". And special ordered S+E from the local Sound Warehouse the minute it came out. Pavement (along with the Grifters and Polvo) became one of my favorite bands all through college.

I wrote them after that first show, and got a really nice postcard back from Spiral Stairs. For a while, I'd get postcards from them whenever they went on tour. The second time I saw them at Trees in Dallas, I got to sit down and have a drink with Spiral and SM. They were fantastically nice and down to earth.

Some point around Wowee Zowee, I kind of lost them. They were getting a lot bigger. You could hear the personal tensions in the band. The postcards became form letters, and then became nothing. Gary Young got replaced by what's his face. That, and I always thought that, while Watery, Domestic and Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain represented a break from their previous sound, at least they were a logical progression...and I loved them. Wowee Zowee just sorta stank to me. To their credit, I did go back later and listen to albums after that. Some good stuff. Shady Lane is especially nice.

Anyway. I still break out S+E and Westing frequently. Few albums remind me of youth like those do. They are damn near perfect.
posted by kaseijin at 7:23 AM on April 20, 2012 [8 favorites]


(that said, Malkmus' well-documented love of fantasy sports is delightful in a way I can't really put my finger on)
posted by troika at 7:24 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


troika: “I don't know, maybe I would have enjoyed them more had they not been so closely associated with a handful of music snob types? Maybe I should give them another shot?”

I would sit here telling you how this band changed my life, how Steve Malkmus' screeches and yawps and quiet reveries make me incredibly happy, how songs like this feel like they're about something but I don't know what and it means a lot to me, but...

If you've heard all that, whatever. You are totally not required to like Pavement. People can like what they like. If you dig Pavement, I think that's great. If not, that's just fine with me.
posted by koeselitz at 7:29 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


this
posted by koeselitz at 7:29 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


SHOUT OUT TO THE SILVER JEWS!
posted by spicynuts at 7:30 AM on April 20, 2012 [7 favorites]


Slanted and Enchanted was/is the perfect extension of Television and Pere Ubu-era punk. Just a brilliant sideways evolution, knowing and sloppy and sharp and fun.
posted by mediareport at 7:33 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


The Fall’s Mark E. Smith said Pavement were a “rip off” of his band, and they “didn’t have an original idea in their heads.”

Ha. I did not know that.
posted by mediareport at 7:37 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


I also have to say that I will be going out to my favorite record stores tomorrow in honor of International Record Store Day, and if IRSD and Slanted and Enchanted's birthday happen to align somehow, that will be all right with me, as I could use a second copy (mine is getting pretty worn.)

koeselitz, you should get your hands on the expanded re-release (Luxe & Reduxe) that was put out a few years ago. It's worth it for the awesome extra material.
posted by brand-gnu at 7:37 AM on April 20, 2012


> Some point around Wowee Zowee, I kind of lost them.

WZ was my introduction to Pavement. I guess in hindsight the extreme stylistic variations might be a sign of the tensions within the band you mention, but I kind of dug how all-over-the-place it was, even if not all of it worked.
posted by The Card Cheat at 7:40 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Yeah, that was always my interpretation it, The Card Cheat. And magazines were full of stories about them teetering on breakup. It started a bit before that, though. One of the songs on Watery, Domestic even is a very pointed jab from SM to Spiral.
posted by kaseijin at 7:47 AM on April 20, 2012


Also, brand-gnu -- if you are into vinyl at all, you can totally get all of that extra material on vinyl from various places, probably for a good price now that it's been released on CD. "Unreleased" in their usage really just means "unreleased by Matador".
posted by kaseijin at 7:53 AM on April 20, 2012


brand-gnu: “koeselitz, you should get your hands on the expanded re-release (Luxe & Reduxe) that was put out a few years ago. It's worth it for the awesome extra material.”

Nah, I let that pass me by – I had all the extra material already in my collection (except the Brixton Academy show, maybe that would be worth it.) And on vinyl, too. Yeah, I'm one of those annoying guys. :)
posted by koeselitz at 7:54 AM on April 20, 2012


kaseijin: “One of the songs on Watery, Domestic even is a very pointed jab from SM to Spiral.”

Holy crap, seriously? That's been my favorite record since I don't even know when, and I never knew that. Which one?
posted by koeselitz at 7:55 AM on April 20, 2012


Like a lot of people in the UK - or at least, a lot of teenage indie fans living in towns where Our Price was the only record vendor - it was Blur's self-titled album in '97 that made me check out Pavement. I was fifteen then, so only just listening to John Peel, and Brighten The Corners had come out - Shady Lane and Stereo were Proper Chart Hits over here. (If memory serves Major Leagues was performed on Top of the Pops, the TV music show *everyone* watched.) I prefer Slanted and Enchanted, probably, but I had to start somewhere. One of my favourite bands since 1999 is The Fall, so they could choose worse to rip off.

To me, though, S&E was always a 'classic' rather than a contemporary album. When Parklife and His and Hers turn twenty, that's when I'll start wondering where all the years went.
posted by mippy at 7:55 AM on April 20, 2012


I saw Sonic Youth live as a student, but missed Pavement's last tour. 'They'll come again', I thought, as I forked over my £6 for JJ72 instead. I suppose a term of listening to Good Mornign Captain in my halls of residence room nightly had fucked my brain.
posted by mippy at 7:57 AM on April 20, 2012


Would it kill these music blogs to have an appropriate picture of the band that matches the article content? Gary Young's drumming, production work and antics should not be forgotten about - the chemistry of all three players is what makes this record so great. To have 'pavement mark II' pictures associated with an article celebrating it's 20th anniversary is just wrong and bad editorial form. That said, this record just 'did something' to how me and my friends listened to and enjoyed guitar rock. It's influence is massive.
posted by mctsonic at 8:06 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


oops 'its influence is massive'
posted by mctsonic at 8:07 AM on April 20, 2012


Mark E. Smith, NME, late 1982: "Right fuckin' rip offs - they've sold about 50 thousand records, those bastards."

Yeah, well, still a great band. "Slay Tracks" is absolutely as great as the "Bingo Masters Break-Out" debut single.

Bought this thing the week it came out on the strength of the killer "Demolition Plot J-7" single and we must have played it a thousand times that year. Christ, I'm getting old.

SEEK: "Perfume V," "No Life Singed Her," "Zürich Is Stained," "Here," "Conduit for Sale!" (a canny rewrite of The Fall's "New Face in Hell")

DESTROY: Fame Throwa
posted by porn in the woods at 8:09 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


oops, late 1992
Is this record sufficiently coffee table?
posted by porn in the woods at 8:09 AM on April 20, 2012


Mark E Smith is a guy who once fired a guitarist who'd been in the band for 20 years by holding a press conference and announcing he was being let go for "improper amplifier maintenance." I think at this point, being accused of being a rip off by Mark E Smith is pretty much a compliment.
posted by koeselitz at 8:12 AM on April 20, 2012 [5 favorites]


Oh, and the 'mature' sound they ushered in with the great Watery, Domestic EP in Fall '92, plus Crooked Rain... 18 months later later, is hard to top. Lost touch with them after Wowee Zowee.
posted by porn in the woods at 8:12 AM on April 20, 2012


Pavement was the first band I became obsessed with. I discovered them, as many people did, through Cut Your Hair, and thanks to a friend in high school who dubbed me copies of Westing and S & E, I quickly fell in love. I was lucky enough to see them in Kansas City for their reunion, which was awesome. Also, Bob Nastanovich totally lives in my town, and he used to run a trivia night at a local bar and he's totally cool. So there.
posted by cottoncandybeard at 8:13 AM on April 20, 2012


Some point around Wowee Zowee, I kind of lost them.

If I recall correctly, my initial response to Brighten the Corners was "Wait, what?" as I imagined the sound of a cash register signifying $16 was now irretrievably gooooooone.
posted by psoas at 8:14 AM on April 20, 2012


koeselitz: Holy crap, seriously? That's been my favorite record since I don't even know when, and I never knew that. Which one?

Story at the time was that "Shoot the Singer" was a thinly veiled song about the faltering relationship between Malkmus and Kannberg under the pressure of growing fame.

There's a line in another song from the same recording session (though released as a B-side on the "Trigger Cut" single), where Malkmus shouts "I can't live beside the Spiral Staircase when the money's coming in!". Dunno if that means anything. It made some people sit up and question it, but I think it's probably just coincidence or cheekiness.
posted by kaseijin at 8:18 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Some rock bands make a record, and then go on tour playing the songs like they put on the record. Pavement made records, and then went on tour and played the songs however they felt like that day. I really like that.
posted by Quonab at 8:18 AM on April 20, 2012


Mark E. Smith did have a point when he claimed he was being ripped off: the music for "Conduit for Sale!" is the same as "New Face in Hell".
posted by with hidden noise at 8:24 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Pavement are the band that taught me to stop looking for meaning in lyrics.
posted by klangklangston at 8:33 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Awww....I remember buying this album in junior year of high school. I didn't know anyone at school who liked them and that made the "discovery" of them all the more awesome. I remember the cool record store dude I bought this from nodding sagely, approving my purchase.

This is one of the few "indie" albums I ever owned; otherwise it was pretty much heavy \m/etal 24-7. I sold my CD during college to pay for, ah, textbooks or something. I should get a new copy.
posted by medeine at 8:50 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Mark E. Smith did have a point when he claimed he was being ripped off: the music for "Conduit for Sale!" is the same as "New Face in Hell" .

I absolutely love Pavement, but damn, I now have to think of Conduit for Sale as basically a cover song.
posted by gwint at 8:55 AM on April 20, 2012


Love Pavement. Can't stop loving them. Don't proselytize, though.

Saw lots of shows back in the day. At a certain point, Malkmus eye-rolled his way through Spiral Stairs' songs.

Once I helped Malkmus get backstage again after he lost his laminate. I was in my twenties, but I might as well have been 14.

What what to the Silver Jews too. I probably listen to them more than Pavement these days.
posted by dontoine at 8:59 AM on April 20, 2012


Pavement made records, and then went on tour and played the songs however they felt like that day. I really like that.

Me too. I don't really care too much about Pavement one way or the other, but I definitely like that. And it's really kind of sad, isn't it, that there are so few bands who've done it like that. Playing the same tunes over and over and over and over, the same damn way every night of a musician's touring life... doesn't it seem ridiculous, and kind of tragic?

Dylan didn't/doesn't do that shit, either.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:59 AM on April 20, 2012




And here's a really good example of their "never never give a single fuck" approach to live playing – one of my absolute favorites, and it's on freaking Leno for god's sake – CUT YOUR HAIR
posted by koeselitz at 9:17 AM on April 20, 2012


Slanted and Enchanted was pavement's sellout album. They sold out from day one. The whole Dotcom era's "I don't give a fuck" attitude owes itself to Pavement. I love that album. It's more a defining moment for me musically than Nevermind will ever be. Did I mention that I love Slanted And Enchanted, and in order to be my friend, you have to love it too? You can hate on it and be my pal, but you ain't gonna be my FREN.

You put S&E with Bedhead's What Fun Life Was, follow that up with some Polvo and you have a musical cocktail that resembles a magic potion.

Zurich Is Stained. Summer Babe. Here.

Love.
posted by roboton666 at 9:29 AM on April 20, 2012


Since today is as good a day as any to let a Pavement playlist play in the background, this morning I put together a YouTube playlist, #1 - #60, ordered from a fun ILM Best Pavement Tracks poll earlier this year (final tallies here). Plenty of S/E included :)

The Pavement 60 Playlist
posted by NolanRyanHatesMatches at 9:36 AM on April 20, 2012 [5 favorites]


It's also a good day to have a listen to Sat. Nite Duets, the only contemporary band I know of that both sounds like Pavement and is good.
posted by escabeche at 9:39 AM on April 20, 2012


Wow. I so genuinely loved Slanted and Enchanted when it came out. And not because I was trying to earn some sort of elusive indie cred or be part of a cultural zeitgeist -- I was already a college radio DJ, and so were most of my friends, and we didn't need to score cool points with anybody. I loved it because I LOVED it -- all the catchy (yet not too obvious) sideways pop melodies, and guitars that careened and buzzsawed so terrifically, plus Malkmus' oblique lyrics that we could all nonetheless sing along with within the space of a week. It was perfectly formed, and seemed like it'd always been there.

This was well before the Internet was too prevalent, and even with the CMJ charts coming over to our station weekly, it was still possible to live in a little college-town bubble without constant reminders of what the rest of the world was digging. But yeah, as the next few months went out, it slowly dawned on me that Pavement fandom was a huge thing among certain people like us, everywhere. I traveled a bit that summer and got to see them play not only in our Missouri college town but also San Francisco and New York. The latter two shows were pretty big (at least by indie standards of the time), and every audience member was so into it. It was totally fun.

For me personally, the period of about April to November 1992 had a crazy dramatic arc -- I graduated from college, traveled around with my friends in "let's have one last good time" trips, and had my share of romantic drama, truly-leaving-my-parents'-nest drama, and trying-to-find-a-job drama. Finally that fall I took my sub-$500 bank account and moved by myself halfway across the country to D.C., where I knew just one person and didn't have a job. For a lot of that time, it seemed like I was listening to Slanted and Enchanted (or watching The Kids in the Hall), so now they're tangled up in all my memories of that era.

For whatever reason, Pavement and some other bands I loved in the '90s (and still do) -- like Yo La Tengo, Sonic Youth, Stereolab, etc. -- really bring out reactionary anti-fan attitudes in some people, like, "The only reason you like THAT band is because you're trying to be cool, not because you really like them." UGH. No, really, I do like how they sound, and after so many years they're now tied up in my personal nostalgia and history too. But really, it's just music. I like what I like. I won't judge you for what you like. Truly.

(/sitting in coffeeshop, fighting urge to play "Trigger Cut" really loudly on laptop.)
posted by lisa g at 9:39 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Oh, and I should mention by way of bragging: I have a first-pressing vinyl of S+E, and there was some kind of mistake with the label where on the B side they accidentally put on the label for the Angry Chimes "Someday" LP instead. Sometimes I like to tell myself that that is some kind of super-rare thing or something, but I'll bet it was actually really common.
posted by koeselitz at 9:41 AM on April 20, 2012


I think one of the great things about Pavement (and I would probably say the same about Pixies) is that they were just guitar/bass/drums and in a way didn't have any new stylistic approach, yet seemed to have an immense amount of personality. Like, it was hard to understand how they could sound fresh and unique, but they did. (Of course, maybe I just liked them a lot.)

They also seemed to emerge more or less fully formed straight out of Zeus's head. That's not exactly true because there were the early singles, but it's basically true.

Also, on the one hand, my memory of listening to them in the college radio station does seem like 20 years ago. On the other hand, I cannot believe that the reissue came out ten years ago. Where did THAT decade go?
posted by snofoam at 10:39 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Came into them late by way of 120 Minutes airing the video for Shady Lane (I think that's it...the one from Brighten the Corners where Malkmus is invisible at times) gradually explored the whole catalog and they became a favorite. I miss the weekly ritual of taping 120 Minutes and listening to the first 30 seconds of each video before deciding to fast forward or look deeper. Still listen to Pavement now and again, but have lost track of much of the other music of the era.

Stood next to Malkmus once at a Sleater Kinney show...that's about all the street cd I've got.
posted by msbrauer at 10:43 AM on April 20, 2012


Pavement are the band that taught me to stop looking for meaning in lyrics.
posted by klangklangston


But, weirdly, they're also the band that taught me to appreciate poetic meter in lyrics.
posted by COBRA! at 10:47 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Pavement are the band that taught me to stop looking for meaning in lyrics.

I learned this from New Order.

On the other hand, Pavement often give at least the illusion that there is meaning to be unpacked from the songs. If most other bands wrote "Cut Your Hair" probably no one would start a debate about whether they were saying career or Korea. But with "Zurich is Stained" on the previous album, which seems to be about the Zurich bombing in an oblique way, it's perfectly reasonable to infer that he means fame is a debacle where no one really wins, like the Korean War. It may be pointless to do close readings of their lyrics, but it can be entertaining.
posted by snofoam at 10:57 AM on April 20, 2012


Pavement are the band that taught me to stop looking for meaning in lyrics.

Sure. But when I played S&E for the first time and heard "I saw your girlfriend and she was eating her fingers like they're just another meal," I knew that this was the kind of band for me.
posted by mcmile at 11:12 AM on April 20, 2012


Maybe Pavement w/out Gary Young was not crazy enough, and maybe Gary Young w/out Pavement was too crazy - remember that "Plant Man" song?...

Agree w/ all sentiments regarding Westing/S&E = their best work, clearly, made w/out pressure and with the right blend of tension, care, craziness, and control... Seconding the anecdote about listening to BtC after the early stuff and thinking, 'Wait a second...'

Not really a fan of later Malkmus/Jicks or the Preston School stuff...
posted by J0 at 11:18 AM on April 20, 2012


It's sad, really. All these years later and they still don't know how Geddy Lee's voice got so high.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 11:19 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


But at least, thanks to a close relative who's a stickler for accuracy and who has direct personal knowledge of Mr. Lee, they've been made aware that he talks like an ordinary guy.
posted by escabeche at 11:24 AM on April 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


J0: “Not really a fan of later Malkmus/Jicks or the Preston School stuff...”

I'm not much of one either, honestly, but I have to say that "Jenny and the Ess-Dog" is completely and totally awesome.
posted by koeselitz at 11:31 AM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


I really like Pavement, and think Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain is an amazeballs album, but I saw Malkmus during his first solo tour and that dude was broke ass drunk on stage and made it through about 6 songs before passing out. That was the worst and I haven't had any interest in listening to any of the material he's released since then.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 11:33 AM on April 20, 2012


For whatever reason, Pavement and some other bands I loved in the '90s (and still do) -- like Yo La Tengo, Sonic Youth, Stereolab, etc. -- really bring out reactionary anti-fan attitudes in some people, like, "The only reason you like THAT band is because you're trying to be cool, not because you really like them."

Funny. At the time, I remember feeling mildly ashamed because my friends viewed my affection for Pavement as a clear sign that I would never truly be punk enough. Which, given that I was sneaking out to drive around and listen to Versus and hiding Blur tapes inside cassette boxes marked Crass, was the gospel fucking truth.
posted by thivaia at 11:36 AM on April 20, 2012 [7 favorites]


I interviewed Malkmus on the phone once. It was about 11 a.m. or noon on the East Coast, so it was 8 or 9 in the morning in Oregon, where he was. Dude was completely baked. Pretty nice though, although the Matador PR guy was kind of a prick.
posted by Rangeboy at 12:59 PM on April 20, 2012


troika: Pavement has been foisted upon me by a never ending stream of indie dudes who just adore Stephen Malkmus and assume that (1) I've never heard of them before and (2) that they're going to change my life. It's like music evangelism. Pavement is all right, but they're not really my jam, and telling me that I simply have to hear Gold Soundz or Cut Your Hair on vinyl or live or whatever to really get it, no, it's okay, I'm familiar. I'll pass.

I don't know, maybe I would have enjoyed them more had they not been so closely associated with a handful of music snob types? Maybe I should give them another shot?


I 1000x agree. I have tried these all many times in vain:
The Clash, The Smiths, The Cure, Sonic Youth, Joy Division, and Bauhaus. And Depeche Mode-- sweet Christ rip my face off with the goddamn Depeche Mode.

Oh, and if the whole planet would please permanently cease the Fugazi appraisals, too. Almost forgot that one. Just... saying. I'll show myself out.
posted by herbplarfegan at 2:08 PM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Geez. Uh – are there any bands from the past thirty years that you like, herbplarfegan?
posted by koeselitz at 2:25 PM on April 20, 2012


Matador PR guy was kind of a prick

The entire Matador crew were a bunch of assholes, at least early on. Founder Gerald Cosloy may have great taste in music, going back to his days at the Homestead label (and published the wonderful, scabrous 'zine Conflict) but he's a complete dick.
posted by porn in the woods at 2:46 PM on April 20, 2012


But at least, thanks to a close relative who's a stickler for accuracy and who has direct personal knowledge of Mr. Lee, they've been made aware that he talks like an ordinary guy. I know him, and he does.
posted by jontyjago at 3:47 PM on April 20, 2012


Geez. Uh – are there any bands from the past thirty years that you like, herbplarfegan?

I can't speak for him, and I actually like the Clash & Sonic Youth, As for bands from the last 30 years, there's the Replacements, Husker Du, Metallica, Anthrax, Slayer, E*I*E*I*O, the Jayhawks, the Bellrays, the Bottlerockets, Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, Primus, the Minutemen, Jason & the Scorchers, OutKast, Mudhoney, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Nashville Pussy, the Supersuckers, the White Stripes, the Black Keys, Maldita Vecindad, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jill Scott, D'Angelo and plenty others. Like me, he's probably just tired of the aforemntioned groups being endlessly pitched as the holy grail.
posted by jonmc at 5:37 PM on April 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


aforemntioned by herb, I mean.
posted by jonmc at 5:38 PM on April 20, 2012


I was glad when the 90s ended because it meant I didn't have to pretend to like Pavement anymore. But, when I saw them at the Hollywood Bowl a couple of years ago it was SO GOOD. Seriously, I don't have enough capslock to say what a good show that was.

(mippy, Modern Life is Rubbish turns 20 next year, get ready!)
posted by betweenthebars at 6:33 PM on April 20, 2012


koeselitz: Geez. Uh – are there any bands from the past thirty years that you like, herbplarfegan?

Sorry for the mass-torching. ..but I, er, (*cough) did forget to wholeheartedly put The Pixies on that list.

Believe it or not, I hit the record shop on the way home Friday (day of this FPP) and snagged 'Slanted And Enchanted' and 'Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain,' then beered it up with my earbuds on. I can see how they influenced a dozen indie rock bands whom I cherish to death, so for that I'm grateful.

cons:
1) the drummer plays the same. goddamn. drum-beat ALL THE TIME o_O ...and it just happens to be my least favorite drumbeat of all time. boo duh DAT boo DAT DAT duh DAT. I just can't take it.

2) the deliberate/ironic imprecision thing simply doesn't work for me when applied this generously.

pros:
a) the aforementioned appreciation for their influence on the world overall,
b) their artwork is positivly magnificent-- pretty much worth the P.O.A.
c) there are a handful of songs that I truly dug...

I will be revisiting these discs from time to time to test for maturing of the eartaste-buds.

jonmc: Like me, he's probably just tired of the aforemntioned groups being endlessly pitched as the holy grail.

Bingo. That was the only reason I was being kinda a crank.

I tend to revisit all of the bands that I listed and get a new reading periodically.

Lately, the music tastes of the 10-year-old me have been making a revival, so.. I guess anything can happen.
posted by herbplarfegan at 12:34 PM on April 23, 2012


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