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May 1, 2012 7:04 PM   Subscribe

Hipster Branding. Via
posted by beisny (64 comments total) 9 users marked this as a favorite

 
Can someone explain to me who I'm supposed to be sneering at today?
posted by TrialByMedia at 7:06 PM on May 1, 2012 [10 favorites]


Not much to quarrel with here.
posted by invitapriore at 7:06 PM on May 1, 2012


This is pretty much just about hating "kids these days", isn't it?
posted by dumbland at 7:09 PM on May 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Is it wrong that I find quite a few of those appealing?
posted by figurant at 7:12 PM on May 1, 2012 [12 favorites]


I was seriously shakeing with anger. I cannot believe -- cannot believe -- that a company as large as Wal-Mart could get away with just awful design. Postponing my hairdrying for yet another day, I rushed out of the car and back to my Tesla. I was home in no time, and I fired up several instances of every version of photoshop that I have. It took 17 hours, but this is what I came up with:
posted by Rhaomi at 7:16 PM on May 1, 2012 [11 favorites]


That new Nets logo is awesome. If these are hipster logos then more hipster logos, please.
posted by 2bucksplus at 7:16 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Yes several of these are quite nice.
posted by shakespeherian at 7:21 PM on May 1, 2012


This isn't hipster. Sorry.
posted by 0xFCAF at 7:23 PM on May 1, 2012


I always knew that Coca-Cola was a tool of the pharaoh.
posted by Burhanistan at 7:23 PM on May 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


Wow, I had no idea so many companies were Straight Edge!
posted by LionIndex at 7:24 PM on May 1, 2012 [6 favorites]


I love the Olympic and Adidas logos.
posted by deadmessenger at 7:24 PM on May 1, 2012


The joke is that they are all useless as branding because they all have the same visual aesthetic, making them completely unmemorable and generic, right?
posted by newg at 7:26 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


I love how they used Arial, rather than Helvetica, for the Goldman Sachs logo.
posted by delmoi at 7:27 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Their Apple logo could have been better
posted by delmoi at 7:28 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yes several of these are quite nice.

I think that's the whole point. The shorthand design language for "nice" has become incredibly easy these past couple years. Applying these early 20th century touches is supposed to lend a "classic" touch, but it's rarely appropriate for the subject matter. In these examples, not remotely appropriate. They do, honestly, come from young hipster graphic designers who don't know any better—who think "nice" is what they're being paid for. In reality, it's tainting the whole industry and misleading a generation of young designers, not to mention consumers.
posted by critzer at 7:29 PM on May 1, 2012 [6 favorites]


The Olympics logo is actually quite tasteful, as is the Trek logo.
posted by gc at 7:29 PM on May 1, 2012


I also quite like many of these. If nothing else, they're less garish than the real logos.
posted by Scientist at 7:30 PM on May 1, 2012


Sans-serif is the new whatever.
posted by argonauta at 7:32 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


In reality, it's tainting the whole industry and misleading a generation of young designers, not to mention consumers.

Oh perish the thought!
posted by shakespeherian at 7:32 PM on May 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


it's tainting the whole industry and misleading a generation of young designers, not to mention consumers.

OMG!!! This ethical travesty must be circumvented. To the edit-suite, noble advertising knights!
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 7:34 PM on May 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


Of all the anagrams of HIPSTER LOGO, I think the best ones are SHORT EPILOG and HOT LIP OGRES and RIG POTHOLES and GRISTLE POOH.
posted by twoleftfeet at 7:35 PM on May 1, 2012 [11 favorites]


Damn. I was hoping to see photos of hipsters being burned with hot irons.
posted by jeremy b at 7:35 PM on May 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


www.weepinghipstersbeingbrandedwithlogos.tumblr.com

Thats what I want to see.
posted by Chrischris at 7:44 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


twoleftfeet: I think the best ones are SHORT EPILOG and HOT LIP OGRES and RIG POTHOLES and GRISTLE POOH.

Imagine somewhere out there a new indie band sprouted with each incantated anagram.
posted by SomaSoda at 7:45 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


We'll survive.

In all honesty, growing up as I did in the late 80s, I fantasized about a world in which the incredibly aesthetic of early-to-mid 20th century design was cool, men wore hats and things like overalls and suspenders again, people canned their own veggies and made their own pickles, and learned to play banjos and mandolins. An unimaginable laughable turn of events. And I must not have been the only one, because it actually came to pass. It's nice...I guess.
posted by Miko at 7:46 PM on May 1, 2012 [14 favorites]


Oh perish the thought!

OMG!!! This ethical travesty must be circumvented. To the edit-suite, noble advertising knights!


I guess what I meant was — there are a lot of small businesses these days rejecting the model of the big, monopolizing, garish corporation that sells mass produced junk. They're trying to return to making things with more care, products and food that aren't, well, junk. Hence all the locavore, artisinal, etc, stuff. Yep, it's hip and sometimes annoying, but in the grand scheme I do think their hearts are in the right place. Unfortunately those big corporations who sell the junk are trying to follow suit, rebranding themselves as local, "green", etc. I know the HipsterBranding is parody, but indeed there are large corporations trying to pass themselves off as classic, trustworthy, handmade, and so forth. It's one step more dishonest than ordinary advertising. And it sucks to see graphic designers going along with it because the type and iconography look "nice" and "tasteful."
posted by critzer at 7:47 PM on May 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Yeah, that all seems pretty anodyne to me. Like, decent first drafts, but if that was someone's portfolio I wouldn't let them do my re-branding because I'd be afraid I'd end up looking just like the rest of those logos.

With a few exceptions (Apple and Adobe, funnily enough), they would probably suit a lot of various media (e.g., I could see them embroidered onto golf shirts or whatever), but seriously, inoffensive and clean is not all I'm looking for.

And I'd be reticent to present some of those logos to Mr. Packard, or Mr. Benz.
posted by gauche at 7:48 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Too see the new Nets logo, and its competition, scroll down a tad on this page. The Nets are center of the top row. I like it. IMHO the only other NBA logo I find appealing is the SF Golden State Warriors.

I'm not a big sports fan though, so please have some salt with that opinion.
posted by tychotesla at 7:50 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


OK Soda, 1993. I was there.
posted by Sys Rq at 7:50 PM on May 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


I love how they used Arial, rather than Helvetica, for the Goldman Sachs logo.

No they didn't. (Check the G.)
posted by Sys Rq at 7:52 PM on May 1, 2012


The weird thing about "OK Soda" was that the name was initially chosen because it was so common - the most commonly known word among all people in the world. Yet, when they decide to start marketing it they just let advertising people go nuts, with the weirdest advertising campaign ever.

No they didn't. (Check the G.)

Huh. They definitely used the 'a' from Arial, though.
posted by delmoi at 7:56 PM on May 1, 2012


I could have swore this was a double, but I guess I'm wrong. Anyway, the Nivea one seems to similar to the real Nivea brand that I don't quite get the point. Yes, I realize the font is different, yet somehow it strikes me as being the exact same logo.
posted by asnider at 7:57 PM on May 1, 2012


If I thought some of these were wonderful examples of visual poetry (the Adidas one, for example), does that make me a) old and lame, and/or b) low-brow?
posted by Saxon Kane at 7:57 PM on May 1, 2012


This appears to be making a joke off of Jay-Z's new designs for the Brooklyn Nets, which don't really seem "hipster" to me so much as "hip-hop inspired," but no matter. Jay-Z's designs are great, and the man knows branding.
posted by Navelgazer at 7:57 PM on May 1, 2012


This appears to be making a joke off of Jay-Z's new designs for the Brooklyn Nets, which don't really seem "hipster" to me so much as "hip-hop inspired," but no matter. Jay-Z's designs are great, and the man knows branding.

HipsterBranding has been out for a couple months. The Nets logo was just unveiled yesterday.
posted by critzer at 7:59 PM on May 1, 2012


I love many of these. I can see why they get called "hipster" as they are part of a certain design aesthetic made by and appealing to our thick-rimmed black glasses wearing friends. But everything here is clean and well thought-out. There are some great ideas here.

The apex of Hipster Branding goes to Best Made Co.

Who I love.
posted by elwoodwiles at 8:01 PM on May 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Huh. They definitely used the 'a' from Arial, though.

Again, no. Helvetica has two different a's, depending on the exact face. The main thing to look for is a horizontal cut on the hooky top bit, as opposed to the (hideous) diagonal one in Arial.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:02 PM on May 1, 2012


The Brand New blog hates the new Nets Logo but I don't really understand why (something to do with fonts, I think).
posted by octothorpe at 8:02 PM on May 1, 2012


Heh. I saw these this morning and in about 5 minutes pumped out a "hipster logo" for my company. Fun stuff!

Logolounge's 2012 logo trends just came out. They mention this design aesthetic as part of the "done to death" category.
posted by brappi at 8:05 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


I like getting my hipster hate on as much as anyone. but that just looks like the same shit over and over with different words.
posted by jonmc at 8:06 PM on May 1, 2012


IMHO the only other NBA logo I find appealing is the SF Golden State Warriors.

Same, though I prefer The City variant (and so do most fans, based on what I see around town).

The Nets logo isn't perfect, but based on the competition link above it's vastly better. Looking at some of the merchandise you can see the brilliance; it's appealing to everyone from Brooklyn hipsters to hip hoppers. This is going to be the Yankees cap for Brooklyn, short hand for liking the area rather than supporting the team. They are going to sell a ridiculous amount of gear.
posted by 2bucksplus at 8:12 PM on May 1, 2012


I could have swore this was a double, but I guess I'm wrong.

No, but I bet you're thinking of Branding 1000 Lakes.

This appears to be making a joke off of Jay-Z's new designs for the Brooklyn Nets

Other way around. This has been happening really for quite some time.
posted by Miko at 8:13 PM on May 1, 2012


"Apple Computers - Designed In California" made me chuckle.

I dunno, I prefer most of these to the original logos.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 8:14 PM on May 1, 2012


The apex of Hipster Branding goes to Best Made Co.

Who I love.


They sure are great at painting the handles of axes.
posted by kenko at 8:20 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


That apple looks a lot like the one in the tree in the original original Apple logo.

And it sucks to see graphic designers going along with it because the type and iconography look "nice" and "tasteful."

Why? They're not even co-opting a movement, they're co-opting the same things the target market has already co-opted.

Hell, these design aesthetics were originally made for crass commercial purposes.
posted by LogicalDash at 8:22 PM on May 1, 2012


This appears to be making a joke off of Jay-Z's new designs for the Brooklyn Nets

Miko: Other way around. This has been happening really for quite some time.

critzer: HipsterBranding has been out for a couple months. The Nets logo was just unveiled yesterday.

The "Nestle Nuts" logo is the most recent blog entry. Like, added today/yesterday, maybe?
posted by Sys Rq at 8:22 PM on May 1, 2012


We're sorry

Our servers are over capacity and certain pages may be temporarily unavailable. We're working quickly to resolve the issue.


I guess the rest of you guys are hipper than me.
posted by swift at 8:26 PM on May 1, 2012


kenko: I don't disagree. I think it's hilarious that someone is selling $200+ Axes in NYC. That's what makes them the apex of Hipster Branding. But you have to admit the style of the Best Made brand is nothing short of brilliant. It's marketing over substance squared. If you like design it's hard to hate the design of that site. Plus they plug straight into the quest for non-ironic authenticity. It's so cynical it's genius.

And for that they have my respect.
posted by elwoodwiles at 8:32 PM on May 1, 2012


I like getting my hipster hate on as much as anyone. but that just looks like the same shit over and over with different words.

I think that's part of the joke.
posted by asnider at 8:52 PM on May 1, 2012


The apex of Hipster Branding goes to Best Made Co.

Hol-lee shit, a $118 canvas duffle bag.
posted by adamdschneider at 9:08 PM on May 1, 2012


HOT LIP OGRES

What about HOT LP ORGIES?
posted by naoko at 9:20 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Back in the 60s and 70s, there wasn't an Internet that allowed people to make fun of things, which is why these things happened and must not happen again.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 9:31 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Back in the 60s and 70s, there wasn't an Internet that allowed people to make fun of things, which is why these things happened and must not happen again.

Look, everyone should be encouraged to make art. Hippies didn't make art to be perfect or to sell the most possible flat-screen televisions. It didn't have to appeal to anyone but them. Doing things purely for the sake of doing them and then taking modest pride in the results is such an innately healthy and harmless activity, if more people drew sun-faces and leaf patterns instead of sitting around puking their negativity out onto the internet, we'd probably be better off.
posted by hermitosis at 9:59 PM on May 1, 2012 [10 favorites]


You can imagine the clerics in Equilibrium approving these logos for use by companies that operate within the borders they control.

Also, forum dwellers, but same difference.
posted by furiousthought at 10:13 PM on May 1, 2012


Hmm, as a non-graphic designer, I really liked the new Nets logo. The only issue I can spot is that the "S" at the end of "Nets" on the primary logo is a bit overly distorted and squished. Otherwise, I have no problems, and some of the designs (like the sneakers hanging from the logo) are plain cool.

...indeed there are large corporations trying to pass themselves off as classic, trustworthy, handmade, and so forth.

Well, yeah. That's absolutely nothing new, and is in fact a big part of what advertising is about. What do you expect, that they are going to make their logos entirely in Courier so as to advertise that they are bland and faceless mega-corporations? Well, obviously that's not what you expect or mean, but it makes a great straw man.

Every era has its own aesthetics for things like branding and signage, and I think the current trends are pleasant compared to some other eras that I've lived through. The motifs tend to repeat a lot through each era, and there is always some risk of not standing out by opting into whatever is trendy. If I had any critique of the current styles, it is that they are usually just too "retro" without bringing anything new to the table. Of course, this applies to more than just advertising, and this particular critique has become pretty popular of late.

Part of me thinks that modern aesthetics are still recovering from the 80's, as if we quickly retreated into the past after the aberrations of that decade, and still can't bring ourselves to give new ideas another go.
posted by Edgewise at 10:44 PM on May 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Hmm, as a non-graphic designer, I really liked the new Nets logo. The only issue I can spot is that the "S" at the end of "Nets" on the primary logo is a bit overly distorted and squished.

That's the main issue for me, too.

That font looks great in the BROOKLYN, and okay in the B, but such a rigid typeface is not suited to the sort of lazy Corel Draw bending that's going on in the NETS. It really needs something custom in there. Even just giving the S some corners would make it look a lot less out of place.

Personally, though, I'd be awfully tempted to put the original swooshy lettering there instead.

Also, the team is called the Nets, but the logo is a ball? Sigh. And what the hell kind of a name is that, anyway? It's like calling a baseball team the Plates. That's really the best they could come up with? At least with New Jersey, it sounded okay, but now it's going to run together all "Brooklynettes" and shit.
posted by Sys Rq at 11:25 PM on May 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Obviously to get minimally literate Mets and Jets fans to watch basketball. There must have been several of them; other teams, such as the Miants and Quankees, proved less popular and are little known today.
posted by fleacircus at 1:27 AM on May 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


You have to scroll to the bottom for the best one, I think. Which, by extension, probably means that the best idea was had first.
posted by running order squabble fest at 4:05 AM on May 2, 2012


Metafilter: the same shit over and over with different words.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 4:28 AM on May 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


I think it's hilarious that someone is selling $200+ Axes in NYC.

Best Made Axes are so 2011. The axe all the cool hipsters are carrying in their Fendi backpack this year is made by John Neeman.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 4:35 AM on May 2, 2012


In all honesty, growing up as I did in the late 80s, I fantasized about a world in which the incredibly aesthetic of early-to-mid 20th century design was cool, men wore hats and things like overalls and suspenders again, people canned their own veggies and made their own pickles, and learned to play banjos and mandolins. An unimaginable laughable turn of events. And I must not have been the only one, because it actually came to pass. It's nice...I guess.

The difference, of course, is the why of it. When people did those things then, it was out of necessity, style and practicality. You wore a hat to keep your head cool (or warm) and dry, you knitted and canned because it was impractical or impossible to get those products otherwise.

Now, in a lot of cases, it is being done for show. Which isn't so bad, that's part of being a social creature.

Where it gets really gross is when people are purchasing the reputation. Buying $200 hand crafted and pre-worn overalls, and carrying a $200 handmade axe to give the impression someone is a down to earth woodworker. It is one thing to note that woodworking is cool and fun and put in the time to master the craft. It is a whole other thing to just purchase that look.

It is "I roast my own coffee- I did the research and learned how it works, I experimented and failed, and then I finally got to be pretty good at it. Because I enjoyed it."

Versus "I roast my own coffee! I bought a kit and followed instructions! Please call me a roastmaster!"
posted by gjc at 5:00 AM on May 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


It is "I roast my own coffee- I did the research and learned how it works, I experimented and failed, and then I finally got to be pretty good at it. Because I enjoyed it."

Versus "I roast my own coffee! I bought a kit and followed instructions! Please call me a roastmaster!"


Funny, I usually see people doing the first and then getting dismissed as the second.
posted by postcommunism at 6:06 AM on May 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


The difference, of course, is the why of it. When people did those things then, it was out of necessity, style and practicality. You wore a hat to keep your head cool (or warm) and dry, you knitted and canned because it was impractical or impossible to get those products otherwise.

That's an overly romantic view of a pure past, which didn't exist. Branding didn't always exist, but vanity always did. We still wear hats for "necessity, style, and practicality," with style not always being least and, throughout history, often the foremost reason, just as with today. As far as canning and picking, those were new inventions at one point, but in the time since then they've undergone periodic revivals when cultural conditions attracted attention to them again. In some of the leaner times of the late 1800s, the WWI and WWII era, people had not grown up canning and preserving out of necessity, but they turned to it as a viable solution, and trendy new interest as well, when conditions encouraged it. There hasn't been an unbroken progression from necessity to curiosity, and motivations for participating in these activities have been mixed ones ever since their invention.
posted by Miko at 7:43 AM on May 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


taking modest pride in the results is such an innately healthy and harmless activity

You're missing the point, and your broad-based slam comes off as obtuse.

When art crosses over from "fun thing a person does" and into "zeitgeist that everyone does," there's an inflection point where a mere art style becomes an artistic expectation. And, as Hunter said, "when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." And then we end up with less artistic variety, not more.

For example, at some point someone made rounded buttons on Web sites and used lots of whitespace. Suddenly, there are style guides for this.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 9:41 AM on May 2, 2012


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