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Please party, test me.
May 14, 2012 9:55 PM   Subscribe

As young as 18, I'd already written the application to join the party, but I was too embarrassed to turn it in to the party branch. I've studiously read the party constitution countless times - always felt I wasn't worthy of the party's requirements. Applying to Join the Chinese Communist Party : a music video (w/ English subtitles)
posted by flapjax at midnite (21 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
I was more a fan of Soviet propoganda myself, though The Red Army Choir has booked some strange gigs in the years since the revolutionary spirit died.
posted by Winnemac at 10:08 PM on May 14, 2012 [2 favorites]


This one is perhaps no less propagandistic, but in a way that I recognize and can sympathize with.

Also, it's listenable.
posted by Nomyte at 10:26 PM on May 14, 2012


His other video, Biking through China's Countryside is worth a watch too (in particular, the housing bubble aspect).
posted by unliteral at 10:27 PM on May 14, 2012 [5 favorites]


How does that work exactly? I mean, you submit your application and two or three weeks later they call you for an interview. "Several others have applied for the position," they tell you, "but we want to interview you on Tuesday." Then you show up, very nicely dressed, because you really want it... I mean, you took a shower and combed your hair and everything. And they ask you a bunch of confusing questions about Marx and Mao and you stumble your way through. Three weeks later you call them up, because you haven't heard anything from them, and they tell you they picked someone else to join the Party.

And then you realize that you can't even get a job as a communist.
posted by twoleftfeet at 10:38 PM on May 14, 2012 [3 favorites]


I just saw this earlier today: a gold plated Leica made to celebrate the anniversary of the Chinese revolution, with a list price of 29k.

Somewhat Ironic.
posted by delmoi at 11:15 PM on May 14, 2012 [1 favorite]


I was more a fan of Soviet propoganda myself

I dunno, man. There's nothing quite as badass as The Red Detachment of Women.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 11:18 PM on May 14, 2012 [4 favorites]


Hey, unilateral, that video is great, thanks so much for posting it here!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 11:22 PM on May 14, 2012


As young as 18 I'd already written the application to join the party
But I was too embarrassed to turn it in to the local branch
I'd studiously read the party's constitution countless times
Always felt I wasn't worthy of the party's requirements

Father is an old party member with a sincere feeling toward the party
He showed me the application he wrote to join the party
He earnestly told me
That the feeling for the party should run deep
Countless martyrs shed their blood for the party's cause
They cared for neither fame nor fortune

What is a party member?
They're a good servant of the people
What is a party member?
They're the backbone of the people
They're a waving flag
They're a standing tree
They're the red candle
That burns itself to give light to others

Now I've been working for many years and am called master
Every moment I feel the care and the encouragement of the party
In the new era there are many Kong Fansens and Jiao Yulus
Selfless and fearlessly devoted their loyal lives

What is a party member?
They're a good servant of the people
What is a party member?
They're the backbone of the people
They're a waving flag
They're a standing tree
They're the red candle
That burns itself to give light to others

As young as 18 I'd already written the application to join the party
And now I'm going to turn it in to the party branch
I should hurry to move closer to the party
Become a qualified party member to serve the people well

Please party, test me
Please party, test me
Please party organization, test me


Definitely a great post. Let's ignore the communist part of the video (if such a thing can be done). These days, in some sections of American society, anyone who expressed any sort of empathy or burning desire to help other people would be considered an idiot. There are some who laugh at the prospect of the uninsured dying.
posted by Roentgen at 4:09 AM on May 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


This explains the apparent idiocy of expat Chinese. With that level of indoctrination, they didn't stand a chance even after they got to Australia. Otherwise utterly lovely Chinese folk that have lived here for years think Tibet is China and the Dalai Lama is a dangerous political subversive.

The Chinese are no freer than the Tibetans. This is not funny, this is really, really sad.
posted by taff at 4:44 AM on May 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


In the new era there are many Ron Pauls and Sarah Palins
Selfless and fearlessly devoted their loyal lives


Now it's the Tea Party application song
posted by Renoroc at 4:45 AM on May 15, 2012


This is not funny, this is really, really sad.

As the OP, I'd like to note that I neither framed this post as funny *or* sad. I merely quoted some lyrics verbatim and provided the link.

However, it is my personal opinion that the terms "funny" and "sad" are not always mutually exclusive. In fact, I happen to find this both funny and sad.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 4:56 AM on May 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Nomyte: That song and video is really great. Earwormish actually. Do you know if there is a translation anywhere?
posted by 256 at 5:40 AM on May 15, 2012


Can I ask something to someone who knows (about) Chinese? Maybe this is a stupid question, but as it is a pitched language, does that make it hard to understand when sung?
posted by dubitable at 5:47 AM on May 15, 2012


This explains the apparent idiocy of expat Chinese.

"Idiocy" is a pretty harsh word. "Apparent" doesn't really mitigate it. "Expat" makes it look like they are still stupid even when abroad. Like they don't even get it when it's shoved in their faces elsewhere.

I have taught many Chinese people English in Australia. I have many Chinese friends here who are also extremely intelligent and well informed. I wonder how many of these people you know.
posted by Wolof at 6:20 AM on May 15, 2012 [3 favorites]


Having worked in China for 2 1/2 years and studied Chinese history in preparation for that stay, I, for one, do not welcome our new Chinese overlords.
posted by the sobsister at 6:27 AM on May 15, 2012


> This explains the apparent idiocy of expat Chinese. With that level of indoctrination, they didn't stand a chance even after they got to Australia. Otherwise utterly lovely Chinese folk that have lived here for years think Tibet is China and the Dalai Lama is a dangerous political subversive.

The Chinese are no freer than the Tibetans. This is not funny, this is really, really sad.


"The idiocy of expat Chinese?" Sorry but that's quite offensive. Then, thinking that Tibet belong to China it's a completely respectable political position in my book. I don't know who is the most indoctrinated here.
posted by - at 8:32 AM on May 15, 2012


taff: "This explains the apparent idiocy of expat Chinese. With that level of indoctrination, they didn't stand a chance even after they got to Australia. Otherwise utterly lovely Chinese folk that have lived here for years think Tibet is China and the Dalai Lama is a dangerous political subversive. "

What a racist, and ultimately revealing, thing to say. I'd bet the average Chinese expat is significantly more informed on the Tibetan question, and less distorted by propaganda, than you are. For example, Tibet has, for the last thousand years or so, been about as much a part of China as it hasn't, as a semi-autonomous region. The Dalai Lama's goal is not even independence from China, if only because that would also mean independence from the massive amount of aid that China has invested into Tibet since 1950, as well as Chinese teachers, doctors, engineers, universities, administrators, and currency.

Additionally, as much as I love the Dalai Lama, there is valid reason to be at least uncomfortable with the idea of his returning. One his primary goals for Tibet is the expulsion of Han Chinese workers, many of whom have been there for 60 years, and closing the border to more. Internal displacement of human beings based on race or ethnicity is a violation of human rights.
posted by Blasdelb at 10:29 AM on May 15, 2012


These days, in some sections of American society, anyone who expressed any sort of empathy or burning desire to help other people would be considered an idiot. There are some who laugh at the prospect of the uninsured dying.

That's one way of seeing it. I think that it's equally true that in many sections of American society, which are (almost entirely) exclusive from the sections you are talking about, it is considered extremely gauche and naive to express a love of one's country. Such people will laugh at you for being patriotic or expressing positive feelings about your country.

Frankly, I don't think that the video is wonderful - it's sickening propaganda. Even the laudable sentiments contained within are spoiled by that fact. You can look at it and imagine a wonderful paean to community sacrifice and single payer healthcare, or you could also imagine a countrified version with waving flags and pick-up trucks. Either way, I still consider it to be a bit pathetic.
posted by Edgewise at 11:20 AM on May 15, 2012


Huh. I would have thought only the United States could produce something of such corny patriotic earnestness as "America, We Stand as One."
posted by jocelmeow at 12:40 PM on May 15, 2012


Does it make me an asshole if I kind of like paeans to community sacrifice and waving flags and pick-up trucks? Group selection manifested as patriotism/jingoism or sports-team-loyalty or whatever is just so human.
posted by pH Indicating Socks at 1:44 PM on May 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Can I ask something to someone who knows (about) Chinese? Maybe this is a stupid question, but as it is a pitched language, does that make it hard to understand when sung?

Context is almost always more important than actual tone, which often fails as a distinguishing characteristic because: there's homophones for a ton of characters (that is, different characters which have identical pronunciation including tone), regional accents will vary tones, singing obliterates tones, etc.
posted by kmz at 7:23 AM on May 18, 2012


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