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I could murder a Kentucky right about now...
May 31, 2012 5:31 AM   Subscribe

Stately Sandwiches: What sandwich should represent your state?

(Or, province or country, for the un-American among us.)
posted by jacquilynne (179 comments total) 18 users marked this as a favorite

 
Chopped beef or straight-up BBQ brisket sandwich for Texas.
posted by SenorJaime at 5:37 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Fluffernutter.
posted by pracowity at 5:39 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Fried oyster poboy for Louisiana.
posted by djeo at 5:39 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


if you click through the Kentucky one, that Hot Brown don't look right. It should be goopier. (At least that's the way they always are at the actual Brown hotel)
posted by DigDoug at 5:40 AM on May 31, 2012


Lobstah roll for Maine
posted by Mizu at 5:40 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Pulled Pork if DC could be included
posted by hal9k at 5:41 AM on May 31, 2012


Eh. California is all wrong. It should be the Menage a Trois from Ike's Place.
posted by spitefulcrow at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


The Reuben has always struck me as unnecessarily messy (not to mention treyf). I'd have gone with a simple pastrami on rye for New York.

I certainly approve of the Fluffernutter, though, for any New England state. Which reminds me that I need to make a loaf of bread and buy a tub of Fluff.
posted by uncleozzy at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Beef on Weck for New York State

Beef on Weck for President
posted by troika at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [13 favorites]


Maryland. Unquestionably crab cake. Don't for get the Old Bay seasoning, either.
posted by imjustsaying at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [6 favorites]


Indiana would definitely be the pork tenderloin. Deep-fried, of course.
posted by Thorzdad at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Pork Tenderloin Sandwich for Indiana
posted by leotrotsky at 5:42 AM on May 31, 2012


Jinx!
posted by leotrotsky at 5:43 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think muffaletta for Louisiana was a good choice as well.
posted by leotrotsky at 5:44 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


If we're defining a sandwich as some kind of tasty filling surrounded by something made with flour, then tourtière should cover Québec pretty well.
posted by maudlin at 5:46 AM on May 31, 2012


Michigan would be a Coney Island
posted by leotrotsky at 5:46 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Eh. California is all wrong. It should be the Menage a Trois from Ike's Place

Taco.
posted by villanelles at dawn at 5:46 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


For Quebec, it'd be either the smoked meat sandwich or the hot chicken sandwich, I'd guess.
posted by Kitteh at 5:47 AM on May 31, 2012


The Reuben has always struck me as unnecessarily messy (not to mention treyf). I'd have gone with a simple pastrami on rye for New York.

You mean unnecessarily delicious. A well-executed reuben is far more satisfying than even the best pastrami on rye. Crispy toasted bread, melted cheese, warm meat and sauerkraut, and all that sweet-tangy thousand island dressing… dammit, lunch is six hours away.
posted by spitefulcrow at 5:47 AM on May 31, 2012 [7 favorites]


Washington DC should be a Ben's Chili Bowl half-smoke.
posted by drlith at 5:48 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Eh. California is all wrong. It should be the Menage a Trois from Ike's Place

Taco.


Tacos are delicious, but they are not sandwiches. I might consider the torta.
posted by spitefulcrow at 5:48 AM on May 31, 2012


Rhode Island is not familiar with this thing you call "sandwich"
posted by hal9k at 5:48 AM on May 31, 2012


If we're defining a sandwich as some kind of tasty filling surrounded by something made with flour, then tourtière should cover Québec pretty well.

You have something against Smoked Meat?

For Ontario, the answer would have to be a peameal bacon sandwich.
posted by jacquilynne at 5:48 AM on May 31, 2012


A well-executed reuben is far more satisfying than even the best pastrami on rye.

Them's fightin' words.
Christ I'm hungry.
posted by Mizu at 5:49 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


imjustsaying, while you are sorta correct about the crabcake for maryland, I for one, would like to nom(nomnom)inate:

the Pit Beef sandwich
posted by ShawnString at 5:49 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Oregon: sustainably raised organic free range biodynamic gluten-free paleo raw beer in a mason jar. We're too cool for "sandwiches".
posted by idiopath at 5:49 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Of the Three Great Philly Sandwiches, I think they chose the popular, but least tasty, option to represent Pennsylvania (also, they chose a Pat's cheesesteak, but I don't want to get into the religious war).

Tastier: hoagie

Tastiest: Italian pulled pork with provolone and broccoli rabe....

Let the hate begin.
posted by blahblahblah at 5:50 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Michigan: Whitefish sandwich.

Or, if we're not being too technical: pastie.
posted by Chrischris at 5:51 AM on May 31, 2012


Smoked meat is pretty Montreal-centric. I'd have to vote for tourtiere also, though it's stretching the definition of sandwich.
posted by jeather at 5:51 AM on May 31, 2012


I think Pennsylvania should be represented by a Primanti Brothers sandwich. But that's a 'burgh thing.

Georgia should be a homegrown tomato on a homemade biscuit with unsalted butter.
posted by Ruthless Bunny at 5:52 AM on May 31, 2012


consider the torta

By Diego Foster Wallace.
posted by villanelles at dawn at 5:52 AM on May 31, 2012 [15 favorites]


You know what, I just hate touching greasy bread. A messy hamburger is fine (although I'd prefer one with a sufficiently-substantial bun that grease doesn't run down my arms as I eat), but a grilled cheese or a Reuben where I'm touching butter-slick griddled toast is unacceptable to me.

I understand that this is my own personal issue.

I also contend that the pastrami on rye lets the singular voices of the bread, meat, and mustard speak more clearly without being drowned out by the strident shouting of the cheese and dressing. (I will never speak ill of sauerkraut, though.)
posted by uncleozzy at 5:54 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


I can see why they chose a ham biscuit for Virginia, but if they were going for authenticity, that ham biscuit is so very wrong. First of all, the ham does not like it is salt-cured. Secondly, that ham is sliced too thin. Thirdly, that biscuit does not look home-baked. Fourthly, a proper ham biscuit is not pretty and neat. Fifthly, that ham has no character.

Personally, I'd have married country ham with thin slices of fresh crisp apples, and a soft cheese (made in the valley) on two slices of bread for my Virginia Sandwich, but I could get behind a properly-executed ham sandwich to represent the state.
posted by julen at 5:56 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Thinking deep thoughts about Washington State sammiches. Salmon-something? Or perhaps Paseo's transcendental Caribbean Roast? Apples & cheese on wheat?
posted by Mizu at 5:58 AM on May 31, 2012


Gotta go with a nice Cubano for Florida, right?
posted by Rock Steady at 5:59 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Well, if I can resurrect the age old question of whether a hot dog qualifies as a sandwich, then the Coney Island Hot Dog should be Michigan's sandwich.
posted by namewithoutwords at 6:02 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I've always despised pulled pork (or any pig product), but it's hard to argue with that choice for North Carolina.
posted by Coatlicue at 6:05 AM on May 31, 2012


Katz's pastrami on rye for New York.
posted by jonmc at 6:06 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Pshaw. Illinois should definitely be the jibarito, an invention of Chicago and the only sandwich with fried plantains for bread that's so good, they eat it in Puerto Rico.
posted by deathpanels at 6:09 AM on May 31, 2012


Yeah, I'm with Ruthless Bunny on this. Let's split Pennsylvania down the middle so that the Pittsburgh side can have a sandwich with french fries and coleslaw on top.
posted by specialagentwebb at 6:13 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Others might say cheese and pickle, a simple bacon sarnie or perhaps even coronation chicken for Britain. These people are fools and buffoons.
posted by Quantum's Deadly Fist at 6:14 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Let us not forget the majestic chip butty.
posted by elizardbits at 6:15 AM on May 31, 2012 [4 favorites]


Washington State: Turkey, cream cheese and cranberry sauce?
posted by ShooBoo at 6:17 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I lived in New Hampshire for over two years and I am at a loss as for what sandwich could represent it. Does apple pie with cheddar cheese count? You eat it by hand in New Hampshire.
posted by Rock Steady at 6:22 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I can see why they chose a ham biscuit for Virginia, but if they were going for authenticity, that ham biscuit is so very wrong. First of all, the ham does not like it is salt-cured. Secondly, that ham is sliced too thin. Thirdly, that biscuit does not look home-baked. Fourthly, a proper ham biscuit is not pretty and neat. Fifthly, that ham has no character.

I was literally about to post the same thing. Compared to a good country ham, sweet-cured, thin-sliced deli ham is a disgusting monstrosity.
posted by strangely stunted trees at 6:23 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Gotta go with a nice Cubano for Florida, right?

Maybe, but it seems a little Miami-specific. I was thinking something more along the lines of a blackened grouper sandwich.
posted by saladin at 6:23 AM on May 31, 2012


Alabama's is suggested here as fried chicken livers on a biscuit. That sounds great, but I'd like to nominate a fried catfish sandwich.
posted by vewystwange at 6:29 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


If we consider the state sandwich as a way to reach out diplomatically to the other states and prove that our state is a good and worthwhile place, then Arizona proudly offers up the Sonoran hot dog.

There really are reasons that non-crazy people still live here.
posted by MrVisible at 6:30 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Compared to a good country ham, sweet-cured, thin-sliced deli ham is a disgusting monstrosity.

Deli ham is horrendous. City ham, in general, is pretty awful, if you ask me. Country ham is a thing of beauty, though.
posted by uncleozzy at 6:30 AM on May 31, 2012


Lobstah roll for Maine

No way. That's for tourists. Bright red hot dog wrapped in a piece of Nissen white bread because no one bought buns.
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:30 AM on May 31, 2012 [5 favorites]


No way. That's for tourists.

I concede in the face of your righteous truth.
posted by Mizu at 6:31 AM on May 31, 2012


Well it's not technically a sandwich, but goddamn if Wisconsin shouldn't be represented by a tasty, delicious brat. (and not that Republican loving Johnsonville tripe, either).

If that's not allowed under the rules of the game, then, it's gotta be a fucking grilled cheese, because, you know... CHEESE!
posted by symbioid at 6:34 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Alabama's is suggested here as fried chicken livers on a biscuit. That sounds great, but I'd like to nominate a fried catfish sandwich.

Seconded, but I think the proper spelling is "sammige".
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 6:34 AM on May 31, 2012


At least that was what was always painted on the road-side signs.
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 6:35 AM on May 31, 2012


I concede in the face of your righteous truth.

I'm probably living in the past. I almost specified a Jordan's Meats hot dog until I googled and found out that they closed.
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:35 AM on May 31, 2012


Austria: Leberkässemmel (mit senf, natürlich)
posted by Quantum's Deadly Fist at 6:36 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


They were right about Illinois, except everything about how it should look. Why in god's name would you try to make one yourself, when you could pop down to a proper italian beef shop and get one from people who make them every day, and have mastered their craft? Seriously. I mean:

Even without a meat slicer these sandwiches were incredible.

That's rank heresy right there.
posted by Ghidorah at 6:37 AM on May 31, 2012


I've always despised pulled pork (or any pig product), but it's hard to argue with that choice for North Carolina.

Well, I would argue that it should be chopped rather than pulled pork and I'm sure there are some heretics who favor sliced, but yeah it should obviously be a barbeque sandwich. I feel like every Southern state's runner up should be pimiento cheese, but that might just be because I've got a delicious pimiento cheese sandwich for lunch today.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 6:41 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I can see why they chose a ham biscuit for Virginia, but if they were going for authenticity, that ham biscuit is so very wrong. First of all, the ham does not like it is salt-cured. Secondly, that ham is sliced too thin. Thirdly, that biscuit does not look home-baked. Fourthly, a proper ham biscuit is not pretty and neat. Fifthly, that ham has no character.

So, artificial traditional southern "country" comfort food which is really processed, northern sugar-coated pig ass on white bread and lacking all character. I'd say that pretty well represents a lot of Virginia!
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 6:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Holy shit, Mizu. We're both wrong. (imagine this said by Frank Booth of "Blue Velvet"): ITALIAN SANDWICH!

(note to people from away: this is a sandwich served on what it essentially a long, top split, spongy hot dog roll. It has strips of cheese, salami or ham, tomato, pickle, green pepper, tomato and optionally some black olives. Topped with vegetable oil. It sounds repulsive in the academic sense, but when I go back to Maine and see a sign, I have to get one and they can be great.)
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


The slaw in the North Carolina pulled pork sandwich looks... weird, somehow. Like, the pieces are about three times as big as they ought to be, and there's no mysteriously opaque white liquid binding it together.

(Damn I can't wait till my vacation to NC this summer)
posted by showbiz_liz at 6:43 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think it's fascinating how many states here have rushed forward to claim the pulled pork sandwich as their own.
posted by hermitosis at 6:46 AM on May 31, 2012


Of the Three Great Philly Sandwiches, I think they chose the popular, but least tasty, option to represent Pennsylvania ... Tastier: hoagie

A proper sub in Massachusetts is sold by an Italian deli and was called a "spuckie" by my grandparents generation. It features meat, cheese, shredded lettuce, and onions, pickles and tomatoes (for some reason) diced into tiny cubes. Mustard is traditional, mayo is an acceptable variant.

My Philadelphia-raised wife always asks for oil and oregano. Frequently prompting seasoned sub-makers to ask "are you from Philadelphia?"
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:46 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


The slaw in the North Carolina pulled pork sandwich looks... weird, somehow. Like, the pieces are about three times as big as they ought to be, and there's no mysteriously opaque white liquid binding it together.

Yeah that looks more like a bowl of cabbage than slaw. Also, let's be ecumenical here, there is also room for the slaw bound together by a mysterious red liquid.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 6:48 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I suppose Tennessee could also claim pulled pork as its State Right, but in the interest of individuality I suggest the fried bologna sandwich, which is properly made of thick-cut bologna, American cheese and white bread. I've recently seen a rise in Elvis Burgers (regular burger + peanut butter + banana) but I suspect these are mostly eaten for shock value.
posted by workerant at 6:52 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


No question in Florida. Cuban sandwich.

Despite what Miami says, they're a Tampa specialty, born from the delicious Cuban-Italian fusion in Ybor.

Lettuce is an abomination, and if the sandwich is not pressed, it is being horrifically mistreated.
posted by cmyk at 6:53 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Mayor Curley, you mean like from Amato's? I dunno, see, my dad worked at Jordan's Meats as a teenager (and as such has this unholy revulsion/love thing going on with red hot dogs) but has also instructed me in the ways of the Italian since I was small. I mean they're definitely the best when you buy them and stick them in the back of your car and drive out wherever to a good view for like three hours, but I dunno, are they that Maine-specific? Red hot dogs just seem more... patriotic, somehow.
posted by Mizu at 6:54 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


A good ole steak sandwich for Alberta sounds right.
posted by tatiana131 at 7:01 AM on May 31, 2012


Nthing the fluffernutter. I was so happy to see that for Massachusetts. There is truly no better answer.
posted by tocts at 7:02 AM on May 31, 2012


Ah, Maine Red Snappers. Love 'em for the snap when you bite into the natural casing!
posted by ericb at 7:05 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


I have to agree with them about the Italian beef for Illinois, although I don't know how popular it is downstate (not that downstate counts). A good beef is only surpassed by its sister sandwich, the combo. Italian beef and an italian sausage (hot please) forming heart cloggingly delicious perfection.
posted by borkencode at 7:09 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Slaw need not be bound by mysterious milky liquids. I make the version on this page, in fact I follow most of Elder Ward's prescription for making pulled pork except that I don't have dogs... and I am now so hungry that I need to get lunch at 10AM.
posted by Ella Fynoe at 7:10 AM on May 31, 2012


Bulgaroktonos: "Well, I would argue that it should be chopped rather than pulled pork and I'm sure there are some heretics who favor sliced, but yeah it should obviously be a barbeque sandwich."

Not chopped on a sandwich, though. I mean, if you are picking the food to represent NC it's probably a plate of chopped barbeque, but for a sandwich it's got to be pulled.
posted by Rock Steady at 7:10 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Google "restaurant" "connecticut" and 9 out of 10 of the results are for Italian restaurants.

Therefore, the official sammich of Connecticut should be a meatball grinder with spaghetti sauce and mozz. Wrapped in that funny thin foil with the wrinkly pattern.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 7:16 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


I'm really glad I wasn't brought in on this project because every state would just be grilled cheese.

I have a very narrow view of the world, sandwich-wise.
posted by six-or-six-thirty at 7:16 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Let's get some sauerkraut on that New York Ruben, please.
posted by StickyCarpet at 7:28 AM on May 31, 2012


you mean like from Amato's? ... are they that Maine-specific?

They are, as far as I know, absolutely unique to Maine (and now New Hampshire with the rise of Amato's as a gas station sub franchise). You'll see things branded as "Italian subs" all over North America, but it usually means "local style long sandwich with salami and some sort of pepper." If I were to walk into the deli around the corner here in Greater Boston and ask for "an italian," I would get a standard sub sandwich with salami, cheese, lettuce, no peppers, and everything else diced into 1/4" cubes. I would have to ask for oil, and I'd have to coax the clerk to get some black olives out the catering case.
posted by Mayor Curley at 7:28 AM on May 31, 2012


You have something against Smoked Meat?

I LOVE smoked meat, but as jeather said, that's pretty Montreal-centric. Kitteh's hot chicken sandwich might work, but I'd have to nominate Cordon Bleu's veal-pork-chicken spread on white bread with bright yellow ballpark mustard. It was a lunchbox staple when I was a kid.
posted by maudlin at 7:29 AM on May 31, 2012


Lunch is so many hours away.
posted by gladly at 7:32 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


One of the things I dislike about my home state is that we are extremely unremarkable in the unique-foods department. So I have no suggestions for the Colorado state sandwich.

The New Mexico state sandwich would be every other state's state sandwich, just smothered in green chile. (If burgers counted, however, it would be the green chile cheeseburger, preferably the one from the Owl Cafe or the one from Bobcat Bite.)
posted by heurtebise at 7:33 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


but I dunno, are they that Maine-specific?

Pretty much. The primary distinguishing difference between "Italian Sandwiches" and your ordinary sub/grinder/spucky is the bread. Nobody outside of Maine seems to use the white-bread split roll, even though you can find them as hot dog rolls anywhere in New England.

I remember back about 20 years ago when a sub shop opened up on Middle St. in Portland and their biggest selling point was that they used "Boston-style" sub rolls, which remain almost impossible to find in Maine, unless you consider the "bread" they use at Subway to be the same thing.
posted by briank at 7:36 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Maryland. Unquestionably crab cake. Don't for get the Old Bay seasoning, either.

I would second ShawnString's vote for pit BBQ. Even though I like crab cakes more. And one could be true to local form if they said soft shell crab sandwich. Even though crab cakes are better. ;)

Don't get me wrong, I will eat a crab cake sandwich. But mostly because it's cheaper than ordering the two crab cakes that seem to be the universal alternative. Even then, if it's anything fancier than two slices of commercial white bread and a tomato thrown on just because it looked too plain to the chef, I will disassemble it. Crab cakes do not want to be in a sandwich. (They also don't want lots of extra Old Bay, but that's a different rant.)
posted by zennie at 7:39 AM on May 31, 2012


if you click through the Kentucky one, that Hot Brown don't look right. It should be goopier. (At least that's the way they always are at the actual Brown hotel)

Agreed. That Mornay sauce looks...chunky.
posted by pecanpies at 7:52 AM on May 31, 2012


Beef on Weck for President

Aw man, now I am craving a beef on weck. Where am I supposed to get one of those on Long Island?

I need to move back upstate...
posted by pemberkins at 7:57 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Colorado should be the Mexican hamburger, a ground beef patty wrapped in a tortilla and smothered in Colorado green chile (which is not like green chile you find anywhere else).
posted by caryatid at 7:58 AM on May 31, 2012


Crab cakes do not want to be in a sandwich.

Aren't they essentially deconstructed sandwiches, reassembled anyway?

Basic Ingredient list for sandwich: bread, protien, condiments
Basic Ingredient list for crab cake: bread chunks (not crumbs), crab, egg, mustard, mayo, seasoning
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 8:00 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Also, heurtebise, listening to the audio at the link I posted may convince you otherwise. I've only lived here 20 years, so perhaps it's more obvious to me that some Colorado food is indeed unique - like the practice of serving everything Mexican smothered in green chile. What is up with that?
posted by caryatid at 8:02 AM on May 31, 2012


NJ's sandwich should be Pork Roll (aka Taylor Ham), probably in the form of pork roll, egg, and cheese.
posted by fings at 8:09 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Montana should be a pork chop sandwich. Man, I want a pork chop sandwich.
posted by Duffington at 8:14 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


If NJ isn't a Taylor Ham or a Chicken Parm I will be so upset.
posted by The Whelk at 8:16 AM on May 31, 2012


Pork chop sandwiches!
posted by uncleozzy at 8:16 AM on May 31, 2012 [6 favorites]


Washington State: Turkey, cream cheese and cranberry sauce?

Jones Soda is not a sandwich.
posted by psoas at 8:34 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Washington State is clearly a styrofoam box of teriyaki.
posted by stet at 8:43 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


I prefer a medianoche for Florida. Same great sandwich as the cubano, but with softer egg bread.
posted by bpm140 at 8:48 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


The Whelk: "If NJ isn't a Taylor Ham or a Chicken Parm I will be so upset."

Chicky-chicky-parm-parm is already taken by Connecticut for some reason. Doesn't seem WASPy enough, though.

bpm140: "I prefer a medianoche for Florida. Same great sandwich as the cubano, but with softer egg bread."

I'll allow it.
posted by Rock Steady at 8:51 AM on May 31, 2012


Shouldn't Connecticut get a steamed cheeseburger?
posted by uncleozzy at 8:54 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


States I've lived in:
Connecticut: the Chicken Parm is about right, although I'd be just as happy with a Meatball Sub.
Michigan: No idea what sandwich that would be. I ate a lot of rubens, but that says more about me than it does about Michigan.
Illinois: Definitely the Italian Beef.
Indiana: No idea.
New Hampshire: The steak bomb: shaved beef, provolone, salami, sauteed green peppers, onions, mushrooms.
posted by gauche at 8:56 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Doesn't seem WASPy enough, though.


Connecticut's sandwich really should be a vodka tonic encase in bitter repression.
posted by The Whelk at 8:56 AM on May 31, 2012 [7 favorites]


A good ole steak sandwich for Alberta sounds right.

There are some very, very good steak sandwiches in Alberta, but putting a sirloin on a roll isn't unique to the place. The "BBQ Beef on a Bun" - the Stampede midway classic - is the more distinctive, though many versions of it are pretty bland. To the uninitiated, it's in the same general ballpark of a Texas-style beef brisket sandwich, though Albertans have not (yet) learned to be as careful and artful in their BBQ as Texans are.

And Maine? Nova Scotia challenges you to a culinary duel for full title to the lobster roll. Everyone knows colder water means better lobster. Everyone knows the bun must be one of those hot dog buns with uncrusted sides that looks like a slice of folded white bread. The smart money's on Nova Scotia in this battle, but in any case there is no real loser in a battle that involves eating multiple lobster rolls.
posted by gompa at 9:00 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


As one who has lived in Virginia for about fifteen years, I've never gotten used to the insanity around ham biscuits here. Not about how good they are -- oh man so good -- but what constitutes a proper one, and how certain each person is that their way is The One True Way. The only advantage to this is that you can create hilarity at any large gathering of Virginians by asking them what should be in a ham biscuit. Mayhem will erupt in short order.

"BUTTER!"
"MUSTARD, YOU SAVAGE!"
"THOSE SLICES ARE TOO THIN!"
"TOO THICK!"


For New York, I gotta second the Beef on Weck. Not that the Reuben isn't magnificent, because it is, but there's more to New York State than the damn city. In the Western Portions of the Empire State, the Beef on Weck rules sandwichery with a firm yet fair hand. It is the true New York State Sandwich. Have it with a Genny Cream Ale and a Buffalo Bills' loss for the true Western New York experience.
posted by Harvey Jerkwater at 9:05 AM on May 31, 2012 [6 favorites]


Connecticut's sandwich really should be a vodka tonic encase in bitter repression.

Actually, it should be Smirnoff Raw Tea.
posted by ericb at 9:06 AM on May 31, 2012


Deep-fried clam hoagie for Rhode Island?
posted by ahimsakid at 9:10 AM on May 31, 2012


I'm afraid Taylor ham will end up being the sandwich of NJ, though really it's very divisive. I grew up in New Jersey, and no one in my family would touch the stuff. I know people who claim to love it, but I don't think they're a majority of sandwich eaters.

I'd nominate something with a hard roll. You could even just use the classic NJ breakfast sandwich, a buttered hard roll. Damn, those are good.

Or you could go with the hard roll with Genoa salami, provolone, lettuce and tomato. It would be really nice to feature tomatoes, because they're so insanely good in NJ.

Italian subs are done particularly well in Jersey, too - fresh-baked Italian bread, shredded lettuce, oil, vinegar, and oregano. I am always disappointed getting subs elsewhere because you often don't get the oil and vinegar. Or if you do, they sprinkle it on the filling without making sure enough of it soaks into the bread.
posted by Miko at 9:11 AM on May 31, 2012


Everyone knows the bun must be one of those hot dog buns with uncrusted sides that looks like a slice of folded white bread.

Known as a 'New England Style Hot Dog Roll.'

longsleeves:
"You must have noticed that it [is] a New England style hot dog roll that is employed. The rolls are baked as a group and then magically sliced in the top and sides [so] they pull away from each other leaving no side crust. This allows for toasting or grilling of the sides of the roll. (not 'bun.' sheesh.) That is what alows for the sublime delight of the lobster roll experience, and also makes serving and eating hot dogs more sensibly accomplished."
posted by ericb at 9:12 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


You'll never get more NJ then a plate of italian cookies eaten out of the box in someone's backyard so you might as well compromise on the sandwich.
posted by The Whelk at 9:15 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


South Carolina: One large slice of homegrown tomato encased in two slices of white bread coated with Duke's mayo. Salt & pepper to taste.
posted by ElGuapo at 9:18 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


One of the best lobster rolls is at the legendary Red's Eats (Wiscasett, Maine).
posted by ericb at 9:18 AM on May 31, 2012


For Hawaii: I suppose spam musubi doesn't count since there's no bread. In any case, something with spam.
posted by book 'em dano at 9:30 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Am I the only one who finds the images on that site un-inspiring? Sandwiches are all about the combining of ingredients, the fractal interleaving of tastes, and these are presented like a patient etherized on a table. They're too damn clean.
posted by benito.strauss at 9:31 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Good magazine held a "sandwich week" last year and held nominations/voting to decide each state's official sandwich.
posted by 27 at 9:34 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


The NC sandwich is right on!
posted by feathermeat at 9:41 AM on May 31, 2012


Utah's contribution must include honey! (But of course, since we are the beehive state.)

Even though the above link shows that Good Magazine's "official" Utah sandwich is "peanut butter and butter", I think it should be Peanut Butter and Honey-- with butter.
posted by PixieS at 9:42 AM on May 31, 2012


Of course this exists.

Sorry, kids: if I'm not getting any work done this afternoon, neither are you.
posted by gauche at 9:42 AM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Thanks gauche.

The best entry by far in that Wikipedia list is the British Rail sandwich. The details from the sandwich recipes are great: "The recipe also specifies, in order to make the sandwiches attractive – and to be able to tell what was inside – at least a third of the filling be placed in the centre, so that when cut diagonally, the customer would see the contents." Reminds me of the ISO standard cup of tea.
posted by spitefulcrow at 9:49 AM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


That GOOD list....I don't know about that GOOD list. It looks like they just asked one or two people from each state...often from the same area (two people from NYC represent the whole state, for example).
posted by troika at 9:49 AM on May 31, 2012


Manitoba: Mayo on white bread, pressed very flat.
posted by WinnipegDragon at 9:50 AM on May 31, 2012


Is a burrito a sandwich? (Apparently some judge says it's not.)
posted by madcaptenor at 9:53 AM on May 31, 2012


New Mexico = Carne Adovada Burrito
I'm taking liberties with the definition of sandwich - meat between bread product, can be hand-held - but it's that good.

Green chile cheeseburger is simply a condiment addition (the chile) to a typical American hamburger. Carne Adovada, tender pork marinated in red chile sauce - that's the real thing.
posted by incandissonance at 9:56 AM on May 31, 2012


MrVisible: If we consider the state sandwich as a way to reach out diplomatically to the other states and prove that our state is a good and worthwhile place, then Arizona proudly offers up the Sonoran hot dog.

On a recent road trip we took a route a couple hundred miles out of our way to obtain these at El Güero Canelo in Tucson. (Okay, and barbecue outside of Austin.)
posted by madcaptenor at 10:00 AM on May 31, 2012


California should probably be a hamburger, really.
posted by The World Famous at 10:02 AM on May 31, 2012


The edge cases always get me. I'm inclined to call a burrito a sandwich, but not an egg roll, and I feel like that's a mistake somewhere. I'm inclined to allow calzone and pasty, but at some point pasty becomes meat pie, and that's right out, too. I feel like open-faced sandwiches should count, but not pizza. NPR's Sandwich Monday blog defines a sandwich as a protein encased in a bread product, which I suppose means they can include fried chicken as a sandwich. Or dumplings. I think that these are clearly not sandwiches.

I really can't articulate a principle behind any of these things -- it's like when my cognitive psych professor drew a bunch of objects on the blackboard and asked us to articulate when they stopped being water glasses and started being vases. I know when, I just don't know why.
posted by gauche at 10:09 AM on May 31, 2012


According to that GOOD map, Indiana's sandwich is fried catfish? WTF? I can only think that, when on a roadtrip, the editors happened to stop at the only mom-n-pop in the state that makes catfish sandwiches. 'Cause, well...see my above declaration. All Hoosiers know it to be truth.
I loves my catfish, but it ain't the state sammich
posted by Thorzdad at 10:10 AM on May 31, 2012


Oklahoma has to be chicken fried steak. Anything else would be completely wrong. Hell, CFS is even the official state meal.

(And I'll nth that, of course, the Cuban sandwich is a natural choice for Florida.)
posted by ThatSomething at 10:20 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Grilled Mahi-Mahi for Hawaii. or perhaps a Teri-beef.
posted by KillaSeal at 10:22 AM on May 31, 2012


Thinking deep thoughts about Washington State sammiches.

I knew right away -- the grilled salmon sandwich. Often available in smoked or blackened variations.
posted by bearwife at 10:22 AM on May 31, 2012




California should probably be a hamburger, really.


With mayonnaise.
posted by caryatid at 10:25 AM on May 31, 2012


California should probably be a hamburger, really.

With mayonnaise.


I'd make it an Umami Burger. But maybe that's too city-specific.
posted by The World Famous at 10:28 AM on May 31, 2012


Despite its questionable methodology, that GOOD list is pretty spot-on with the fried bologna sandwich for Ohio. That was the first food I learned to "cook" as a wee Buckeye.
posted by denriguez at 10:34 AM on May 31, 2012


This is relevant. List of Official U.S. State Foods
posted by denriguez at 10:36 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Everyone knows colder water means better lobster.

That idea was invented by marketers for the Maine lobster industry, to make Maine lobster sound more desirable than the indistinguishable competitors to their south. So it's only fitting that the Maritimes should use it against them!

Although I should point out that the cursory search I just made suggests that Nova Scotia's ocean temps are actually slightly higher than Maine's.
posted by Mayor Curley at 10:40 AM on May 31, 2012


As a youth I was always totally pissed off that anything on a menu called "Californian" had avocado on it. I am a 5th generation Californian who is allergic to avocado! (I also hate sprouts, fuckin' sprouts all over the place giving people salmonella!)
posted by vespabelle at 10:40 AM on May 31, 2012


The California strikes me as a bit out of date. Sprouts are not as ubiquitous as they used to be and Californians are no longer the crunchy, granola-eating, birkenstock-wearing, Honda drivers of yesteryear. The torta is a logical choice but only represents the Latino side of the equation. I would recommend the Korean BBQ taco, as more more representative of our diversity. Yeah, I know, tacos aren't sandwiches but they're a reasonable approximation. If not that, a half torta, half banh mi, would be fitting as well.
posted by doctor_negative at 10:54 AM on May 31, 2012


I am from Ohio and my family goes back many generations in Ohio. I was staying at my grandma's house for the day when I was elementary school aged and she offered to make me a grilled cheese for lunch. I LOVE grilled cheese so I said YES! We had gone to the store earlier so I knew we had Conn's salt and vinegar potato chips for with the sandwich and malted milk balls for dessert. I was super excited for THE BEST LUNCH EVER!

Then, my grandma brings me my sandwich. There was white bread, american cheese and BOLOGNA! I was horrified! I freaking hate bologna with all my heart. After getting a bologna and mustard on white bread in my lunch every day from 1st through 3rd grade, I cannot stand that shit. I was promised a grilled cheese and I get served bologna? I almost cried but I was raised to eat what was served and not complain. And, my grandmother being a child of the depression, is a strict cleanplater. I knew if I wanted dessert, I was going to have to finish that horrid sandwich.

It took a while and almost an entire bag of chips to choke it down but I did it. I was so upset though that the milk balls didn't even sound good. So, yes, bologna sandwich can be Ohio's sandwich.

Although, since Ohio is the birthplace of White Castle, it seems that the slider should be the official sandwich. But not a trendy slider. Ohio sliders are made with the nastiest "beef."

Ugh. I love Ohio but some of our food is gross!
posted by rachums at 10:59 AM on May 31, 2012


Elvis and his fried peanut butter/banana sandwich aside, I agree that a nice thick-cut bologna sandwich would be a good fit for Tennessee if it weren't for the delicacy known as a Fish Sammich. Either a fried whiting or catfish filet on white bread, with mustard, pickles, red onion, and hot sauce. Those who put ketchup, tartar sauce, or lettuce on their Fish Sammich are Heathens and Sinners in the eyes of the gods.
posted by rhythim at 11:00 AM on May 31, 2012


This is relevant. List of Official U.S. State Foods

Things I knew but had confirmed for me today: Many state legislators don't have enough work to justify their own existance.
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 11:00 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Michigan is obviously best represented by a "steak" sandwich: an insanely oversized portion of white "Italian" bread surrounding an insanely oversize portion of ground beef cooked in a tomato sauce that may not actually have ever been within pissing distance of a tomato. "Pizza cheese" (aka mozzarella) is of course a must. There are two popular ways to eat one, both symbolically Michiganian. Either your can eat the whole thing, and the fries, and the quart glass of endless pepsi, consuming several days' worth of calories in a single lunch. OR you can leave three quarters of the food on the plate, covered in a soiled napkin and, in years past, put a cigarette out in the middle of the uneaten half, letting the waitress who earns less than minimum wage throw the whole thing in the
dumpster.

These things are great, though. If you're going out to Tony's in Saginaw for one on a Monday, swing by Kroger and grab a banana, so you can get the ridiculously huge banana split for half price. I think the health department should officially frown upon this particular practice, but I'm glad they don't. It's a great gimmick.
posted by LiteOpera at 11:04 AM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Avocados are kind of ubiquitous in California, though. As a Philadelphian who moved to California, I've become partial to a chicken parmigiana sandwich with avocado on it. Extra bonus: it's red, white, and green! Like Italy!
posted by madcaptenor at 11:42 AM on May 31, 2012


If you click through the Kentucky one, that Hot Brown don't look right.

I'm in Louisville, I've made hot browns for years, and I concur.

However, I disagree that the hot brown represents Kentucky as a commnwealth. Louisville, yes. Kentucky, no. The Kentucky one should be either a fried catfish sandwich, or a sausage-and-egg biscuit made with Purnell's Old Folks Country Sausage. Either one served with a cold bottle of Ale-8, of course.
posted by magstheaxe at 12:27 PM on May 31, 2012


Question for you Kentuckians:

Why do people from Kentucky call Ale-8-One "Ale-8"?

The name is a pun: "A late one." It says the pun right on the bottle. And the website you linked as "Ale-8" is www.ale-8-one.com.

I've known lots of people from Kentucky and I've lived not far from the Kentucky border, and almost everyone seems to omit the "one" from the name. I don't get it.
posted by The World Famous at 12:37 PM on May 31, 2012


As a youth I was always totally pissed off that anything on a menu called "Californian" had avocado on it. I am a 5th generation Californian who is allergic to avocado! (I also hate sprouts, fuckin' sprouts all over the place giving people salmonella!)

I'm old and still hate this. Plus, the tomatoes look like pure shit. I mean, 70s-era quality to go with your Instamatic pix, but still. If you're going to take photos of food, at least use food that I'd want to eat. (Sadly, yeah, all the delis around here == tomatoes like that).
posted by Ogre Lawless at 12:43 PM on May 31, 2012


Many state legislators don't have enough work to justify their own existance.

Having watched a couple of these get pushed through, including NH's "state fruit" being the pumpkin, a lot of it is just the work of local boosters, which may include a classroom of kids taking on a project as the pumpkin thing was, or the work of a lobby of growers or even tourism office folks developing the whole package and just getting a legislator to introduce it.
posted by Miko at 12:57 PM on May 31, 2012


Many state legislators don't have enough work to justify their own existance.

As someone who grew up in a state with an official state "red berry" (Strawberry) and an official state "blue berry" (Blueberry) AND a part-time state legislature, I can tell you that there is no floor on how little work a state legislature can do.

Seriously, if you state has something distinctive, go ahead, but if your state beverage is "milk" you need to rethink things.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:03 PM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Illinois, downstate division, should be the Horseshoe.
posted by brentajones at 1:10 PM on May 31, 2012


Question for you Kentuckians:

Why do people from Kentucky call Ale-8-One "Ale-8"?

The name is a pun: "A late one." It says the pun right on the bottle. And the website you linked as "Ale-8" is www.ale-8-one.com.

I've known lots of people from Kentucky and I've lived not far from the Kentucky border, and almost everyone seems to omit the "one" from the name. I don't get it.

posted by The World Famous at 3:37 PM on May 31


@The World Famous:

The soda inventor sponsored a name-the-product contest when he got ready to launch the drink. “A Late One”, a pun adopted for its description as the latest thing in soft drinks, was the winner.

I think we can all agree that Ale-8 is no longer the latest thing in soda pop. It's just an abbreviated way of referring to the pop. No one I know thinks that "A Late One" makes much sense as a pop name, anyway.
posted by magstheaxe at 1:16 PM on May 31, 2012


It's not 'pop.' It's 'soda'!!!
posted by ericb at 1:18 PM on May 31, 2012


Question for you Kentuckians:

Why do people from Kentucky call Ale-8-One "Ale-8"?



I suppose it's because pronouncing the "one" could be a little confusing, especially if you were talking to someone who wasn't used to hearing it. At first it almost sounds as if you're being redundant: "I'll have an Ale-8-One" sounds like, "I'll have an Ale-8 - one!" as if you're specifying you only want one.

Also: do people who aren't from Kentucky call it "Ale-8-One"? I was confused by the wording of your question.
posted by pecanpies at 1:18 PM on May 31, 2012


Given the other shit state legislatures have been getting up to lately, I'd really prefer they stick to naming official songbirds and sandwiches.
posted by jacquilynne at 1:18 PM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Also: does anyone say, "I'll have a "Coca-Cola?" Maybe someone out there does. I usually ask for a Coke, though.
posted by pecanpies at 1:19 PM on May 31, 2012


Previously: Pop vs. Soda
posted by ericb at 1:20 PM on May 31, 2012


Pro tip: it's delicious mixed with bourbon.

End derail.

posted by pecanpies at 1:20 PM on May 31, 2012


And, previouslier: The new national divide...
posted by ericb at 1:22 PM on May 31, 2012


Also: does anyone say, "I'll have a "Coca-Cola?" Maybe someone out there does. I usually ask for a Coke, though.

It says "Coke" on the can.

The label of Ale-8-One says "Ale 8 1" The 1 is in the logo, right there next to the 8.

Calling it "Ale-8" is like calling a BMW just "BM"
posted by The World Famous at 1:22 PM on May 31, 2012


And even more previouslier: Pop vs. Soda || Soda. Pop. Whatever - just don't call it Coke.
posted by ericb at 1:25 PM on May 31, 2012


The Great Pop vs. Soda Controversy: An Interactive Study.
posted by ericb at 1:26 PM on May 31, 2012


Oh god Pop vs Soda again what is this the first week of freshman year

is this a dorm lounge
posted by troika at 1:29 PM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


I'm not saying it's wrong to call Ale-8-One "Ale-8." I'm just asking if anyone knows why it's called that. I'm guessing nobody does.
posted by The World Famous at 1:36 PM on May 31, 2012


I'm not saying it's wrong to call Ale-8-One "Ale-8." I'm just asking if anyone knows why it's called that.

Is the fact that it's shorter, easier to say, and less potentially confusing not an answer, then? 'Cause really, I think that's about as good as it's gonna get. I did tweet the Ale8One account this question, though, and will report back if/when they reply.
posted by pecanpies at 1:43 PM on May 31, 2012


Awesome. FWIW, I do love Ale-8. One of the best things about living in L.A. is that I know just where to go to find it.
posted by The World Famous at 2:09 PM on May 31, 2012


Hey guys, we came here to talk about sandwiches. So what is it, a grinder, a sub, or a hoagie?
posted by denriguez at 2:35 PM on May 31, 2012


Chopped beef or straight-up BBQ brisket sandwich for Texas.

This works for Arkansas, too.
posted by zardoz at 2:35 PM on May 31, 2012


Wisconsin should be a cheeseburger topped with bacon, grilled onions, and a fried egg. Also, I grew up in rural Illinois, and we still loved Italian beef.
posted by impishoptimist at 2:48 PM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Idaho....I dunno. Maybe something Basque like a Solomo Sandwich? Here's a murky picture and a recipe.
posted by gamera at 2:58 PM on May 31, 2012


Oklahoma has to be chicken fried steak. Anything else would be completely wrong. Hell, CFS is even the official state meal

Chicken fried steak is definitely "the" Oklahoma meal - but it's not a sandwich. Chicken fried sandwiches are technically a thing, but they're pointless. Turning it into a sandwich makes it all soggy and impossible to eat like a sandwich anyway. And it's so unnecessary.

If it were just Tulsa, I'd argue for the Coney (assuming that counts as a sandwich). Coneys may have come from Michigan and may even be more popular there, but I guarantee Tulsa has the highest per capita coney concentration west of the Mississippi, and I would put Jim's Never on Sunday or the Coney I-Lander at Southroads up against any other coney place in the country. Technically, there are things called coneys sold in the surrounding states, but all I've found so far are just chili dogs - so not the same thing. Tulsa is absolutely the Coney Mecca of the West.

Unfortunately, I think the Oklahoma sandwich might be the gas station sandwich. Okies don't really have much in the way of distinctive sandwiches, but they do have a convenience store or two or three or four on every corner. Gas station sandwiches are bland, tasteless, and not very healthy, but then again, so are a whole lot of Oklahomans.
posted by Dojie at 3:06 PM on May 31, 2012


From my experience growing up in central PA, there should be a three-way split on the representative sandwich, with the cheesesteak in the east, Primanti's in the west and the hoagie filling out the middle.

Mayor Curley My Philadelphia-raised wife always asks for oil and oregano. Frequently prompting seasoned sub-makers to ask "are you from Philadelphia?"

My mother is from New Jersey and has a very specific way of making roast beef sandwiches (roast beef piled on top of buttered wheat bread with salt and pepper). While living in Greensboro, I used to frequent a laundromat with a deli across the street and would grab a sandwich to eat while waiting for my clothes to achieve cleanliness. One day I asked one of the clerks, clerk A if he could make me a roast beef sandwich like my mom used to make. Clerk A was clearly bewildered by my request. Clerk B, having heard the exchange, volunteered to make my sandwich and asked me where in New Jersey I was from. I had no idea that my mom's sandwich was actually a kind of thing until that moment.
posted by theBigRedKittyPurrs at 4:03 PM on May 31, 2012 [3 favorites]


Impossible to avoid the lobster roll for Maine, but an Italian sandwich (ham, cheese, onion, pickle, tomato, green pepper, olives, salt, pepper & oil) is really more authentic. Most Mainers have a preference for a particular Mom-n-Pop store's Italians, with Amatos always being a valid alternative. I've known people to ship Italian sandwich components from their preferred vendor, carefully packaged, to relatives outside Maine.

I personally contend that lobster should not be served in bread. It dilutes the butter.
posted by theora55 at 4:12 PM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


Mississippi: tomato sandwich with salt and pepper, on Bunny bread. We got great food where I'm from, but not so much of it in sandwich form. Still, a tomato sandwich goes down great on a hot day.

My alternate suggestion is the Moon Pie, but too many states would lay claim to that.
posted by Countess Elena at 4:36 PM on May 31, 2012


I love sandwiches.
posted by Divine_Wino at 5:19 PM on May 31, 2012 [2 favorites]


There are probably too many other competitors for Arkansas to claim the pulled-pork barbecue sandwich, so I'll put up the burger with pimiento cheese on top.
posted by box at 5:29 PM on May 31, 2012


From my experience growing up in central PA, there should be a three-way split on the representative sandwich, with the cheesesteak in the east, Primanti's in the west and the hoagie filling out the middle.

When I lived in Philly I always ate more hoagies than cheesesteaks, despite having both easily available.
posted by madcaptenor at 5:42 PM on May 31, 2012


Georgia: a "Southern chicken sandwich" (aka Chik-fil-a mock-up), served with an ice-cold CoCola.
posted by gone2croatan at 6:29 PM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Earl of Sandwich retail chain has come to the States. California, Florida, Nevada and New York. Coming soon -- Anaheim, CA, Atlantic City, NJ and Boston, MA.
"[T]he current 11th Earl and the Sandwich family remain passionate about the world's most popular quick food that carries their name and have developed the sandwich everyone has been waiting for.*
Franchises available!!!
posted by ericb at 7:07 PM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


New Jersey: Pork roll, egg and cheese on a hard roll.
posted by rachaelfaith at 8:12 PM on May 31, 2012 [1 favorite]


Avocados are kind of ubiquitous in California, though.

Maybe in southern California, but not so much in San Francisco.
posted by mike3k at 11:07 PM on May 31, 2012


Since the governors of my state seem to end up in jail (Illinois), I nominate bologna for our state. First, I've been told that bologna sandwiches are common in the pen. and secondly, because our elected officials are full of baloney. Sorry I couldn't be more creative, but I think my state really sucks.
posted by readyfreddy at 12:13 AM on June 1, 2012


Maybe in southern California, but not so much in San Francisco

I live in San Francisco, and avocados are definitely a thing. I would say the majority of restaurants in the city serve an avocado-related dish. My favorite steakhouse, sushi place, morning cafe, and bakery all serve avocados. Schroeder's, the 120 year old German restaurant that hosts polka dancing? They have avocados on the menu. I can't think of any type of restaurant that wouldn't have avocados in San Francisco.
posted by ryanrs at 12:17 AM on June 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


This is relevant. List of Official U.S. State Foods

Is it fair that Oklahoma appropriated every good Southern food as their "state meal," or did they way overstep their bounds there?
posted by halfbuckaroo at 2:52 AM on June 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


I know, and Texas has a pretty good claim to chicken fried steak too.
posted by Miko at 6:06 AM on June 1, 2012


These people drink terrible beer.
posted by batmonkey at 8:03 AM on June 1, 2012


Maybe in southern California, but not so much in San Francisco

I live in San Francisco, and avocados are definitely a thing.



Avocados are pretty much in everywhere in the state, if we had a state dip or condiment, it would be guacamole. My mom introduced me to them as a kid and it's been a love/love relationship ever since. In salads, on a sandwich or just cut one in half and eat it with a spoon.
posted by doctor_negative at 2:45 PM on June 1, 2012


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