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June 12, 2012 3:25 PM   Subscribe

Gin and Tonic, A Love Story It's summertime, and the sipping is easy. Time for an ode to the magical, malarial-fighting mixture of mother's ruin and tonic. "The final product looked like a box of Crayolas: thin curls of lemon and lime peel, floating pebbles of pink peppercorns, a wedge of star anise, and a few fresh mint leaves, lightly crushed between Andrés’ fingers at the last second. It was everything a gin and tonic hadn’t been before: complex, bracing, a world of sweets and sours and bitters to be discovered in every sip." Bonus: Recipes for making your own tonic water.
posted by cyndigo (77 comments total) 99 users marked this as a favorite

 
Don't drag me back to my dark glorious days of excessive indulgence, my mouth is watering just reading that.
posted by Max Power at 3:29 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Best enjoyed while listening to Gin and Pentatonic... as indeed I am doing now, glass in hand.
posted by Talkie Toaster at 3:31 PM on June 12, 2012


You might not want to drink lots of homemade tonic water if you're pregnant, or have a heart condition.
posted by anthill at 3:32 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


I enjoy a Gin and Tonic but Campari improves it.
posted by jeffburdges at 3:35 PM on June 12, 2012 [2 favorites]


This article is making me thirsty...so very thirsty.
posted by infinitywaltz at 3:40 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


1) From a freshly plucked, very firm and greenish lemon, slice off a length of peel, taking care not to bring any of the white pithy stuff. Throw into a large glass.
2) Add a little gin. With a sharp knife, puncture the peel so as to release the zest and oils.
3) Add ice up to half way, throw in a slice of lemon, then fill up to the top with ice.
4) Pour gin onto ice, trying to make it take the most complicated route possible through the ice and the lemon slice. Nothing less than 1/4 gin.
5) Pour on the Schweppes tonic water (warm, so it retains its bubbles) very carefully, avoiding obstructions. Every crash is a bubble lost.
6) When the drink is ready, don't stir it. The tonic water does the necessary mixing. Just put your finger in one of the top ice cubes and turn 180º.
7) Finally, twist a long length of lemon peel over the surface of the drink. Get your face close to the glass to observe the tiny droplets of lemon oil.
8) Americans prefer lime with their gin and tonics. But lime is, for the true connoisseur, too sweet. Well, the perfect gin and tonic has two slices - one of lemon, one of lime, together as in the Brazilian flag - and, before the twist, squeeze just a little lime juice into the drink.
Credit to that estimable imbiber MiguelCardoso. As an American, I do in fact prefer lime.
posted by Iridic at 3:44 PM on June 12, 2012 [18 favorites]


If Spain wasn't on my list of places to visit before it is now!
posted by ephemerista at 3:45 PM on June 12, 2012


The G&T is by far my favorite cocktail. I think I've found my new weekend project.
posted by BostonEnginerd at 3:47 PM on June 12, 2012


Beer street and gin lane bear linking here.

I have often thought a modern E street and meth lane or similar might be neat.

Even a poorly prepared gin and tonic is more refreshing than many drinks, and I expect to improve my summer greatly with the instructions above.
posted by poe at 3:48 PM on June 12, 2012


Where can I find Gin Mare here in NYC? Thyme, rosemary and arbequina olives? Wow!!!
posted by paindemie at 3:52 PM on June 12, 2012 [3 favorites]


I personally spend too many nights drowning my problems in Ouisghian Zodahs.
posted by Greg_Ace at 3:55 PM on June 12, 2012 [3 favorites]


Oh yes.

There is no finer legal buzz than a fine gin and tonic buzz. But remember, there is a cost. Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic, and the numbers for life expectancy of chronic gin drinkers...well she's not so good.

Anyhow, that receipe sounds insanely delicious, and I want want want one of those right frickin' now.
posted by Skygazer at 3:55 PM on June 12, 2012


Where can I find Gin Mare here in NYC? Thyme, rosemary and arbequina olives? Wow!!!

If you find it, and I will meet you there!
posted by Skygazer at 3:56 PM on June 12, 2012


thin curls of lemon and lime peel, floating pebbles of pink peppercorns, a wedge of star anise

....and one gilded lily.
posted by pompomtom at 4:05 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic
Explains why people think it makes you lachrymose, I suppose. Although it's not distilled so much as the berries are macerated, no?

I certainly can't remember my first gin and tonic, but I do remember how, newly 21 and utterly opposed to the stuff, I one day realized how many classic drinks use it and resolved to give it at least a full bottle's attempt, a little each day, before I gave up on it entirely. I bought some Citadelle, which was untraditional but looked relatively kind.

Success! Mmmm, gin.
posted by postcommunism at 4:06 PM on June 12, 2012


the numbers for life expectancy of chronic gin drinkers...well she's not so good.


These numbers... show them to me.
posted by ikahime at 4:08 PM on June 12, 2012 [5 favorites]


Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic

I can't find any evidence online that J. communes berries are toxic, can you point to anything?

Of course since I'm a physical scientist I may not be putting the right queries into PubMed. Or it might just detect the whiff of partial differential equations gin on my breath.
posted by Talkie Toaster at 4:11 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


J. communis, that is. Hic!
posted by Talkie Toaster at 4:12 PM on June 12, 2012


Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic

Gin isn't distilled from juniper berries; they're just used for flavoring. It's distilled from grains, like pretty much any other spirit (vodka, for example).

And in any case, juniper berries aren't highly toxic, although if you eat enough of them--or extract an oil from them--it'll give you a hell of a stomach ache. It's also an abortifacient. (Caveat: that only applies to berries from juniperus communis, the common juniper, which is used to flavor gin; other, closely related species can be highly toxic, so don't pick them yourself unless you're a real botany expert.)
posted by infinitywaltz at 4:14 PM on June 12, 2012


Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic, and the numbers for life expectancy of chronic gin drinkers...well she's not so good.

Would you mind providing some evidence for that? I've looked around, and can't find anything authoritative saying that Juniperus Communis is highly toxic. This toxicity asessment mentions abortifacient properties, but otherwise "Acute studies using animals show little toxicity of the oil or tar."

the numbers for life expectancy of chronic gin drinkers...well she's not so good.

I suspect life expectancy issues may be related to the chronic drinking, not the flavoring of the gin.
posted by zamboni at 4:15 PM on June 12, 2012


I love a gin and tonic, but I'll freely admit to doing it "all wrong," somewhere halfway between a G+T and a rickey. Once limes are involved, I have trouble controlling myself.
posted by uncleozzy at 4:19 PM on June 12, 2012 [4 favorites]


Gin has made the transition. From it's humble beginnings as the crystal meth of it's day. To it's current position of idolatry.

It's fantastically delicious. The smell of Tanqueray will always remind me of my mother. She taught me how to make gin and tonics so I could make them for her.

Current gin based favourite would have to be the negroni though. Tastes like marmalade.
posted by aychedee at 4:19 PM on June 12, 2012 [3 favorites]


Summer drinking is the best drinking.
posted by villanelles at dawn at 4:24 PM on June 12, 2012 [2 favorites]


I'm so glad my SO comes from a tradition where stomachaches are cured with Gin and Tonics.
posted by The Whelk at 4:27 PM on June 12, 2012


I can't find this online so here goes: (I haven't made this myself, but I know someone who does and it's amazing stuff).

Tonic Water Syrup

2 1/4 teaspoons cinchona bark powder
1 1/2 tbs Everclear 151 (or vodka)

Combine, cover, leave overnight.

1 1/2 cups water
20 cardamon pods crushed
12 juniper berries
1/2 tsp coriander seeds
1/4 cup Szechwan peppercorns
4 lemon grass stalks chopped
1 tbs + 1 tsp citric acid
2 tsp sumac
zest and juice of one orange
zest and juice of two large meyer lemons
zest and juice of 4 limes

Add to cinchona/alcohol, bring to a simmer, cover, simmer for 30min.
Let sit overnight.

Filter through fine sieve, filter through fine cheesecloth, filter through coffee filter. Takes a long time. Some people don't filter this fine and just let it settle in the fridge.

1 1/2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cup water

Heat sugar and water until sugar dissolves.; Cool and combine with the tea.


Store in refrigerator.

Mix with carbonated water about 1 part to 6 parts water.
posted by aspo at 4:27 PM on June 12, 2012 [7 favorites]


Also Juniper is delicious
posted by The Whelk at 4:28 PM on June 12, 2012


Great post! G&Ts are, by far, my favorite drink. I know they're technically a summer drink, but I drink them year round.

This past weekend was my 20th high school reunion, which was held at a beyond-shitty dive bar on the edge of town (held there because the proprietor was an alum, and donated the use of the facility). Shortly after arriving, I wandered up to the bar to drink something, anything, to take the edge off of my anxiety, so I ordered my standard: Sapphire & tonic, extra lime.

The bartender said, nope, we only have Beefeater and New Amsterdam. Fine, then, I said, I'll take a New Amsterdam and tonic, extra lime.

Bartender started the pour, then she looked up at me and said, oh sorry, no tonic water, either. But I can make it with 7-Up.

Desperation overtook common sense, so I agreed, and friends, I am here to tell you that that shit was vile. I was relegated to drinking some abominable concoction of orange juice, cranberry juice, pineapple juice, and bottom-shelf vodka just to make it through the night. Not good. Not good at all.
posted by shiu mai baby at 4:34 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Juniper berry non-toxicity notwithstanding, I can tell you there's something in gin (what's the word for other ingredients in liquor - adjutants? aggregates? something like that) that my body's not crazy about. I love the stuff, but overindulging with gin makes me feel more tired and cranky the next day than the same amount of, say, whisky. No idea why.
posted by Greg_Ace at 4:34 PM on June 12, 2012


For those in London, Graphic Bar (a bar in Soho which has over 100 varieties of gin) hosts a monthly/bimonthly gin tasting known as the Juniper Society. At each one, a representative from a gin distillery comes along and talks about their gins, with samples (of the various gins, and sometimes the constituent spirits if the gins are blended, as was the case with Hendrick's) being poured out. It's well worth going; one learns a lot about gin distilling.
posted by acb at 4:39 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


My father found out the hard way that although it seems like an excellent idea to coast down a very steep hill on one's bike after drinking three gin and tonics, that is actually not the case. This was in 1979. He never rode his bicycle again.

He drinks gin and tonics to this day.
posted by medeine at 4:44 PM on June 12, 2012 [4 favorites]


I friend and I were drinking gin and tonic's just last night. Fever Tree brand tonic water is very good, and we found the addition of grapefruit bitters was a very nice touch.
posted by sevenyearlurk at 4:52 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


If you can find it in your area, I recommend a Ransom Gin and Tonic with lemon.
posted by Fleebnork at 4:53 PM on June 12, 2012


He never rode his bicycle again.

He drinks gin and tonics to this day.


'When I read about the evils of drinking, I gave up reading' kind of situation then? I love a good G & T.
posted by ersatz at 4:55 PM on June 12, 2012 [2 favorites]


Besides a stint in my late teens to early twenties of guzzling handle bottles of whatever alcohol was available, I really never drank much in my 20s and early 30s. But I was in Turkey with my brother (I know, Turkey! How exotic!) and we were sitting at a bar. I didn't ever go to bars, so I asked him what he was drinking, and he said "gin and tonic". I thought, "Blegh" remembering some incident with drinking gin straight as a youth. So I said, "Blegh", and my brother said, "no, try it, it's good!" I thought, "what the hell, it's a different place, try something different". So I tried it. It was good. I said, "give me a gin and tonic" and we sat there and kept drinking them for a few hours. The weather was nice and it was great, and the G&Ts were great. I've not had one since, and that was 13 years ago. I kind of forgot about them, for some reason. This makes me want one again.
posted by Red Loop at 5:03 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Ohhh, good article. Now I know what to look for when I finally get to Spain—I think.

'Cause yeah, the last time I had a gin and tonic was back in college at this shady (and I mean shady) little bar we used to have around here called the Red Sea (on the Loop—weird that the commenter before me is named Red Loop!). We'd been drinking plum wine at my friends' apartment and decided to go for a walk to the bar and back. My head was already buzzing, and that G+T at the bar put me over the top. I had to concentrate to walk back, and when we got there, I took another sip of plum wine, laid down on the floor...and awoke the next morning propped up in a camp chair.

As it turned out, I'd thrown it all back up...then laid down in it...then fought and cursed my friends as they tried to get me to sit up and stop doing that.

I haven't had a gin and tonic since.

I also don't really do shots anymore, but when I did, gin and soy sauce was actually one of my favorites, sort of a savory shot. I know, it sounds awful, but try it—it's good!

Not that you're going to take my advice after that first story, I know!
posted by limeonaire at 5:05 PM on June 12, 2012


Filter through fine sieve, filter through fine cheesecloth, filter through coffee filter. Takes a long time.

Okay, I can provide expert advice in this thread.

My wife and I have made several batches of tonic syrup, using many variations on the recipe from Imbibe, and we found a good shortcut for the filtering.

There are these cloth coffee filters with wire and a handle... they look like this. Using these makes the filtering process MUCH faster. It's really just a one-step thing, aside from filtering out the really big pieces with a sieve first. We do let the bottles settle in the fridge, too, but there's barely any real silt left.

The tonic syrup comes out red and very opaque, since it's made from the bark powder, but you don't use very much of it when you make a drink, so it doesn't overwhelm the visual presentation. And the particulates in the syrup make the bubbles from the fuzzy water fizz out pretty quickly, but holy crap it is SO GOOD. Really, I can't look at commercial tonic water any more.

We often just make tonic water on ice and drink that. And no malaria yet, for either of us.

We've tried all kinds of spice variations, with lots of peppercorns, or coriander seeds, anise, all kinds of things. It's so much fun. So yeah, gin and tonic. Don't settle, mefites, BE A TONIC SNOB.
posted by dammitjim at 5:24 PM on June 12, 2012 [3 favorites]


The time I made my own tonic syrup; I went with an even shorter short cut and used a french press, and it seemed to work fine, although I was using bark rather than powder, so it may be the case that powdered cinchona is sinister to filter...
posted by ambilevous at 5:31 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


(what's the word for other ingredients in liquor - adjutants? aggregates? something like that)

Congeners. Took me a while, but I was highly motivated because not remembering was driving me crazy.
posted by Greg_Ace at 5:46 PM on June 12, 2012


Had to have a couple G&Ts to help me gather my wits, in fact...
posted by Greg_Ace at 5:47 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


These numbers... show them to me.

I thought it was common knowledge that Juniper berries were toxic, but it seems only to apply to Juniperus Sabina and not the variety J. Communis that's used to flavor gin.

As for "the numbers" I mentioned above, I admit they're anecdotal, and from some big gin drinkers, I've known, who may, or may not, have been pulling my leg I suppose. My bad then. Sorry.

Everyone stay calm and go back to your Gin and tonics.
posted by Skygazer at 5:56 PM on June 12, 2012


I have yet to dilute my gin with tonic water, but I may try based on the post. Thanks!
posted by grimjeer at 6:13 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Bourbon is and always will be my lady but a good gin and tonic is the mistress I just can't resist.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 6:22 PM on June 12, 2012 [6 favorites]


But, but.. bitters!

and not angostura.. they always taste like cardboard to me - currently.. it's Fee's for me
posted by drewbage1847 at 6:41 PM on June 12, 2012


It was World Gin Day on June 9.
Mark it on your calenders for next year. I know I will.

(Post bookmarked as delicious).
posted by Mezentian at 6:44 PM on June 12, 2012


What I love about gin and tonics (aside from the fact that they're a rawking good drink, one of my all time favorites) is that you're getting something other than alcohol as you drink, and I find I'm never as hung over after drinking g&t as I am after, say, the equivalent amount of gin in martini form.
posted by hippybear at 6:45 PM on June 12, 2012


I had thought that in the early days of gin there was much more juniper and this had a great deal to do with gin toxicity associated with gin mills and factory workers during part of the industrial revolution. And I though that, like in the case of absinthe, the proportion of the questionable substance was reduced.

Or perhaps it was just that a lot of the alcohol the gin mills served was adulterated with methanol. That's probably what was going on, now that I think about it.
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich at 6:48 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


Juniper berries, from which gin is distilled are highly toxic, and the numbers for life expectancy of chronic gin drinkers...well she's not so good.

Last Christmas my family was sitting around the table and my 88 year old dad told me about his 82 year old dad. My grandpa was in the nursing home dying of emphysema after suffering through stomach cancer and 7 heart attacks (a lifelong smoker). My dad would go every day after work and they'd have a "martini," which, in their case was gin on the rocks. One evening when my dad was getting ready to leave, my grandpa took his hand and said "We're out of gin."
The next morning he was dead.
My dad told me that story, took my hand and said "Remember that."
We've just learned that soon my dad won't remember much of anything, being in the early stages of dementia, and he gave up gin a year or so ago because it's hard on his kidneys. But every time I visit I bring a bottle of Bombay Sapphire.
He'll never be able to say "We're out of gin."
posted by Floydd at 6:48 PM on June 12, 2012 [12 favorites]


I just call gin Pine Drank.
posted by polywomp at 7:11 PM on June 12, 2012 [2 favorites]


I friend and I were drinking gin and tonic's just last night. Fever Tree brand tonic water is very good, and we found the addition of grapefruit bitters was a very nice touch.

Came to give a recomendation for Fever Tree. I drank quite a few gin and tonics in college, and then switched to vodka tonics sometime after I graduated. To this day, vodka tonic is my deserted island drink.

One night -- while at a fancier bar -- the bartender took pity on me with my vodka cum Schweppes tonic, pulled a small bottle out from under the bar and said "Here, try this." The first sip of my new drink was like the coming of God at the Rapture. Turns out that everything I didn't like about a vodka/gin and tonic was due to cheap ass, adulterated tonic water.

The bad thing is that the drink is now ruined for me unless they have a higher end tonic water :(
posted by sbutler at 7:14 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


What's funny is, there is a LOT of gin out there which isn't nearly as juniper strong as Tangueray. I do prefer Tangueray for my g&t, because the juniper works nicely with the quinine. But check out Bombay Sapphire or Hendricks or any other of a zillion other kinds of gin, and you'll find there is a huge range of what gin can taste like.

(I'm particularly fond of the rather low-shelf New Amsterdam gin on the rocks. It has a nice complex infusion which takes on great character as it chills and dilutes.)
posted by hippybear at 7:15 PM on June 12, 2012


Gin threads make me want to skip delightedly around the room, strewing juniper everywhere from a tiny wicker basket. Anyone else a Bluecoat fan? (Junipero is also great - a little bit of a spicy edge to it.)
posted by en forme de poire at 7:26 PM on June 12, 2012 [3 favorites]


I just call gin Pine Drank.

If gin is your "pine drank," you'll want to stay away from the hard stuff. It's like a frigging christmas tree to the face.
posted by Sys Rq at 7:27 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


If you only have a G&T infrequently, how can you avoid wasting most of a bottle of tonic water each time?

I have an occasional drink -- usually a bottle of good beer -- and adding G&Ts to my options would be nice. But I am reluctant to use a whole bottle of bubbly water for each tall, tangy beverage.

Do I have any options?
posted by wenestvedt at 7:31 PM on June 12, 2012


Yes. Cans.
posted by Sys Rq at 7:35 PM on June 12, 2012


I have an occasional drink -- usually a bottle of good beer -- and adding G&Ts to my options would be nice. But I am reluctant to use a whole bottle of bubbly water for each tall, tangy beverage.

Buy smaller bottles of tonic. They can come in six packs, or sometimes in single 12-16 oz bottles, or whatever. Amazon seems to carry all kinds in smaller than 2L bottles.
posted by hippybear at 7:37 PM on June 12, 2012


There is almost nothing I enjoy drinking more than a G & T, and I drink them year round since I live in a tropical climate. This thing about the toxicity of the juniper berry reminds me of an experience I had when I was a kid. My Grandpa was a confirmed whiskey drinker, although his consumption of beer (especially Guinness) was pretty legendary in our neighborhood...and my father loved gin. So Grandpa, trying to convince me how awful gin was, told me to get two worms from our yard, and to fill two shot glasses: one with water, one with gin. He instructed me to drop a worm into the glass of water, where it writhed and flailed but still lived; the worm dropped into the gin flailed for a short while, then died.

Grandpa asked me, "What did you learn from this?"

I answered "If you drink gin you won't get worms!"
posted by motown missile at 7:39 PM on June 12, 2012 [9 favorites]


Not to sound like a shill, but the fever tree that I recommended up thread comes in 4-packs of 200ml bottles -- very convenient.

Is anyone here a fan of cucumber in place of lime? It's an interesting change of pace in a G&T.
posted by sevenyearlurk at 7:40 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


SYL, yes! Especially in Hendrick's.
posted by en forme de poire at 7:44 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


When I was in college, I couldn't stand beer. Strictly mixed drinks. My roomates and I managed to build up a pretty nice liquor cabinent in senior year. Then, I moved to China to teach English. My salary was $100 a month, which was enough to live on, but there was a problem: a bottle of gin (or vodka, or pretty much anything) was worth $10. In my foolish youth, I felt that spending 10% of my income on alcohol (more specifically, a single bottle) was excessive, so I learned how to drink beer (750ml bottles of the local beer sold for roughly 16 cents).

Halfway through the year, the university doubled our salaries, out of nowhere. Since I'd lived just fine on $100, now I essentially had $100 of totally disposable income. One of my first purchases was a bottle of gin, along with some bottles of tonic, and some limes. That first gin and tonic in my apartment in China was a thing of beauty. Absolutely perfect.
posted by Ghidorah at 7:46 PM on June 12, 2012 [2 favorites]


Hendrick's and a cucumber are like peanut butter and chocolate.

I'm actually a big fan of Plymouth as my drinkin' gin, though I have a bottle of Bombay Sapphire at the moment.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 7:47 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]


I insisted on toting my own outrageously large gin and tonics to parties while in college. Then for some reason I don't recall I stopped drinking them altogether. Right now I want one of those old dream makers real bad.
posted by nowhere man at 7:59 PM on June 12, 2012


I remember reading a NYT article some years ago naming Plymouth sort of the all around best basic gin, whereas many of the others such as Bombay Sapphire and Hendricks are a bit on the overly fancy side of things. So I drank Plymouth a lot, but I have to say I really like the differences both Hendricks and Bombay Sapphire can give to the palate. Bombay Sapphire especially is so opulent and magnificent and makes me feel like this.
posted by Skygazer at 8:01 PM on June 12, 2012


The G&T is a fantastic drink and my go to beverage of choice. It's refreshing, alcoholic and the bite of quinine is just what the doctor ordered.
posted by arcticseal at 8:13 PM on June 12, 2012


I've been a confirmed Plymouth man for some time, only last week we found ourselves out of luck due to the handing over of the State liquor establishment to private hands, which so far don't seem up to the task of keeping the necessary in stock. So we bought a bottle of Bendistillery Crater Lake Gin. It's marvelous; not completely clear, which I suppose is like some Genevers, but very nice juniper flavor and smooth, at 95 proof. I may just skip the Plymouth one more time.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 8:46 PM on June 12, 2012


And thanks to others above, I plan on giving the Crater Lake gin - Fever Tree tonic G&T a go. I'll report back.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 8:48 PM on June 12, 2012


This is making me homesick in the best way possible.
posted by flippant at 9:01 PM on June 12, 2012


I'm actually a big fan of Plymouth as my drinkin' gin

I've visited Plymouth not too long ago and was planning to get to the distillery but couldn't get it together enough.

The good thing about gin and tonics is that even a noname, supermarket brand can be quite good, especially on a golden summer's day.

Of course if you want the real deal, go artisan and authentic, you skip all those pale English imitations of jenever and go straight to the source. There's this little tiny bar to the side of the Krasnapolsky hotel at the Dam that does nothing but jenevers, where they pour your glass so full you need to take a big sip first before you can lift it without accident. Lovely, lovely stuff and if you drink it the right way (with a beer on the side), it won't fuck you over the next day.
posted by MartinWisse at 11:15 PM on June 12, 2012 [1 favorite]




Was reading this thread on the bus on the way home after waiting most the day for a gobshite solicitor to finalise a deal on a commercial lease that was finalised a week ago before he got involved and am now home drinking a double Tanqueray even though it's the middle of winter here and the day is suddenly much better thank you!

Also, the deal finnnaaaalllly got done, so yay, another reason to have another gin when this one is finished!
posted by Hello, I'm David McGahan at 3:17 AM on June 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Plymouth Navy Strength. That is all.
posted by jonnyploy at 5:50 AM on June 13, 2012


Wow, it's not even 11AM and I really want a G&T
posted by eriko at 8:37 AM on June 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Tanqueray and tonic with a splash of Roses lime...so summer...so fine.
posted by judson at 8:52 AM on June 13, 2012


I do like G&Ts - unfortunately, tonic water upsets my stomach for some reason. It might be one of those psychosomatic things, because I once threw up after drinking a vodka & tonic (which had less to do with the vodka or tonic than with something in the food at the time not agreeing with me).

And perhaps I've become too much of a whiskey/whisky drinker, but I have a hard time telling the difference between gins. I've sort of learned to distinguish between Tangueray and Bombay Sapphire - Tangueray has more of a syrupy mouthfeel to me, the Sapphire tastes lighter.
posted by dnash at 9:15 AM on June 13, 2012


Where can I find Gin Mare here in NYC?

I just bought a bottle in Toronto. ($55!). It's fantastic.

I'm actually a big fan of Plymouth as my drinkin' gin,

So was I until they practically doubled the price about 2 months ago. Went from $27 a bottle in Canada to $44. Fuck that.
posted by You Should See the Other Guy at 8:55 PM on June 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


We were in Madrid last summer and the gin and tonic prevalence really caught us by surprise. I'm used to going into a bar in the States, slapping down six bucks, and getting a rocks glass filled with ice and a splash of gin at the bottom. The bars in Madrid turned the G&T into a ritual.

The bartender/waiter/bouncer (inevitably only one person running the whole show) would take your order for the "gin tonic" and return with the biggest brandy snifter you can think of, full of large cubes of ice. I could have fit my head into some of these glasses. In addition to the glass, the waiter had on his tray the entire bottle of gin from behind the bar as well as an individual-sized glass bottle of tonic. The glass was placed on the table, the gin was free poured from the bottle, and the tonic was uncapped and left for you to do with as you wish.

They were ridiculously expensive (usually between 12 and 15 euros), but you really didn't need more than one.
posted by backseatpilot at 8:50 AM on June 14, 2012


Pour on the Schweppes tonic water (warm, so it retains its bubbles)

? I thought cold liquid retained carbonation better. Not so?
posted by Lexica at 10:35 PM on June 16, 2012


Pour on the Schweppes tonic water (warm, so it retains its bubbles)
? I thought cold liquid retained carbonation better. Not so?
Gas solubility in water increases as temperature decreases. q.v. Henry's Law.
carbon dioxide from a carbonated drink escapes much faster when the drink is not cooled because the required partial pressure of CO2 to achieve the same solubility increases in higher temperatures.
You might think that the faster escape would lead to more effervescence, but we also perceive higher carbonation at lower temperatures.
The objective of this study was to determine the effect of temperature on carbonation perception in carbonated spring water and to determine the influence of the degree of panel training on this effect. Spring water was carbonated to two carbonation levels, 2.4 and 3.0 volumes CO2. The samples were served at 3, 10, 16 and 22°C, and evaluated by both trained and naive panels. Two assessing conditions, swallowing and expectoration, were employed to rate samples. Carbonation intensity was perceived to be higher at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures, even after having taken into account the fact that there was less CO2 in the samples at higher temperatures. This effect held true for both naive and trained panels. The temperature effect on carbonation perception was carbonation level dependent; differences were more evident at the higher carbonation level.
posted by zamboni at 10:44 AM on June 18, 2012 [2 favorites]


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