You know, "let them eat cake" would actually have been nicer...
July 13, 2012 10:31 AM   Subscribe

During the presentation of tough new austerity measures at the Spanish parliament, and more specifically of a cut in unemployment benefits (with unemployment currently standing at 24%), and as her fellow conservative MPs clapped, Andrea Fabra yelled "Fuck 'em all!". Hilarity has predictably ensued...

Although she maintains that her yell was addressed at opposition hecklers, not the unemployed, Ms. Fabra's case is not helped by the fact that she's the daughter of notorious local politician Carlos Fabra, who is mostly known for his surprising lottery luck and for promoting the construction of Castellón airport, which one year after its inauguration still has to see its first aircraft...
posted by Skeptic (50 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
Link in the OP forces you to log in to the Twitter Mobile site. I think you want this.
posted by ejazen at 10:34 AM on July 13, 2012


maybe switch that mobile.twitter link to the regular version? That's kicking me to a signup page.
posted by JPD at 10:34 AM on July 13, 2012


I can't help but wonder if this might have been a misstep, from a public-relations perspective.
posted by clockzero at 10:34 AM on July 13, 2012 [33 favorites]


Surely, this...
posted by gauche at 10:35 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


This tradition goes back to ancient Rome.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 10:39 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


I can't help but wonder if this might have been a misstep, from a public-relations perspective.

Easy fix:

"I'm very sorry if anyone was offended. I will say that I am surprised and saddened that in this modern age so many people should be offended by a sincere wish that everyone should be fortunate enough to experience the joyful pleasure of sexual intercourse. I mean, cake is nice, to be sure, but surely sex is even better?"

What could go wrong?
posted by yoink at 10:43 AM on July 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


What hilarity? There's only one response to the Tweet as far as I can see. (I don't use Twitter so perhaps my visibility is limited, but generally posts to link to things you have to sign up to view are bad posts.)
posted by wolfdreams01 at 10:46 AM on July 13, 2012 [5 favorites]


This lady is articulating the underlying philosophy of those who see the suffering of the masses as preferable to asking wealthy citizens to contribute to the greater good of a society that has pampered them at the expense of the general population.

And I say: "No, fuck YOU all."
posted by birdhaus at 10:48 AM on July 13, 2012 [10 favorites]


What Europe is doing to itself is horrifying. The ECB and the German government seem committed to not just making people suffer, but unproductively suffer. If the problem with the PIIGS is that they have too much debt, how is keeping people unemployed and slashing benefits they would pour into the economy supposed to help pay down that debt?

I can only imagine what it's like to be a Spanish MP, being strongarmed by the Germans into accepting these ridiculous austerity measures. It must get on the nerves.
posted by Cash4Lead at 10:54 AM on July 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


So, poor people, it's not just your imagination: those in power actually do hate you.
posted by clockzero at 10:56 AM on July 13, 2012 [8 favorites]


wolfsdream, I'm sorry, this is the only English-language link I could find to reflect the fact that #quelesjodan ("#fuckemall") is THE trending topic today. And "hilarity" is of course meant ironically. The mood has rather been one of torch-lighting, pitchfork-sharpening anger.
posted by Skeptic at 10:58 AM on July 13, 2012


This lady is articulating the underlying philosophy of those who see the suffering of the masses as preferable to asking wealthy citizens to contribute to the greater good of a society that has pampered them at the expense of the general population.

Spain has already imposed a number in tax hikes on the wealthy in response to the crisis--including a direct tax based on assets rather than income. They could certainly do more, but it's not true to say that the wealthy have been left untouched while everything is taken out on the poor.
posted by yoink at 11:00 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


I can only imagine what it's like to be a Spanish MP, being strongarmed by the Germans into accepting these ridiculous austerity measures.

Except that the ones strongarming the Spanish parliament aren't so much the Germans as the bond markets, who are very reluctant to buy Spanish bonds, not least thanks to the antics of Ms. Fabra's own father, who pretty much embodies all which is wrong in Spanish politics.
posted by Skeptic at 11:02 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


We were in Madrid last year before the Occupy movement got started, right around their election day. The protests were amazing, and in hindsight they put the US protests (and the reaction to the protests) to shame.

When we arrived, the Plaza del Sol was filled with people and covered in protest signs. Within two days a whole camp had sprung up and all of the smaller plazas around the city had started amassing discussion groups and sit-ins. The whole area was filled day and night with people, and since unemployment was around 20% when we were there it wasn't like there was a shortage of protestors.

We walked through the plaza one night on the way back to our hotel and I finally saw some police there (maybe three or four days after people started pitching tents). I asked them what they thought of the protests and the general consensus from the cops was, "They're not hurting anyone. Why should we arrest them? It's a party!" I tried to explain how, were this to happen in the States everyone in that plaza would have been beaten and handcuffed and they just didn't get it. Again, this was before Occupy, so I don't know if their perceptions have changed since.

At the time, I was wondering what would happen if protestors set up a camp in Times Square and shut that whole area down and it was inconceivable to me. Interesting now to compare it to how Zucotti Park and the other camps were handled.

Some photos here if you're interested.
posted by backseatpilot at 11:02 AM on July 13, 2012 [3 favorites]


Sorry, it's #quesejodan, not #quelesjodan.
posted by Skeptic at 11:04 AM on July 13, 2012


Except that the ones strongarming the Spanish parliament aren't so much the Germans as the bond markets, who are very reluctant to buy Spanish bonds,

Over simplification no? If the ECB would be allowed to issue debt and that debt was used to finance the issues in Spain the situation would look a lot less dire. And its the Germans who refuse to allow the ECB to act.

Not to say local politician corruption in Spain hasn't been a big part of the problem. Or that the PP is has few too many barely reformed franco fans hanging around it.
posted by JPD at 11:06 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


LET THEM FUCK CAKE
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 11:09 AM on July 13, 2012 [16 favorites]


Except that the ones strongarming the Spanish parliament aren't so much the Germans as the bond markets, who are very reluctant to buy Spanish bonds,

But the bond markets are acting in part due to the fact that the ECB is setting monetary policy not in the interest of all 17 eurozone countries, but for Germany. (There's a reason the ECB headquarters is in Frankfurt.) Whatever problems there are with the Spanish economy, they are being exacerbated by the actions of the ECB and the Germans.
posted by Cash4Lead at 11:09 AM on July 13, 2012


¡Ya basta!
posted by klangklangston at 11:10 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


At the time, I was wondering what would happen if protestors set up a camp in Times Square and shut that whole area down and it was inconceivable to me.

Setting up a camp in the Puerta Del Sol or organizing your protest march to end there has been happening since times immemorial. The government has a whole permitting system around it and the police are well educated on what to do there.

It's Kilometer Zero of the Spanish road system, the social center of Spain and is where the seat of government is, the congress of deputies being right up the street and the senate being a couple of blocks down. It's the equivalent of the National Mall in Washington DC., so there wasn't anything really that special about the occupiers being there. In the end they were a nuisance to traffic and business and were finally removed once they had their say.

Currently, there's a miners protest taking place and they're being met with a different bent as they caused a lot of trouble and damage up in Asturias and Leon prior to embarking on a march to Madrid.

tl;dr Large gatherings in the center of Madrid are par for the course.
posted by jsavimbi at 11:10 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Large gatherings in the center of Madrid are par for the course.

Compare to the US where more than two people sitting on a park bench is a national security risk. I didn't realize the history of protesting in that area, good information.
posted by backseatpilot at 11:13 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Also: How has no one yet written "Spanish Bonds" set to the tune of "Spanish Bombs"?

For example: Spanish bonds in the LTRO / The sovereign debt in the days of 2012
posted by Cash4Lead at 11:14 AM on July 13, 2012 [4 favorites]


Came expecting parliament fight, left disappointed.
posted by Hollywood Upstairs Medical College at 11:16 AM on July 13, 2012


¡No pasarán!
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 11:16 AM on July 13, 2012 [3 favorites]


Everything Europe is doing reminds me of the bad advice to pay down debt before you put down food.
posted by TwelveTwo at 11:18 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


JPD, I think you mean if the ECB was allowed to buy debt. The ECB doesn't need to issue debt: it has the printing press. But this would be contrary to the EU Treaty and would also run into constitutional problems in several countries, including of course Germany.

Cash4Lead, the ECB really sets monetary policy in the interest of all eurozone countries, and it has apparently been the only lifeline of the Spanish and Italian financial systems for several months now. The problem is that nobody trusts the periphery countries right now, whereas Germany, France and other Northern European countries are managing to sell their bonds at negative interest rates. The question which, as a Spaniard, I must ask myself, is "why do investors trust those other countries so much more than my own?". The answer is pretty clear in my eyes.
posted by Skeptic at 11:18 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Well at least it's honest.
posted by mazola at 11:19 AM on July 13, 2012


essentially what you want is for the ECB to sell debt, and then use the proceeds to buy Spanish debt. Its basically the same thing as running the printing press. The fact its against the EU treaty is a statement on the need to change the treaty. The issue is precisely as you say, the ECB controls Monetary policy but not fiscal policy - i.e. it can't issue debt

he question which, as a Spaniard, I must ask myself, is "why do investors trust those other countries so much more than my own?". The answer is pretty clear in my eyes.

That markets are usually irrational and wrong at times of stress?
posted by JPD at 11:22 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Streaming video of the current demonstration before the conservative HQ.
posted by Skeptic at 11:23 AM on July 13, 2012


That markets are usually irrational and wrong at times of stress?

Well, that too...
posted by Skeptic at 11:24 AM on July 13, 2012


essentially what you want is for the ECB to sell debt, and then use the proceeds to buy Spanish debt. Its basically the same thing as running the printing press. The fact its against the EU treaty is a statement on the need to change the treaty. The issue is precisely as you say, the ECB controls Monetary policy but not fiscal policy - i.e. it can't issue debt

Try to convince Germans to adopt inflationary policies?

You go do that. And I'll go find God, quit drinking, get in touch with myself emotionally, and we'll meet right back here at half past impossible.
posted by Talez at 11:24 AM on July 13, 2012 [6 favorites]


one of the roots of the problem is a weak, inefficient and appallingly slow justical system which does little or nothing to reign in the vast corruption throughout the country.
The voters are powerless in spite of the elections where politicians immediately renage on their promises.
There is zero accountability.
The Crooks win, whatever their so called political affiliation, while their political
allies tell more lies than truths.
In 2009 the economist asked
Why is Spain so corrupt? about an opinion piece from Spain´s leading daily El Pais.
Fast forward two years to July 2011: Why Corruption reigns.
To understand how bad it is here is a map of Political corruption in Spain, from the blog Corruption in Spain.
posted by adamvasco at 11:26 AM on July 13, 2012


Like France - read the news today. PSA wants to close some plants because their is structural overcapacity in Western European autos. They aren't even trying to "delocalize" - i..e build a plant in Romania or something, they just want to be able to make less cars. Hollande is basically going to refuse to allow them to do this through some form of extra-legal persuasion that will probably at the end come down to how big a check he'll write. And that guy can right now actual get paid to borrow money from people!!!

Try to convince Germans to adopt inflationary policies?

You go do that. And I'll go find God, quit drinking, get in touch with myself emotionally, and we'll meet right back here at half past impossible.


I don't disagree with you. But work through the scenarios. My guess is that if the Euro fails Munich becomes Detroit.
posted by JPD at 11:27 AM on July 13, 2012 [3 favorites]


Maybe she was MSTing the proceedings in real time?
posted by JHarris at 11:30 AM on July 13, 2012


CSMonitor: Spanish Police Clash With Miners in Madrid

Al Jazeera: Miners in Madrid denounce slashed subsidies : Coal workers, angered by mining cuts, met by thousands of supporters in Madrid's main square as PM reveals more cuts.

Al Jazeera: Spanish miners dig in for prolonged protest: Austerity protesters occupy Madrid in "struggle for the working class" after marches ended in violence yesterday.

The eXile: Shocking video from Spain protest: Austerity gestapo brutally attacks peaceful protesters

PRI's The World: Coal Miners’ Revolt Gives Frustrated Spaniards a Voice, and Some Rockets
posted by the man of twists and turns at 11:37 AM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


Compare to the US where more than two people sitting on a park bench is a national security risk.

I believe that you're uninformed about the US as well.

In my case, and at times begrudgingly, Bostonians host all sorts of spectator events over the course of the year drawing in millions of people, some welcomed others not. Aside from some oddly placed Aqua Teen Hunger Force marketing materials, we don't get to have as many national security events as one would hope.
posted by jsavimbi at 11:37 AM on July 13, 2012


My guess is that if the Euro fails Munich becomes Detroit.
The Wolf's house will be blown down by the PIIGS.
posted by fullerine at 11:43 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


justical judicial system.
posted by adamvasco at 11:45 AM on July 13, 2012


¡No pasarán!

I thought about that one, but then realized that yes, it has passing.
posted by klangklangston at 11:45 AM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Thank god Tosh isn't in their parliament!
posted by symbioid at 11:58 AM on July 13, 2012


> Hilarity ensued.

So then Democracia Real YA says... "Andrea Fabra, member of Spanish Parliament, insulted unemployed citizens saying "Fuck them all!" during a Parliament session!"

Ya get it? Fuck them all! During a Parliament session!

Eh, I guess you just have to know how to tell them.
posted by Naberius at 12:00 PM on July 13, 2012


FUCK TWITTER!
posted by Eekacat at 12:10 PM on July 13, 2012



More like ASSterity.
posted by Pogo_Fuzzybutt at 12:13 PM on July 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


Spanish Bonds . . .
posted by Eyebeams at 1:21 PM on July 13, 2012


I was logged out when I first viewed this thread. The Google ads are supporting Fabra, I guess?
posted by Condroidulations! at 1:30 PM on July 13, 2012


Sorry, it's #quesejodan, not #quelesjodan.

I think that's the Twitter link you want in the FPP.
posted by mrgrimm at 1:50 PM on July 13, 2012


The yell directed at the opposition is a perfect summary of the Popular Party's dogmatic attitudes: we are right by definition; fuck 'em all. Let's give a standing ovation to our leader while he announces the dismantling of our (hard-earned) wellfare state; fuck 'em all.
posted by valdesm at 3:31 PM on July 13, 2012


Doesn't the phrase mean more like "let them go fuck themselves"?
posted by telstar at 3:50 PM on July 13, 2012


No it means fuck 'em, fuck what happens to 'em, I don't fucking care, their kids can starve and fuck them too. Fuck all those fucking poor people.*

Well, at least thats my interpretation of it.

This is a great thread, thanks guys (and girls). Just finished a killer 11 hr shift in a kitchen on minimum wage and am knackered and my hands hurt from where I burnt myself on a pan handle, and the response to the unbelieveable "fuck 'em" comment from a politician in this thread has cheered me up a bit.

*(As a poor person, I would like to reply "fuck you too, asshole.")
posted by marienbad at 3:58 PM on July 13, 2012 [2 favorites]


Primero contra la pared.

What a cunt.
posted by bardic at 12:10 AM on July 14, 2012


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