The making of a swimsuit
August 1, 2012 11:15 AM   Subscribe

How Speedo Created A Record-Breaking Swimsuit: After officials banned the swimsuit that caused records to fall at the 2008 Games, scientists are back with a new outfit that could break more.

Bonus: Uni Watch history of Olympic swim uniforms.
posted by Chrysostom (86 comments total) 13 users marked this as a favorite

 
Oh my god that article calls Captain America CAPTAIN AVENGER

burn it to the ground
posted by elizardbits at 11:19 AM on August 1, 2012 [15 favorites]


Michael Phelps set world marks in seven of his eight events at Beijing wearing the suit, but applauded its ban.

"I got mine."
posted by Tanizaki at 11:23 AM on August 1, 2012 [29 favorites]


Captain Avenger
posted by jquinby at 11:23 AM on August 1, 2012 [5 favorites]


Perhaps the most interesting part of the article (to me) was this snippit:

A new 3-D printer at Aqualab fabricated prototypes of the cap and goggles for testing within hours, rather than sending drawings to a manufacturer and waiting weeks or months. “In the past we couldn’t do many changes to the original design,” Santry says. “With this process, we completely revolutionized the goggle from scratch.”

I love reading about applications of 3D printing. I can't wait until they're mainstream.
posted by Strass at 11:24 AM on August 1, 2012 [7 favorites]


Perhaps the most interesting part of the article (to me) was this snippit: A new 3-D printer at...


Another interesting nugget:

Just wearing the Fastskin requires athleticism. Some female swimmers, who step into the suit through an armhole, reported it took them as much as an hour to wriggle into it on their first attempt. Santry says it can be done in 10 to 15 minutes with practice. “The first time you do it, it’s daunting,” he adds. “There’s quite a bit of compression in the suit. It can feel a bit alien.”
posted by Jody Tresidder at 11:28 AM on August 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Mark Spitz' moustache laughs at your Fastskin 3 System.
posted by Capt. Renault at 11:29 AM on August 1, 2012 [14 favorites]


Too-advantageous swimswuits in international competition: #1 on the list of problems that can be solved with nudity
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 11:29 AM on August 1, 2012 [61 favorites]


Personally I support requiring Olympic athletes to compete in three-piece suits and fedoras.
posted by Holy Zarquon's Singing Fish at 11:31 AM on August 1, 2012 [16 favorites]


I do hope to be alive on the day that Eyebrow McGee's suggestion is implemented. What we can see is already fairly awesome.
posted by bearwife at 11:32 AM on August 1, 2012 [6 favorites]


I can understand 3D-printing the lenses of the goggles, but I can't imagine how they could 3D print a swim cap -- unless it was just a model used for the shape in some sort of wind tunnel or hydro(?)tunnel, or a 3D-printed mold. Perhaps that was all just Captain Avenger's dream too.
posted by This_Will_Be_Good at 11:35 AM on August 1, 2012


GO UNITED STATES OF AVENGERS! USA! USA!
posted by straight at 11:38 AM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


#1 on the list of problems that can be solved with nudity

If memory serves, there was a swimmer (Soviet?) who competed nude ages ago, but my google-fu is failing me. Dangly bits proved problematic.
posted by Capt. Renault at 11:39 AM on August 1, 2012


This is pretty much why I think we should just let them all take drugs.
posted by ckape at 11:39 AM on August 1, 2012


Rio 2016.

Due to the ban of all swimsuits by Eyebrows McGee, each race comes down to the wire in a battle between the dominant Castrati and Eunuch teams, with the bronze going to the Ken-Dolls.
posted by This_Will_Be_Good at 11:39 AM on August 1, 2012 [9 favorites]


Or. You know. The women.
posted by elizardbits at 11:40 AM on August 1, 2012 [15 favorites]


Women and men don't race against each other.

I can't imagine the 3D printed prototypes were anything more than mockups for people who have difficulty visualizing a hat. 3D printers are super terrible so far.
posted by DU at 11:42 AM on August 1, 2012


Although it doesn't give any one swimmer an advantage, it should be noted that swimming pool designs are have also contributed to increased athlete performance. It's no coincidence that swimmers at China's Water Cube broke 25 world records during competition because the facility was specifically designed to decrease turbulence with special side gutters to absorb waves.
posted by RonButNotStupid at 11:43 AM on August 1, 2012 [6 favorites]


Or. You know. The women.
posted by elizardbits at 7:40 PM on August 1 [+] [!]


Girls, maybe.

Women do have their own sticky outy bits that create drag.
posted by Reggie Knoble at 11:43 AM on August 1, 2012 [6 favorites]


The 3d print could be used as a mold to make something more durable.
posted by FireSpy at 11:46 AM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


If they're sticky, something's wrong.
posted by 2bucksplus at 11:47 AM on August 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


new handicap, all swimmers must compete with huge novelty dongs on the outside of their speedos. Even the women.
posted by The Whelk at 11:48 AM on August 1, 2012 [21 favorites]


It's called a rudder, people.
posted by griphus at 11:49 AM on August 1, 2012 [9 favorites]


I can imagine those rubberized swim caps coming out of a 3D printer.
posted by ceribus peribus at 11:49 AM on August 1, 2012


Sticky outy bits

This is why we have hyphens.
posted by This_Will_Be_Good at 11:49 AM on August 1, 2012 [14 favorites]


I thought the very long hair many of the women sported to be odd but perhaps just a fashion, but then read
Santry, who has developed helmets for cyclists, noted that time trial racers use an aerodynamic teardrop shape. They designed a swimmer’s cap that does something similar,building a place for a woman’s hair that creates a tail on the back of the head.
Ah, I see. You can make a shaped "helmet" that way. Very clever. Will we see the men sporting long hair soon?
posted by Bovine Love at 11:50 AM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Mark Spitz' moustache laughs at your Fastskin 3 System.

All Olympic swimmers would wear 3D printed exact replicas of Mark Spitz' moustache if it hadn't been banned because of its known but not-fully-understood hydrodynamic advantages.
posted by The World Famous at 11:56 AM on August 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


It was actually camouflage for a hydro ramjet the US Navy was testing.
posted by griphus at 11:57 AM on August 1, 2012


It's funny how much emphasis they are putting on hydrodynamics, since somehow swimming laps is the "glamour" sport of the aquatic events. I was watching the U.S. women's water polo match today, and the entire time I kept thinking how a simple swimsuit change would create a huge advantage. If you watched any of the match or know water polo, when they cut to the underwater shots it is just a brutal battle where there is a ton of pulling and yanking on the swimsuit to create an advantage. If they had that full-length swimsuit with a high neck, they would quickly eliminate most of the main grab points. It doen't really help you if you get kicked in the face, but it might prevent some of the powerful wedgies and dunkings those women were putting on each other to drag down the other team.
posted by This_Will_Be_Good at 12:01 PM on August 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


You want fedoras in the Olympics? I give you the Chap Olympiad...
posted by C.A.S. at 12:02 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Wait.

Wait, wait wait wait.

Olympic wedgies? Excuse me, I have some torrents to download.
posted by Holy Zarquon's Singing Fish at 12:03 PM on August 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


Captain Avenger

..hmm, or perhaps Captain Underpants
posted by caddis at 12:07 PM on August 1, 2012


Image of Michael Phelps's junk courtesy of Speedo
posted by dismas at 12:11 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Bovine Love, how ironic would it be if the "mullet" came back into fashion because of its success in the water?
posted by mr_crash_davis at 12:11 PM on August 1, 2012


Michael Phelps IS Namor The Sub-Mariner
posted by The Whelk at 12:12 PM on August 1, 2012


powerful wedgies and dunkings

I got yelled at in PE swimming in third grade for doing this. If only someone had noted my Olympic water polo talents instead...
posted by Forktine at 12:12 PM on August 1, 2012


how ironic would it be if the "mullet" came back into fashion

Came back into fashion?
posted by MartinWisse at 12:15 PM on August 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


since somehow swimming laps is the "glamour" sport of the aquatic events.

Water polo: The U.S. hasn't won gold against anyone ever. (In 1904, only U.S. teams played.)

Canoeing/kayaking: The U.S. isn't in the top 10 of gold medals or total medals.

Swimming: The U.S. has more gold medals than any other country has medals of any kind; as many silver medals as the #3 and #4 countries have total medals combined; and as many bronzes as the bottom 30 countries (that have won any swimming medals) have total medals combined.

Not a lot of "somehow" involved. If Hungary had the cultural power that the U.S. does, water polo would be a megasport.
posted by Etrigan at 12:17 PM on August 1, 2012 [5 favorites]


They should have a demonstration sport where the competitors can wear flippers, fins, tails, snorkels, water wings, whatever they like as long as they're relying on human power for propulsion. If you're going to allow technological leverage then why not go all out.
posted by ceribus peribus at 12:22 PM on August 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


If they ever allowed nude swimming I would DVR the contests and watch them in 3 minute increments. This would also solve the problems of spoilers, because honestly I wouldn't care who wins.
posted by cjorgensen at 12:29 PM on August 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Well, this answers a question: my husband pointed out that this year, all female swimmers suddenly have no boobs whatsoever. If the goal is to compress into a tube, that suddenly makes sense.
posted by DarlingBri at 12:45 PM on August 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


How unsporting. Back in my day we all went into the water in board shorts.
posted by Slackermagee at 12:49 PM on August 1, 2012


You want fedoras in the Olympics? I give you the Chap Olympiad...

The 2012 Chap Olympiad, in photos

(Surprised Mitt Romney didn't drop by for the butler racing event.)
posted by potsmokinghippieoverlord at 12:53 PM on August 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Swimming: The U.S. has more gold medals than any other country has medals of any kind; as many silver medals as the #3 and #4 countries have total medals combined; and as many bronzes as the bottom 30 countries (that have won any swimming medals) have total medals combined.

And other countries that have no chance at wining anything in swimming are probably not watching swimming at all.

Me? I'm only interested in the snark of how bad the coverage by NBC is, couldn't care less about the events any more. I certainly don't care about any sport in which you can get an advantage just by wearing a super suit.
posted by SpannerX at 12:58 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


If they ever allowed nude swimming I would DVR the contests and watch them in 3 minute increments. This would also solve the problems of spoilers, because honestly I wouldn't care who wins.

Dude, TMI.
posted by JimmyJames at 1:00 PM on August 1, 2012 [5 favorites]


At the next Olympics, I hope to see some badass dude that's so fast that he doesn't even have to shave. It would be great to have some hairy monster beat all the waxed up mannequins.
posted by Burhanistan at 1:02 PM on August 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


Zach Galifianakis: Olympic Champion
posted by The World Famous at 1:03 PM on August 1, 2012


It was actually camouflage for a hydro ramjet the US Navy was testing.

Hydro ramjet rides: 5¢
posted by The Bellman at 1:05 PM on August 1, 2012 [3 favorites]


It would be great to have some hairy monster beat all the waxed up mannequins.

Wasn't this an episode of Doctor Who?
posted by griphus at 1:06 PM on August 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


There really should be assist favorites here.
posted by Burhanistan at 1:13 PM on August 1, 2012 [5 favorites]


I dunno...Of any event for which equipment technology shouldn't come into play, it seems like swimming should be it.
posted by Thorzdad at 1:22 PM on August 1, 2012


There really should be assist favorites here

NOT ASS-IST
posted by Forktine at 1:24 PM on August 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


Or. You know. The women.

Not just any women. Amazons.
posted by bonehead at 1:25 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


DU: "Women and men don't race against each other."
2016 changed a lot of things, dude.
posted by boo_radley at 1:27 PM on August 1, 2012 [2 favorites]


Me? I'm only interested in the snark of how bad the coverage by NBC is,

It's certainly turbulent.

Was watching a little fencing today out of curiosity (not really a spectator friendly sport but oh well) and the commentators where going on about how so and so needed to continue her aggressive attacks because they are working so well... despite the person they are talking about was losing at the time (and lost the match). I know jack-all about the sport, but seriously, even I could tell how empty headed the commentators where.
posted by edgeways at 1:47 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


If you don't know the sport how could you tell?

Fencing has some weird rules. You basically have a "right of way" and can't score unless certain circumstances are met. I don't know as much as I used to (I fenced in college 2 decades ago and often did foil only as a courtesy to the people who were willing to be my opponents in saber). I've forgotten a lot, so if I say something ignorant it's because I am.

In your example the loser might have needed to continue to attack, because if she stops she'd lose the right of way. Once that's gone not only can she no longer score, but she can be scored on. Pressing on and on even when behind seems like the thing that would make sense.

If you manage to get ahead, then it makes sense to go on a purely defensive mode, since even a poor fencer can often hold off a superior foe if she's not worried about scoring. Again, it's a weird sport.

I once had a guy argue with me about fencing being a wimpy sport. I never see it that way. You have people going at each other with swords for fucks sake. I loved fencing. I was too big and slow to be good at it, but it was one of the few sports that your gender pretty much matters fuck all.

I gave up watching it the last go-around because of the clear visors. I also bitch about electric scoring, but that ship sailed. I'm old.
posted by cjorgensen at 2:03 PM on August 1, 2012 [5 favorites]


Oh, I wouldn't say it was a wimpy sport, just that commentators encouraging a line of attack that has the person they where rooting for in a losing situation seems pretty inane. "Hey they need to keep doing what they are doing because it clearing is working for them so well!"

I've read elsewhere, on MeFi I believe, that up to a certain level fencing is fairly gender neutral, but after a certain point there is a pretty definite gender gap. I can't speak to this authoritatively, but those that where talking about it seems pretty definite about it.
posted by edgeways at 2:20 PM on August 1, 2012


cjorgensen: "so if I say something ignorant it's because I am."

hello, new tattoo.
posted by boo_radley at 2:23 PM on August 1, 2012 [4 favorites]


When my son was swimming high school, he wound up competing at a state meet where one of the teams showed up with everyone in these high-tech suits. They cost like 300 dollars and the chlorine in the water dissolves them after about 3 races. Even back then, when I had a job, I wasn't popping for $300 suits that last a month. Kinda took the fun out of the meet for everyone who wasn't one of "those guys".
posted by DaddyNewt at 2:25 PM on August 1, 2012


Kendo is even cooler than fencing. The idea is to slice a person in half from the top of their head down, AND be very relaxed while you're doing it.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:31 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


I've read elsewhere, on MeFi I believe, that up to a certain level fencing is fairly gender neutral, but after a certain point there is a pretty definite gender gap. I can't speak to this authoritatively, but those that where talking about it seems pretty definite about it.

Yeah, mechanically there isn't much advantage to being a man, but once things like endurance become bigger factors, differences start to show.
Although even at the beginning there is a large advantage to being male in that you fence against a larger pool of competitors. You don't get far by being a big fish in a small pond. Someone I knew who competed at the commonwealth games, she was decent enough among the men, and I think that was her most powerful secret - she did a lot more fencing against men than most other women (even though almost all actual competition was segregated). If you're losing, you're learning. If you're top of the pile and not being challenged, you're stagnating. She took full advantage of the bigger pool, but that wasn't something I saw a lot of others do.
posted by -harlequin- at 2:36 PM on August 1, 2012


Funnily enough, handedness in fencing is the opposite - being left-handed is a huge advantage when a beginner, then eventually becomes a (slight) disadvantage.

(Left-hand beginners are rarer than right-handers, so they are quite used to fencing against right-handers, while right-handers have very little practice against left-handers. So the left-handers win. Because left-hand beginners do so well because of this, they are more likely to stick with the sport - success is more pleasing than failure - and so at the higher levels, half the competitors are left-handed, at which point there is no-longer an advantage to it, and actually a slight disadvantage, because righties have more practise against lefties than lefties do against lefties)
posted by -harlequin- at 2:43 PM on August 1, 2012 [8 favorites]


But there is something you don't know. I... am not left-handed.
posted by LordSludge at 3:18 PM on August 1, 2012 [11 favorites]


When my son was swimming high school, he wound up competing at a state meet where one of the teams showed up with everyone in these high-tech suits. They cost like 300 dollars and the chlorine in the water dissolves them after about 3 races.

Huh. I wore a paper suit in the junior varsity regional meet in high school - we all did. They were weird and almost transparent but there was no earthly way they were $300. (I think the only people who didn't wear them were the people who owned expensive competition suits, but those were not disposable.)

Also, no one's modesty lasts beyond stepping up on a platform in front of a couple hundred people and touching your toes while wearing a paper suit. Either you die, or your modesty does.
posted by restless_nomad at 4:41 PM on August 1, 2012


But there is something you don't know. I... am not left-handed.

I'm waiting for the absurdist take on that trope with the protagonist and villain escalating through fencing with their feet, vestigial tail, telekinetic powers, and then finally pulling out guns.
posted by BrotherCaine at 4:51 PM on August 1, 2012


Fencing has some weird rules...

Not really that complicated compared to something like baseball.

Blade rules.
There are three different weapons with three different rule sets.

Foil
Has right of way.
Target Area: Torso, no arms legs or head
History: Military training weapon, touches had to count, you wanted to practice killing dudes.
Blade: Smallest weapon. Small bell guard, can only score with the tip of the blade.

Epee:
Right of way: none
Target area: Full Body. (even toes)
History: Classical Dueling weapon
Blade: Largest blade. Huge bell guard to protect the hands and fingers from touches. Can only score with the tip of the blade.


Saber:
Right of way: yes
Target area: Upper body, everything above the waist
History: Calvary Weapon (Upper body only so you hurt the man, not the horse)
Blade: Curved bell guard. Can hit with the side of the blade in a slashing motion.


Right of way

Right of way is actually pretty simple. It only has to do with who is currently in control of the action.

The first person who initiates an attack, by moving forward or extending their arm, has right of way.

You must have right of way for a touch to count. ( foil and saber only.)


You lose right of way if you stop your attack, your attack misses or if you are blocked by the opponents blade.

You gain right of way by taking control of the action, by blocking an attack, causing an attack to miss, or attacking while your opponent is in preparation.

So, if one fencer 1 went in for a touch, and fencer 2 counter attacked (without blocking) and got the touch first and fencer 1 came in and completed the attack, fencer 1 would get the touch.

Its simply about who is controlling the situation.
posted by JimmyJames at 4:58 PM on August 1, 2012 [7 favorites]


I imagine the origins of right of way rules are, ironically, to prevent it getting too much like sport. As a sport, your instinct will be to win by scoring points. As a historical, uh, skill, by contrast your priority is to not get killed, and hitting the other guy comes a distant second to that!
Right of way is a rule that codifes this by saying if an attack is incoming, it is to your supreme advantage to address that attack somehow before you launch your own attack. Survival comes first, points come second.
posted by -harlequin- at 5:45 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


If memory serves, there was a swimmer (Soviet?) who competed nude ages ago, but my google-fu is failing me. Dangly bits proved problematic.

And would certainly slow down Team USA!

I realize most of this silliness was done with up above, but as I came to the thread late, and really feel the need, 'twas said.
posted by BlueHorse at 5:49 PM on August 1, 2012


I used to watch fencers who didn't use the right of way rule. They basically just charged at each other, hoping to get the first touch in.
posted by happyroach at 6:04 PM on August 1, 2012


Some female swimmers, who step into the suit through an armhole, reported it took them as much as an hour to wriggle into it on their first attempt. Santry says it can be done in 10 to 15 minutes with practice.

Ye gods, can someone get me a bag to breathe into? I'm experiencing garment claustrophobia.
posted by FelliniBlank at 6:17 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


Speedo's Jammer Fitting Guide and Closed Back Fitting Guide provide directions on how to put these on. Bonus, the Super Elite FastSkin3 suits come with gloves to "make fitting easier".
posted by zinon at 7:50 PM on August 1, 2012


Speedo's Jammer Fitting Guide yt and Closed Back Fitting Guide yt provide directions on how to put these on. Bonus, the Super Elite FastSkin3 suits come with gloves to "make fitting easier".

I just watched those videos, and my first reaction was to wonder what happens if you have an emergency bathroom need?
posted by Forktine at 7:59 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


DaddyNewt writes "They cost like 300 dollars and the chlorine in the water dissolves them after about 3 races. Even back then, when I had a job, I wasn't popping for $300 suits that last a month. Kinda took the fun out of the meet for everyone who wasn't one of 'those guys'."

An obvious solution stolen from dirt track racing: claimer races. $15 at the end of every heat seems about right.
posted by Mitheral at 8:26 PM on August 1, 2012 [1 favorite]


I just watched those videos, and my first reaction was to wonder what happens if you have an emergency bathroom need?

No problem. The compression of the suit forces your anus to clench tightly.
posted by MegoSteve at 8:38 PM on August 1, 2012


No problem. The compression of the suit forces your anus to clench tightly.

Mine clenched just watching the video.
posted by Forktine at 8:39 PM on August 1, 2012


Apparently you also need a head shaped like a football. My wife's take: "I wouldn't mind the constant Phelps coverage (even during events in which he is not competing!) if he was cute."
posted by Brocktoon at 9:40 PM on August 1, 2012


If you need to pee, you pee through the suit. (I've take an hour to put on a Fastskin. Then I went fast. )
posted by dame at 12:45 AM on August 2, 2012


If you really want to get rid of this things then you give the swimmers something like a 15 minute window to change from their street clothes into their suits. ;)
posted by caddis at 4:39 AM on August 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Now imagine getting out after you've exhausted yourself in competition.
posted by cjorgensen at 5:07 AM on August 2, 2012


caddis: "If you really want to get rid of this things then you give the swimmers something like a 15 minute window to change from their street clothes into their suits."

Or include the time spent changing out of the suit into their overall race time, the way triathlons do.
posted by I am the Walrus at 6:02 AM on August 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Or include the time spent changing out of the suit into their overall race time, the way triathlons do.

UGH TRANSITION. "Oh hey, and your secret fourth event is performing multiple costume changes in front of hundreds of people while attempting to keep all your gear in a one-foot-square area of wet grass!"
posted by psoas at 8:02 AM on August 2, 2012


one of the teams showed up with everyone in these high-tech suits. They cost like 300 dollars and the chlorine in the water dissolves them after about 3 races.

Funny, I was just wondering about a dissolving suit that would create a very slick boundary layer.

Either slimy or effervescent, perhaps.

A 'poisson soluble' might indeed swim very fast.
posted by jamjam at 9:11 AM on August 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


I was watching the U.S. women's water polo match today, and the entire time I kept thinking how a simple swimsuit change would create a huge advantage.

There was an interview with one of the U.S. men's polo team and he said their suits keep getting smaller because it gives opponents less to grab and that their fans appreciate it as well. I would think a tight full-body suit would give less grab area, but I'm not complaining.
posted by Bunglegirl at 10:54 AM on August 2, 2012


There are two issues with suit-grabbing - one is grabbing the edges, which is why women's polo suits don't have straps and have that comparatively high neck. (Cleavage is not your friend, it is your opponent's friend.) The other is grabbing the fabric directly, and anything stretchy enough to get in to and move around in will have enough give that you can pinch it. A hyper-compression suit won't work, because you have to be able to bend way more than any straight-up swim stroke requires. Women definitely have a disadvantage there, because of the vastly greater necessary area.
posted by restless_nomad at 11:16 AM on August 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Now imagine getting out after you've exhausted yourself in competition.

This is the thing that actually makes me vicariously panic and hyperventilate a little. Being trapped in a tight article of clothing, having my arms temporarily stuck over my head while taking off a snug shirt . . . aaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh, torture.

I remember once having to drive 50 miles home from work on a sweltering August Chicagoland day, wearing an underwire bra (plus a blouse), a high-waisted skirt with a belt, and a snug seatbelt. I somehow made it home before totally flipping out, but I would have been perfectly happy to let someone free me from that sweat-soaked shit with a circular saw rather than have to peel it off laboriously. I get the same suffocating/drowning sensation watching stuff like The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. Immobility is terrifying!
posted by FelliniBlank at 11:49 AM on August 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


Haven't watched water polo all that much before, but man, that is a vicious sport.
posted by edgeways at 2:07 PM on August 2, 2012


Burhanistan: "Kendo is even cooler than fencing. The idea is to slice a person in half from the top of their head down, AND be very relaxed while you're doing it."

Iaido's even cooler. "Yeah, I'll kill you, but just incidentally as part of pulling my sword from its sheath." *flick!* //thud// *wipe* *resheath*
posted by Lexica at 6:04 PM on August 8, 2012


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