Call me Maybe, Geordie
September 3, 2012 2:28 AM   Subscribe

Call me maybe, Geordie version. Careful who you call a Geordie though; there's Sandancers, Mackems and Pit Yakkars all within a 5 mile radius. They may all speak Geordie though.
posted by BadMiker (31 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
Eh by gum. Call Me, Maybe is such an alreet song.
posted by Mezentian at 2:43 AM on September 3, 2012


I rather like the sidebarred Profanithauruss from Viz; click on more gutter filth...
posted by adamvasco at 2:43 AM on September 3, 2012


Twenty years ago, my father had the magnificent idea to take the whole family on an English-learning holiday to Newcastle, of all places.

Most English people whom we've told about this were quite simply lost for words. Probably the best reaction was that of the nice waitress in a nondescript restaurant on the M1, close to Coventry, in the early morning as we trekked North from Dover on our way to Northumbria. As my father explained his plan, in his less-than-perfect English, to this lady, and asked what she thought, her eyebrow shot up to the ceiling, and she gave the deadpan answer: "Well, they're...nice people."

That was my introductory lesson in English understatement.
posted by Skeptic at 2:45 AM on September 3, 2012 [11 favorites]


I wouldn't suggest you tell a mackem he's speaking Geordie either.

My favourite, of the region, though remains the Monkeyhangers.
posted by Hobo at 2:54 AM on September 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


Amusing fact about Call Me Maybe: it was mixed by Dave Ogilvie, perhaps best known as one of the guys from Skinny Puppy.
posted by Pope Guilty at 3:01 AM on September 3, 2012 [5 favorites]


MIND BLOWN!
posted by Mezentian at 3:12 AM on September 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


Geordi in Call Me Maybe.
posted by ceribus peribus at 3:49 AM on September 3, 2012 [9 favorites]


As a native English speaker, I thought the Glaswegian dialect was difficult to understand, and then I had to sit and listen to a Pit-Yacker taxi driver natter at me for the drive from Durham to Newcastle. I think I understood one word in five.
posted by grajohnt at 4:12 AM on September 3, 2012


Rite canny lassies
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 4:13 AM on September 3, 2012


Cookie Monster did it better.
posted by Effigy2000 at 4:18 AM on September 3, 2012


I was expecting Geordie La Forge / Levar Burton.
posted by humanfont at 4:23 AM on September 3, 2012 [9 favorites]


Why did they say sorry for the slang, there wasn't any? Anyway, Geordie is most likely the most beautiful English accent. They should sing all their songs like that.
Eh by gum. Call Me, Maybe is such an alreet song.
Tha's ont wrong side o Tees theer love.
posted by Jehan at 5:08 AM on September 3, 2012 [5 favorites]


The north-eastern accent is by far my favourite UK accent, especially on women.

If anyone wants more I urge, nay beseech you to check out The Unthanks - sisters Rachel and Becky Unthank.

If The Testimony Of Patience Kershaw (SLYT) doesn't bring a lump to your throat then you're beyond help.
posted by GallonOfAlan at 5:27 AM on September 3, 2012 [7 favorites]


'Ow d'ye tell a Geordie?

Divvent, 'e canna be telt.
posted by Ice Cream Socialist at 5:38 AM on September 3, 2012 [7 favorites]


There's also this boundary stretching version...
(possibly NSFW?)
posted by BadMiker at 5:39 AM on September 3, 2012 [12 favorites]


BadMiker... that is hilarious!
posted by HuronBob at 6:26 AM on September 3, 2012


That was brilliant. Geordie chicks with guitars is usually a bad concept in my experience, but this is a happy exception.

Carly Rae is a genius for crowd-sourcing her video.
posted by Nick Verstayne at 6:43 AM on September 3, 2012


Really liked the video too, accents are fun! Would this thread be complete without The Wildheart's anthemic and characteristically tongue-in-cheek Geordie In Wonderland though? I think not!
posted by comealongpole at 8:40 AM on September 3, 2012


Hey, I'm Schrodinger and this is crazy, But here's a seal box, the cat lives maybe
posted by Chekhovian at 9:05 AM on September 3, 2012 [5 favorites]


*sealed
posted by Chekhovian at 9:07 AM on September 3, 2012


Careful who you call a Geordie though; there's Sandancers, Mackems and Pit Yakkars all within a 5 mile radius.

You can't fool me, those are all enemies from The Legend of Zelda.
posted by Strange Interlude at 9:23 AM on September 3, 2012 [4 favorites]


I rather liked that. I've never heard the original and I have no intention to lest it ruin this for me. "rather"? "lest"? What the hell am I doing?
posted by MikeMc at 9:33 AM on September 3, 2012


Stephen Fry, master of the English language and ambassador for its glories and delights, does not quite speak Geordie.
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey at 9:46 AM on September 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


My 10th grade English teacher would have been aaaallllll over this during our Robert Burns unit.
(Knowing their not the same thing but she was obsessed with teaching us about poetry in Scottish dialects so this would be the next best thing.)
posted by bleep at 10:44 AM on September 3, 2012


Canny canny like.
posted by anagrama at 11:06 AM on September 3, 2012


Na, bleep, in Scotland even a Geordie bloke would be known as 'The Englishman' (not a compliment.)
posted by glasseyes at 11:22 AM on September 3, 2012


I am disappoint. I expected this to be about Star Trek.
posted by azarbayejani at 11:37 AM on September 3, 2012


BadMiker, I think I peed myself laughing.

The Geordie version was fun, but the ChatRoulette version is priceless!!!

Thank you.
posted by BlueHorse at 11:52 AM on September 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


As a native English speaker, I thought the Glaswegian dialect was difficult to understand, and then I had to sit and listen to a Pit-Yacker taxi driver natter at me for the drive from Durham to Newcastle. I think I understood one word in five.

I grew up in the south-east of England. First time I went to Durham, I got a bit confused coming out of the station, and asked a little old man for directions. He was very helpful, and spent about a minute giving me directions. At least, I think that was what he was doing, because I didn't understand a word of it.

Fast forward three years and I'm living in Sunderland, baffled by people who can't tell the difference between the mackem and geordie accents, but now amazed by my wife's ability to tell which end of her village people came from. Fast forward twenty years of living here, and now I'd get every word the old man said. Well, most of them.
posted by reynir at 12:10 PM on September 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


Ah divvent nah, laike. Smerk tabs. Guvvenmen health wahnen: divvent smerk tabs.
posted by Decani at 4:22 PM on September 3, 2012


Ah grew up in the south-east of England. Forst time Ah went te Durum , Ah got a bit confused coming oot o the station, an asked a little aad gadgie fre directions. He wez git helpful, an spent aboot a minute giving me directions. At least, Ah think tha wez what he wez deein , cos Ah divvnae understand a word of it.

Fast forward three years an Ahm living in Sunlun , baffled bi fowk fowk whee canna tell the difference between the mackem an geordie accents, but noo amazed bi me wife's ability te tell which end of hor village fowk fowk cyame frem . Fast forward twenty years of living heor , an noo I'd get every word the aad gadgie sez . Well, myest of them.
posted by carping demon at 9:53 PM on September 3, 2012 [2 favorites]


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