Join 3,430 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Tools for the 1/12 scale craftsman
November 3, 2012 3:20 AM   Subscribe

The Toolchest Site does what it says on the tin. Possibly the most mind blowing tool chest on the site is this masterful 1/12 scale reproduction based on the Hewitt chest at Colonial Williamsburg, done by celebrated miniaturist William Robertson. Everything works like the original, down to the lock and the included tools like the plane and the folding rule.
posted by Harald74 (27 comments total) 22 users marked this as a favorite

 
If you dig this, check out it's big brother, Studley!
posted by fairmettle at 3:33 AM on November 3, 2012 [4 favorites]


Wow. That 1/12 scale toolchest is just stunning.
posted by MartinWisse at 3:34 AM on November 3, 2012


If my dad were still alive, he would love love love that miniature tool chest, assuming he could see it (we has not great about getting his glasses prescription updated).
posted by GenjiandProust at 4:26 AM on November 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


Oh gosh, gorgeous stuff! Now someone sould sew tiny little colonial outfits and train tiny mice to make tiny rocking chairs eeeee!
posted by Erasmouse at 4:28 AM on November 3, 2012 [4 favorites]


this masterful 1/12 scale reproduction

Hopefully built with tiny 1/12 tools.
posted by twoleftfeet at 5:01 AM on November 3, 2012


Big tools have little tools, to build'em with precision, And little tools have lesser tools, and so on, till derision.
posted by twoleftfeet at 5:05 AM on November 3, 2012 [15 favorites]


You can get those machinist boxes (like the Kennedy) on Craiglists list pretty frequently but they are in the >$200 range. Or, like me, at the flea market for more like $50 (and packed with tools besides).
posted by DU at 6:12 AM on November 3, 2012


Hopefully built with tiny 1/12 tools.

Actually, each one was painstakingly machined down from a normal-sized tool!
posted by GenjiandProust at 6:32 AM on November 3, 2012 [4 favorites]


GenjiandProust: Actually, each one was painstakingly machined down from a normal-sized tool!

Nope, they were created by 3" tall carpenters at 2:1 scale.
posted by Rock Steady at 7:12 AM on November 3, 2012 [5 favorites]


Now I can finish those projects in half the time!
posted by hal9k at 7:19 AM on November 3, 2012


Ken and Barbie have no excuse not to repair that stuck door on the dream house now.
posted by orme at 7:24 AM on November 3, 2012 [4 favorites]


That's nothing: here's a guy who made a 1/12 scale model Ferrari 312PB. Complete with a working 1/12 scale V12 petrol engine. 20,000 hours of work ... 3 years to make the drawings, 12 years to build the car.
posted by cstross at 7:43 AM on November 3, 2012 [5 favorites]


Sorry, got the engine wrong; it's a 24-valve flat-12, not a V12. With a total capacity of 100cc. And a working miniature replica of the original gearbox, complete with reverse gear.
posted by cstross at 7:44 AM on November 3, 2012


Clearly several folks were actually listening when the phrase "Everyone needs a hobby" was coined.
posted by sammyo at 7:48 AM on November 3, 2012


Sorry, got the engine wrong; it's a 24-valve flat-12, not a V12. With a total capacity of 100cc. And a working miniature replica of the original gearbox, complete with reverse gear.

Recently, it was stolen by Stuart Little in the first case of Petite Theft Auto.
posted by GenjiandProust at 7:51 AM on November 3, 2012 [6 favorites]


I recognize William Robertson as the Grandmaster of Teeny-Tininess.
posted by Egg Shen at 7:53 AM on November 3, 2012


btw, I've read that, in the old days, a maker's own toolchest would serve as his portfolio - as it were - when seeking employment.
posted by Egg Shen at 7:56 AM on November 3, 2012


A lot of people make tiny versions of engines. A lot of people make tiny versions of cars. Fewer make cars with engines. And even fewer make all of that from photographs only. In fact, I don't even see how that could work. Are there photos of *every single part* of the car? Even the valve springs? Washers?
posted by DU at 7:58 AM on November 3, 2012


So, 1/12th scale. How well will that work with my Dad's 28 mm miniature collection?
posted by Canageek at 8:00 AM on November 3, 2012


Not well, Canageek. Dollhouse scale is 1/12 and 28mm is 1/64 scale, roughly, so a little guy from your dad's train set would barely be able to climb into the tool chest.

Dollhouse scale

1/64 scale
posted by jfwlucy at 8:21 AM on November 3, 2012


Big tools have little tools, to build'em with precision, And little tools have lesser tools, and so on, till derision.

This reminds me of the novel "The Third Policeman", where one of the policemen is showing the narrator a box which contains progressively smaller boxes, made with correspondingly smaller and smaller tools, which eventually become too small for the human eye to see...
posted by sneebler at 10:47 AM on November 3, 2012


Thanks jfwlucy, so unless I need one for a giants home or something they aren't good gaming props.
posted by Canageek at 3:18 PM on November 3, 2012


Nope. But this is pretty cute if you like trains.
posted by jfwlucy at 4:16 PM on November 3, 2012


I wonder what that 1/12th scale box would go for at auction? (US$100 x 1000 hours = $100k?)
posted by InsertNiftyNameHere at 10:51 PM on November 3, 2012


I've thought a lot about Henry F. Philips.

No one remembers him anymore, but he totally revolutionized the way people screw things.
His idea for a new type of screw and a new type of screwdriver was patented, but continues to be a major improvement in screw technology.

The Phillips head screw is a major advancement in equal opportunity, because it works well when you have a big screw and a small screwdriver, or a small screw and a big screwdriver. Unlike the flat screw, which has problems people can only torque about.

I salute you, Mr. Phillips!
posted by twoleftfeet at 1:45 AM on November 4, 2012


twoleftfeet: "The Phillips head screw is a major advancement in equal opportunity, because it works well when you have a big screw and a small screwdriver, or a small screw and a big screwdriver. Unlike the flat screw, which has problems people can only torque about."

I agree that the flat head screwdriver sucks royally, but I have to disagree that the Phillips head is the panacea. I vote for the torx head. I've no idea regarding the provenance, but I believe it is clearly superior to slot screwdrivers or Phillips.
posted by InsertNiftyNameHere at 5:27 AM on November 4, 2012


The Robinson head is far superior to both. It says on the end AND doesn't strip.
posted by Canageek at 9:33 AM on November 4, 2012


« Older In China, hipsters are called “cultured youth”...  |  Amateur astronomer Stuart Atki... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments