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Plans for a DIY Industrial Chic Table
January 15, 2013 8:02 AM   Subscribe

Cast Iron Pipe Legs? Check. Thick board top? Check. Basic plans for building this "industrial" table at home? Check.
posted by OmieWise (65 comments total) 42 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is one of those things where I'm going to have to learn how to construct things because I too want a kick-ass table, isn't it?
posted by Kitteh at 8:08 AM on January 15, 2013


"Doug... designed and built this GREAT table for me using plumbers, cast iron pipes and fittings."

Looks great, but plumbers are pretty expensive. Plus you have to feed 'em.
posted by Floydd at 8:09 AM on January 15, 2013 [8 favorites]


'Industrial Chic' is half right, at least.
posted by Mister_A at 8:10 AM on January 15, 2013 [2 favorites]


The shelves above it are nice.
posted by Mister_A at 8:10 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


I sometimes, because I hate myself, leaf through the Restoration Hardware catalog and emit big wails of whooping laughter. The prices they charge for pine, PINE* objects that I, myself, a lifelong city dweller who can somehow injure himself with a hammer despite it being in another room, could reasonable put together in my living room, are just well see the comment on big whooping snorts.

*The softest cheapest wood known to man! PINE! It's used for things you don't care about too much!
posted by The Whelk at 8:17 AM on January 15, 2013 [10 favorites]


I like the look of this table, and I like the look of the black cast iron pipe bookshelves that seem to be all the rage with the young, hip Brooklynites these days. But the idea that an ostensibly "DIY" project requires what amounts to a lot of custom metal fabricating leaves me cold.

Maybe that's the perfect arrangement for an apartment dweller. Nothing wrong with that.

Is there no way to use pipe for such projects without getting involved in thread cutting? Are pipe cutting and thread cutting really too difficult to do at home?
posted by Western Infidels at 8:18 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


I wonder how close a match for something like this you could get using lengths of pipe that are standard lengths available at your local big-box store. They usually sell a selection of short pipe nipples in various lengths.
posted by rmd1023 at 8:21 AM on January 15, 2013


It's an option for those of us looking to step up to a standing desk. Combine with those iron pipe DIY shelving setups to complete the look.

(But I still think an adjustable drafting table is the best thrifty standing desk option.)
posted by notyou at 8:22 AM on January 15, 2013


I've been looking for a simple replacement for my completely rickety and worn-out Rube Goldberg workbench setup. I believe you have shown me it, thank you.
posted by middleclasstool at 8:27 AM on January 15, 2013


Is there no way to use pipe for such projects without getting involved in thread cutting?

You could use Kee Klamps, which are a little spendy and not quite so hip looking, but pretty cool in their versatility.
posted by ghharr at 8:27 AM on January 15, 2013 [2 favorites]


It drives me crazy when, as here, someone shares a "DIY" thing they did but refuses to disclose how much it cost them.
posted by brain_drain at 8:28 AM on January 15, 2013 [11 favorites]


Guys, I know she says at one point that she used "plumbers" to help with the table construction, but if you RTA carefully you will find that the author and her helper had the pipes custom cut and threaded to spec at a plumbers' supply shop, and did not, in fact, hire a plumber or plumbers to come over to her house with tools to cut and thread pipes. Admittedly I have never tried getting pipes cut at a plumbers' supply store myself, but it does not seem all that different than having the hardware store cut custom cut wood that you bought there, which in my experience does not tend to be prohibitively expensive.

You can buy simple tools to cut pipe yourself, and my husband has actually cut pipe for minor plumbing jobs in our house (though he has not had to do it with cast iron pipe, and I'm not sure how that would go).
posted by BlueJae at 8:28 AM on January 15, 2013 [2 favorites]


It's not too difficult to cut pipe with a hacksaw, though a proper pipe cutter would be easier. You can get tapping kits at most hardware stores or big-box home improvement places.

The thing is, to me that just looks heavy - which is good for something you don't plan to move much.

You could offset the cross bracing if you wanted to make more space for your legs if you were planning on sitting at it, too.
posted by Xoebe at 8:29 AM on January 15, 2013


You don't need custom pipes, there are a lot of examples online. Some with prices! (Another example)
posted by blue_beetle at 8:30 AM on January 15, 2013 [2 favorites]


Er., by tapping, I mean "thread cutting", to put your own threads in.
posted by Xoebe at 8:31 AM on January 15, 2013


Rough costing estimate:

~32 fittings @ $3/fitting,
~ 4x 8' pipe @ $15 @,
table top (clear maple) ~8'x26"x1.5" ~$375 (shipped)

= $550 before assembly.

No tool costs, retail pricing with no real bargain hunting.
posted by bonehead at 8:31 AM on January 15, 2013 [4 favorites]


Is there no way to use pipe for such projects without getting involved in thread cutting? Are pipe cutting and thread cutting really too difficult to do at home?

Thanks to cheap Chinese tools from Harbor Freight, pipe cutting and threading can be done at home with only a modest investment. Pipe and basic fittings like elbows and tees are pretty cheap, but the prices for those damn 4-screw flanges are just ridiculous.
posted by klarck at 8:33 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


You can build a matching CD rack as well! (Assuming you still have CDs, although I guess you could use it for DVDs and video games too.)
posted by TedW at 8:36 AM on January 15, 2013


As a less hip looking alternative that might be easier to build, I hear good things about this wooden work table design. If I had more space I would build a couple of these and an airplane (I told Mrs. exogenous about this motorglider with a pretty ginormous wingspan that was built in a place no bigger then ours, but she'd have none of it.)
posted by exogenous at 8:38 AM on January 15, 2013


As a less hip looking alternative that might be easier to build, I hear good things about this wooden work table design.

Yeah, that's a bomber table.
posted by OmieWise at 8:42 AM on January 15, 2013


It says kind of a lot that "put some pipes together using standard fittings, lay boards on top" needs to have "plans".
posted by DU at 8:43 AM on January 15, 2013 [6 favorites]


Nothing at Cafe Cartolina is a free printable or a free download. You may not borrow, drag or right click any image for your art or craft because you will find that almost everything here is copyrighted material...
-From the copyright notice on the sidebar


So, Doug has put together the plans for the table and you can download them, for free, from here - 'Table Plans"

-From the actual article

Just an interesting juxtaposition I noticed.
posted by TedW at 8:46 AM on January 15, 2013 [3 favorites]


As a less hip looking alternative that might be easier to build, I hear good things about this wooden work table design.

That and the table in the FPP are OK for some very light work like beading or gluing. I think most workshops are going to laugh if you call them worktables, though, especially the all-wood one. No diagonal bracing? And the slender cast iron legs one looks a little iffy to do heavy hammering on from a wiggliness pov.
posted by DU at 8:48 AM on January 15, 2013


(And I should know, having two wooden "work tables" very similar to that in my own workshop that are not Masters of Stability. I need to upgrade.)
posted by DU at 8:51 AM on January 15, 2013


I think most workshops are going to laugh if you call them worktables, though, especially the all-wood one.

I dunno, that wooden one is built with 14 2x4s. Looks sturdy.

Anyway, if you do an image search for workbench, you don't really see any diagonal braces.
posted by orme at 8:57 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


Seems like one would have to be lucky for all the threads and fittings to be snug enough when assembled to be structurely sound. I'd bet at least one of those pipes is loose and jiggly/turny.
posted by zengargoyle at 8:59 AM on January 15, 2013


Here in the Midwest the big box stores will cut your pipe to length and thread it for you, so that's really not an issue. Threading it yourself isn't that bad. All you need is a pipe die of the proper diameter, a vise that can handle pipe, and something to turn the die with (I've used a pipe wrench before though that's not the official equipment.)

The issue issue I see with the table they show is that there is nothing to the top but some boards that are glued together - maybe with some kind of dowel or tongue and groove thing going on but I can't see it. Sooner or later that thing is going to split in half with the grain. A better design would put a couple cleats on the bottom to support the individual planks. You can't just screw, glue or nail them into place, though, because then you'll have issues with seasonal humidity so... You know, I'm just going to put together an FPP on this.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 9:02 AM on January 15, 2013 [9 favorites]


DU: "That and the table in the FPP are OK for some very light work like beading or gluing. I think most workshops are going to laugh if you call them worktables, though, especially the all-wood one. "

Nope. As a matter of fact, the wood EAA table design I linked works fine for building airplanes and everyone seems pretty pleased with them. I think the parallel sheets of plywood provide more than enough rigidity.
posted by exogenous at 9:04 AM on January 15, 2013




I think most workshops are going to laugh if you call them worktables, though, especially the all-wood one.

I dunno, that wooden one is built with 14 2x4s. Looks sturdy.

Anyway, if you do an image search for workbench, you don't really see any diagonal braces.
posted by orme at 8:57 AM on January 15 [+] [!]


Yep. I built one of those for about a hundred bucks worth of lumber. Ten feet long, and a few hundred ponds worth of wood. (Like this one) You can make a spectacularly solid bench out of 2x4 struts. Just make sure that the top is heavy enough.

I think DU is wrong on this one. You just have to make sure that you give it a good heavy top, and cut and measure everything right. Solid as hell. I use mine for heavy auto work, hammering, electronics, WHATEVER. Fantastic, cheap, and it looks pretty good with some sanding and a coat of paint. Wood is a fine material if you use it right.

There are entire forums and communities for this stuff if you really want to feel inadequate about your own feeble furniture construction efforts. :)
posted by Stagger Lee at 9:08 AM on January 15, 2013


Metafilter: a selection of short pipe nipples in various lengths

WE DID IT GUYZ HIGH FIVES ALL ROUND
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:09 AM on January 15, 2013 [3 favorites]


My husband made our headboard out of cast iron pipe and fittings. I don't have a good picture of it, but you can see a little of it here. When he went to Lowes to buy the materials, he started laying the pieces out on the floor. A Lowes guy came by and said, "What's your project? I was a pipe fitter for twenty years - there's nothing I haven't seen." Mr. Ant looked up at him and said, "I'm building a headboard." The guy paused for a second, said, "You're on your own." and walked off.
posted by workerant at 9:10 AM on January 15, 2013 [15 favorites]


My sister's boyfriend built basically this table (from other plans I think) and it is really gorgeous. He used a giant chunk of some fancy wood (cedar?) he found out hiking in BC that he hauled out and got plained (yes, he is a catch). It is an absolutely stunning table that would probably take, as said above, $400 dollars to replicate. Buying wood is a lot more expensive that I would have thought - kind of like trying to knit a sweater (out of nice wool) to save money.
posted by hydrobatidae at 9:13 AM on January 15, 2013


It says kind of a lot that "put some pipes together using standard fittings, lay boards on top" needs to have "plans".

I think it says "we already spent the time to figure out the measurements and do all the problem solving, so why not share it - here you go." I mean of course you could figure it all out yourself, but this saves you that step, if you like their solution. I've built a lot of stuff and really, the most time-consuming part is the sketching, measuring, and trial and error. If someone's already got a workable design and will share the measurements with me so I don't have to invent that wheel, I'm all for it.
posted by Miko at 9:16 AM on January 15, 2013 [3 favorites]


Looks like my workbench - cast iron pipes and two pocket doors.
posted by MOWOG at 9:22 AM on January 15, 2013


You can build a matching CD rack as well!

But I don't have that many Industrial CDs.
posted by Strange Interlude at 9:23 AM on January 15, 2013 [6 favorites]


If you want to thread 1" pipe, you better have a pipe vice. A regular heavy duty vice doesn't have deep enough serrations to keep the pipe from spinning from the threading force. And yeah, eat a big breakfast before you start.
posted by digsrus at 9:44 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


Cute. But, the cross bracing does not allow for storage underneath. Fail.
posted by I'm Doing the Dishes at 9:47 AM on January 15, 2013


How about PVC tubing instead of the iron pipe? Or is that not hip enough?
posted by JoeZydeco at 10:08 AM on January 15, 2013


The one thing that I recall from Wood Shop class in JHS. Ponderosa Pine smells good.
posted by Splunge at 10:13 AM on January 15, 2013


Not strong enough. PVC has pretty good longitudinal strength, but it's not so good with knocks from the side, especially at the glue joints. A few good kicks and bumps and it would be in trouble.

Besides, it looks like crap. Literally. It's sewer pipe material.
posted by bonehead at 10:14 AM on January 15, 2013


The issue issue I see with the table they show is that there is nothing to the top but some boards that are glued together - maybe with some kind of dowel or tongue and groove thing going on but I can't see it.

Yeah, I wish they had more details on that. I'm also surprised they got such nice results out of construction lumber. I wonder if they bought higher end stuff or just picked through them to find nice pieces.
posted by smackfu at 10:19 AM on January 15, 2013


Anyway, if you do an image search for workbench, you don't really see any diagonal braces.

That's because they're using alternate ways of getting the same effect. Most of the those workbenches have one or two big wide boards (trestles) up on their edges like floor joists going from one end of the bench to the other. Note also that they are bolted through the ends, rather than screwed through the faces. This will provide a much tougher, longer-lasting joint. Screws in pine will gradually loosen and become useless if you put repeated shear forces on them. Diagonal bracing is the easy, weekend-warrior way of getting around this.

I think DU is wrong on this one. You just have to make sure that you give it a good heavy top, and cut and measure everything right.

No, he's right. The type of joinery you use has a huge effect on what kind of design you can get away with. If you want to put screws through the faces of the boards, you should use diagonal bracing.

But here's the thing. You can build one of those EAA benches and it'll be fine for a lot of things. Electronics? Sure, not much wear and tear involved. Hammering? No problem, that's just a downward force, so no worries. Auto and aviation work? You mostly just need the table to lay things out and hold them at a convenient height. You're not actually transmitting any forces through the table.

But start using a hand saw or a chisel, and now you're putting repeated lateral forces on your table. Now your table wants to rack back and forth. I've built benches similar to the EAA plan, and they're fine for maybe six months. Then all the joints are coming loose and when you try to saw something, you're putting most of your energy into wiggling the table around, and very little into making the cut.

If anyone wants to hang out at a forum where people talk about this stuff all day, Lumberjocks is fun to browse around.
posted by echo target at 10:22 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'd skip the IKEA countertop stuff and go with a maple benchtop from a place like Global Industrial Supply. This is good sturdy heavy wood.
posted by JoeZydeco at 10:23 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


I made a long, low bookshelf out of pipe, boards, and fittings; it turned out sturdy and pretty good-looking in a generic Anthropologie kind of way. Some miscellaneous notes for things the twee DIY blogs don't tell you, and that you may not have known if you are just a generally handy person who can pretty much figure things out but have never worked particularly with pipe before:

1) pipe nipples are DIRTY. You will spend the greatest amount of time in the whole project scrubbing them down with GoJo and a bottle brush, and still end up with grease and metal filings embedded in your cuticles.

2) pipe fittings ADD UP QUICKLY, especially those goddamn flanges that look so great and could serve so many useful functions if they weren't $6 a pop, what the hell.

3) the stated diameter of pipe is for the INSIDE, duh, which should be obvious but maybe isn't to you even though your mama always told you you were a smart girl, and so you waste an embarrassing amount of dollars and time going back and forth to the hardware store to buy a series of incrementally larger hole saws trying to make holes to pass the pipe through, not that I'm bitter or anything.

4) pipe can't be assembled into a closed loop because you won't be able to turn the last piece in two directions at once, which again, duh, but who thinks about that kind of thing when you're excited about MAKING THINGS?!!

5) pre-cut and threaded pipe nipples lengths are for the unthreaded potion only, and you will get 3/8-5/8" of thread exposed at every juncture when the pieces are screwed arm-tight. The exact amount depends on the particular two pieces being joined and is impossible to predict. You can unscrew to level things out a little to make your pieces match...ish, but you lose stability after just a couple turns, which is like 1/8". GRAR.

5a) this makes planning the thing difficult if you're doing anything more complicated than single-height shelves across the piece, say differing height shelves that need to fit together and make up the same height overall, or if you're planning it to fit a particular space.

5b) it also leads to needing pipe pieces cut to strange dimensions like 12 5/16".

5b.1) the man at Home Depot will laugh in your face if you ask for pipe cut to 12 5/16".

5b.2) the man at Home Depot will, not unkindly, recommend that you rent the machine to cut and thread pipe, and assure you that if that idiot Jake who works Sundays can learn to do it, man why they don't fire him is a mystery, you can learn with no problem. You can totally do it, and you'll feel like a badass. But your poor little hatchback will be pretty unhappy with the amount of machine oil you spill transporting it.

6) people will oooo and ah over the finished bookshelf. They will ask you to help them make one for their own home. You will definitely, certainly say no.

Good luck with your pipe projects, everyone!
posted by peachfuzz at 10:31 AM on January 15, 2013 [29 favorites]


Is there no way to use pipe for such projects without getting involved in thread cutting?

About eight years ago I built a dining table using cast iron pipe for the legs. Aside from the fact that I like the look, one of the main reasons I chose cast iron pipe was that I didn't have to do any cutting/thread tapping. I was able to just buy standard lengths at Home Depot and screw them together by hand. I don't think I even used a wrench. Cast iron pipe is also pretty cheap, and made a very sturdy base for the table.

Here's a pic, though it doesn't show the legs all that well.
posted by sriracha at 10:34 AM on January 15, 2013


As mentioned, they will usually cut pipe, and other things, for you at the big hardware stores. Even though I have the tools, I usually have them cut wood, especially plywood and sheets, for me. They do a better job and it makes it easier to get home. Just have all you measurements before you go. This is a great way to make bookshelves and the like.
posted by bongo_x at 10:34 AM on January 15, 2013


Western Infidels: "
Is there no way to use pipe for such projects without getting involved in thread cutting? Are pipe cutting and thread cutting really too difficult to do at home?
"

Well, thread cutting on 1/2" and 3/4" isn't too hard in small batches, even with less-than-optimal tools (optimal tools - pipe stand, power die turner, etc. Less-than-optimal=bench vice with round jaws, manual dies.) I wouldn't want to turn 1" by hand.
But all those pipe lengths? You don't do those at home. You call up the plumbing supply house, say, "I need four 4" nipples, two 10.25, four 20", ... , four unions, ...etc", and give them your credit card number.
posted by notsnot at 10:42 AM on January 15, 2013


Looks like my workbench - cast iron pipes and two pocket doors.

Doors actually make good workbench surfaces. Get yourself a good solid-core door that hasn't had holes sawed or drilled in it yet, and you'll get a nice flat, level surface with square corners. Find one that got marred in transit, and you'll get a decent deal on it.
posted by middleclasstool at 10:50 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


This reminds me of when an old roommate of mine wanted to create a found materials, student-type bookshelf for herself. But rather than try her luck dumpster diving, she went out and bought pvc pipe fittings, cinderblock, and boards. She ended up with the right look--a piece of crap ramshackle thing that looks like it's made out of trash--but ended up spending over $80 and many hours to do so.

It was ok though because she's an asshole.
posted by phunniemee at 10:54 AM on January 15, 2013 [3 favorites]


I've built benches similar to the EAA plan, and they're fine for maybe six months.

I dunno. My dad has a couple of those that are going on twenty years old now, and they're still in good shape. One's a planer table, the other a routing station. They get plenty of sideways pressure. Mind you, we didn't use screws to build them either, but a few 6" carriage bolts at each corner.
posted by bonehead at 10:55 AM on January 15, 2013


For anyone who is a fan of this type of thing, the blogger at Manhattan Nest posted some really cool projects a while ago.

Book shelf
http://manhattan-nest.com/2010/10/20/pipe-ply/

Very large book shelf
http://manhattan-nest.com/2011/05/19/the-danieldaniel-project-the-colossus/
posted by forkisbetter at 10:56 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


pipe can't be assembled into a closed loop because you won't be able to turn the last piece in two directions at once

The trick is to reverse the thread on the last joint, but that requires a grandfather with custom taps and dyes.
posted by bonehead at 10:58 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


peachfuzz: "4) pipe can't be assembled into a closed loop because you won't be able to turn the last piece in two directions at once"

That's why they have unions.

...and the slight differences in mating lengths? If you've got pipe tape in there, you can just crank the longest parts down to make 'em even.

(ask me about the time I had to put an extra half-turn into 2" stainless pipes on a car wash arch. Then realized I'd forgotten to slide the pendant that hides the joint over the pipe before joining, so I had to *undo* it and re-do it. Thank you, 30" pipe wrench with five-foot cheater!)
posted by notsnot at 11:05 AM on January 15, 2013


4) pipe can't be assembled into a closed loop because you won't be able to turn the last piece in two directions at once, which again, duh, but who thinks about that kind of thing when you're excited about MAKING THINGS?!!

That's why they put one of these on each leg.

Well, not exactly one of those as that's for 1-1/4 and a lot more expensive than 3/4.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 11:05 AM on January 15, 2013


Cute. But, the cross bracing does not allow for storage underneath. Fail.

That, and the cross-bracing looks like it would definitely get in the way of your legs. I like to stretch-out sometimes. Looks like I would be banging my knees on the pipes.
posted by Thorzdad at 11:07 AM on January 15, 2013


we didn't use screws to build them either, but a few 6" carriage bolts at each corner.

Indeed! Carriage bolts are a great upgrade from screws. Metal on metal threads will last basically forever, wood on metal threads will degrade. They get expensive, though, which is why a lot of people go for screws.
posted by echo target at 11:10 AM on January 15, 2013


If you head down to the "plumbers" to get pipe cut and threaded, call it black iron. You can call it anything you want at Home Depot :-)

It's not cast iron. It's black iron, which is a malleable iron pipe that is not galvanized, or coated with zinc, to prevent rust. The blackness is from an oxide layer. Uncoated black iron is used for fuel gas plumbing in appropriate locations, and is cheaper than galvanized pipe.

Cast iron is used (less and less) for drain lines and big sewer lines in houses, and is not joined by threading, but by jointing and caulking (or even casting with lead, again less and less). It would be difficult to thread in the field.
posted by the Real Dan at 11:15 AM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


The fittings are malleable iron. The pipe is steel with a welded seam. Or seamless for high pressure applications.
posted by digsrus at 12:04 PM on January 15, 2013


I've built benches similar to the EAA plan, and they're fine for maybe six months

Instead of ripping one 4'x8' plywood sheet in half to make a 2' deep work surface/shelf, I ripped 1' off two plywood sheets, giving me a luxurious 3' deep work surface/shelf and a 1' tall back panel top & bottom to mount gear onto and keep stuff from falling off the back. The bottom panel also provides a bit of side-to-side diagonal bracing.
posted by CynicalKnight at 12:49 PM on January 15, 2013


I like using black steel pipe as supports. I just used them for the base legs and the brackets in a bookshelf/office desk I built. Before that I used them like the OP link for the base on a quartz slab we turned into a table.

As pleased as I was with the results, I can second everything peachfuzz said; except for trying to make a closed loop... everybody knows that :P..
posted by doctoryes at 1:06 PM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]


OK, linkoliceous FPP about why you shouldn't just screw rails onto your table top has been posted.

Now, continuing with what I was saying earlier, I think this thing needs some rails, at least on the short ends (across the grain) or the top is going to split in half when someone uses it as a chair. Just don't attach them with a bunch of screws.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 1:09 PM on January 15, 2013 [1 favorite]



Nothing at Cafe Cartolina is a free printable or a free download. You may not borrow, drag or right click any image for your art or craft because you will find that almost everything here is copyrighted material...
-From the copyright notice on the sidebar


So, Doug has put together the plans for the table and you can download them, for free, from here - 'Table Plans"
-From the actual article

Just an interesting juxtaposition I noticed.


... especially since pretty much everything Cartolina sells is made from old designs and images created by other people.
posted by oneirodynia at 1:49 PM on January 15, 2013


TedW writes "You may not borrow, drag or right click any image for your art or craft because you will find that almost everything here is copyrighted material..."

I love when sites attempt to disable right click; I tend to download the whole site just for spite.

zengargoyle writes "Seems like one would have to be lucky for all the threads and fittings to be snug enough when assembled to be structurely sound. I'd bet at least one of those pipes is loose and jiggly/turny."

Black iron pipe threads are tapered, it's not hard at all to make them non-jiggly.
posted by Mitheral at 3:39 PM on January 15, 2013


Regarding the closed loop: I've seen unthreaded flanges and unions that fasten via allen studs perpendicular to the pipe. They’re not meant for traditional pipe duties like carrying fluids or gases, but for things like handrails. Probably more spendy than black pipe though.
posted by El Mariachi at 1:36 AM on January 16, 2013


= $550 before assembly.

I saw a furniture maker selling these at a Brooklyn flea market a few months ago, and I think it was priced about $500 (with distressed butcher block top). I thought I could do that myself for a lot cheaper - till I priced out those fittings.

By the way, threading is not difficult at all - and you can cheaply rent power equipment to do the job.
posted by sixpack at 6:34 AM on January 16, 2013


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