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Moonrise Kingdom
January 16, 2013 6:26 PM   Subscribe

An interactive script for the movie, Moonrise Kingdom. Also worth a look is a set of photos by the movie's still photographer, which he posted in a set on Flickr.
posted by blaneyphoto (26 comments total) 54 users marked this as a favorite

 
Wonderful! I ought to see this movie again. Thank you!
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 6:36 PM on January 16, 2013


I want to recommend everyone watch Moonrise Kingdom and Race For Your Life Charlie Brown as a double feature.
posted by humanfont at 6:47 PM on January 16, 2013 [4 favorites]


I bookmark it, thanks for share.
posted by binaryoptionstips at 7:03 PM on January 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's beautiful. I didn't expect to like Moonrise Kingdom at all, since I was disappointed with Darjeeling and never bothered with Fantastic Mr. Fox, but it was a surprisingly great movie.
posted by codacorolla at 7:04 PM on January 16, 2013


I adore this.
posted by empath at 7:06 PM on January 16, 2013


Even just the words, and my heart can't stop throbbing.
posted by Apropos of Something at 7:49 PM on January 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


. . .and never bothered with Fantastic Mr. Fox

WHAT THE CUSS?!?!?
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 7:49 PM on January 16, 2013 [13 favorites]


The cuss you say?
posted by ikahime at 7:52 PM on January 16, 2013


You cussin' with me, ikahime?
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 7:56 PM on January 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


I was actually a bit disappointed to not really care for the movie all that much, but I know lots of people loved it so I thought this would be worth posting. It was interesting (to me) that they filmed much of it in the field behind my aunts house and at the scout camp 3 generations of my family has attended.
posted by blaneyphoto at 7:57 PM on January 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


It was on my third visit to the theater that I realized why Moonrise Kingdom is the best thing Wes Anderson has made, at least since Rushmore. So many of his films are populated by these overgrown non-adults who still see life through the unrealistic assumptions of childhood. But if you're going to make movies about people who think like kids, why not have them be kids?

It also fulfilled the promise made in the beginning of The Royal Tenenbaums, where the old-fashioned children's library imagery, the references to well-known YA novels from a slightly fantastical New York City, the surreal "375th Street YMCA" and the grand Tenenbaum apartment and its flag -- all combined to say "this is a movie set in the New York that all you bookish suburban kids created in your minds when your only exposure to the place was outdated fiction." But then it went on to sabotage itself by showing how damaged these people are who try to live in the real world that way. Moonrise Kingdom completely embraces its setting, a "romantic" mash of every young person's adventure book that we ever grew up reading.

New Penzance Island, St. Jack Wood, and the adventure story that he tells are unabashedly, unironically, straight out of Suzy's favorite novels. Maybe I fell in love with the movie because I finally got the escapist fantasy I crave?

Anyway, thanks for the links. I intend to read every single word.
posted by Harvey Kilobit at 8:02 PM on January 16, 2013 [24 favorites]


I was a little disappointed by MK as well - it didn't come together as well for me as the other films did (including Fantastic Mr Fox) - but it is still a nice film and I really love the visuals.
posted by heyjude at 8:03 PM on January 16, 2013


My eyes! The beauty! I cannot take it!
posted by ouke at 8:49 PM on January 16, 2013


I really liked Moonrise Kingdom. I thought it was a great little YA novel.

One thing that confused me was that I thought there were a couple scenes implying Suzy's mother was physically abusive to her dad, but it seemed hinted rather indirectly and I haven't encountered anyone else who read the movie that way.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:52 PM on January 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Most Wes Andersony movie ever, and therefore his best.
posted by Artw at 8:59 PM on January 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


The Flickr set is utterly gorgeous. I'm so glad they released it, sometimes you can see a few set photos here and there on IMDB buried in the photos from the red carpet premiere, but full screen glorious photos from the set on Flickr are a million times better.
posted by mathowie at 9:55 PM on January 16, 2013


It is indeed the most Wes Andersony movie ever (which had me rolling my eyes a bit during the first half, but I was won over by the end for sure), but it will never replace Life Aquatic in my heart.
posted by adamdschneider at 10:07 PM on January 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


A good movie, bit not enough Owen Wilsony.
posted by Brocktoon at 1:06 AM on January 17, 2013


There was so much that was good about the movie and at the same time so much that kept the good back. I remember being kinda annoyed, thinking, "When's this guy gonna get the fuck out of his own way?"

And then they dance on the beach and I thought, "Finally, a W.A. movie where the actors get to dance a little." For that I think this is his best movie. Maybe not as impressively 'cool' as some of the others, but the characters were way more fleshed out than I expected from one of his movies.

It makes me look forward to 'Grand Budapest Hotel'.
posted by From Bklyn at 3:28 AM on January 17, 2013


OK, I read through that script and I have some thoughts.

Wes Anderson really does plan everything out in advance and then shoot exactly what he wrote. There's not much improvisation here, and any changes feel more like edits. There were two major differences in the final version, though:

1) The scenes with Sam and Suzy are now a LOT less fighty. This is a very good move.

2) One of the best things about the movie is its willingness to forego blow-by-blow details. Surprisingly, that was a late addition to the plan; in several places the script adds time-wasting explanations. One of the most memorable: the Khaki Scout battle in the woods. In the final version you see the fight begin, then an immediate cut to the aftermath, a motorbike in a tree, and just the single line "he's been stabbed with lefty scissors."
PhoBWanKenobi: I thought there were a couple scenes implying Suzy's mother was physically abusive to her dad, but it seemed hinted rather indirectly and I haven't encountered anyone else who read the movie that way.
I love you, but you don't know what you're talking about.

Sorry, I had to say that. Actually I did find the bit you're remembering:
Mr. Bishop stands off to the side by himself poking at the ground with a stick. He has two black eyes, and half his face is swollen and purple.
SCOUT MASTER WARD: What happened to him?
BECKY: I'm not sure. I think he went searching in the dark.
MR. BISHOP: She stole the batteries out of my flashlight.
[i.e. Suzy took the batteries to power the portable record player and her dad only discovered that too late]
[... some parts omitted...]
CAPTAIN SHARP: Did you hit him?
MRS. BISHOP: No. He fell in a ditch.
There's no question that Mrs. Bishop is a tough-as-nails battleaxe kind of personality, and she treats her husband as a disappointing child. I think that starts to turn around in the scene on the pier where he stands up for her against Captain Sharp and Scout Master Ward. I can definitely see where you'd get a husband-bashing vibe from the two of them, but I don't think it's there in the light of day.

And oh yeah! A Wes Anderson movie where the girl gets to be the hero. Makes up for "Sweet Lime" in The Darjeeling Limited.
posted by Harvey Kilobit at 3:39 AM on January 17, 2013


Cool. I was convinced that Jed the mailman's airplane was CGI. Guess not.
posted by punkfloyd at 4:23 AM on January 17, 2013


"Was he a good dog?"

"Who's to say?"
posted by punkfloyd at 4:25 AM on January 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


I love this movie, but I still do not understand why Snoopy had to die.
posted by Dr. Zira at 5:32 AM on January 17, 2013


I kind of thought Bishop was getting smacked around by the Mrs. as well. The way it was kind of never directly addressed made it all the more poignant.
posted by From Bklyn at 7:26 AM on January 17, 2013


There's no question that Mrs. Bishop is a tough-as-nails battleaxe kind of personality, and she treats her husband as a disappointing child. I think that starts to turn around in the scene on the pier where he stands up for her against Captain Sharp and Scout Master Ward. I can definitely see where you'd get a husband-bashing vibe from the two of them, but I don't think it's there in the light of day.

After I said that, I did some searching on the internets and the people over at TV tropes and a few at IMDB agree with me. It's all indirect, and could be read either way--he ends the film with two black eyes, and we're told it's from falling in the ditch, which is pretty much that movie trope where an abuser claims someone "tripped." In the scene near the end, she apologizes for having "wounded" him (he asks which wounds--she responds "whichever hurt the worst" and he admits many of those wounds are self-inflicted). It's not clear if the language is meant to be metaphorical or literal. We know that Suzy is violent. We know that she and her mother are meant to be read as similar. I don't think he ruled out reading the movie that way at all.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:50 AM on January 17, 2013


Yeah, one interesting thing about the script, as I mentioned earlier, is how combative Sam and Suzy are towards each other, with Suzy generally hitting harder. They're shaping up to be an early version of Suzy's own parents' relationship. That supports your reading.
posted by Harvey Kilobit at 12:22 PM on January 17, 2013


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