Cell Phone Propaganda Posters
January 29, 2013 8:08 AM   Subscribe

Ted Slampyak has created some helpful etiquette posters for cell phone users. [via buzzfeed]

Give Your Full Attention
Don't Ruin The Experience for Others
Texting is for Cowards
Be Discreet
Don't Pester a Captive Audience
Keep it Classy
posted by quin (110 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
I was with him until he he tried to make me feel bad about my Lady Sniff ring tone.
posted by mph at 8:13 AM on January 29, 2013 [6 favorites]


It's always interesting to see the divide between people for whom this is common sense knowledge and people who genuinely seem to think that this doesn't matter at all.
posted by elizardbits at 8:13 AM on January 29, 2013 [14 favorites]


I'm not sure why this needs to be part of the 'art of manliness'....which is a pretty lame aesthetic, tbh.
posted by snuffleupagus at 8:19 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


Slightly related, today also gives us a promo for the new Black Mirror series. (Which I'm sure is going to be a poignant commentary on dystopian cellphone ubiquity.)
posted by Catblack at 8:20 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


I was looking for a "Hang Up and Drive!" poster.
posted by ahimsakid at 8:22 AM on January 29, 2013


1999 called, they want you to get some new ideas.
posted by mary8nne at 8:24 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


today also gives us a promo for the new Black Mirror series.
Note to BBC America...Import this please. Perhaps in place of the unending replays of Casino Royale?
posted by Thorzdad at 8:26 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


My latest pet peeve is people who text while walking in bottleneck areas, such as stairs, escalators, or the doors of subways. HELLO THERE ARE PEOPLE BEHIND YOU!

Also, what's up with airplane food?
posted by bondcliff at 8:29 AM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


SUCH SMALL PORTIONS
posted by elizardbits at 8:30 AM on January 29, 2013 [6 favorites]


I'm not sure why this needs to be part of the 'art of manliness'....which is a pretty lame aesthetic, tbh.

It's actually from the Art of Manliness website, which is not exactly in line with the aesthetic of The Man Show
posted by asnider at 8:31 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


Cell phone etiquette is shaping up to be the big generation gap issue between those born before and after 1980 or so.
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:32 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


SUCH SMALL PORTIONS

not on the new Galaxy Note 2...jealous much? ~^
posted by sexyrobot at 8:35 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


These posters are the perfect size for wrapping around a brick.
posted by orme at 8:39 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


um. it is a bad old joke about airplane food.
posted by elizardbits at 8:40 AM on January 29, 2013


Cell phone etiquette is shaping up to be the big generation gap issue between those born before and after 1980 or so.

These things all seem like common sense to me. Basic "don't be a dick" type stuff. If thinking so makes me some sort of old man, then I am happy to be an old man and you kids can get off my lawn. Not being rude has nothing to do with what year you were born in.

On the other hand, bypassing the polite request and jumping right to the yelling and the gnashing of the teeth is also rude. So many times on the train (I ride in the quiet car, because I am an old man) I see people tear into others and attempt to publicly shame them before politely suggesting maybe they didn't see the "quiet car" sign and perhaps they should stop yelling into their phone.
posted by bondcliff at 8:41 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


While a lot of these seem like common sense, I actually don't mind it when strangers include me in their side of a conversation in a public space. I figure it gives me carte blanche to chime in with helpful advice on whatever intensely personal problem they have just shared with everyone within hearing distance.
posted by TedW at 8:41 AM on January 29, 2013 [11 favorites]


Cell phones are just a convenient tool for the obnoxious to pester others. An EMP could hit North America and there would still be some asshole with a double bassoon walking around acting like you're the asshole for scowling at him.

In addition, I don't know why every shithead on the 4 train thinks everyone else wants to hear his particular mix of shitty '00s euro-dance and awful hip-hop at 7:45 on a Tuesday morning, but there's this seemingly universal shithead code d'honneur that states MAKE ALL THE NOISE ALL THE TIME.
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 8:44 AM on January 29, 2013 [14 favorites]


I know people with impeccable etiquette in every other way who, for whatever reason, will pull out their phone and start texting mid conversation. It's super off-putting.
posted by mean cheez at 8:44 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


I know they are illegal and all (*gasp*) but I am seriously considering the purchase of a cell phone jammer. Yes, you, woman who spent fifteen minutes (I checked) describing her lunch at Crazy Bowls & Wraps in excruciating detail, including her reactions to the bowl, its composition, its arrangement, and so on. You, guy doing the Regional Bureau Chief Gordon Cole From Another Place, bellowing in another language so hard I can hear your lungs crackle under the yelling. You, anonymous silhouette in a minivan making a left with a turn radius more appropriate to a battleship, using just one arm, head turned down to whatever is in your lap.

Only the miracle of the cell phone jammer will allow me the peace needed to grasp at the last rags of my faith in humanity, instead of having them blown away by the ceaseless chatter of inanity.
posted by adipocere at 8:44 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


Actual yelling into one's phone in a public area, especially an enclosed space, is quite teeth-gnashing. It doesn't matter if it's designated as a quiet space or not. Speakerphone is made for discussions in private locations where more than one person on the call is located. It is not meant for Starbucks or McDonalds or the bus.
posted by zombieflanders at 8:45 AM on January 29, 2013


> These things all seem like common sense to me.

You're right, it's not inherently an age thing. But as this sort of behaviour becomes more and more prevalent it becomes the new normal for younger people who have never known anything different.

> I actually don't mind it when strangers include me in their side of a conversation in a public space.

Things I Recently Learned About The Life Of A Woman On Her Cell Phone At The Coffee Shop:

1. She used to be best friends with someone she now realizes is a bitch and a leech.
2. Her mom can go fuck herself.
3. She's not going to pay back the money. Hell no! Why should she?
4. Her niece is a bitch.
5. Her boyfriend is a loser, and she doesn't know why she hasn't dumped him yet.
6. She's having an all right day.
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:47 AM on January 29, 2013 [33 favorites]


It's actually from the Art of Manliness website, which is not exactly in line with the aesthetic of The Man Show

From what I can see it's exactly in line with that aesthetic (faux Brit 'gentleman' + faux 50s kitch + tiki lounge + hunting lodge + garage workshop) just without all the sexual objectification.

There will always be irritating people with bad manners, but cell phones really do enable some virtuoso performances.
posted by snuffleupagus at 8:49 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


Speakerphone is made for discussions in private locations where more than one person on the call is located.

I do not mourn the near-death of Nextel.

BEE-BEEP "WHERE YOU AT"
BEE-BEEP "MOM'S MINIVAN BRO, GOING TO BEAST THE MALL LATER"
BEE-BEEP " LET ME GRAB YOUR STROKES AND OUTKAST CDS LATER GOTTA FILL OUT THIS IPOD"
BEE-BEEP "OK PEAAAACE"

*twitch*
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 8:50 AM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


The Card Cheat: "Things I Recently Learned About The Life Of A Woman On Her Cell Phone At The Coffee Shop:

1. She used to be best friends with someone she now realizes is a bitch and a leech.
2. Her mom can go fuck herself.
3. She's not going to pay back the money. Hell no! Why should she?
4. Her niece is a bitch.
5. Her boyfriend is a loser, and she doesn't know why she hasn't dumped him yet.
6. She's having an all right day.
"

Hello new tumblr.
posted by boo_radley at 8:50 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


Speakerphone is made for discussions in private locations where more than one person on the call is located. It is not meant for Starbucks or McDonalds or the bus.

It is also not meant for business calls in the middle of a quiet office wherein there is only one party on either end of the phone. Get a goddamn headset if you don't want to hold the receiver, jerkbag.
posted by elizardbits at 8:56 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


I am seriously considering the purchase of a cell phone jammer

Even better would be a device that caused the user's phone to emit a horrible screechy shrill FAX FAX I'M SENDING A FAX FAAAAX noise into their ear until they hung up.
posted by elizardbits at 8:58 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


"Things I Recently Learned About The Life Of A Woman On Her Cell Phone At The Coffee Shop:

1. She used to be best friends with someone she now realizes is a bitch and a leech.
2. Her mom can go fuck herself.
3. She's not going to pay back the money. Hell no! Why should she?
4. Her niece is a bitch.
5. Her boyfriend is a loser, and she doesn't know why she hasn't dumped him yet.
6. She's having an all right day."


I wonder how many "asking for a friend" AskMe's are generated by that mechanism?
posted by TedW at 8:58 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


I know they are illegal and all (*gasp*) but I am seriously considering the purchase of a cell phone jammer.

It's cool, I don't really need reception, I'm not expecting the doctor's office to call with test results or anything.
posted by tylerkaraszewski at 8:58 AM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


It is also not meant for business calls in the middle of a quiet office wherein there is only one party on either end of the phone. Get a goddamn headset if you don't want to hold the receiver, jerkbag.

If you get into the office before anyone else, you can dismantle their phone and disconnect the speaker. Another option is rubbing their stuff on your butt.
posted by orme at 9:00 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


Cell phone etiquette is shaping up to be the big generation gap issue between those born before and after 1980 or so.

Nah, rude self absorbed people are going to be rude and self absorbed no matter what their age.

The most flagrant examples of being rude with your cell phone I can think of have all been done by people who looked to have been over 30. My neighbor who makes personal and important phone calls over the speaker phone while sitting in our shared walkway, or that really obnoxious lady who treats the library as her personal office and yells at people over her blue-tooth (although I think she got kicked out, I haven't seen her since the I complained and the librarian sighed and said "her again"), or how every time I go out with my family there seems to be one guy who insists on doing business over his phone while completely ignoring the people he's with (this even happened at the little Indian place where there were only 8 people in the room, and 3 of them were related to me).

Teenagers texting is at least a quiet rudeness.
posted by Gygesringtone at 9:05 AM on January 29, 2013 [6 favorites]


I still think the rules re: "texting" have yet to be evenly hammered out.

I'm somewhat introverted, and I get shit from my more extroverted friends for dicking about with my phone "during conversation". This feels like an impasse to me, as I consider conversation a mutual exchange of ideas between one or more people, and most often they consider it to be "everyone pay rapt attention to me as I dominate every possible conversation until I decide I am done."

MY Personal cell phone ettiquette rule is, if you talk over me more that 3 times, I'm checking Facebook. I'll keep my cell phone in my pocket when you learn how to take a breath.
posted by Uther Bentrazor at 9:11 AM on January 29, 2013 [11 favorites]


Oh, and as someone who's worked as a cashier, please don't talk on the phone while paying for stuff. Trust me, it makes things easier for you, me, and the guy behind you who doesn't want to have to wait for me to be able to get your attention so I can give you your change.
posted by Gygesringtone at 9:15 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


In addition, I don't know why every shithead on the 4 train thinks everyone else wants to hear his particular mix of shitty '00s euro-dance and awful hip-hop at 7:45 on a Tuesday morning, but there's this seemingly universal shithead code d'honneur that states MAKE ALL THE NOISE ALL THE TIME.

Yeah, I feel like an old person for saying this, but loud, tinny beats early in the morning seems like a decision as contrary to life and well-being as having a cigarette with your breakfast cereal. Except in this case it's like I'm being forced to smoke the cigarette too.
posted by invitapriore at 9:17 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


From what I can see it's exactly in line with that aesthetic[...]just without all the sexual objectification.

That's like saying Batman is exactly like Superman, just without the flying and superstrength and eye-beams.
posted by zombieflanders at 9:17 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


This series is missing one about driving. The thing that's funny to me about people who talk on the phone while they drive who think they can drive just as well in that state is that they're wrong both when they say that and when they imply that their unencumbered driving meets an acceptable standard either.
posted by invitapriore at 9:20 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


I wonder if any ER's or Urgent Cares have gotten cases where they have had to extract a phone which has been anally inserted.

Because, I have been this close, a few times.
posted by Danf at 9:21 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


It's cool, I don't really need reception, I'm not expecting the doctor's office to call with test results or anything.

It's not like test results require an immediate rapid response. Turn this bus around! I'm positive for the clap and need to get the to doctor's office IMMEDIATELY!

I would think that people with that level of education would know how to leave a voicemail.
posted by snottydick at 9:26 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh, and as someone who's worked as a cashier, please don't talk on the phone while paying for stuff. Trust me, it makes things easier for you, me, and the guy behind you who doesn't want to have to wait for me to be able to get your attention so I can give you your change.

One time in a fit of admittedly passive-aggressive pique at my local coffeeshop I reached around the asshole in front of me who was engaged in Important Business Speak while the cashier was waiting on him and moved the sign on the counter that says "NO CELL PHONES AT THE COUNTER" to be right next to his shithead left hand that was resting on the counter and he still didn't notice. This was an important moment in my education and I now employ a much more direct means of engagement with assholes in public.
posted by invitapriore at 9:28 AM on January 29, 2013 [3 favorites]


adipocere: I know they are illegal and all (*gasp*) but I am seriously considering the purchase of a cell phone jammer.

My wife's cousin is a SEPTA conductor and a lot of the conductors do just this on the train, after being held up by more than one douche who would rather yak on the phone than dig out their monthly pass. The jammer isn't on long, just enough to drop the calls before they come through to collect.
posted by dr_dank at 9:32 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


It's cool, I don't really need reception, I'm not expecting the doctor's office to call with test results or anything.

I have to wait FIVE EXTRA MINUTES! OH NOES!!!
posted by DU at 9:34 AM on January 29, 2013


Yeah you know levity really isn't called for in that particular situation.
posted by elizardbits at 9:36 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


These are pretty funny, but I gotta agree with snuffleupagus that Art of Manliness needs to give their collective boner for the '50s a rest.
posted by en forme de poire at 9:39 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


When I commuted by train regularly I kept trying to work up the nerve to go over to the people using speakerphone and join their calls. I'm a team player, I can make a positive impact on this meeting discussing your confidential sales figures or legal strategy!

My ex-brother in law once took notes while commuting on the train and when the rude caller hung up he handed them the piece of paper. His notes included their name, address, phone number, where they worked, the names of their kids, their social security number, medical conditions, etc.

On the other hand, the person I overheard talking loudly about his really bad month I kind of wanted to give a hug.
posted by postel's law at 9:50 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


While a lot of these seem like common sense, I actually don't mind it when strangers include me in their side of a conversation in a public space. I figure it gives me carte blanche to chime in with helpful advice on whatever intensely personal problem they have just shared with everyone within hearing distance. posted by TedW

I do this too. I also do it to roommates who bring their domestic squabbles into my space (If I cannot hide in my own home from your argument, then I'm putting in my two cents.)
posted by _paegan_ at 9:54 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


I don't know why every shithead on the 4 train thinks everyone else wants to hear his particular mix of shitty '00s euro-dance and awful hip-hop

Seriously. I've often tried to justify the trend for blaring music from your phone as if it's 1982 and your phone is some kind of Ghetto Blaster.

Headphones cost like $4.95 at Duane Reade. Nobody wants to hear your shitty music.
posted by Sara C. at 9:55 AM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


As a side note, it is pretty common for medical professionals not to leave actual test results on voicemail.

Also, wait, I can't tell - are people seriously defending the idea of regular people using a cell phone jammer because they are personally inconvenienced by noise? Because if so, wow, really hope nobody nearby has a family emergency or needs to dial 911.
posted by en forme de poire at 9:55 AM on January 29, 2013 [9 favorites]


Also, re the generation gap thing, I know so many older people who blatantly breach cell phone etiquette all the time that I thought the original poster of that comment meant that the gap is such that younger people get it and older people don't.

It's really embarrassing when I have to tell my mother not to text and drive.
posted by Sara C. at 10:00 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


I wonder if any ER's or Urgent Cares have gotten cases where they have had to extract a phone which has been anally inserted.

Because, I have been this close, a few times.


Use more lube and relax your sphincter. You'll get it.
posted by bondcliff at 10:11 AM on January 29, 2013 [7 favorites]


Also, re the generation gap thing, I know so many older people who blatantly breach cell phone etiquette all the time that I thought the original poster of that comment meant that the gap is such that younger people get it and older people don't.

I was just coming back to say that I just realized that the comment could've been meant that way.

Anyway, I think that this is a lot like e-mail formatting. You've got this weird grouping of teenagers and older people of people don't follow the etiquette that's developed, each for very different reasons.
posted by Gygesringtone at 10:14 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm already a known cane-waving, get-off-my-fucking-lawn curmudgeonly asshole, but seriously: People who use their cell phones to inflict their music selections, at top volume, upon every person within hearing distance -- no headphones, no volume control, nothing to mitigate the sound -- will be first against the wall when I am king. They definitely need an etiquette poster plus some quality time in the stocks, being pummeled with rotten fruit (and headphones).

This is a much worse phenomenon than when people would lug around actual full-size boomboxes, because at least boomboxes possess sound systems that are meant to play amplified music. Even if I think the music is terrible, at least it sounds marginally OK in that format.
With cell phones, it's not just obnoxious ringtones, it's entire songs, entire albums, a pox on public spaces. Any type of store, public transit, banks, schools, bars, anywhere -- someone will start playing music on their cell phone, turn the volume all the way up, and then just sit there, perhaps nodding dispassionately on occasion. Is that really considered enjoyable to listen to? Or are they just waiting for someone to ask them to turn it down or use headphones? (I have done this and it has not gone well.) Music that comes out of a cell phone speaker is tinny, shrill, and distorted no matter how sweet the jam is or how bitchin' your mini-jambox specs have been advertised to be.

I understand that everyone in the world loves them some tunes, but, like, could you put headphones on? No? How about when you're at the grocery store and it's real crowded and there's no way for me to get the hell away from you so I can please stop listening to Lady Gaga or whatever? Still no? Maybe when there are children around and the music has lots of unambiguously inappropriate lyrics? Still no? Please allow me to silence your shiny, discordant toy under the heel of my boot.
posted by divined by radio at 10:19 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


Does this style of illustration have a name? I see the ink-drawing with subdued colors that do not stay within the lines and feel like it was all over the place in 50s and 60s stuff, but don't know what it is called. It seems like Fairly Oddparents also uses the same look and feel.
posted by cgk at 10:29 AM on January 29, 2013


Space age? But that's not quite right....
posted by snuffleupagus at 10:30 AM on January 29, 2013


It's not like test results require an immediate rapid response. Turn this bus around! I'm positive for the clap and need to get the to doctor's office IMMEDIATELY!

I don't care who gets inconvenienced as long as its not me! Get me my cell phone blocker! Clearly the solution to one person being inconsiderate to me is to buy illegal equipment so I can be inconsiderate to every single person around me!

No seriously, other people are relying on their cell phones for things a lot more important than your right not to hear other people talking in public spaces, no matter how annoying that is. Some things can't wait, or the cost of waiting on them is very high.
posted by tylerkaraszewski at 10:33 AM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


I think that this is a lot like e-mail formatting. You've got this weird grouping of teenagers and older people of people don't follow the etiquette that's developed, each for very different reasons.

So the assholes with the 32kbps MP3s over the speakers of their phones on the subway are V1@GR@ spammers?

You know, actually, that's not a bad analogy...
posted by Inspector.Gadget at 10:38 AM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


other people are relying on their cell phones for things a lot more important than your right not to hear other people talking in public spaces

While I agree that cell-phone jammers aren't something that should be used by the average train passenger, I would like to remind people that there was a time, not too long ago, when nobody had cell phones and the trains weren't filled with corpses because people couldn't get their test results in time.

Nobody is as important as they think they are. Nothing is as important as they think it is. If something is going to blow up or someone is going to die if your cell phone doesn't work then you should be sitting in a command center instead of on the train.

Things only seem urgent because we have decided they are urgent. Most things really aren't.
posted by bondcliff at 10:46 AM on January 29, 2013 [20 favorites]


Tell me more about these corpse-trains, bondcliff.
posted by Mister_A at 11:12 AM on January 29, 2013 [4 favorites]


That would be the D branch of the Green Line.
posted by bondcliff at 11:14 AM on January 29, 2013 [8 favorites]


Nobody is as important as they think they are. Nothing is as important as they think it is.

Sure, and that's true 99.5% of the time. But that 0.5% can make one hell of a difference. During major accidents, natural disasters, or terrorist attacks having access to accurate and timely information can and does save lives.
posted by leotrotsky at 11:24 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


But that 0.5% can make one hell of a difference. During major accidents, natural disasters, or terrorist attacks having access to accurate and timely information can and does save lives.

I'm certainly not talking about that .5%. Also, if you're waiting for a lung or other organ, you get a pass. As long as you're waiting for it to be transplanted into your body and it's not just your lunch order.

I'm not anti-cell phone. I carry one and use it. I try to be considerate with it and only use it for quick, factual information. Never for casual conversation if I'm somewhere public. Then again, I work in healthcare IT and they make us carry pagers as if it's 1993. I'm one cool cat when I'm rockin' the Motorola. "Big ol' six-inch garage door open-a."
posted by bondcliff at 11:34 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


I do believe there's some room for compromise between "Cell-Phone users can be rude, and cell jammers should be used sometimes in public places" and "...but not by a random citizen"
posted by Uther Bentrazor at 11:47 AM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


TedW: "I actually don't mind it when strangers include me in their side of a conversation in a public space. I figure it gives me carte blanche to chime in with helpful advice on whatever intensely personal problem they have just shared with everyone within hearing distance."
Let's see if you still think that when you're standing in a jam-packed subway train and the tall muscular guy next to you starts to loudly threaten his ex-girlfriend on the phone with physical violence.
posted by brokkr at 11:49 AM on January 29, 2013


I mean, once upon a time people used to get along perfectly fine without cars, and even today many people survive without one, but I doubt anyone in the thread would say they were entitled to go around emptying people's gas tanks just because the owner almost certainly wasn't going to literally die as a result. I also think -- and I realize that you're not arguing this, bondcliff -- that it would be kind of self-absorbed to set the bar for being able to receive (let alone take) a cell phone call at "mortal danger or death," but to set the bar for it being okay to use a cell phone jammer at "in danger of being annoyed."

Don't get me wrong, I say this as someone who hates loud cell phone talkers and shushes people in the quiet car on the regular. I just think that using a jammer, esp. by some rando without warning, rates much more highly on my "f'ed-up" scale than having an obnoxious ringtone or even having a loud cell phone conversation.
posted by en forme de poire at 11:53 AM on January 29, 2013 [7 favorites]


From what I can see it's exactly in line with that aesthetic (faux Brit 'gentleman' + faux 50s kitch + tiki lounge + hunting lodge + garage workshop) just without all the sexual objectification.

I was focusing more on the "BROSEPH! BOOBS ARE GREAT!" thing, which isn't really the aesthetics, I guess.
posted by asnider at 11:53 AM on January 29, 2013


I would like to remind people that there was a time, not too long ago, when nobody had cell phones and the trains weren't filled with corpses.

That time only worked because people structured their lives around the lack of cellphones. No-one got on a train without knowing which stop was their stop, for example, but now people can (and constantly do) rely on being able to learn their route while already en-route.

Because people have now structured their lives around an access to information, taking that access away without warning has consequences that Just Don't Happen when the same "loss" is applied to people who don't actually have it and so are already set up to operate without it. Apples and Oranges.
posted by anonymisc at 11:53 AM on January 29, 2013 [8 favorites]


But that 0.5% can make one hell of a difference.

That's 1 in 200 conversations; something to think about.

How about if the jammer was only operated when one encountered "inappropriate cell-phone use", and the result was just that everybody in a 20-foot radius had their calls dropped. Still leaves the jammer operator as the arbiter of proper behavior, but focuses the results a little. Like one of those little TV remotes that people carry to mess with sports bars and the like. (not suggesting a directional cell phone jammer)
posted by achrise at 11:55 AM on January 29, 2013


Or what about instead of using a jammer, the person who was annoyed said "hey, can you lower your voice?"
posted by en forme de poire at 12:01 PM on January 29, 2013 [5 favorites]


Isn't the trend that people talk less on their phones and use them more for texting, emailing, surfing the web and so on? From what I have seen, rude cell phone use has steadily declined over the last decade.
posted by Triplanetary at 12:03 PM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


I just think that using a jammer, esp. by some rando without warning, rates much more highly on my "f'ed-up" scale than having an obnoxious ringtone or even having a loud cell phone conversation.

I completely agree with you. I think the whole point is that people everywhere need to be more aware of how they're affecting those around them. As elizardbits point out in the second comment of the thread, for some of us this is just common sense but there are a whole bunch of people out there who just aren't aware of others, or don't care. It has nothing to do with cell phones, really. There are tons of AskMe threads about loud neighbors or people who litter or smoke in no-smoking areas who just don't give a shit.

I can't imagine anyone would argue that cell phones should not be used during an emergency.

That time only worked because people structured their lives around the lack of cellphones.

This is true. If we went back to that time we'd probably have to give up stuff like The Internet. I have no desire to go back. Doesn't mean people should be rude though.

And once again on Metafilter I find myself passionately defending something I'm not even all that passionate about. Bondcliff: Defender of carbonation appliances, common courtesy, and other mundane stuff.
posted by bondcliff at 12:10 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's 1 in 200 conversations; something to think about.

You would probably interfere with that many conversations in a matter of hours if you were operating one of these things in a crowded city.

My wife is on hospice care. I literally can't leave my house unless I have someone else here to care for her first, and bring my phone with me in case someone, a hospice worker or a family member, needs to reach me. Interfering with my phone calls could cause my wife to sit at home in pain for longer because it delays a nurse in scheduling a visit, or worse, it could cause me to not be there when she dies. Do you really think I should never leave my house until she dies? That might be tomorrow, or it might be six weeks from now. Do you really think a person caring for a dying spouse doesn't deserve to go out for fresh air once in a while? Do you really think your right to quiet trumps *every other concern of those around you*?

The only way you can think this is because you haven't considered anyone else but yourself. It is an immensely selfish and inconsiderate thing to consider.

(I don't mean to address this specifically to the person I quoted).
posted by tylerkaraszewski at 12:12 PM on January 29, 2013 [9 favorites]


From what I can see it's exactly in line with that aesthetic (faux Brit 'gentleman' + faux 50s kitch + tiki lounge + hunting lodge + garage workshop) just without all the sexual objectification.

If you add the sexual objectification back in and add animal metaphors, you get Bears™.

Also, I have to strongly endorse the "Keep It Classy" one, because whenever a nearby cellphone "rings" by playing some screechingly loud, tinny, and distorted clip of a song that the phone's owner thinks is ever so cute and funny, I am compelled to turn to them and either say (if I know the person) or telepathically project (if I don't know the person) "I fucking hate you," which, of course, is not classy at all, making me a bit of a hypocrite.

I do think the jammer's not a very good idea. That said, I have no qualms whatsoever about the occasional use of a TV-B-Gone, because EVERY PLACE IN THE WORLD DOES NOT NEED A GODDAMN TV BLASTING STUPID AT ME.
posted by sonascope at 1:32 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


My pet peeve is people who walk into my office while loudly having a conversation on their cell. Yes, my office is in a corner of our showroom. No, that doesn't mean you should pull up a chair and carry on as if it's your office. Lately, I just turn up my music until they get fed up and leave.

Also, fuck Nextel. There are volume settings besides 11 on those things, people. No one wants to listen to your shouty conversation with the Peanuts teacher all day.
posted by xedrik at 2:13 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


My latest pet peeve is people who text while walking in bottleneck areas, such as stairs, escalators, or the doors of subways. HELLO THERE ARE PEOPLE BEHIND YOU!

I'm not texting. I'm posting on Metafilter.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 2:18 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's not a joke, BTW. I've just posted during my commute, so I've been typing on my phone at the train station, several escalator rides, and while crossing the street.

And who cares if people have cell phone conversations in public? They're not talking to you! Sometimes I have a long train ride and I need to chat with someone. It's the same as talking to someone in person.

If you don't like noise, stay home or get your own pair of decent, over the ear headphones.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 2:29 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


Does this style of illustration have a name? I see the ink-drawing with subdued colors that do not stay within the lines and feel like it was all over the place in 50s and 60s stuff, but don't know what it is called.

I could be wrong, but I don't think it has a name. The limited colors/not staying in the lines is derived from cheap printing methods, though.

The aesthetic that's associated with 50's/60's illustration could be based off of the work of one Jim Flora.
posted by girih knot at 3:07 PM on January 29, 2013


Does this style of illustration have a name? I see the ink-drawing with subdued colors that do not stay within the lines and feel like it was all over the place in 50s and 60s stuff, but don't know what it is called.

I could be wrong, but I don't think it has a name. The limited colors/not staying in the lines is derived from cheap printing methods, though.


Some of it... but some of it appears to be a deliberate stylistic choice... I recall a few examples from the Gallery of Regrettable Food, like this and this.
posted by xedrik at 3:32 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


Thanks girth knot and xedrik. The examples in the Gallery of Regrettable Food are exactly what I was thinking about. At least I am not just imagining that it is a thing.
posted by cgk at 4:50 PM on January 29, 2013


TedW: "While a lot of these seem like common sense, I actually don't mind it when strangers include me in their side of a conversation in a public space. I figure it gives me carte blanche to chime in with helpful advice on whatever intensely personal problem they have just shared with everyone within hearing distance."

Yeah, well, one of my favorite things to do when someone nearby loudly sounds off with a "Love you!" at the end of a call is say "Well, I love you too, but I didn't want to rush our relationship."
posted by Samizdata at 5:26 PM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


mean cheez: "I know people with impeccable etiquette in every other way who, for whatever reason, will pull out their phone and start texting mid conversation. It's super off-putting."

What the blistering green fuck is that about? I mean, for such a dedicated geek as I seem to be, I HATE texting, and primarily only use it for things like contacting a best bud with a pay as you go phone so we can skate the daily fee and for two factor authentication with a couple of places.
posted by Samizdata at 5:29 PM on January 29, 2013


zombieflanders: "Actual yelling into one's phone in a public area, especially an enclosed space, is quite teeth-gnashing. It doesn't matter if it's designated as a quiet space or not. Speakerphone is made for discussions in private locations where more than one person on the call is located. It is not meant for Starbucks or McDonalds or the bus."

I DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT! THE DOCTOR SAID I AM NEGATIVE!

Could you PLEASE keep it down? Some of us are trying to have a discussion here.

NO. NEGATIVE. SO THAT MEANS THE NIGHT WITH THE DONKEYS WAS OKAY, EVEN IF THAT ONE BIG ONE, KNOW WHAT I MEAN?, HAD A COLD SORE...
posted by Samizdata at 5:30 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


elizardbits: "Speakerphone is made for discussions in private locations where more than one person on the call is located. It is not meant for Starbucks or McDonalds or the bus.

It is also not meant for business calls in the middle of a quiet office wherein there is only one party on either end of the phone. Get a goddamn headset if you don't want to hold the receiver, jerkbag.
"

Yeah. I had an ex-girlfriend who would speakerphone everything no matter who was around. I got to know SOOOOO much about the people in her life that I never wanted to know...
posted by Samizdata at 5:32 PM on January 29, 2013


tylerkaraszewski: "I know they are illegal and all (*gasp*) but I am seriously considering the purchase of a cell phone jammer.

It's cool, I don't really need reception, I'm not expecting the doctor's office to call with test results or anything.
"

NO, I AM NEGATIVE!
posted by Samizdata at 5:32 PM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh, and as someone who's worked as a cashier, please don't talk on the phone while paying for stuff. Trust me, it makes things easier for you, me, and the guy behind you who doesn't want to have to wait for me to be able to get your attention so I can give you your change.

"Oh, EXCUSE ME, I can see that you have some more important business to deal with right now, so might I presume that you don't mind if I JUST GO AHEAD OF YOU in the queue?" (Now that might make the cashier hate ME even more...)

Yeah, it can be annoying sometimes, but really, if the person in line in front of me can multi-task without too much fuss or delay (which they usually can), then I don't mind too much.

Recently some Cab Companies have started clamping down on drivers chatting on those Blueteeths. Personally, I don't care. If a cabbie can get me from Point A to Point B with a minimum of fuss, they'll get a decent tip from me. I myself don't mind if you chat with your buddies along the way. Let's all get along for ride. It's cool.

What I don't like is cashiers taking cash from me, and then picking up a call on the desk phone before they've handed over my change. This happens quite a bit. I find it infuriating.

What? I ACTUALLY pay for small purchases with paper monies in this day and age? I feel like a Neanderthal, the last of a dying breed...

I can recall a moment about two decades ago, when a tired and distressed person in the queue in front of me at a variety store was vaguely attempting to pay for a candy bar with a credit card! It seemed rather ridiculous at that time. Perhaps this incident in my past has biased me against using electronic transactions for trivial sums. But don't mind me, I'm just... getting old.
posted by ovvl at 5:45 PM on January 29, 2013


Does this style of illustration have a name?

I propose calling it "Googie Art", based on the style of architecture of the same name, which was also prevalent around the same era.

Mid-Century Modern is probably more correct, though.
posted by ShutterBun at 6:14 PM on January 29, 2013 [2 favorites]


What I don't like is cashiers pausing while taking cash from me, and then picking up a call on the desk phone their cell phone to answer a personal text before they've handed over my change. This happens quite a bit. I find it infuriating.
posted by snuffleupagus at 7:15 PM on January 29, 2013


I propose calling it "Googie Art", based on the style of architecture of the same name, which was also prevalent around the same era.

Good suggestion ShutterBun, the signage in the Googie photographs resonated with the use of type I associate with the style. Great pointer.
posted by cgk at 8:44 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


The best thing about the wide acceptance of texting is that people assume I'm doing it when I'm really surfing the web or posting here.

As to why? Woody Allen's 'I need to do 5 things at once to distract me from death', maybe. Or simply distraction.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 8:47 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


But that 0.5% can make one hell of a difference. During major accidents, natural disasters, or terrorist attacks having access to accurate and timely information can and does save lives.

I suspect that in these situations people probably don't object to cellphone use.
posted by sevenyearlurk at 9:04 PM on January 29, 2013


I doubt that .5% is an accurate number that describes *truly important* cell calls.

Also, during natural disasters, terrorist attacks (and possibly 'major accidents', although i'm not sure exactly what is meant by this) cell phone's won't work. 9-11 and Katrina are good examples of this; cell traffic didn't work as the network was fully congested... (send text messages in case of these sorts of emergencies - they use 'spare' bandwidth and can be more reliable).

The use cases of cell-phone jammers to momentarily disconnect the rude folks around you in public places seem quite reasonable to me (although I'll personally use headphones to prevent being annoyed, or take them off to be amused by peoples personal lives). It's hard to imagine anyone using one of these devices when someone is dealing with an *actual* emergency.

Finally, tyler, sorry to hear about your wife; and I'm glad you brought it up as an example - I was having a hard time envisioning the type of real need folks might have for a cell phone.
posted by el io at 9:18 PM on January 29, 2013


But even if its something as trivial as making plans for tonight - why is my need to make plans less important than somebody's need to go out in public and not deal with other people? Its like people who get venues shut down due to noise restrictions.


The use cases of cell-phone jammers to momentarily disconnect the rude folks around you in public places seem quite reasonable to me (although I'll personally use headphones to prevent being annoyed, or take them off to be amused by peoples personal lives). It's hard to imagine anyone using one of these devices when someone is dealing with an *actual* emergency.

Finally, tyler, sorry to hear about your wife; and I'm glad you brought it up as an example - I was having a hard time envisioning the type of real need folks might have for a cell phone.


It's the year 2013, you're on a website, and you can't imagine why people might need a cell phone? How about you justify why you want to cut people off from the outside world to preserve your little bubble of silence instead of turning into Mr I Don't Own A TV or Use Facebook.

I honestly don't understand this. I don't like going to restaurants and listening to kids yelling and people talk that, but I know that's the price of leaving the house.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 9:24 PM on January 29, 2013 [1 favorite]


Charlemagne: Well, I don't own a TV, or have a facebook account (nor, for that matter, have a cell phone at the moment). I can understand why people might *want* to use a cell phone, but *need* a cell phone is a much rarer use case. Similarly I don't really *need* metafilter, nor most of my web browsing, and I could understand if my web browsing was actively impacting people trying to use public transportation (eg: playing youtube at loud volumes on public transit) why they might actively want to stop me.

Has using cell phones whenever/wherever suddenly become a human rights issue?

Like I said, I'll just use headphone to insulate myself from rude obnoxious people that can't bring themselves to use a bit of reasonableness in their use of technology (loud conversations on public transit, for example), but I certainly understand the impulse to use a technology like a cell phone jammer to give some momentary relief.


(and I generally choose to dine at restaurants that aren't 'family restaurants' and am rarely bothered by children being obnoxious, but at least when children are obnoxious they have the excuse of they are children).
posted by el io at 10:04 PM on January 29, 2013


Has using cell phones whenever/wherever suddenly become a human rights issue?

It's an issue of you imposing your preferences on the rest of the world. The rest of use mobile phones as part of our daily lives (I admit I use mine too much). Its okay to outlaw them when driving (as my state does) but what possible use or benefit is there to making people walk around silently in public?
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 10:21 PM on January 29, 2013


"... but what possible use or benefit is there to making people walk around silently in public?"

I don't have any issue with people walking the streets talking on their phones (even relatively loudly). In places like public transit, or even in line at the grocery store, where essentially everyone is stuck in one place I think some basic courtesy about your audio output is reasonable. And yes, it is about imposing your preference on the rest of the world, and the balance we want to strike as a society. But I would argue that the person who is operating a loud volume (with their phone, loud ringer, conversation, boom box, screaming child, barking dog, what have you) is the person imposing their preference (of being loud) onto the world.

I think the answer to these annoyances and essentially bad manners is to try to socialize good behaviour. So yeah, raise your children well (teach them some manners), and silly campaigns like this one are pretty cool, imho... We need to raise awareness about public courtesies and manners.

(oh yeah, I do try to ensure my headphones aren't bleeding out for everyone to hear).
posted by el io at 11:02 PM on January 29, 2013


On public transport and supermarkets people are talking to each other anyway. Why does it make a difference if they're physically present or not?

Hell that's when you need to talk - to check what groceries to buy or figure out what stop to get off at or something (though texting works better).

Do those jammers block data? Because mobile phones are also maps and without them I'd get lost.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 11:26 PM on January 29, 2013


Or what about instead of using a jammer, the person who was annoyed said "hey, can you lower your voice?"

You either haven't tried this very much or you don't ride the subway in Philadelphia.
posted by snottydick at 6:47 AM on January 30, 2013 [2 favorites]


WTF, Charlemagne In Sweatpants? Seriously, all people are asking for is a toning down of what is fairly unacceptable behavior like yelling, blasting your music at unacceptable levels (which can often be heard over one's headphones unless they're turned to an ear-damaging volume), and general bad manners. Nobody's asking for mandatory silence in all public spaces like you claim.

Just because people are being obnoxious doesn't mean we need to just accept that as the new normal.
posted by zombieflanders at 7:35 AM on January 30, 2013 [2 favorites]


Snottydick, you're right, I don't live in Philly, but I also have a hard time believing that the only people who are too loud on their cell phones are like, 500-lb murderers. I am not super intimidating and have politely shushed cell-using businessmen and teenagers alike on the train, and the worst that's happened is that someone got a little stroppy at me about it (this was a guy in a suit... go figure). It has yet to come to fisticuffs.
posted by en forme de poire at 9:07 AM on January 30, 2013


IDK, I've noticed that many of the worst phone bellowers are about as reasonable as Two Gun Tommy when it comes to being told what to do, regardless of age or gender.
posted by elizardbits at 10:41 AM on January 30, 2013


And who cares if people have cell phone conversations in public? They're not talking to you! Sometimes I have a long train ride and I need to chat with someone. It's the same as talking to someone in person.

Actually, it isn't. It's a lot more distracting when we're only hearing one half of the conversation, largely because we try to mentally fill in the gaps and figure out what the person on the other end might be saying:
The researchers suggest that the reason that half a conversation is so distracting — and therefore, most cell phone conversations we overhear — is because the speech processing part of our brains is drawn to make sense of the pattern we’re hearing. Since it generally can’t do this with only half the data, our brains are straining under the load of this processing task. In a normal conversation, speech is predictable — Person A talks, then Person B responds, and so on.
posted by asnider at 10:55 AM on January 30, 2013 [1 favorite]


Seriously, all people are asking for is a toning down of what is fairly unacceptable behavior like yelling, blasting your music at unacceptable levels (which can often be heard over one's headphones unless they're turned to an ear-damaging volume), and general bad manners.

Actually, what started the conversation was somebody threatening to use something to block people from making calls. So, no, people aren't asking others to be polite and not talk, they're threatening others with consequences if they don't.

I think we all agree, people should be polite.

The question is if blocking jerky guy's, oh yeah and everyone else who isn't jerk guy but happens to be on a cell phone's call is a good idea. It seems to me that doing that is just as disruptive as someone talking loudly, or blasting their music, and quite frankly it doesn't matter how much or how little hangs in the balance of the other people's conversations, because nobody will die from having to listen to loud jerky guy talking either.
posted by Gygesringtone at 12:42 PM on January 30, 2013 [1 favorite]


Actually, what started the conversation was somebody threatening to use something to block people from making calls. So, no, people aren't asking others to be polite and not talk, they're threatening others with consequences if they don't.

If by "started" you mean after 25 comments discussing manners, and "people" you mean a distinct minority of the commentors, then sure.

I think we all agree, people should be polite.

Well, OK. My response was to someone saying we should just accept people not being polite.
posted by zombieflanders at 12:50 PM on January 30, 2013


If by "started" you mean after 25 comments discussing manners, and "people" you mean a distinct minority of the commentors, then sure.

Yeah, and one of those minority of commentors is the person you were addressing. Jammers were mentioned two comments up from yours. In fact, of his six comments the last three either mention Jammers or are in response to comments that do. I think it's safe to say that when you responded to him, he was talking about people blocking cell phones, TO people talking about blocking cell phones.
posted by Gygesringtone at 1:05 PM on January 30, 2013 [1 favorite]


Are we reading the same thread? Because I only saw one comment that advocated the use of jammers and one comment that may or may not have been coming to his defense, but I read as more of a "Actually, maybe jammers could be less destructive if used this way..." sort of comment.

I didn't see anyone else defending the use of jammers.
posted by bondcliff at 1:21 PM on January 30, 2013 [1 favorite]


Are we reading the same thread?

Yup.

I didn't see anyone else defending the use of jammers.


Me either.

My last couple of comments read a little more aggressively then I intended. I was just trying to explain that Zombieflanders was misreading what Charlemagne In Sweatpants was objecting to.

I'm going to bow out now, because this isn't really all that important, something I should've probably phrased differently, and a bit of a derail.

Sorry.
posted by Gygesringtone at 1:28 PM on January 30, 2013


Snottydick, you're right, I don't live in Philly, but I also have a hard time believing that the only people who are too loud on their cell phones are like, 500-lb murderers. I am not super intimidating and have politely shushed cell-using businessmen and teenagers alike on the train, and the worst that's happened is that someone got a little stroppy at me about it (this was a guy in a suit... go figure). It has yet to come to fisticuffs.

Nobody said anything about murder or morbid obesity, but a lot of people have tried asking people in a friendly manner, and yet the problem is persistent. In my experience, the majority of the time you'll just be told to go fuck yourself and will not achieve the desired result.

Being "super-intimidating" is not always a good way to get someone to turn off their music or speak quietly. It can be a great way to escalate the situation. Charm is the only strategy that I've seen be successful, but that's a complicated social dynamic in a public space. For example, if I politely ask a teenage boy who's high on his manhood to turn the volume down, I don't get the same response as when my wife does it.

At worst... Well, you don't need 500 pounds of force to pull a trigger. That sort of outcome is an outlier, but it's a real enough possibility that a lot of people who grow up in the city are conditioned to not to mess around with it too much.
posted by snottydick at 2:36 PM on January 30, 2013


Are we reading the same thread? Because I only saw one comment that advocated the use of jammers and one comment that may or may not have been coming to his defense, but I read as more of a "Actually, maybe jammers could be less destructive if used this way..." sort of comment.

I didn't see anyone else defending the use of jammers.


Except for the several people who did.

And if somebody comes up to me and interrupts a phone call I'm having, I'll probably just stare at them until they go away, or talk louder. The 'etiquette' people are talking about is old fashioned, and doesn't really make sense for the modern world.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 2:39 PM on January 30, 2013


I think it's safe to say that when you responded to him, he was talking about people blocking cell phones, TO people talking about blocking cell phones.

I don't think that's safe to say at all, and if that was the intent, then perhaps he shouldn't have used victim-blaming phrases like "If you don't like noise, stay home or get your own pair of decent, over the ear headphones," where "noise" was somebody yelling into their Nextel or playing their music on speakerphone. Nor should he have claimed that said yeller and/or music-blaster were in effect just being normally conversational while hypocritically telling someone that they were imposing their preferences for a quieter bus/train or supermarket on the rest of the world. Which brings us to:

And if somebody comes up to me and interrupts a phone call I'm having, I'll probably just stare at them until they go away, or talk louder. The 'etiquette' people are talking about is old fashioned, and doesn't really make sense for the modern world.

Hey, look, he perfectly illustrates his real point, which is that it's fine to inflict his conversations and music on us--nay, to deliberately be an asshole in response to a polite request--but heavens forfend that someone suggest that perhaps this is something that could possibly wait or be discussed at a personal volume level with the mic/headphone combos that come standard with every single phone from Apple and most major manufacturers. After all, that's just "old-fashioned" manners. You coming off a 10-hour workday with a pounding headache and don't want to listen to some douche talk about all those chicks he's gonna bang, or some crappy song played at a volume of 11 with horrendously shitty sound quality? Tough luck, and how dare you impose your old-guy morality on me?!
posted by zombieflanders at 2:51 PM on January 30, 2013


Hey, look, he perfectly illustrates his real point, which is that it's fine to inflict his conversations and music on us--nay, to deliberately be an asshole in response to a polite request--but heavens forfend that someone suggest that perhaps this is something that could possibly wait or be discussed at a personal volume level with the mic/headphone combos that come standard with every single phone from Apple and most major manufacturers. After all, that's just "old-fashioned" manners. You coming off a 10-hour workday with a pounding headache and don't want to listen to some douche talk about all those chicks he's gonna bang, or some crappy song played at a volume of 11 with horrendously shitty sound quality? Tough luck, and how dare you impose your old-guy morality on me?!

Now who's projecting? When I listen to music, I wear headphones (unless I'm sharing it with a companion, but I usually wear headphones). But what is imposing about me talking in a normal volume to members of my family or friends to chat, catch up, confirm plans, etc? I'm not 'deliberately being an asshole' any more than somebody talking to another person in public is being an asshole. I just don't make distinctions between IRL and mobile usage.

The only restriction I support is the bans on mobile use while driving.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 2:58 PM on January 30, 2013


So then you believe that, separate from the jammer red herring, people talking in louder-than-normal voices or playing music without headphones are in the wrong and that it's not old-fashioned to believe that doing that is something that should be corrected rather than tolerated?
posted by zombieflanders at 3:07 PM on January 30, 2013


So then you believe that, separate from the jammer red herring, people talking in louder-than-normal voices or playing music without headphones are in the wrong and that it's not old-fashioned to believe that doing that is something that should be corrected rather than tolerated?

I don't believe it should be 'corrected', since the 'correction' is just as rude and adds more tension. Basically, I'm rude, and I expect other people to be rude as well, especially in public places. If they're doing it in a venue or a theatre or at a concert than I will shush them.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 3:22 PM on January 30, 2013


People have different ideas about what's rude. Some people might take issue with you if you shushed them at a concert. They paid their money and they want to sing along so blow it right out your ass buddy. How come your rules are the right rules? Maybe you need to get modern. Here, let me put my hand in your pocket. We do that where I come from.
posted by snuffleupagus at 7:47 PM on January 30, 2013 [1 favorite]


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