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This blessed plot, this earth, this realm
February 6, 2013 12:10 PM   Subscribe

How exactly did England get that name, anyway?
posted by Chrysostom (13 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
Free free Logres!
posted by ocschwar at 12:12 PM on February 6, 2013


Because Saxony and Jutland were already taken.

The more important question: What ever became of King Sigskel?
 
posted by Herodios at 12:25 PM on February 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


The more important question: What ever became of King Sigskel?

He teamed up with King Eibert and they did a show together for many seasons.
posted by briank at 12:32 PM on February 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


I just always assumed New Englanders named it that retroactively.
posted by bondcliff at 12:32 PM on February 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


That was fascinating, thanks for posting it.
posted by LobsterMitten at 12:42 PM on February 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


That was interesting. No way to know if it's accurate, but the story it tells of ideas that come and go, then come again centuries later, and historical records that slowly disappear, before being discovered and championed, then discredited, then reexamined again with modern evidence, is rather haunting. It's like history is a weak signal that wavers in strength from era to era, that we need precise equipment and patience to hear.
posted by Kevin Street at 1:29 PM on February 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


briank, you really need to make that show. Really.
posted by steambadger at 2:12 PM on February 6, 2013


Depressing, isn't it, Herodios?
posted by George_Spiggott at 3:28 PM on February 6, 2013


Depressing, isn't it, Herodios?

Indeed.

However, tho' I don't collect favouites per se, it is nice to have evidence that at least one person both RTFA and GTFJ.

Thanks.
 
posted by Herodios at 8:21 PM on February 6, 2013


Wait, it doesn't have anything to do with Chang and Eng?

Anyhoo -- connect this with the discussion of the manuscripts of Timbuktu, and how prized they are precisely because West Africa lacks so many written records from before the colonial era. In the same way a millennia earlier European peoples lack so much of their own history. I found it fascinating that the Richard III exhumation brought forth a particular history of the loss of one specific fact of history, i.e. the location of this grave. Henry VII placed a marker, to be sure, and its value is known, but no other record of it exists. A mere century later the site was essentially lost to history forever ... but for some plausible assumptions put together by some puzzle-obsessed amateur historians many centuries later.
posted by dhartung at 1:36 AM on February 7, 2013


England was first colonized by ancient Egyptians bearing protractors.

I believe it was the Greek Heterodotus who observed this "magical land of angles", or Angle-Land.

The Vikings later shortened the term to "Angland" and finally the Normans put a French twist on it and dubbed it "England".
posted by Renoroc at 5:12 AM on February 7, 2013


England was first colonized by ancient Egyptians bearing protractors

That must be why it took so long.
 
posted by Herodios at 5:35 AM on February 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


Very interesting; thanks for posting it.
posted by languagehat at 11:13 AM on February 7, 2013


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