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Coming to Canadian military ration packs: poutine in a pouch?
February 21, 2013 7:45 AM   Subscribe

Included in this Canadian government call for alternate bids for "boil in a bag" rations is a request for +60,000 servings of poutine in a pouch - for those who don't know, that's french fries, gravy and cheese curds. Wonder how that'll hold up in a boil-in-a-bag pouch?
posted by MILNEWSca (91 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is clearly a plot to get US troops to defect to Canada. Make no mistake war is upon us.
posted by vorpal bunny at 7:50 AM on February 21, 2013


As a recent immigrant, poutine is my favourite thing about Canada apart from the unrelenting violence of hockey.
posted by Damienmce at 7:51 AM on February 21, 2013 [12 favorites]


Poutine was one of my most favourite discoveries when I moved to Canada. My wife went through the exact same revelation when she moved here. Seriously eye-opening "Why did I not know of this before?" stuff.

Why is Poutine not more widely available? It's one of the top comfort foods you can possibly get. Someone should market it in the UK as it'd go down a storm over there.
posted by Brockles at 7:52 AM on February 21, 2013 [5 favorites]


If I recall the Good Book correctly, this is a Biblical sign of the Apocalypse.
posted by XMLicious at 7:53 AM on February 21, 2013


Wouldn't boiled poutine just degenerate into mashed potatoes and gravy with blobs of cheese?
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 8:02 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Why is Poutine not more widely available?

You should start something yourself, Brockles. As they probably don't say in Quebec, you only get out what you poutine.
posted by MuffinMan at 8:03 AM on February 21, 2013 [57 favorites]


MuffinMan: " As they probably don't say in Quebec, you only get out what you poutine."

Holy shit.
posted by boo_radley at 8:05 AM on February 21, 2013 [7 favorites]


I'm surprised there isn't a Poutine truck in San Francisco. (Also Cornish Pasty truck)
posted by schwa at 8:05 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


qu'est ce que fuck?
posted by Strass at 8:06 AM on February 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


How easy is it to get curds down in somewhere like SF? I've lived in 4 provinces; half of them it was rare to find them, the other two were in reasonably french-speaking areas and near the Quebec border.
posted by Lemurrhea at 8:07 AM on February 21, 2013


I drove from Halifax to Vancouver once with two other guys: one a French-Canadian and one a Brit (I am English-Canadian). The francophone and I were telling the Brit about poutine, and he was totally floored by the idea. The only problem was we told him too early in the trip (on the first day), before we were nearing the Quebec border. When we were still somewhere round Moncton, New Brunswick, he declared he had to try this stuff so he ordered it at the next meal stop. Big mistake.

I am sure you can get good poutine in New Brunswick, but this diner brought him what appeared to be some McCain's frozen fries with Cheez Whiz smeared on top of them, a sprinkling of gravy, and the whole assemblage apparently stuck in the microwave for 45 seconds. His disappointment was palpable.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 8:08 AM on February 21, 2013


Hunh... when I was in, they just bought Freddie Chef camp meal packs, which were... decent, depending on what you got. The ham omelette was called "lung in a bag", and to be avoided, but others were fine.

I'm all for this, btw. Poutine is so good that my wife and I now have "Poutine Christmas", which is a couple days before Christmas, when we go out, get poutine as take out, come back and eat it while watching Die Hard and Love, Actually.
posted by fatbird at 8:08 AM on February 21, 2013 [8 favorites]


I am so relieved that this has nothing to do with the President of Russia and kangaroos.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 8:09 AM on February 21, 2013


Why is it always prison loaf and not MREs that are offered to those "I only eat food because my body makes me" people? Hell, the MRE even comes with a heating unit so you don't even need to turn on the microwave.

Plus, now you can get poutine in it, so there's that.
posted by backseatpilot at 8:10 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've had actual poutine in New York. It was tasty, but since I never had it in Canada, I can't vouch for it's authenticity. I have had Disco Fries many a time, however.
posted by jonmc at 8:11 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


FYI, for all you foreign poutine lovers: authentic is french fries, gravy, and cheese curds. Really authentic is the preceding, with un steamie (a steamed wiener) sliced on top.
posted by fatbird at 8:13 AM on February 21, 2013


Canada has a military? Huh.
posted by JibberJabber at 8:13 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Poutine in a bag? What's next, milk?
posted by Kabanos at 8:14 AM on February 21, 2013 [14 favorites]


Jeez I never had anything this tasty when I was eating IMPs! I had to deal with crappy Mac&Cheese for breakfast, or the dreaded cherry cake for dessert.
posted by smcniven at 8:16 AM on February 21, 2013


I've only had poutine a couple of times, at roadside casse-croûtes in rural Quebec towns*, and what I've found is that the first 1/5 of it is kind of yummy, the next 2/5s are a soggy mess, and the last 2/5s is an inedible dark brown lump of paste. Is that normal?

I would imagine poutine in a pouch would skip the kind-of-yummy part and start right in with the soggy mess part.

*Most of these places are along Rt. 105/5 heading North from Ottawa to Maniwaki, and none of them are known for the quality of their food. Near as I can tell the primary ingredient for most of their products is cigarette ash.
posted by bondcliff at 8:17 AM on February 21, 2013


If anyone wants great poutine, La Banquiste in Montreal has my favorite.
posted by Strass at 8:18 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Poutine is one of those dishes we always make friends visiting from the US try. Some cotton to it, others....really don't.
posted by Kitteh at 8:21 AM on February 21, 2013


Canada has a military? Huh.

Can we please stop doing this?
posted by leotrotsky at 8:22 AM on February 21, 2013 [23 favorites]


Meh. Call me when they start including Rappie pie.
posted by Gungho at 8:27 AM on February 21, 2013


It's true that french fries---hand cut, not too small, double fried---and cheese curds---fresh & squeaky---are essential to the poutine experience, but for my money the most overlooked ingredient is the sauce.

Too many commercial or foreign interpretations get the sauce wrong. It's not a traditional sauce brune gravy, nor is it a watery jus. It has to be thin enough to penetrate to the bottom of the fries, but viscous enough to hang onto the fry when picked up. The best ones are neither beef nor chicken stock-based, but a combination. Beef stock is too beefy, chicken alone doesn't have the body. It should be peppery, to highlight the cheese. Finally, and possibly most importantly, it needs to have an acid, vinegary character to set off the fries.

Fries, and cheese curds are the foundation of the dish, but the sauce is what makes it poutine, and not other (but still delicious) dishes like disco fries or curry fries.
posted by bonehead at 8:27 AM on February 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


Wouldn't boiled poutine just degenerate into mashed potatoes and gravy with blobs of cheese? posted by ROU_Xenophobe

You make it sound like a bad thing
posted by ShawnString at 8:27 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


How easy is it to get curds down in somewhere like SF?

I'm very surprised they haven't caught on more in the states. We can get it at a few places in Vermont, mostly truck stops that are on highways going up to Canada and while what we get here is really nothing like what you'd get in Canada, it was decently okay. I went to Smoke's Poutinerie when I was in Toronto and while I am sure some people would find what they serve to be an abomination I enjoyed my nachos grande poutine.
posted by jessamyn at 8:27 AM on February 21, 2013


Oh, man, what I wouldn't do for a way to get poutine regularly down here in Podunk, Maryland. Only place nearby that does anything resembling poutine is a damn gastro pub that makes theirs with duck fat fries, duck confit, gruyere, and duck gravy, which is TOO MUCH FUCKING DUCK when all you want is proper trashy greasy delicious artificial spooky wonderful poutine and not some snide little emblem of Nathan-Myrvhold-assinine fin de civilisation hero cooking. Just fries and brown gravy and cheese curds, for pete's sake.

Maybe I just need to visit Canada more frequently.
posted by sonascope at 8:30 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


As a second generation Canadian-American I've tried really hard to distance myself from my roots. I rolled my eyes at my grandparents with their quaint electric kettles and saying zed and their stories of the old country. Ask I kid I yearned to fit in with my more American classmates. The times I've been to our ancestral birthplace, the little hamlet of St. Catharines, I've been struck by how different yet how similar the people were. Didn't they know that there was a life of freedom and opportunity just miles south? Were they so stuck in the old ways they couldn't slip over the border and disappear into the teeming masses of America? I guess something kept them there. That something must have been poutine.
posted by Ad hominem at 8:30 AM on February 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


There's a food truck in Portland (actually they have two locations now) that serves not-quite-authentic but still delicious poutine named Potato Champion. My fiance and I go there quite often since it's just a few minutes away.
posted by zrail at 8:30 AM on February 21, 2013


My husband has had this idle dream of bringing poutine to my part of the US because it's a perfect drunk food, but he was always stopped at where he would have gotten proper cheese curds.

I guess he'll just have to comfort himself with the bevy of proper poutines here in Quebec.
posted by Kitteh at 8:31 AM on February 21, 2013


| How easy is it to get curds down in somewhere like SF?

I'm in Portland Oregon, and I have access to curds at the local market.

I'm thinking that the Poutine in a Bag would have to be three bags: sauce, fries and curds; combine after heating.
posted by spacely_sprocket at 8:35 AM on February 21, 2013


TOO MUCH FUCKING DUCK

I am unable to parse this.
posted by bondcliff at 8:40 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Canada has a military? Huh.

leotrotsky: Can we please stop doing this?

Canada is the only American neighbor that its cool to ironically hate on. Making fun of Mexico is like kicking somebody while they're down, Cuba is usually overlooked, Bermuda is too small. Who's left?

The land of milk in a bag, healthcare that works, and the Royal Canadian Air Farce, that's who.
posted by dr_dank at 8:44 AM on February 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh Canablah!
posted by Fizz at 8:44 AM on February 21, 2013


I am sure you can get good poutine in New Brunswick, but this diner brought him what appeared to be some McCain's frozen fries with Cheez Whiz smeared on top of them, a sprinkling of gravy, and the whole assemblage apparently stuck in the microwave for 45 seconds. His disappointment was palpable.

Consider yourself lucky you stopped in the half of New Brunswick owned by the McCains. If you'd stopped in the Irving-owned half, you'd get wood chips in crude oil.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:45 AM on February 21, 2013 [5 favorites]


I just searched Yelp for poutine in my city and got 30 hits. I suggest you all do likewise.
posted by orme at 8:45 AM on February 21, 2013


Poutine is one of those dishes we always make friends visiting from the US try. Some cotton to it, others....really don't.

Try adding some vegemite.
posted by yoink at 8:51 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


How easy is it to get curds down in somewhere like SF?
Reasonably easy, if this is still up to date - good hunting!
posted by MILNEWSca at 8:52 AM on February 21, 2013


Poutine came to me first in Kingston, with the late-night drunken Bubba's. Always a good time. It was decently available in Fredericton, although not fantastic. I recently had Smoke's on the walk back to a friend's house after seeing the Dead Kennedys, got the pulled pork. It was amazing.
posted by Lemurrhea at 8:53 AM on February 21, 2013


Park Bruges Cafe in Pittsburgh serves poutine, and despite having half a greasy, cheesy wad of Vinny's Pizza in my fridge, I'm tempted. (I can't vouch for the poutine; I'd say it's authentic, but I had chorizo pizza on my lone trip, which I'm pretty sure is indigenous to neither in Belgium nor Quebec.)
posted by Turkey Glue at 8:58 AM on February 21, 2013


Of all the non-living things to which Metafilter has introduced me, poutine would be in the top ten... maybe five.

Then again, my response to:

Wouldn't boiled poutine just degenerate into mashed potatoes and gravy with blobs of cheese?

Was 'Well, that doesn't sound that bad,' so my opinions on food matters might be a bit suspect for some.
posted by MCMikeNamara at 9:00 AM on February 21, 2013


Canada has a military? Huh

They liberated Amsterdam!
posted by The Whelk at 9:03 AM on February 21, 2013 [5 favorites]


Maybe I just need to visit Canada more frequently.

Sonascope - you visit and the poutine/beer is on me.
posted by arcticseal at 9:22 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Canada has a military that, in various incarnations, fought the U.S. to a standstill on several occasions.

Oh, but do continue.
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 9:23 AM on February 21, 2013


BE WARNED: Poutine added 40lbs to my waistline in college. Look upon my folly and DESPAIR!
posted by blue_beetle at 9:29 AM on February 21, 2013


Apparently poutine used to be available in Philly. Alas.
posted by DoubleLune at 9:29 AM on February 21, 2013


Maybe they can ship out some of the bag poutine to the states.
posted by DoubleLune at 9:30 AM on February 21, 2013


I am not a fan of poutine (thankfully, I am a fan of more than enough seriously unhealthy foods). If you want to try a traditional Quebec dessert, though, you can try the (rich man's) pouding chomeur, which is a cake covered in a maple syrup/cream/butter/sugar sauce. It's hugely delicious and exactly as sweet as you think it's going to be. (I have an excellent recipe for it.)
posted by jeather at 9:40 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Poutine is still available in Philly. Franklin's Pub in East Falls does a passable version, although their curds don't have any squeek. There's a place in Conshohocken off Fayette St that I haven't had a chance to try yet.
What has me excited is that the new dairy that opened up in Reading Terminal are going to start selling curds as soon as their equipment is up and running. I can make poutine at home, but finding fresh curds is impossible.
posted by Eddie Mars at 9:42 AM on February 21, 2013 [3 favorites]


Metafilter: their curds don't have any squeek
posted by bondcliff at 10:14 AM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Good news for poutine lovers! Even after a devestating fire, The St. Albert Cheese factory, home of the world's finest curds, will continue to churn out curds, and the Curd Festival will not be cancelled.
posted by BozoBurgerBonanza at 10:27 AM on February 21, 2013 [4 favorites]


Next up: Flipper pie-in-a-bag.
posted by Lemurrhea at 10:30 AM on February 21, 2013


As I read this I am preparing a very Canadian lazy version of poutine here in Chicago. Oven baked fries, cheese curds and Swiss Chalet Dipping Sauce from the packet. It will not be true poutine at all but it will be quick, easy and taste like home.
posted by srboisvert at 10:38 AM on February 21, 2013


I never had it in Canada, I can't vouch for it's authenticity.

If by authentic poutine you mean the kind of poutine you would get if you randomly went to some place in Canada that sells something they call poutine, authentic poutine is terrible. Montreal-style poutine with smoked meat is fantastic. If in downtown Vancouver, go to La Belle Patate.

Canada has a military? Huh.

158 Canadian soldiers were killed in Afghanistan. Our troops held down Kandahar for years. Either stop disrespecting the dead or stop asking us to fight in your wars.
posted by justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow at 10:42 AM on February 21, 2013 [12 favorites]


Yeah, Canada has a military - one where we let women fight in active combat roles. Unlike the American military with 21st century weapons and 19th century social mores.

Also, once a supplies gets these right I'll be ordering a few hundred as the only Canadian prepper, ever.
posted by GuyZero at 10:49 AM on February 21, 2013 [4 favorites]


Also, I suspect the difficulty in getting poutine more commonly is that curds don't keep well and they're surprisingly hard to get. growing up with tiny dairies in eastern Ontario where you could waltz in and fresh curds all the time I never realized what a regional thing they are.
posted by GuyZero at 10:50 AM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Canada has a military? Huh.

They stormed the beaches of Normandy with bicycles. They are hardcore. Respect our neighbors to the north.
posted by bondcliff at 10:52 AM on February 21, 2013 [9 favorites]


Either stop disrespecting the dead or stop asking us to fight in your wars.

Easy, Tex; we in the US don't like the war(s) either. In fact, an awful lot of us fucking despise it; it's a horribly messed up situation founded on lies and greed, and it's sad from every angle. You don't have to live outside the US to see this as the criminal travesty that it is, so chill on your fellow MeFites — who, like you, do not support murdering people all over the globe for political gain.

I have never had poutine. Thank god. (Because I suspect I'd quite like it.)
posted by heyho at 11:06 AM on February 21, 2013


Oh god and less than a year after I leave Fredericton a smoke's is opening up there.

Although admittedly I would still take Relish over Smoke's, and neither compares to the gloriousness that is Picaroon's beer. I hate my life right now, need a road trip to Quebec.
posted by Lemurrhea at 11:30 AM on February 21, 2013


the new dairy that opened up in Reading Terminal are going to start selling curds

You know, I've been having a pretty damn good day, and you just made it so much better.
posted by DoubleLune at 11:42 AM on February 21, 2013


For variations on the theme, check out this menu from La Belle Patate.
posted by ageispolis at 11:44 AM on February 21, 2013


Next up: Flipper pie-in-a-bag.

Just for the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, maybe.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:12 PM on February 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


There's also a guy on Commercial Drive in Vancouver who's been serving up Poutine Pizza.
posted by mannequito at 12:30 PM on February 21, 2013


I only had poutine in Canada once. (It was glorious.) Powerless to resist, I also ordered a Molson.
posted by wenestvedt at 12:40 PM on February 21, 2013


Ooh, this post inspired (distracted?) me to poke around for other military innovations in food production/packaging per both parts of my username: kimchi was first packaged for export to feed South Korean soldiers fighting in Vietnam, Spam famously fed the Russian army (among others) during WWII.

The American Institute of Chemical Engineers has a write-up on general food innovation (pdf) that included this early advance in military eats:

"In the late 1790s, French confectioner, Nicolas Appert, discovered that many foods will resist spoilage for extended periods once they are sufficiently heated and sealed in airtight glass containers. By the early 1800s, his promising preservation principles were demonstrated by the French Navy in tests on meat, vegetables, fruits, and milk."

Maybe beef bourguignon was the original MRE?
posted by spamandkimchi at 12:51 PM on February 21, 2013


Canada has a military? Huh

Wow, no wonder everyone keeps despairing about the state of American schools.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 1:09 PM on February 21, 2013




Canada has a military that, in various incarnations, fought the U.S. to a standstill on several occasions.

Not to mention burning down the White House.... ;)
posted by MILNEWSca at 1:24 PM on February 21, 2013


Maybe they can ship out some of the bag poutine to the states.

That's this year's Quonsmas sorted then.
posted by arcticseal at 1:56 PM on February 21, 2013


Julen, I call dibs on arcticseal for my SQ this year!
posted by heyho at 2:00 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I had my first taste of poutine in Montreal two years ago. It was, as is proper, bought at a cheap Chinese take out joint late at night. It was an eye opener - a completely new flavor experience, like trying sushi for the first time, or the first time one tries oysters. It was an umami flood that was completely different from what I expected, given the simplicity of the various elements. It is also about as unhealthy as a food can get, which seems to be the standard for things that taste good in Quebec.

Give them poutine in a pouch and next they are going to want Chez Schwartz' smoked meat sandwich in a pouch. That shall not stand!
posted by zaelic at 2:08 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Poutine and smoked meat MREs? That could be the start of one hell of a recruitment drive, I suspect.
posted by peppermind at 2:13 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


i always thought curds were like or the same as, cottage cheese? by the amount of love poutine is getting here, i must be wrong, since the version in my mind does not sound very appetizing.
posted by fuzzypantalones at 2:21 PM on February 21, 2013


I like cottage cheese, but it has no place in my poutine.
posted by arcticseal at 2:26 PM on February 21, 2013


It's more like ... imagine if string cheese were shaped more like small Cheetos ( or those Dutch corn curl things) and was a little fluffier but not much fluffier. The picture on Wikipedia gives a general idea. So no, not that runny yikky stuff.
posted by jessamyn at 2:26 PM on February 21, 2013


It also makes sounds that no food should make.
posted by Kitteh at 2:31 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


i always thought curds were like or the same as, cottage cheese?

I'm not sure if it's strictly a South Asian thing, but in any case Indians and Nepalis refer to a certain kind of thick, lumpy yogurt as "curds" in English. At its best, it is very much its own thing and swooningly good. The "royal curds" of Bhaktapur are strong contenders for my Top 10 all-time food experiences.

In any case, cheese curds are nothing like cottage cheese. In addition to the flavour of the curds themselves, they add a singular textural element to real poutine -- they melt a bit, oozing over the fries, but maintain their structural integrity as a separate element from the gravy. In some Canadian fast-food joints and diners, you'll get "poutine" with shredded mozzarella or cheddar as the cheese, and that's just wrong.
posted by gompa at 2:33 PM on February 21, 2013


If by authentic poutine you mean the kind of poutine you would get if you randomly went to some place in Canada that sells something they call poutine, authentic poutine is terrible. Montreal-style poutine with smoked meat is fantastic.

That's not poutine, that's poutine with smoked meat. You're right that there might be some bad poutine out there - in the Western provinces I'd imagine, or made with McCain crinkle cut fries and mozzarella or what have you, and I've found Harvey's poutine to be revolting which is a shame as their fries would be perfect for good poutine - but in fact it's very easy to get good poutine in and around Quebec and Eastern Ontario, and even here in the Maritimes. Montreal lays no claim to poutine. Any chip truck or chip trailer you see out in the boonies will make great poutine, or greasy spoon in the city. My favourite poutine ever has been from a Chinese corner store on Bank Street in Ottawa (across from Babylon, I think it's still there)
posted by Flashman at 2:43 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've found Harvey's poutine to be revolting

That's exactly what I had in mind when I was thinking of bad poutine.

That's not poutine, that's poutine with smoked meat.

True, but the kind of place that does poutine with real smoked meat is likely to be getting the curds, gravy and potatoes right as well.
posted by justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow at 4:27 PM on February 21, 2013


You can get Schwartz's smoked meat in a bag! My uncle buys it for my grandfather every father's day.
posted by jeather at 4:50 PM on February 21, 2013




Canada has a military? Huh.

Just the one guy. Apparently though, only one they need.
(just an aside, if you're bad-ass to not expect to catch shit for being from "Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry" you're plenty bad-ass)

On topic, I don't know how people eat that stuff. Arteries of steel.

posted by Smedleyman at 6:24 PM on February 21, 2013


I went to Smoke's Poutinerie when I was in Toronto

aw, Jessamyn, that's a shame, because their fries are so sadly limp and withered. Amazing poutine can be had at Poutini's

mmmm I want some now. right now.
posted by 5_13_23_42_69_666 at 6:46 PM on February 21, 2013


My son brought home poutine topped with pulled pork, pork sausage, and bacon from this place. I call it Heart Attack In A Box.
posted by BozoBurgerBonanza at 7:31 PM on February 21, 2013


Not to mention burning down the White House.... ;)

Apparently, only 174 Americans are aware of this.

My sculpture instructor is one of the folk on the short list to do up a War of 1812 memorial. I've been telling him the location is wrong: it should be in front of the American embassy.
posted by sebastienbailard at 8:18 PM on February 21, 2013


I don't think that poutine is very good fighting food. Perhaps if you put a bag on the other side of a group of Taliban fighters, our soldiers would be fierce in trying to get to it, but once consumed they would enjoy a good nap and the decreased likelihood of a hangover.
posted by salishsea at 11:53 PM on February 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Not to mention burning down the White House.... ;)

Apparently, only 174 Americans are aware of this .


To be fair, it's not like Canadians care about 1812 either.

So proud of my countrypeople when I read that article. No on 1812, John A., and hockey. Yes on universal suffrage and the Charter.
posted by Lemurrhea at 8:23 AM on February 22, 2013


The pouding chomeur recipe. It was once for people without much money (as evidenced by the name), but this is not that version.

Pouding chomeur

Pâte à gateau (cake batter):

½ t de beurre ramolli / 1/2 cup butter, softened
1 t de sucre / 1 cup sugar
2 œufs / 2 eggs
1 c. à thé de vanille / 1 tsp vanilla
1 c à tab. De poudre à pâte / 1 tbsp baking powder
2 t de farine / 2 cups flour
1 1/3 t de lait / 1 1/3 cups milk

Sauce à l’érable (maple sauce):

1 ½ t de sirop d’érable / 1 1/2 cups maple syrup (this is the crucial ingredient, use real syrup)
1 ½ t de cassonade / 1 1/2 c brown sugar
1 ½ t de crème 35% / 1 1/2 c heavy cream
1/3 t de beurre / 1/3 cup butter

Préparation de la pâte (batter):

Dans un bol, incorporer le sucre au beure à l’aide d’un batteur électrique.
Ajouter les œufs et la vanille et fouettez jusqu’à le mélange soit crémeux.
Dans un autre bol mélangez la farine et la poudre à pâte.
Incorporez les ingrédients secs à la préparation au beurre en alternant avec le lait.
Verser dans un plat allant au four de 13 po x 9 po.

Mix the butter and sugar until creamy. Add eggs and vanilla until smooth. In a separate bowl, mix the flour and baking powder. Incorporate the dry ingredients into the butter alternating with the milk. Put in a 13" x 9" pan.

Préparation de la sauce (sauce):

Dans une grande casserole, amener tous les ingrédients à ébultion, en brassant.
Réduire le feu et mijoter pendant deux minutes.
Verser sur la pâte, tranquillement.

In a large pot, bring the ingredients to boilling, mixing all the time. Lower the heat and cook for two minutes. Pour onto the batter slowly.

Chauffer à 325 F pendant 35 minutes

Bake at 325 for 35 minutes.



Je fais généralement ½ recette

Make half a recipe unless you have a dentist on call.
posted by jeather at 11:21 AM on February 22, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm an expat in UK and this thread is making me miss the variety of poutine that was always available in Toronto. I am absolutely salivating.

We have "poutine" nights at home with my SO... but its not the same, I can't find curds so we use various cheeses. Still delicious, but not real poutine.

(Oh god, poutine with smoked meat and a big pickle... I'd pay anything for this to be in front of me RIGHT NOW.)
posted by olya at 11:55 AM on February 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


My favourite poutine ever has been from a Chinese corner store on Bank Street in Ottawa (across from Babylon, I think it's still there)

That poutine was fantastic, but alas that store is no longer there.
posted by aclevername at 7:49 PM on February 22, 2013


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