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Digital Life a Buggles Parody
February 24, 2013 5:17 AM   Subscribe

Amy Burvall made a video updating the original MTV classic by the Buggles for her final project in "E-Learning and Digital Cultures" #edcmooc a free open course offered this spring on Coursera. [warning earwormy]
posted by humanfont (12 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
Loved this - Amy Burvall is the best kind of nerd: theater, history, techie, and librarian-cute!
posted by Lipstick Thespian at 6:12 AM on February 24, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ironic DMCA takedown in 4, 3, 2....
posted by cjorgensen at 6:32 AM on February 24, 2013


This pretty much embodies the #edcmooc. It is glitzy and shiny. Very video-centric. It expects little--subtitle tagging the obligatory Marshall McLuhan appearance at the end, just in case nobody got it. And finally, she fails to carry through on the transformation. Viral, yes, but still she just wants to be "a video star" according to her lyrics--exactly like The Buggles did these 20+ odd years ago

Was going to drop in something from her website, but this "edupunk" has set it up to make it difficult to copy and paste from. So, the first "O" of mooc doesn't seem to apply.

It was a great take off of The Buggles and good entertainment. But if that is meant to be a significant commentary on E-learning and Digital Cultures, um.... clever, but...
posted by Gotanda at 6:34 AM on February 24, 2013 [5 favorites]


But if that is meant to be a significant commentary...

I think she uses song parody to launch into in depth discussions from what I read. So these are the skits at the beginning of the lecture, not the lecture itself.
posted by cjorgensen at 6:37 AM on February 24, 2013


So these are the skits at the beginning of the lecture, not the lecture itself.

There might be a lecture, but the final project at the end of #edcmooc was supposed to be a digital 'artefact' that would "express something of your own context as an educator, student and/or technologist" with one of these topics scroll down to it. Didn't see any of them in that video--except for maybe the "dystopia" of Block One of the course.

But, maybe that's just her context, and I should just enjoy the song, not get any crankier about #edcmooc, and let the edupunks play on my lawn.
posted by Gotanda at 6:51 AM on February 24, 2013


Tell me more about the crankiness against edupunks? I was unaware of a backlash.
posted by humanfont at 7:44 AM on February 24, 2013 [1 favorite]


As a side note, it's kind of interesting that video did not kill the radio star, but peaked and receded. I mean, people obviously still produce videos, but it's not the main means of exposure anymore. Which, to get back to the point, is the fate of 99% of all futurist pronouncements -- for example, the death of the book (and reading) has been announced pretty much every decade for the last century and yet books are still with us for the foreseeable future (yeah, ereaders will gain traction, but not at anything like the speed their proponents claim, and legacy books will be with us for a long long time). Similarly, I hear a lot of claims for the MOOCs, but I don't see the infrastructure elements really coming together (low completion rates are OK for unaccredited free courses, but when people start getting charged anything, it immediately becomes a serious problem).

So I guess it's a fun video with a somewhat different message for me than the creator intended.
posted by GenjiandProust at 8:39 AM on February 24, 2013 [2 favorites]


The "pop-up" version is worth watching.
posted by brina at 9:43 AM on February 24, 2013


I am pro all things cyborg. Also, earworm is caught in my head.
posted by RainyJay at 2:27 PM on February 24, 2013


Tell me more about the crankiness against edupunks?

I didn't mean to imply any crankiness against edupunks. I just didn't see much that was "punk" or edu for that matter here. The song and video are well done and fun. As another person who grew up with the original MtV, if anything I mostly felt nostalgia. How punk is hawking a longing for the early eighties? Or an "About" and "Profile" pages that prevent copying?

The "pop-up" version is worth watching.

Yes, it is worth watching. It is much better, but what does the soundtrack add to the list of Diigo bookmarks? I guess the song is the reflection, but in the end it is a dressed up list of bookmarks from the course and related items that takes 4 minutes to scroll through with little additional actual comment or meaningful augmentation. Edutainment.

It's fun. But, it's just fun. It's more self-branding, advertorial media. It doesn't say much to me about e-learning, but that's also what makes it an accurate reflection of the mooc itself, which was heavy on the digital culture but pretty thin on the e-learning.

But, it's fun.
posted by Gotanda at 2:48 PM on February 24, 2013


The scanlines are terrible. Are they supposed to be ironic? Is trying to replicate analog artifacts with digital stuff but failing horribly a thing?
posted by Monday, stony Monday at 6:14 PM on February 24, 2013


The scanlines are terrible. Are they supposed to be ironic? Is trying to replicate analog artifacts with digital stuff but failing horribly a thing?

That's pretty much the whole instagram business model, isn't it?
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 8:15 PM on February 24, 2013


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