Join 3,558 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


The Daily Viz
March 12, 2013 6:09 AM   Subscribe

Matt Stiles is a data journalist for NPR. He tries each day to create a data visualization, or post those he finds online.

e.g. A heatmap of birthdays, baseball standings at a glance, and health insurance rates by county.
posted by frimble (21 comments total) 31 users marked this as a favorite

 
Nice!

Today I learned that my birthday is super common. Huh.
posted by dismas at 6:18 AM on March 12, 2013


Love the baseball graph. Can't get the larger, interactive insurance rate graph to load. All I get is a big white page with the legend in the corner.
posted by Thorzdad at 6:18 AM on March 12, 2013


My birthdate is positively COMMON. Hmph.

I wonder if a heatmap of birthdates would differ by hemisphere/popular religion?
posted by Currer Belfry at 6:20 AM on March 12, 2013


Today I learned that my birthday is super common. Huh.

Well, that was the likeliest outcome.
posted by NathanBoy at 6:30 AM on March 12, 2013 [3 favorites]


Touché.
posted by dismas at 6:39 AM on March 12, 2013


What is the deal with sudden decrease of birthdays July 4th and 5th?
posted by nerhael at 7:10 AM on March 12, 2013


This is so sexy.
Thank you!
posted by pointystick at 7:14 AM on March 12, 2013


I wonder why it appears to be more common to be born on Valentine's Day, as opposed to the days on either side of it. My birthday is the day after, and I'm super-glad about it. Who wants to be born on a holiday like Valentine's Day?

Uh, no offense if your birthday/your child's birthday is on Valentine's Day.
posted by Elly Vortex at 7:16 AM on March 12, 2013


What is the deal with sudden decrease of birthdays July 4th and 5th?

If you compare the same stats for Austria, the least likely 6 birthdays, excluding the 29th of February, are all public holidays.
posted by frimble at 7:20 AM on March 12, 2013


What is the deal with sudden decrease of birthdays July 4th and 5th?


Inducing is not going to be scheduled on those days because everyone wants the holiday.
posted by srboisvert at 7:23 AM on March 12, 2013 [3 favorites]


Why is the upper Midwest (illinois, wisconsin, minnesota, iowa) so mostly insured, comparable to or better than the northeast, but the central Midwest (ohio, indiana) is less well insured, more comparable to the south?
posted by toodleydoodley at 8:08 AM on March 12, 2013


These are good. But how frustrating to be a visualization expert for National Public Radio. NPR produces other quality non-radio content but it always seems sort of second fiddle for them.

There's a small body of work of people using sound to present data: the audioization blog has some examples. I particularly like the NYT treatment of Olympic race finishing times.
posted by Nelson at 8:12 AM on March 12, 2013


I'm going to make a wild prediction that the same data will show American births peak on Friday afternoons and then dip on the weekends, with any localized variations in the data explained by the happy hour schedule of the local golf club.
posted by rh at 8:22 AM on March 12, 2013


So apparently, the longer your inaugural speech is, the more irrelevant your presidency will be.
posted by dry white toast at 8:53 AM on March 12, 2013


So that's what stileproject looks like now? Would not have guessed.
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 9:00 AM on March 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


I was highly disappointed not to get a daily comic of The Fat Slags or Roger Mellie.
posted by salmacis at 9:03 AM on March 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


I was looking at this and thinking back to the recent thread on Nate Thayer. Contrast the data science done by Styles at NPR and Silver of 538 fame with Thayer's most recent post to NkNews.org. The prosaic analysis and traditional news story seems to be falling in value relative to the technical analysis provided by Styles and Silver.
posted by humanfont at 9:51 AM on March 12, 2013


Inducing is not going to be scheduled on those days because everyone wants the holiday.

Plus isn't there research that shows people can "hold off" dying until after a holiday? If so, presumably they can hold off giving birth the same way.
posted by DU at 11:45 AM on March 12, 2013


Today I learned that my birthday is super common. Huh.

Don't we just compare that chart with a graph of temperature that's shifted by 9 months?
posted by benito.strauss at 1:00 PM on March 12, 2013


San Francisco gets hottest in September/October, so your claim could conceivably be tested, Benito.
posted by madcaptenor at 9:34 PM on March 12, 2013


These are great, thank you for posting this. Very surprised by the birthday distributions, especially the Valentine's Day one.
posted by LobsterMitten at 11:16 PM on March 12, 2013


« Older A brief Tumblr rant about Fantasy: The great tempt...  |  Astronomers Conduct First Remo... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments