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Amazing Water and Sound Experiment #2
March 12, 2013 7:55 PM   Subscribe

Amazing Water & Sound Experiment #2 - brusspup synchronizes his video camera to a water stream run in front of a speaker outputting a 24 Hz sine wave
posted by Blazecock Pileon (22 comments total) 27 users marked this as a favorite

 
Now that is fantastic. Shame it is freezing here otherwise I'd give this a try.
posted by arcticseal at 8:00 PM on March 12, 2013


Two questions - is it LOUD? Infrasound can be unpleasant.
And what does it look like without the sampling/aliasing effect? That is, to the naked eye?
posted by sea at 8:12 PM on March 12, 2013


OK, the reverse effect one completely fucked my head up, so...thanks?
posted by mr_crash_davis at 8:18 PM on March 12, 2013


Without the sync, it'll look like a rather messy bunch of water coming from a hosepipe with a broken nozzle. You can certainly have as much fun with a strobe light, and these days that doesn't even involve the sorts of voltages you don't want to have near water. A few high intensity LEDs and a 555... take it into the shower and sing Old Man River.
posted by Devonian at 8:26 PM on March 12, 2013


Hey, it's a Piddler!

Piddler Previously.
posted by charlie don't surf at 8:31 PM on March 12, 2013


The speaker's just shaking the hose nozzle. There's very little "OMG physics" going on here.
posted by schmod at 8:50 PM on March 12, 2013


It's a video oscilloscope! I wonder if anyone makes a video camera with a tuneable framerate. It would be very cool to perform this effect on other vibrating things (though I can't think of many that would work well right now).
posted by Popular Ethics at 8:53 PM on March 12, 2013


It's a nice application of cos(β)cos(γ) = ½[cos(β+γ) + cos(β-γ)]. And you thought geometry was useless!
posted by Monday, stony Monday at 8:57 PM on March 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


It looked to me like the frequency had more of an effect on the end of the hose, which then caused the nifty shapes when the video framerate was adjusted accordingly. It was neat, and something that I'd never even think of... you know... had it not been for this.
posted by Blue_Villain at 9:12 PM on March 12, 2013


> The speaker's just shaking the hose nozzle. There's very little "OMG physics" going on here.

The speaker is shaking the hose at a nicely controllable rate, so it makes it easy to sync it to the filmrate of the camera.

The reversing of the water effect is also what accounts for wheels to slow down and then appear to spin backwards as a car changes speed, the rotation of the hubcaps is moving in and out of sync with the camera framerates.
posted by mrzarquon at 9:56 PM on March 12, 2013


a great experiment, I liked the reverse 25 hz a lot.
posted by Ahmed_Nabil at 11:04 PM on March 12, 2013


This is cool. Thanks for posting.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 11:05 PM on March 12, 2013


Super cool.
posted by BungaDunga at 11:46 PM on March 12, 2013


I had to keep reminding myself: this is not slow-motion, particularly during the 25 and 23hz sections.

I suspect that with an even higher speed shutter (say, 1/10000th of a second) but maintaining 24fps, you'd get a really neat "dotted line" effect.
posted by ShutterBun at 12:20 AM on March 13, 2013


man, this effect would be badass in a sci-fi movie where someone in the future turns on their kitchen sink and this happens. practical effects rule.
posted by dogwalker at 12:21 AM on March 13, 2013


Tutorial please!
posted by phaedon at 12:22 AM on March 13, 2013


Tutorial please!

There's detailed instructions in the video's description.
posted by ShutterBun at 12:24 AM on March 13, 2013


There's very little "OMG physics" going on here.

I dunno, I found it neat that even droplets "froze". Because that isn't the same droplet actually frozen. That's a series of droplets, one every 1/24th of a second, always appearing in the same spots.
posted by DU at 4:01 AM on March 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


There's very little "OMG physics" going on here.

There's no physics here. Move along.
posted by Diag at 4:56 AM on March 13, 2013


That's a series of droplets, one every 1/24th of a second, always appearing in the same spots.

Yeah that is blowing my mind right now.
posted by grog at 6:09 AM on March 13, 2013


The speaker's just shaking the hose nozzle. There's very little "OMG physics" going on here.

What others just said, this is nothing but OMG physics! Events that would otherwise be identified as random, like the location and size of a particular water droplet, are revealed as predictable because this technique is essentially a way to show a stack of points-in-time each with the same starting conditions. This is a real-time demonstration of why experiments are repeated to reduce the effect of random outliers. What you view here is a condensation of events that only meet a set of parameters by physical definition. It's awesome.
posted by odinsdream at 10:38 AM on March 13, 2013 [3 favorites]


This is absolutely fantastic. I agree the droplets are mindblowing... I think they look even better in their previous iteration of the same effect.

It would be cool to see more things moving in the shot or interacting with the stream to emphasise the "real-time" nature of the effect. And it would be amazing to have two degrees of freedom... you could have rotating spirals! MAKE IT SO, INTERNET!!
posted by Pre-Taped Call In Show at 11:49 AM on March 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


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