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Miracle twins
May 2, 2013 11:15 AM   Subscribe

Amy and Katie, the twins born 87 days apart - after mother's contractions simply stopped.
posted by CrazyLemonade (41 comments total) 8 users marked this as a favorite

 
As someone said in one of my own FPP's once - Damn, life, you tenacious.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 11:20 AM on May 2, 2013 [6 favorites]


Crazy stuff. Glad they both seem healthy!
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 11:21 AM on May 2, 2013 [3 favorites]


What really surprised me (other than the fact that I was reading something interestedly that was in the Daily Mail) was that the previous record was 84 days.
posted by jessamyn at 11:27 AM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


"The Irish twins are now set to become a Guiness World Record."

Irish twins, lol.
posted by resurrexit at 11:27 AM on May 2, 2013 [20 favorites]


Yeah. I was like "Irish Twins," HA! Then I was like, oh, they're from Ireland.
posted by etc. at 11:31 AM on May 2, 2013 [18 favorites]


Wow. Are they developmentally okay so far?

I listened to an interview with an OB on twins on NPR once and she said that most multiples actually have developmental delays and cognitive problems, but it's usually not evident because the parents of multiples who do suffer problems usually don't take them out in public. I think the doc was mentioning that some women doing IVF sometimes
ask if they can increase chances for having twins because they either want to have 2 kids all at once for the cost or to get pregnancy over with at just one time, or because they've seen normal twins around looking cute, dressed up in matching outfits, healthy, etc. the doc said women don't realize the problems having multiples can cause.
posted by discopolo at 11:32 AM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


As a twin born 12 minutes after my partner in crime, all I can say is that they're never going to hear the end of it from their mother...

(I also that hope they're both okay, and growing well.)
posted by jetlagaddict at 11:45 AM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


The difference in their size now is amazing. I can't tell whether they're identical or fraternal.
posted by leotrotsky at 11:48 AM on May 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


As a twin born 12 minutes after my partner in crime, all I can say is that they're never going to hear the end of it from their mother...

Totally. My mother is a twin. The way my grandmother told the story (frequently!) is that my aunt was born late at night, and she didn't want my Mom to be born on the next day, so she pushed before she was supposed to and did herself some sort of internal injury.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 11:52 AM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


Wonderful to see the older one doing so well. 24 weeks is really on the cusp of viability; I have a friend who gave birth to twins at 23 weeks 3 days who never left the hospital. What an amazing story.
posted by KathrynT at 12:05 PM on May 2, 2013


I can't tell whether they're identical or fraternal.

I used to work with a pair of twins and I asked them over lunch one day if they were identical or fraternal, and they both said they didn't know. One explained, "We look a lot alike, but siblings often do, and to settle the question, it would be a bunch of expensive blood tests and neither one of us cares that much." I was mildly surprised -- I figured somehow they would know these things, but on reflection I suppose not.

That being said, they seemed to have little in common save having the same physical appearance, and often came across as blissfully unaware of their twindom. One remarked to me once that she had been walking down a sidewalk downtown and she had noticed a bunch of 'weirdoes' across the busy street shouting and waving their arms, trying to get her attention. She said she had no idea of who they were so she ignored them and kept walking. I asked if maybe they were friends of her sister's; she paused and said, "Oh, yeah. I guess that is possible."

Anyway, thanks to CrazyLemonade for the link. I imagine that there are only a handful of people worldwide who have a sibling (not half-sibling) three months removed in age. One the other hand, twins are often born several minutes apart and I occasionally muse on how many multiple births have occurred around midnight so that the twins/triplets/whatever wind up with different birthdays.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 12:06 PM on May 2, 2013


[Folks, if we need to have a larger discussion about the Daily Mail please do it over in MetaTalk, thank you.]
posted by jessamyn at 12:11 PM on May 2, 2013


I used to work with a pair of twins and I asked them over lunch one day if they were identical or fraternal, and they both said they didn't know. One explained, "We look a lot alike, but siblings often do, and to settle the question, it would be a bunch of expensive blood tests and neither one of us cares that much." I was mildly surprised -- I figured somehow they would know these things, but on reflection I suppose not.


The Olsen twins are fraternal twins. I never saw that. I just figured Ashley was the one hogging all the nutrition in the womb and that's why Mary Kate is tinier. Turns out they're fraternal anyway. But I bet they got their nose jobs at the same exact time. I wonder if they had to compromise on the nose shape. I wonder if the surgeons operated on them side by side. The new noses look exactly alike.
posted by discopolo at 12:14 PM on May 2, 2013


I'm 27 weeks pregnant right now and all I can say is THIS BABY BETTER STAY INSIDE FOR ANOTHER 3 MONTHS. You can definitely tell the "younger" twin has all of that extra baby fat that the "older" never got a chance to develop. I wonder how much developmentally they will be different as they grow up.

Plus, you know, the baby's room is still full of crap and we aren't having the baby shower for another 2 months and MAMA'S NOT READY YET.
posted by jillithd at 12:16 PM on May 2, 2013 [9 favorites]


Being able to tell the difference between the Olsen Twins at all ages is one of my special gifts that I wish I could figure out how to put on my resume.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero at 12:33 PM on May 2, 2013 [14 favorites]


I looked at all the photos before reading the captions to see which baby had been born first--it's interesting that I could easily tell who had spent longer in the womb. That said, the premature twin looks surprisingly healthy considering she was born at only 24 weeks! As KathrynT said, that is really on the cusp of viability. What an amazing birth story.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 12:33 PM on May 2, 2013


The way my grandmother told the story (frequently!) is that my aunt was born late at night, and she didn't want my Mom to be born on the next day, so she pushed before she was supposed to and did herself some sort of internal injury.

Man, the lengths some people will go to just to avoid having to spring for two birthday parties...
posted by Etrigan at 12:38 PM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


Being able to tell the difference between the Olsen Twins at all ages is one of my special gifts that I wish I could figure out how to put on my resume.

Please MeMail me to let me know the rest of your superpowers. If they include finding pictures of Gerard Butler after he's taken a bath, then count me extremely impressed and willing to endorse you on LinkedIn.
posted by discopolo at 12:53 PM on May 2, 2013 [9 favorites]


That is so neat. The months when one was on life support and one was in the womb must have been torture. Also they are beautiful.

Being able to tell the difference between the Olsen Twins at all ages is one of my special gifts that I wish I could figure out how to put on my resume.

Totally! There are web videos about it for the unschooled. I actually think it's kind of neat the things fans noticed when the twins were on Full House.
posted by sweetkid at 12:53 PM on May 2, 2013


> "We look a lot alike, but siblings often do, and to settle the question, it would be a bunch of expensive blood tests and neither one of us cares that much." I was mildly surprised -- I figured somehow they would know these things, but on reflection I suppose not.

My nephews are the same way. They're probably identical, but nobody knows for sure because the parents don't care and don't see the need to do the testing. I believe they could have found out at birth by examining the placenta, but for whatever reason that didn't happen.
posted by The corpse in the library at 1:03 PM on May 2, 2013


I know a family that has biological siblings three months apart-- the parents had given up on fertility treatments, and enlisted a surrogate mother. The surrogacy was three months along, and then the mother got pregnant on her own. Much difference circumstances, but it's still mindblowing to think about.
posted by Mayor Curley at 1:05 PM on May 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think the doc was mentioning that some women doing IVF sometimes
ask if they can increase chances for having twins because they either want to have 2 kids all at once for the cost or to get pregnancy over with at just one time, or because they've seen normal twins around looking cute, dressed up in matching outfits, healthy, etc.


My understanding is that when doing IVF, several embryos are transferred to increase the chances of at least one of them implanting. In most cases, multiples are not intended, but definitely part of the possibility. (There's a fine line between "let's increase our chances" and becoming Octomom). Women taking fertility drugs to ovulate also have greater chances of having multiples cause more than one egg can be released during ovulation.

I can't tell whether they're identical or fraternal.

I'm guessing fraternal. It's not clear in the article but I guess that the woman's contractions stopped on their own because when her "water-broke" that must have meant the amniotic sac of the baby that was born, and the other baby had her own sac.
posted by CrazyLemonade at 1:06 PM on May 2, 2013 [3 favorites]


I can't tell whether they're identical or fraternal.

I'm guessing fraternal. It's not clear in the article but I guess that the woman's contractions stopped on their own because when her "water-broke" that must have meant the amniotic sac of the baby that was born, and the other baby had her own sac.


Monoamniotic twins are only about 1-2 percent of identical twins (per the caption on the picture).
posted by Etrigan at 1:43 PM on May 2, 2013 [2 favorites]


I have a feeling that when they are older they will get a lot of mileage out of saying "I can never remember when my twin sister's birthday is."
posted by ckape at 1:46 PM on May 2, 2013 [4 favorites]


I'm having a hard time imagining what it must have been like for the mother. Going through birth ONCE is a big thing. Doing it twice in 3 months? Yikes.
posted by stoneweaver at 1:51 PM on May 2, 2013 [6 favorites]


Monoamniotic twins are only about 1-2 percent of identical twins (per the caption on the picture).

Ahhh, I thought all identical twins shared an amniotic sac. Just learned something new today!
posted by CrazyLemonade at 2:03 PM on May 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


I used to work with a pair of twins and I asked them over lunch one day if they were identical or fraternal, and they both said they didn't know

I find this fascinating. I have a relative who is an (apparently) identical twin and has two sets of twins herself -- I was curious about this because I've read that the tendency to fraternal twinning is genetic but that identical twins are a random occurrence. So I asked her about her kids, and was amazed when she said that she thought they were fraternal but didn't really know.

It had never occurred to me before that that could be something you wouldn't know.
posted by gerstle at 2:06 PM on May 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


I was a nanny for a pair of boy/girl twins and people asked me every damn day if they were identical or fraternal.

(In the case of boy/girl twins it's really easy to tell they're fraternal because THEIR GENITALS ARE DIFFERENT.)
posted by kate blank at 3:32 PM on May 2, 2013 [4 favorites]


One of the craziest things is that they are only breaking the world record of 'days between twin birthdays' by three days. I can't find anything about the previous record holders, who were born in 1995.
posted by jacalata at 3:33 PM on May 2, 2013


Wow. What a story they have... and that they'll have to tell. Over and over and over again. On the plus side, the Irish twins joke probably isn't as big a thing in Ireland (or is it?).

My dad was a twin and they have no clue if they're identical or fraternal. Going on looks and such, it seems obvious to me. But they never had the test done. Over the years, the idea that they were fraternal seems to have taken hold, but I think that has more to do with family dynamics/disfunction than anything else. (Uncle is gay. His parents did not approve. There was drama.)
posted by imbri at 3:39 PM on May 2, 2013


I was a nanny for a pair of boy/girl twins and people asked me every damn day if they were identical or fraternal.

(In the case of boy/girl twins it's really easy to tell they're fraternal because THEIR GENITALS ARE DIFFERENT.)


How old were they, and were they generally dressed in a highly gendered way? Or were the askers people who already knew that they were opposite-sex?

My mother and her twin are obviously not identical when you see them next to each other, but people mistake them for each other when they're seen separately.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:07 PM on May 2, 2013


The funny thing is that they look identical, but also not. As if the extra three months in the world has aged the older one a bit. She looks a little more world-weary.

I also have the "able to tell twins apart" superpower.

My grandmother was an identical twin. She died when I was pretty young, but I vividly remember her. It was slightly traumatic whenever I saw her sister after that.

All I know is, if I ever have children that are twins, one of them is going to have an "X" on the bottom of his or her feet for the first year of their lives. Its the only way to be sure.
posted by gjc at 8:17 PM on May 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


My twin was born six minutes before me. Everyone who knew us both used to say that it was obvious she pushed me out of the way to get out first so she could be the older one and boss me around. This would have made her laugh like a drain.
posted by emcat8 at 12:13 AM on May 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I first read it as "the twins born 87 years apart". 87 days doesn't seem much of an accomplishment, now.
posted by snakeling at 4:39 AM on May 3, 2013


My dad was a twin and they have no clue if they're identical or fraternal. Going on looks and such, it seems obvious to me.

My father and his younger brother look so much alike. Their posture, their mannerisms, the way they move and stand, the faces they pull, their vocal mannerisms, it's striking. They haven't lived in the same town for more than thirty years and don't see each other that much but it's still there. Except my Uncle was adopted so they aren't at all genetically related. Upbringing really does make a big difference.

I also know two sets of twins who aren't sure if they're identical or not. Apparently it's not that big a deal in their everyday life.
posted by shelleycat at 4:48 AM on May 3, 2013


Monoamniotic twins are only about 1-2 percent of identical twins (per the caption on the picture).

A friend of mine had monoamniotic twins about 6 months ago. Total hospital bed rest for months. It's a rare type of twins that is very high risk-- the odds that both twins will survive have increased with aggressive fetal monitoring and ultrasounds, but quite often the twins will struggle physically and developmentally.

I believe these are also the type of twins who also have identical fingerprints.
posted by vitabellosi at 4:57 AM on May 3, 2013


Premies often have a specific head shape so it's easy to tell them apart that way.
posted by bq at 8:40 AM on May 3, 2013


(In the case of boy/girl twins it's really easy to tell they're fraternal because THEIR GENITALS ARE DIFFERENT.)

I am asking this in all seriousness: is there a transgender lobby angle on this? There must be.

I asusme there's a reason they didn't C-section her but I'm afraid to look at the Daily Mail.
posted by Mezentian at 9:47 AM on May 3, 2013


Why would they c-section her? According to the article, labor had stopped completely, so they said well, the baby is looking fine in there, and it's better in there than out yet.
posted by jacalata at 11:19 AM on May 3, 2013


(In the case of boy/girl twins it's really easy to tell they're fraternal because THEIR GENITALS ARE DIFFERENT.)

I am asking this in all seriousness: is there a transgender lobby angle on this? There must be.


What does this mean?
posted by sweetkid at 12:02 PM on May 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


How old were they, and were they generally dressed in a highly gendered way? Or were the askers people who already knew that they were opposite-sex?

The people who asked always already knew that one was a boy and one was a girl.
posted by kate blank at 2:26 PM on May 3, 2013


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