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Caffeine and food maps
June 3, 2013 1:17 PM   Subscribe

The Boston Globe's map of Starbucks versus Dunkin Donuts locations is surprisingly beautiful. Other useful mapping views into dining and drinking: grocery stores versus bars (On, Wisconsin!), BBQ styles (more information on Serious Eats), and beautiful worldwide food maps from Food: An Atlas.
posted by blahblahblah (124 comments total) 28 users marked this as a favorite

 
That Starbucks/Dunkin map webpage is so bizarre. I'm sure you can actually see everything you need to but the way it scrolled made it feel like exactly the opposite.

What an odd choice of page design.
posted by Brockles at 1:21 PM on June 3, 2013 [33 favorites]


Oh, goodie, pale green and pale orange. They do realize that those are basically the colors the use to test for colorblindness, right?
posted by phooky at 1:21 PM on June 3, 2013 [25 favorites]


I need another giant iced coffee to suck down enough caffeine for my brain to comprehend what is happening while I'm scrolling here.
posted by This_Will_Be_Good at 1:22 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


phooky: "Oh, goodie, pale green and pale orange. They do realize that those are basically the colors the use to test for colorblindness, right?"

Ha, I had to check to see if there was some toggle or something as it just looks like "dots" to me.
posted by wcfields at 1:23 PM on June 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


Tip: you can see more of the maps on the Boston.com site by physically picking up your computer monitor and waving it around.
posted by theodolite at 1:24 PM on June 3, 2013 [47 favorites]


That Starbucks/Dunkin map webpage is so bizarre. I'm sure you can actually see everything you need to but the way it scrolled made it feel like exactly the opposite.

What an odd choice of page design.


The suicide article from today used the same design. Let's hope it's a short term fad.
posted by cosmic.osmo at 1:25 PM on June 3, 2013


Huh, I actually quite liked the page design, although it was unusual enough to be part of the 'focus' of reading the piece. We tried to do a similar design for a school project website once which I really didn't think worked, so it's interesting to see how it can work.
posted by jacalata at 1:29 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've always been a bit confused by the Dunkin/Starbucks ratio where I live (New Haven, CT). By my count there are 23 Dunkin Donuts within the city limits (including 2 in the train station!) but only two Starbucks.
posted by Lazlo Hollyfeld at 1:30 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I need another giant iced coffee to suck down enough caffeine for my brain to comprehend what is happening while I'm scrolling here.

So like an ounce of coffee's worth?
posted by shakespeherian at 1:31 PM on June 3, 2013


Oh, goodie, pale green and pale orange.
I had to check to see if there was some toggle or something as it just looks like "dots" to me.


Yeah, praising that map display for being well done is absurb. Being a graphic designer who has never studied color theory doesn't make you an awesome prodigy, it makes you prone to dumb mistakes that constitute incompetence.
posted by cribcage at 1:31 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Eeeeeee! Another map of things in Chicago! The grid is so soothing. Soooo soooooooothing.
posted by phunniemee at 1:32 PM on June 3, 2013 [16 favorites]


News agencies: the eerie, sliding window thing that makes you feel like you can never see the entire picture at once is no longer cool.

Everyone else: here are the maps in a slightly easier-to-see way.

The US
The Northeast
Boston
New York
DC
Chicago
Detroit
Florida
Texas
California
Seattle
posted by Going To Maine at 1:32 PM on June 3, 2013 [5 favorites]


I was annoyed at first by the use of "Dunkins" to shorten "Dunkin Donuts." Doubly so since it's commonly abbreviated as the singular "Dunkin," as in their slogan, "America Runs on Dunkin."

What really did it for me was that the article wasn't even consistent in its misuse; that's almost forgivable, but about 1/3 of the time, it was "Dunkin," singular. So it's not even a stylistic choice, but terrible editing.
posted by explosion at 1:32 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Everyone else: here are the maps in a slightly easier-to-see way.

Now even more grid. NOW EVEN MORE SOOTHING.
posted by phunniemee at 1:33 PM on June 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


There there, phunniemee. There there.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:34 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


That really is suprisingly horrible layout.
posted by Artw at 1:35 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Imagine if each of those dots was an independent coffeeshop.
posted by oulipian at 1:35 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hah, I was right. That Dunkin Donuts in the super inconvenient-to-me location in Austin is in fact the only one in at least a hundred miles. (And goddamn Krispy Kremes are everywhere. I like a nice big insulin trigger as well as anyone, but they can't do Boston Kreme for shit.)
posted by restless_nomad at 1:36 PM on June 3, 2013


Have we talked about that bars vs. grocery stores one before? It's funny, to me it seems natural to have more bars - grocery stores around here are mostly pretty big. You can have hundreds of people inside at the same time, and one store can easily serve many thousands of people over a week. But bars (here, at least) are mostly smaller places that get pretty crowded at 50 people, and are more comfortable at two or three dozen. Plus bars are a place to sit and hang out, wheras in a grocery store you get in, work efficiently, and get out. Of course we have more bars, we need them.
posted by echo target at 1:36 PM on June 3, 2013


Oh, goodie, pale green and pale orange. They do realize that those are basically the colors the use to test for colorblindness, right?

One day vector maps like this will be routinely translated into a language like SVG that the browser can render natively, rather than converted to images, at which point it will be possible to do things like click on the color in the legend (not that this has a legend, it was buried in the text, which is another usability failing) and change it to something you can actually see.

But that day is not today.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:37 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


I have a Dunkin' Donuts a mile from my house. It's new. I love it. I can afford it.

They could put a Starbucks in my living room and I still wouldn't go there.
posted by cjorgensen at 1:37 PM on June 3, 2013


I was annoyed at first by the use of "Dunkins" to shorten "Dunkin Donuts."

I'm with you. I love Dunkin Donuts with an expat's fervency, and this bugged me a lot. I would have been fine with:

Dunkin
Dunky
Dunky D
Dudo
Dunkin Fuckin' Donuts (it's worth the fuckin' trip)
posted by dirtdirt at 1:38 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Wait, does that barbecue map really point to VIRGINIA when it describes North Carolina styles of barbecue?

I am...not happy about this.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:38 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Imagine if each of those dots was an independent coffeeshop.

Four colors would not suffice.
posted by echo target at 1:38 PM on June 3, 2013


Dunkin' Donuts tried to make inroads in the Seattle area 15 or so years ago. They failed. We're just not casual donut eaters out here.
posted by trunk muffins at 1:39 PM on June 3, 2013


~What an odd choice of page design.
~The suicide article from today used the same design. Let's hope it's a short term fad.


I've run across several articles in the past few months using this same sliding window crap, and it's all but universally been a pita to read. This is the first one, though, that actually brought Firefox to a stuttering crawl. I hope the fad dies a violent death.
posted by Thorzdad at 1:39 PM on June 3, 2013


I was annoyed at first by the use of "Dunkins" to shorten "Dunkin Donuts."

You're still wrong about "doughnuts".
posted by sparklemotion at 1:39 PM on June 3, 2013


("Dunkies")
posted by Greg Nog at 1:39 PM on June 3, 2013 [5 favorites]


Dunkin' Donuts tried to make inroads in the Seattle area 15 or so years ago. They failed. We're just not casual donut eaters out here.

Whereas in Maine we are hardcore donut eaters and Dunkin Donuts do not qualify. Although everyone likes their coffee-flavored water for some reason.
posted by selfnoise at 1:41 PM on June 3, 2013


At the D-Dawg Dunk Hawse
posted by shakespeherian at 1:42 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


So where do people in Maine eat donuts?
posted by Going To Maine at 1:42 PM on June 3, 2013


One day vector maps like this will be routinely translated into a language like SVG

You mean like most of the graphs published by NYT Graphics? They're using a lot of D3.js these days, in part because the D3 creator works there and in part because D3 is awesome. Lots of SVG, although I can't think of any that have a UI that lets you recolor from the legend yourself. Most of the time you can go in and edit a few CSS rules to change around the colours, though.
posted by Nelson at 1:43 PM on June 3, 2013


Dunkin' Donuts tried to make inroads in the Seattle area 15 or so years ago. They failed. We're just not casual donut eaters out here.
False. We like our artisanal donuts here in Seattle.
posted by b1tr0t at 1:45 PM on June 3, 2013


The orange/green color scheme really makes Florida look kind of diseased.
posted by troika at 1:47 PM on June 3, 2013


Bulgaroktonos: “Wait, does that barbecue map really point to VIRGINIA when it describes North Carolina styles of barbecue? I am...not happy about this.”

As far as I can tell, it doesn't. It points out that Virginia styles of barbecue sauce can sometimes be similar in some respects (specifically in their vinegar content) to those found in North Carolina. It doesn't say that they're the same thing.

It is odd, however, that they chose to divide the two Carolinas into "South Carolina" and "Central Carolinas and Georgia." That doesn't really seem to make sense. Maybe "South Carolina" is a typo for "North Carolina."
posted by koeselitz at 1:48 PM on June 3, 2013


On the idea of food maps: a friend, while on a cross country road trip observed that there is a definable line that separates "barbecue country" from "taco country" but that this line is at least 50 miles wide and beneath it lies the aberration that is the "barbecue taco"

Which instigated a comment thread proposing a map of the US breaking regions down into categories kime "taco", "barbecue", "pizza", "subs", "sausages", "coffee" and "crystal meth"
posted by bl1nk at 1:48 PM on June 3, 2013


So where do people in Maine eat donuts?

Well, it depends.

In Cumberland County you have Frosty's, Tony's, and Holy Donuts. Frosty's has the best glazed donuts, but Tony's cake donuts are better, particularly chocolate. Holy Donuts are a bit frou-frou but their Bacon and Cheese donut is to die for (and actually, will probably kill you). You really can't go wrong, though, and they're all better than Dunkin or the hell abomination that is Tim Horton's.

I am partial to Frosty's because really there is nothing better than a big glazed cruller. Mmmmmm.
posted by selfnoise at 1:50 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Dunks, FFS.

And it is interesting to me that there are so many Dunks here in North Carolina. Every since I moved here I've been bitching about how far I have to go to get a coffee (until we moved to a little suburb that somehow has one regular location and one "Express"). Scary to know it could be so much worse.
posted by Rock Steady at 1:51 PM on June 3, 2013


Starbucks vs. Tim Horton's in Canada.
posted by Kabanos at 1:51 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


When we lived on Cape Cod, as a contrast, we had 3 locations within .5 miles of our house.
posted by Rock Steady at 1:52 PM on June 3, 2013


False. We like our artisanal donuts here in Seattle.

'Artisanal' donuts are not 'casual' donuts, and I'd argue that Voodoo Donuts and its local apers is about as far from Dunkin as you can get while still being a donut place.
posted by trunk muffins at 1:56 PM on June 3, 2013


As far as I can tell, it doesn't. It points out that Virginia styles of barbecue sauce can sometimes be similar in some respects (specifically in their vinegar content) to those found in North Carolina. It doesn't say that they're the same thing.

I see one arrow that points to Virginia, that connects to a box describing Eastern and Western NC barbecue, which is what I meant. That map is kind of a mess; the colored outlines of regions are useful, but they need something defining areas with those regions. The arrows don't really do that very well.

It's a tricky thing to map, if only because you'd need separate shadings for the two different parts of North Carolina alone, but I feel like if I didn't already know what was going on, I wouldn't be able to learn much from that map.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 1:56 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Regarding Dunkins:

I looked up older Boston.com articles that reference Dunkin' Donuts and it seems that the paper either calls it by the full name throughout articles OR shortens it to Dunkin' after the initial mention. "Dunkins" is an aberration. I wonder what their official style guide says.

I also found out that June 7th (this friday!) is National Donut Day. Mark your calendars.
posted by troika at 1:57 PM on June 3, 2013


I was quite surprised not to see Dunkins in Texas, only Starbucks.

I have never been to Texas. I was projecting based on the handful of Texans I know. Knew.
posted by Capt. Renault at 2:00 PM on June 3, 2013


How can there only be 240 starbucksen in NYC? I am pretty sure there are more than that within walking distance of my house.
posted by elizardbits at 2:03 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


It impresses me here in the Northeast that there is such demand for Dunkin Donuts. They cram them into every gas station they can, and those really are busy in the morning. And then the standalone ones with drive-ins are crazy busy too. I feel like they have a ludicrous amount, but could still use more. Still working on that "rest-of-the-day" thing though.
posted by smackfu at 2:04 PM on June 3, 2013



'Artisanal' donuts are not 'casual' donuts, and I'd argue that Voodoo Donuts and its local apers is about as far from Dunkin as you can get while still being a donut place.


Uh, as far as my love handles are concerned, they are the exact damn thing.
posted by kurosawa's pal at 2:06 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


It looks just like the pox I wish on both their houses.
posted by steganographia at 2:11 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Would somebody please explain to me why I can't put my own sugar and creamer in my coffee at DD?
posted by Confess, Fletch at 2:14 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


They must have used some formula to compare grocery stores vs bars. In Juneau, we have appr. 8 grocery stores, including two small Filipino specialty shops. We have appr. 20 bars with full liquor licenses, including places like hotel bars, private club bars, and traditional bars. Of course, we aren't shown on the map but I doubt we are much different than other places in AK.
posted by Foam Pants at 2:16 PM on June 3, 2013


There is a Dunkin' Donuts in the Camp Pendleton Marine base shopping center here in the San Diego area.
posted by Drumhellz at 2:16 PM on June 3, 2013


Oh, goodie, pale green and pale orange. They do realize that those are basically the colors the use to test for colorblindness, right?

Bit thoughtless, i agree, but I believe they chose the colors because those are the predominent colors of the respective logos.

Still working on that "rest-of-the-day" thing though.

Yeah, word. Sorry, Dunks, as long as you continue to be the king of breakfast, you cannot even be the viceroy of lunch. With great skpeticism shall we ever eye your tuna melts and ham-on-flatbreads.

In other news, apparently they're rolling out some unholy Paula-Deen-inspired breakfastwich this month. Eggs and bacon between two glazed donuts. Even the carefully art directed menu photo made me turn a little green.

Also, I used to have a theory that you could make a map like this for Dunks and Jamba Juices showing parallel full-color splashes on the opposite coasts fading to sprinkles that reveresd polarity somewhere around Illinois.
posted by Diablevert at 2:20 PM on June 3, 2013


Tim's is making some tiny inroads into the US in the northeast and Michigan. But yeah, really, you haven't seen anything until you've seen an intersection in Guelph with a Tim's on all 4 corners.
posted by GuyZero at 2:24 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Krispy Kreme > Dunkin Donuts
posted by empath at 2:25 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


I like how, in Boston's Prudential Center/Copley Place complex, you can get to three Starbucks without going outside. (Two of them are even attached to the same Barnes & Noble.) Only one Dunkin, though.

Also, there's a huge two-story Starbucks in Harvard Square that's open until 1 AM seven days a week...and then another dinky one around the corner that no one cares about anymore. (There's a Dunkin there too, but it's surprisingly new.)
posted by danb at 2:26 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Would somebody please explain to me why I can't put my own sugar and creamer in my coffee at DD?

Just a guess here, but the official line is probably something like "Our beverage professionals are experts at providing the ideal proportions of cream and sugar and we consider their skill as part of the DD customer experience."

The truth is probably more along the lines that self-serve cream and sugar run out and create messes, so by not having it available they can keep employees behind the counter. I'm sure there has been some cost-benefit analysis that has been done on this. After all, DD hasn't actually *made* donuts on-premises for quite some time, instead they are all shipped in from a centralized location, keeping things standardized and cutting down employee costs.
posted by jeremias at 2:26 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hah, I was right. That Dunkin Donuts in the super inconvenient-to-me location in Austin is in fact the only one in at least a hundred miles. (And goddamn Krispy Kremes are everywhere. I like a nice big insulin trigger as well as anyone, but they can't do Boston Kreme for shit.)

Ooh! Can we please do a vacation swap or something? We're in an opposite living situation. I have at least 4 Dunkin' Donuts within a few miles of my house, but Krispy Kreme, our addiction of choice, is a 20 minute drive with traffic. :(
posted by misha at 2:28 PM on June 3, 2013


I like how, in Boston's Prudential Center/Copley Place complex, you can get to three Starbucks without going outside. (Two of them are even attached to the same Barnes & Noble.) Only one Dunkin, though.

From there you can take a tunnel to Back Bay station where there are two DDs under the same roof, within throwing distance of each other.
posted by bondcliff at 2:29 PM on June 3, 2013


> June 7th (this friday!) is National Donut Day

Free donut at Krispy Kreme, no purchase required.
Free donut at Dunkin' Donuts with purchase of beverage.
posted by needled at 2:29 PM on June 3, 2013


I still don't understand how Starbucks and Dunkin are direct competitors. Sure, they both have coffee. That's about it though. They serve completely different demographics. Not a lot of Starbucks people are going to switch to Dunkin, or vice versa.

Of course I'm in Minnesota, where Dunkin is unknown and Starbucks is unpopular and kind of run down. Caribou is the leading chain coffee shop here. I'm not sure about the quality of the coffee, but they're a much better hangout because they have comfy tables and chairs and they don't try to kick you out.
posted by miyabo at 2:29 PM on June 3, 2013


Would somebody please explain to me why I can't put my own sugar and creamer in my coffee at DD?

This, I believe.
posted by clavicle at 2:34 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm sorry, but there's no way that Voodoo donuts could be considered "artisinal." Blue Star Donuts, however, with their chipotle chocolate ganache and blueberry bourbon basil, and with descriptions like this:

Our donuts are made from a classic brioche recipe that originated in the south of France. The dough is made from scratch every day: we start with a certified sustainable bread flour from Shepherds Grain, add Cage Free eggs from Stiebrs Farms, mix in whole milk from Sunshine Dairy, and then fold in a European-style butter from Larsen’s Creamery. All the fruits that go into our fillings and glazes are organic, and we only cook our donuts in rice oil.

That's an artisinal donut.

I'd also consider the $3.75 gluten-free donut from Petunia's Pies and Pastries to qualify for artisinal donut status. But throwing some Captain Crunch on a glazed ring? Hardly that special.

*sigh* I miss the Portland area Dunkin Donuts.
posted by redsparkler at 2:34 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


The truth is probably more along the lines that self-serve cream and sugar run out and create messes

Well that's ridiculous, I won't patronize any coffee joint that doesn't have a self-service counter strewn with straw wrappers and sugar and semi-congealed creamer spills.
posted by prize bull octorok at 2:39 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


I just have to shout out to Gourdough's, which has an entire menu made from donuts.

No, really. Donut appetizers. Donut burgers. Sandwiches on donuts. Chicken and dumplings with donuts instead of dumplings.

It gets a touch cloying by the end of the meal, but the Big Cheez - "fresh mozzarella wrapped in donut dough and deep fried, served with garlic butter" - is in the running for Best Thing I've Ever Put In My Mouth.
posted by restless_nomad at 2:40 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Echoing Diablevert, Dunkin' taking doughnut bacon sandwich national
posted by hyperizer at 2:40 PM on June 3, 2013


If you go to the Durham Farmer's Market you can get donuts from Monuts Donuts and coffee from bikeCOFFEE. They set up their tricycles side by side. Our strategy has been for one of us to line up for donuts and the other person for caffeinated beverages, as lines can be long, and sometimes a delicious donut flavor will sell out while you're still in line (tragic!).
posted by research monkey at 2:40 PM on June 3, 2013


I am partial to Frosty's because really there is nothing better than a big glazed cruller. Mmmmmm.

It's apparently under new management and Christ no longer jizzes on every donut.
posted by Mayor Curley at 2:45 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Of course I'm in Minnesota, where Dunkin is unknown

This was actually a compelling data point in my decision not to move to Minnesota.

I still don't understand how Starbucks and Dunkin are direct competitors. Sure, they both have coffee. That's about it though. They serve completely different demographics. Not a lot of Starbucks people are going to switch to Dunkin, or vice versa.


Then there are those of us who go to both, all the time. Dunkin for sheer quantity, Starbucks for ... I dunno... treat yo self?
posted by like_a_friend at 2:46 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


and beneath it lies the aberration that is the "barbecue taco"

If pulled pork tacos are wrong, I don't want to be right.

I took a trip through Kentucky and Tennessee last year, and if a restaurant had pulled pork nachos on the menu, you bet we ordered some. Just the best.
posted by muddgirl at 2:46 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Would somebody please explain to me why I can't put my own sugar and creamer in my coffee at DD?

Clavicle is right, that's just a regular. A couple-three decades ago, whenever you got coffee at a truck or a counter, you just said how you liked it and they did the mixing. There were endless variations ("light" or "white" for just cream, milk only, half sugar, various sweeteners, etc). I didn't see sugar and milk put out for people to just handle anywhere until the late 1980s, except in a sit-down restaurant where they brought you an individual creamer and the sugar packets.

The beer one was pretty interesting. A few years ago I visited Wisconsin and was absolutely flabbergasted by the sheer number of neighborhood and local bars and breweries. I think it would be cool to layer this beer/grocery map over another map showing the inflow of immigrants to the US from Germany, Bohemia, etc in the nineteenth century.
posted by Miko at 2:47 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


True regionalism in barbecue is pretty much eroded. What we have left is styles, and you get almost any style anywhere, even if one dominates. It's hard to be a purist any more, as great barbecue is more common than ever in all its interpretations, though there are some excellent holdouts in Texas and, I'm sure, elsewhere.
posted by Miko at 2:49 PM on June 3, 2013


From the Atlantic link, it is interesting how the % of Farmers Markets that except SNAP is much higher in the northeast and the west coast, compared to the south.
posted by Seymour Zamboni at 2:51 PM on June 3, 2013


How can there only be 240 starbucksen in NYC? I am pretty sure there are more than that within walking distance of my house

I know, there is one in my goddamn building.Looking at the map it seems like it must be wall to wall Starbucks, at least 2 per block. They have been known to open across the street from eachother just to shut down regional competition.

Starbucks VS Dunkin Donuts is kinda a bullshit fight here anyway since there were never many Dunkin Donuts to begin with. The real fight is Starbucks vs Deli coffee.

Count me on team Deli, I been going to the same place for 10 years, with the same counter guy. He still makes me repeat my order 3 time. "large coffee, regular" "you said large, sweet and low?" "no, large coffee regular" "oh ok, large black coffee" "no , large regular". At least they have a cat.
posted by Ad hominem at 2:51 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've never understood the obsession people in the Northeast U.S. have with Dunkin Donuts. Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?
posted by Area Man at 2:58 PM on June 3, 2013


I don't know about the grocery stores in your area, Area Man, but around here the donuts they sell at the major grocery chains are loathsome abominations unworthy to bear the name of donut.
posted by prize bull octorok at 3:07 PM on June 3, 2013 [5 favorites]


Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?

There aren't enough of the former, and the latter generally doesn't have coffee/drive-through windows?

I would welcome Dunkin' Donuts to MN if it meant that it was easier to just go get a doughnut and a coffee around here. Of course, it would be better if it was Tim Hortons. Or better yet, Coffee Time.

/homesicktorontonian
posted by sparklemotion at 3:08 PM on June 3, 2013


but around here the donuts they sell at the major grocery chains are loathsome abominations unworthy to bear the name of donut.

Also if I go into a grocery store I am not leaving without entemanns' and that is just bad news for everyone.
posted by elizardbits at 3:10 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


i would commit international atrocities for their walnut danish ring
posted by elizardbits at 3:11 PM on June 3, 2013


You mean that wierd scrolly/not-scrolly thing was intentional?

Well, then, I'm entirely justified in not giving the slightest fuck about whatever data or opinion they're trying to exhibit.

On preview: Coffee Time indeed has the best treats. Especially the owner operated ones. With the full kitchen in the back. And the cheerful owner who just loves to bake. Albert at the corner of Philip in Waterloo, Ontario. Make the trip. It's worth it.
posted by seanmpuckett at 3:12 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I would welcome Dunkin' Donuts to MN if it meant that it was easier to just go get a doughnut and a coffee around here.

I don't live in the Northeast, and we don't have Dunkin Donuts, but I prefer the Shipley chain to our local Mom and Pop donut shop because the coffee at the Mom & Pop is literally nauseous ("offensive to the taste or smell").
posted by muddgirl at 3:12 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Love the curved barbell of Starbucks running down I-35 in Texas- Blob in the Austin metro area and then down the interstate for another blob in the SA metro area. Who needs roads? Show me the Starbucks spots and I can get you there!
posted by PuppyCat at 3:14 PM on June 3, 2013


Yeah, word. Sorry, Dunks, as long as you continue to be the king of breakfast, you cannot even be the viceroy of lunch. With great skpeticism shall we ever eye your tuna melts and ham-on-flatbreads.

Eh, Timmy's does okay. For limited values of okay equal to "better than McDonald's and mostly better than Subway." Their chili is pretty good for that sort of thing.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 3:14 PM on June 3, 2013


> True regionalism in barbecue is pretty much eroded.

<northcarolina style="eastern">Sorry. You're wrong.</northcarolina>
posted by ardgedee at 3:14 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


I still don't understand how Starbucks and Dunkin are direct competitors. Sure, they both have coffee. That's about it though. They serve completely different demographics. Not a lot of Starbucks people are going to switch to Dunkin, or vice versa.

Of course I'm in Minnesota, where Dunkin is unknown and Starbucks is unpopular and kind of run down. Caribou is the leading chain coffee shop here. I'm not sure about the quality of the coffee, but they're a much better hangout because they have comfy tables and chairs and they don't try to kick you out.


Interestingly, the guy they're quoting seems to be based in Milwaukee, otherwise I'd be blaming his analysis of Chicago on Boston-centric-ness. They do seem to compete in Boston, but not so much in Chicago. I find it hard to imagine someone going to a Dunkin Donuts in Chicago for coffee, as opposed to getting coffee in the process of getting a donut.

I have no idea what is with the lack of donuts in Minnesota. I don't even like donuts and it's noticeable. Starbucks does do a roaring trade near me, but I suspect the distribution of Starbucks vs Caribou vs Dunn Bros would probably be interesting if one were to map it. (I think the only not-in-a-grocery-store and not downtown Caribou I can think of is the one near campus, though 'places I go' is kind of a limited category, but I can think of at least three Starbucks and two or three Dunn Bros, depending on how you define downtown.)
posted by hoyland at 3:16 PM on June 3, 2013


Oh Entenmann's. I would commit novel and unspeakable intergalactic atrocities to get my hands on one of these again. Can't find them anywhere.
posted by prize bull octorok at 3:17 PM on June 3, 2013


Pretty sure that webpage layout image reveal thing was an accident and they were like, "actually, it's kind of cool, let's keep it."
posted by jeffamaphone at 3:20 PM on June 3, 2013


FWIW, that barbecue map as far as Texas goes is bunk. But I gug this one.
posted by PuppyCat at 3:21 PM on June 3, 2013


Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?

The mistake you're making is assuming that the doughnuts are the primary draw. I'm not saying nobody buys them, but if you actually watch the line at a DD, I would be shocked if more than 1 in 3 purchases includes food. Even when they do include food, it's usually an afterthought.

Krispy Kreme came up to MA and thought they could beat Dunks by having great doughnuts. And you know, they do have a great glazed donut -- but they have shit coffee. They misunderstood the market they were getting into. Unsurprisingly, Krispy Kremes around here all went under.
posted by tocts at 3:22 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah, I have to get donuts regularly for work so I've tried most of the donut places in Minneapolis. The only one that I really like is A Baker's Wife which is a little out of the way. But the donuts are only 50 cents and they're really good. I think the lack of donuts is due the saturation of Bruegger's Bagels outlets, which are topologically if not gastronomically competitive.
posted by miyabo at 3:26 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?


Well, the local bakeries and the grocery store near me only sell donuts by the dozen or half dozen. Which is great if I'm having six people over for brunch, but not so great if I want to pick up breakfast and coffee on the way to the train. I can't reasonably eat that many donuts before they go stale (and at the grocery store they're almost stale when you buy 'em).
posted by like_a_friend at 3:34 PM on June 3, 2013


I can't reasonably eat that many donuts before they go stale

You gotta believe in yourself. You can do it!
posted by thelonius at 3:53 PM on June 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


I love my local Dunkin Donuts. For many reasons:

1- It has a Baskin Robbins in it.
2- Their donuts are fresh.
3- They are clean and friendly.
4- A single donut is about half the size of anything at Starbucks.
5- They don't take themselves too seriously.

I'm mad at Dunkin Donuts, however, for eliminating the Dunkin Donut. That was the most delicious breakfast ever.

(Also, I *still* think I dreamed that I saw and ate at a Tim Hortons in Manhattan.)
posted by gjc at 4:11 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I can't reasonably eat that many donuts before they go stale

You could always make Donut Bread Pudding (aka Krispy Kreme Bread Pudding).
posted by needled at 4:16 PM on June 3, 2013


Bulgaroktonos: “I see one arrow that points to Virginia, that connects to a box describing Eastern and Western NC barbecue, which is what I meant. That map is kind of a mess; the colored outlines of regions are useful, but they need something defining areas with those regions. The arrows don't really do that very well.”

Yeah, what I meant is that the text for Virginia reads:
"Thick sweet (sugar and molasses) tomato-based sauce. Sauces can also be vinegary like Eastern NC or ketchup-vinegary like Western NC."
To me, that reads as a description of Virginia barbecue that just uses NC as a point of reference (as in, "sauces in Virginia can also be vinegary like Eastern NC..."). But it is a bit ambiguous, and moreover if it's just a point of reference there I'm not sure why they didn't actually say that in a separate description of NC barbecue. That map really is a mess, and not in the good sort of get-it-all-over-your-hands barbecue kind of way.
posted by koeselitz at 4:17 PM on June 3, 2013


I'm mad at Dunkin Donuts, however, for eliminating the Dunkin Donut. That was the most delicious breakfast ever.

Hey folks here's something not to Google on your work computer: "the dunkin donut"
posted by prize bull octorok at 4:23 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


I am not a coffee drinker so I almost never go to DD or SB. But for you folks who do go to DD, please let me know when they figure out how to make a decent bagel. Maybe I will go back.
posted by Seymour Zamboni at 4:54 PM on June 3, 2013


I never knew Dunkin Donuts was just an East Coast thing. I have fond memories of the ones in Westport and Stratford.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants at 5:21 PM on June 3, 2013


I am not a coffee drinker so I almost never go to DD or SB. But for you folks who do go to DD, please let me know when they figure out how to make a decent bagel. Maybe I will go back.

I always thought they were fine, except that they rarely toast them dark enough. What don't you like about them?
posted by gjc at 5:38 PM on June 3, 2013


Another useful map, at least for Bostonians: A heat map of Dunkin' Donuts proximity in Boston.

Not sure what Government Center workers are going to do when the MBTA shuts their subway stop for two years - and takes away one of the three Dunkin' Donuts within roughly 100 feet of each other (with a Starbucks somehow snuck in between two of them).
posted by adamg at 5:54 PM on June 3, 2013


FYI, the best doughnuts anywhere are available at The Donut Shoppe in Jacksonville, Florida. Though I understand they moved a few blocks down the street since the last time I visited, and now you don't have to get up nearly so early in the morning to score some.
posted by asperity at 6:06 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I want a count of the maximum number of each that can be viewed from a single location. There is one place I know of in Boston where you can see one DD from another one. In Brookline, of all places.
posted by grubby at 6:31 PM on June 3, 2013


But it is a bit ambiguous, and moreover if it's just a point of reference there I'm not sure why they didn't actually say that in a separate description of NC barbecue.

If you are making a map of American barbecue, you have one job. That job is to have an arrow pointing at North Carolina. If you want to go into greater depth after that, that's fine, but start with an arrow pointing at NC.
posted by Rock Steady at 6:43 PM on June 3, 2013


Man, this reminds of the an SNL skit I've been trying to find a copy of (from Season 18, episode 9):

"Whats the best way"

Stanley Sperrow: Ok folks, back to our game. From Hartford to Sturbridge -
(Katie buzzes in)
Katie McGregor: Ok, now that's straight on route 84, but you're gonna want to avoid the tourist traps up there, now, if you go up Manhill Road,you'll see a pretty Bed and Breakfast in Bradford - but that's a little out of your way, but it's very reasonable. And there's a farm (fahm) down the hill where you can get fresh Maine blueberries, of course, but that's only in the summer -
(Wrong answer)
Stanley Sperrow: Sorry Katie, I didn't finish the question. From Hartford to Sturbridge, how many Dunkin Donuts along the way?
(Tony buzzes in)
Stanley Sperrow: Tony.
Tony Vallencourt: Fourteen.
Stanley Sperrow: Correct! Bonus point for each drive-thru.
Tony Vallencourt: - Four
Stanley Sperrow: That's right!
Tony Vallencourt: Yeah, and the one in Caucus got this WICKED fat kid workin' there.

posted by mrzarquon at 7:41 PM on June 3, 2013 [5 favorites]


Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?

I grew up mostly in the NY/NJ area, and this might be surprising, but I didn't really know there was such a thing as a "mom and pop donut shop" until I was an adult. I only knew Dunkin for donuts. We did have local bakeries, many of them great, but they specialized in things like hard rolls, Italian cookies, crumb buns, cinnamon rolls. When they did have donuts, it was just a couple varieties - glazed, white frosted, yellow cake. For whatever cultural reasons which I'm sure would be fascinating to uncover, donuts were just not the speciality they chose and the donut product line was narrow. There was tons of other good stuff.

Meanwhile, Dunkin was where we went for a super special treat, to get the dozen box on Sundays. It's not that there weren't local bakeries, just that the donut niche was totally occupied by Dunkin.

Oh Entenmann's. I would commit novel and unspeakable intergalactic atrocities to get my hands on one of these again. Can't find them anywhere.

I have access to Entenmann's, and I have sad news. The quality has gone far downhill. I used to love, love, love many of their products - the tiny chocolate chip cookies, buttery and crumby with a hint of salt; the chocolate sheet cake with the rubbery icing; the Pop 'Ems mini donut holes. But a couple years ago I got a box of the cookies for a treat: and they were nasty. Insipidly sweet with none of the balance I remember. I tried the sheet cake, too, and it was the worst - just absent of flavor, with a dry spongey texture. I suspect some big changes in recipes since the 80s/early 90s when last I ate those things, probably involving reformulations to get corn syrup into the batter. Long and short of it is they just don't taste the way they used to; it's a different product now.
posted by Miko at 7:47 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Duncan Doughnuts.
posted by capricorn at 7:57 PM on June 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I spent my adolescence in Chicago, and there was no Starbucks at the time (well, not outside of Seattle, anyway); it was usually Dunkin' Donuts, although there were plenty of other donut outlets, at that time. I first got into the Starbucks habit when I was in grad school in the early nineties. I'd take the train home to Chicago, and have to walk several blocks east from Union Station to the El line that I needed. Especially in winter, it was so great to have a place that was open and serving coffee and hot chocolate for the rest of the journey. (Chicago was one of the first places outside of Seattle that got a franchise.) Now, though, where I'm living, the nearest place (outside of a relatively new indie coffee shop, which is very nice but also relatively expensive) is a DD. And just when I'm trying to limit carbs, too.
posted by Halloween Jack at 8:11 PM on June 3, 2013


I've never understood the obsession people in the Northeast U.S. have with Dunkin Donuts. Is there something wrong with buying donuts from a locally owned bakery or a grocery store?

We often do this as well. Dunkie's is kind of the fast food of donuts - if you have to bring food to a meeting, they're probably on your way to work, open at 8:30AM, and relatively fast. The locations have parking lots or are close to public transportation. They're open during snowstorms and lockdowns. They aren't the best, but they're reliable enough and folks know what they like. You can get passable donuts and passable takeout coffee and no one is going to complain.

But if you really want to treat your coworkers, you stop at Lyndells or Vera's or whathaveyou.

They do seem to compete in Boston, but not so much in Chicago.

The thing is, they don't really compete, not all that much, in Boston at least. Starbucks is white collar. Dunkin Donuts is blue collar. You don't find Starbucks at construction sites and you don't find Dunkin Donuts in banking offices.
posted by maryr at 9:19 PM on June 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also - Harvard Square has not two, but THREE Starbucks (the new 2 story one, the small one on Church, and a third in The Garage). I think that's it. I don't think the coffee shop in The Coop is a Starbuck. There may be another one tucked in to one of the hotel lobbies, but I may just be thinking of that hotel over by the Aquarium.
posted by maryr at 9:27 PM on June 3, 2013


That article talks about Dunkin' Donuts expanding westward, but is it possible they've retreated eastward over the last two decades? I grew up in New Mexico and lived in Texas, and I recall DD being common in Albuquerque and elsewhere. I'd just assumed they were common nationwide until I learned otherwise from a similar discussion of DD/SB a few years ago.
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich at 3:01 AM on June 4, 2013


I don't think the coffee shop in The Coop is a Starbuck.

It's a Barnes & Noble cafe. B&N has the contract to manage the coop.
posted by Miko at 5:46 AM on June 4, 2013


Not a lot of Starbucks people are going to switch to Dunkin, or vice versa.

*raises hand*

I slowly transitioned from Starbucks to Dunkin' Donuts over the course of several years. Dunkin' Donuts has gigantic iced coffees, which is all I want, and the line always moves much faster. I could never tolerate going to Starbucks during the morning rush, but Dunkies I can do.

Moving to Boston helped, too.
posted by Metroid Baby at 6:30 AM on June 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Starbucks vs. Tim Horton's in Canada.

The map shouldn't limit the Tim Horton's locations to Canada. They've made huge advances into NY state in the last five years. The real commuter donut and coffee battle here around Ithaca for example is between TH and DD, with Starbuck's sidelined to a location next to a downtown hotel and a Target cafe in the mall. DD just opened a couple more gas station convenience store locations this year, so I would say they're winning the battle.

I don't really have a horse in this race (or the one vs. Starbucks) since I don't drink coffee or eat donuts very often - though I did get a quote-unquote tuna melt a few months ago at a Dunkin Donuts (while traveling with no better lunch options) and it was horrible (even worse than I expected).

I'll also mention that (having grown up and lived most of my life in the East) it had never occurred to me that Dunkin Donuts was primarily an East Coast thing.
posted by aught at 6:44 AM on June 4, 2013


Oh Entenmann's. I would commit novel and unspeakable intergalactic atrocities to get my hands on one of these again. Can't find them anywhere.

Sad to have to agree with Miko on Entenmann's having nowhere the same appeal as it did when I was in my late teens and early 20s (early 80s). I was willing to believe it was me who had changed, but Miko's detailed comment reassures me it was the product all along. ;-)
posted by aught at 6:49 AM on June 4, 2013


I thought it was me too, perhaps loss of childhood taste buds or absence of certain taste-enhancing substances, but after I noticed the change I googled around and a lot of people have complained. They have been through a whole string of corporate takeovers/mergers and so it's not surprising that production has changed.

The map shouldn't limit the Tim Horton's locations to Canada. They've made huge advances into NY state in the last five years.

They're all over New England now, too - nowhere near DD's density, but visible. First I heard of that chain was in about 2004 when they took over one of our local outlets for Bess Eaton, a small southern-New England regional chain with mediocre donuts, but good coffee, famous for the Bible verses printed on the styrofoam cups.
posted by Miko at 7:45 AM on June 4, 2013


Something something Marylou's? I don't think I ever had their coffee when I was living on the Cape, as I couldn't bear the color scheme (sorry, TPS).
posted by Rock Steady at 7:58 AM on June 4, 2013


Ohhh yeah! Marylou's is the place that only hires traditionally attractive young women. I knew someone whose sister worked there and was on one of their TV commercials.

I'd much rather get my coffee from the surly older ladies at Verna's, but that's the free market for ya.
posted by Metroid Baby at 8:28 AM on June 4, 2013


Only hiring attractive young women for certain customer-facing jobs seems to be a thing in MA -- on the south shore in particular. I mean, seriously, I think it was maybe 5 years ago that I first can recall seeing a man (teenaged boy really) working at Peaceful Meadows, and even then it was at a ratio of about 20:1 Girls:Boys. The same is true of every single-store mom 'n pop ice cream stand I can recall in my whole life living in MA.

That said, Marylou's does have some great coffee. If I still lived near one, I would be going there over DD any day. Sadly, they have not, as of yet, managed to get west of Rt. 24.
posted by tocts at 9:58 AM on June 4, 2013


tocts: The same is true of every single-store mom 'n pop ice cream stand I can recall in my whole life living in MA.

Definitely true in my experience, too. I always assumed it was because dudebros didn't think working at a ice cream stand for the summer was manly enough, and they'd rather be landscapers or parking lot attendants or whatever. I never thought that it might be discrimination on behalf of management. I guess I'll have to take this ice cream out of my invisible insulated backpack.
posted by Rock Steady at 10:26 AM on June 4, 2013


Entenmann's is currently owned by Bimbo Bakeries USA, which is a branch of a Mexican company, Grupo Bimbo, the largest baking company in the world.

Grupo Bimbo.

Cookie, anyone?
posted by Kirth Gerson at 11:16 AM on June 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I live in a Mexican neighborhood, and EVERYTHING in my grocery store has the Bimbo logo on it. As ubiquitous as Kraft and Nabisco everywhere else, except you actually notice it because the logo looks like this.
posted by phunniemee at 11:20 AM on June 4, 2013


Aw, Bimbo is cute.
posted by Miko at 11:35 AM on June 4, 2013


Naturally I assume he's looking off camera to check out his BF Snuggle.
posted by phunniemee at 11:38 AM on June 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I guess bimbo means something else in Spanish.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 12:30 PM on June 4, 2013


Bimbo makes the absolute best "wonder bread" style white bread in the world. As soft as a marshmallow and almost sweet tasting. When you want that kind of bread, pick yourself up a nice fresh loaf of it.

(Also, Mrs. Freshley's twinkies are better than the real thing.)
posted by gjc at 4:08 PM on June 4, 2013


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