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Previously, on Mad Men
June 6, 2013 9:56 AM   Subscribe

There are only three more episodes in the penultimate season of Mad Men. Let's look back on what we've seen so far.

In previous seasons:

Every on-screen drink in Mad Men.

Every cigarette smoked on Mad Men previously

Don Draper says "What" previously

Don Draper comes to "Jesus"

The best of Roger Sterling's one-liners
and the complete list of Roger Sterling's quips.

Joan leaves the room

Everyone Don slept with in season 4

March Madness

Seasons 1 & 2 hook-ups

Next on Mad Men h/t

This season:

Pete Campbell falls down

Stan flips Peggy the bird.

Don and Ted Chaough fly to visit a client.

Ken Cosgrove dances to Daft Punk h/t

Abe got stabbed and Don, Betty, and Bobby sing "Father Abraham" (with the right!).

Roger Sterling gets punched in the balls and Pete Campbell gets high.
posted by donajo (2244 comments total) 70 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is the second-to-last season?
posted by quonsar II: smock fishpants and the temple of foon at 9:59 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Yep!
posted by The Whelk at 9:59 AM on June 6, 2013


It is. I checked. </penultimate police>
posted by mazola at 10:00 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


*Sob.*
posted by mynameisluka at 10:00 AM on June 6, 2013


Don is a dead man in 3 episodes, calling it now
posted by smackwich at 10:02 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Roger Sterling gets punched in the balls.

This is where I reached peak Mad Men. It was beautiful.
posted by Big_B at 10:03 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Last episode is Don eating onion rings with his family and a smash to black.
posted by entropicamericana at 10:03 AM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


Coming up on the antepenultimate episode of the penultimate season: Pete's auntie offers SC&P the ultimate pen account, but will the relationship with Bic stick?
posted by psoas at 10:05 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Abe got stabbed and Don, Betty, and Bobby sing "Father Abraham" (with the right!).

When that happened I said out loud to my wife 'If the next twenty minutes of this episode is just these three doing this song I will be okay with that.'
posted by shakespeherian at 10:06 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


Last season is Don and Peggy solving crimes.

Shh it is
posted by sweetkid at 10:06 AM on June 6, 2013 [26 favorites]


Sixteen episodes remain in all of Mad Men.

1. They won't kill Don, Six Feet Under did that.

2. They won't repeat the exact ending of The Sopranos. Though I do think the show will go out with a whimper. Definitely Weiner's style.

3. I don't think they'll do a left-turn final season like Roseanne winning the lottery or Angel & Co. taking over Wolfram & Hart. Those mostly happen when they wrap the show up because they anticipate cancellation, but then SURPRISE RENEWAL. Which isn't the situation with Mad Men.
posted by Sara C. at 10:07 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Tony Soprano's father and Uncle Junior kneecap Don while Tony waits in the car and listens to the radio
posted by briank at 10:08 AM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


So it's crimes then.
posted by sweetkid at 10:09 AM on June 6, 2013


The last season takes place in the Amber universe where Glenn and Betty team up against Walternate at Kenny Cosgrove's Carnival. Every episode features Pete Campbell falling down the stairs.
posted by shakespeherian at 10:09 AM on June 6, 2013 [15 favorites]


Sara C., can you tell us the odds on George Hearst having the SC&P office burnt to the ground?
posted by entropicamericana at 10:09 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


I have horrible associations with the song "Father Abraham", could barely stomach that scene, and cannot watch any youtube supercut video that even remotely implies that any part of that scene could be in there at all.

This is why you should never pawn your kids off on the bigger, fancier all-summer-long Vacation Bible School that the local megachurch does in lieu of childcare during the summer.
posted by Sara C. at 10:09 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I've predicted it before but there is only one possible ending for Don. Miami Vice Houseboat in Florida. Coke spoon in the chest hair. Ugly tan. Black teeth. Hacking his lungs out writing a novel and throwing chunks of it into the sea every night.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:11 AM on June 6, 2013 [26 favorites]


Tony Soprano's father and Uncle Junior kneecap Don while Tony waits in the car and listens to the radio

I've been hoping for sly references to the Soprano crime family for the whole show. I mean, I'd take a background radio broadcast that says "Giovanni Francis "Johnny Boy" Soprano was arrested today on racketeering charges following a raid of the Newark Longshoreman's Union headquarters..." or the like.
posted by Sara C. at 10:11 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Don and Joan are visited by Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock and are drafted to replace Gary Seven and Terri Garr, who were killed by government alien hunters shortly after that one episode.
posted by briank at 10:12 AM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


It was all implanted into Dick Whitman's mind by Communist agents after Dick was captured in Korea.
posted by Thorzdad at 10:13 AM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


odds on George Hearst having the SC&P office burnt to the ground?

I wonder what the odds are that Patty Hearst will?

(Just kidding, I think the Hearst kidnapping all happened in like '73, and I don't think the Symbionese Liberation Army ever got out of California.)
posted by Sara C. at 10:13 AM on June 6, 2013


There was a sly reference to 30 Rock in one episode this season (the one where Ted Chaough orders an Old Spanish). Perhaps the ending will be 200 years in the future with an immortal Bob Benson running SC&P and pondering a new ad campaign based on the lives of the famed "Mad Men" of the 1960s.
posted by Cash4Lead at 10:16 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Why Hearst...?
posted by sweetkid at 10:17 AM on June 6, 2013


The more I see of Bob Benson the more I'm convinced he's twelve hundred locusts in a human suit.
posted by shakespeherian at 10:17 AM on June 6, 2013 [28 favorites]


CONSPIRUCY
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:17 AM on June 6, 2013


Last season is Don and Peggy solving crimes.

Shh it is


What? Of course not. That's just absurd.

The last season is Peggy and Sally solving crimes.

Kristen Bell has a cameo in the pilot.
posted by Tomorrowful at 10:18 AM on June 6, 2013 [17 favorites]


What if Bob Benson is that bear everyone over at Uproxx keeps talking about?
posted by Sara C. at 10:18 AM on June 6, 2013


I think there's plenty of violence to go around and take out Megan of the Tall Teeth.

There's always the Weather Underground in 1970, though, blowing up that place in Greenwich, right? Maybe they're Peggy's renter upstairs and Megan happens to be visiting ....

I'm thinking that Bob and Peggy and Joan will start their own company, looping in Harry for the LA coverage. Joan and Bob marry, kind of a bearding situation (since they're working so hard to paint him as undercover aware gay).

And Ted gets Don and that other guy up in a plane and crashes it, possibly unintentionally.
posted by tilde at 10:19 AM on June 6, 2013


I'm ready for that show to come to an end. Jeez it's getting terrible.
posted by Keith Talent at 10:19 AM on June 6, 2013


That squishy popping sound you just heard was my liver exploding after watching the first video.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 10:20 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


In the last episode, Pete finally takes out that hunting rifle from the first season and tries to go postal on everyone, but

A) he realizes he has no ammo and his secretary has no idea where to buy ammo in Manhattan at 3pm on the Friday before Labor Day Weekend,

B) he realizes he has no idea how to shoot a gun,

and/or

C) the thing doesn't even work considering it's been moldering in a series of offices for the last decade.
posted by Sara C. at 10:20 AM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


Fuck, now "Father Abraham" is on repeat in my head.
posted by mynameisluka at 10:20 AM on June 6, 2013


I don't get the hate for Bob Benson, he's just bland, that's the point. Not horrible, not brilliant, not noble, not evil, just an ad executive, like they all are everywhere now. He might commit an atrocity or betrayal, but only if ordered. He will be the boss, but only by default of survival. He's the boring ass present creeping in mediocre-izing the world. He's worthless.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:21 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


In the last season, Don blows up Roger Sterling and becomes Ad Kingpin, marries Peggy, then is murdered along with Peggy and Joan and the entire wedding party by Pete Campbell. The final scene is Pete eating in the diner while "Don't Stop Believin'" plays on the jukebox. Smash cut to black, then after a beat, Don wakes up next to Suzanne Pleshette, who murders him again, beating him to death with Tommy Westphall's snowglobe. Smash cut to black, offscreen, Nelson laughs, "Ha Ha!" [in fine]
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 10:22 AM on June 6, 2013 [15 favorites]


I'm seeing Don driving off, alone, in some horrible '70s car, California bound...
posted by mynameisluka at 10:24 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


C) the thing doesn't even work considering it's been moldering in a series of offices for the last decade.

IT'S A CHIP AND DIP
posted by shakespeherian at 10:24 AM on June 6, 2013 [20 favorites]


They all end up on an empty Earth and Starbuck just vanishes. We all know how it ends.
posted by GuyZero at 10:24 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I don't get the hate for Bob Benson, he's just bland, that's the point.

It's not hatred, it's suspicion.
posted by shakespeherian at 10:25 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I'm still pondering that last scene in the latest episode (not exactly any spoilers to follow). What was the emphasis on Pete smoking a doobie to Janis? Was it just stupid? It was the first real "The 60s" reference that seemed lame Time-Life Booksish. Is that supposed to be the point? The moment when the counter-culture entered even the lamest person's life? Idk.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:26 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sometimes you have a really shitty day and just want to SMOKE A FUCKING DOOB.
posted by lalochezia at 10:27 AM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


The series ends with Don and Bobby taking a flight together. Bobby gets invited into the cockpit, insults the co-pilot and then the pilot asks him if he likes movies about gladiators. Fade to black.
posted by drezdn at 10:27 AM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


I don't get the hate for Bob Benson, he's just bland, that's the point. Not horrible, not brilliant, not noble, not evil, just an ad executive, like they all are everywhere now.

I don't see hate at all for Bob Benson, unless it's from the other account executives on the show. From fans of the show, I see only fascination. But viewers are wise to Matt Weiner's ways now, of moving background characters more and more into the center until suddenly they're married to Don Draper. I think Bob Benson is supposed to serve some purpose, and it's just fun figuring out what it will be.
posted by gladly at 10:27 AM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


The moment when the counter-culture entered even the lamest person's life?

Was that Pete's first joint? Why do I have it stuck in my head that Pete shared a joint at some earlier point?
posted by Thorzdad at 10:28 AM on June 6, 2013


Potomac Avenue: It's Pete finally giving up on trying to be The Good One Who Is Right All The Time because he's been feeling shut out of every aspect of his life for the last several episodes. I am sort of hoping the future has in store Pete Going Off The Deep End and talking to everyone about Pink Floyd at every opportunity or something.
posted by shakespeherian at 10:28 AM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


I think the Pete scene was a sign that he was giving up fighting.
posted by drezdn at 10:28 AM on June 6, 2013


If that's all it was then that it was too on-the-nose to be successful I think. Unless in the next ep we're greeted with Pete the Hippie Dork in scene 1.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:31 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


don't see hate at all for Bob Benson, unless it's from the other account executives on the show. From fans of the show, I see only fascination. But viewers are wise to Matt Weiner's ways now, of moving background characters more and more into the center until suddenly they're married to Don Draper. I think Bob Benson is supposed to serve some purpose, and it's just fun figuring out what it will be.

I was going to say this - no one hates Bob Benson, it's fascination and in my case at least, affection for his two-coffee-cup weirdness.

He's fun.
posted by sweetkid at 10:31 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Maybe I just hate Freedom Rock more than I'm supposed to.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 10:31 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I can't believe it didn't occur to me until the last thread that the whole summer camp "Bobby 5" thing was a Count the Bobbys joke, and I can't believe I didn't realise until just now that the "Father Abraham had Seven Sons" thing totally was too.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:32 AM on June 6, 2013 [19 favorites]


He's the boring ass present creeping in mediocre-izing the world. He's worthless.

No, he's also cute and helpful.

Also the Pete/Janis Song ...read the lyrics, so many heart motifs in this season, right down to being stabbed in one.
posted by The Whelk at 10:34 AM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Final scene, last episode: Don wakes in the apartment, rolls over, Megan is gone. He gets out of bed, coughs, and walks to the kitchen.

We see the back of his head, just as we did in the very first shot of the series. Sitting silently at the kitchen counter are all 5 (5? 4? 6?) Bobby Drapers, waiting. We see the back of his head again.

Cut to black, some iconic pop song you forgot about plays.
posted by dyobmit at 10:34 AM on June 6, 2013 [14 favorites]


Also it's Meredith who is secretly a KGB mole or whatever. She's freaking Princess Giselle
posted by The Whelk at 10:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Next season Joan, Peggy, and Moira (yes, Moira!) will be called upon to fight crime for a top-secret organization led by a disembodied voice who only contacts them by telephone.
posted by Superplin at 10:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Potomac Avenue: "Maybe I just hate Freedom Rock more than I'm supposed to."

Have you tried turning it up, man?
posted by Chrysostom at 10:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [24 favorites]


I think the Pete and Doobie scene was part 'Pete stops fighting against everything around him' and part 'the moment when the counter-culture entered even the lamest person's life.'

The times, they are a changin', man.
posted by saul wright at 10:37 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


I know I've posted this theory before, but: I always kind of assumed that Madmen, like the sixties themselves, would end at Altamont. Now I'm just waiting for the plot twists that turn Joan into a vengeful Hells Angel security guard and Pete Campbell into a doomed Stones fan.
posted by Sonny Jim at 10:38 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Pete ends up as a back to the land proto-yuppie type but is REALLY REALLY aggressive and competitive about it, MY COMPOST IS BEST COMPOST EVERYONE IS DOING IT WRONG I AM WINNING AT BEING LAID BACK.

Basically Pete becomes Pat from Achewood.
posted by The Whelk at 10:38 AM on June 6, 2013 [12 favorites]


Fuck, now "Father Abraham" is on repeat in my head.

Unless you are me when I was doing two miles' worth of laps in the pool last week, you have no idea the kind of madness that song causes.
posted by psoas at 10:39 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I like the idea that Bob Benson represents the bland competence that inherits the world. The history of western civilization is one of iconic individualistic leaders slowly being replaced by soulless automatons. Benson embodies this change.
posted by Keith Talent at 10:39 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


I see Pete as more of a Herman's Hermits fan.
posted by drezdn at 10:39 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I always kind of assumed that Madmen, like the sixties themselves, would end at Altamont.

Which ties into all the stabbings lately.
posted by drezdn at 10:42 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ending at Altamont would be the opposite of the "going out with a whimper" idea tho.
posted by sweetkid at 10:44 AM on June 6, 2013


I had a theory that Mad Men would end with a bunch of dark happenings, and then the first moon landing. That would leave out Woodstock and nearly half of '69 though.
posted by drezdn at 10:46 AM on June 6, 2013


Oh my god Pete already kind of is Pat from Achewood. Roger is Ray.
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:47 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


That would make Don ....Clown Penis?

Bert is Cornelius Bear of course.
posted by The Whelk at 10:49 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ken is Theodor. (wait no PEGGY is Theodor)
posted by The Whelk at 10:49 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


(also, Don face down in a pool? Sunset Boulevard or Great Gatsby allusion? It can be both!)
posted by The Whelk at 10:51 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


It is pretty easy to hear Don saying, "Pretty good, man. Bought a boat, bought a plane."

I am still struggling with Roast Beef. Ginsberg is too outgoing and confident.
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:51 AM on June 6, 2013


Wait I never read Achewood before and now I'm trying to figure all that out
posted by sweetkid at 10:52 AM on June 6, 2013


Was it just stupid? It was the first real "The 60s" reference that seemed lame Time-Life Booksish.

I think part of the problem is that "Take Another Little Piece Of My Heart" was in one of those SONGS OF THE SIXTIES compilation commercials back in the mid 90s. It's a great song, but it's one of those songs that's, like, super iconic THAT IS A SONG THAT IS FROM THE 60s along with "Turn, Turn, Turn", "If You're Goin' To San Francisco", "Blowin' In The Wind", "My Generation", etc.

I think Mad Men can use songs like that, but it has to really earn them. I'm not sure it was entirely earned in this situation. Though it helps that it's Pete, and that the song lyrically makes sense, and that it inverts the usual ideas people are trying to evoke with the song.
posted by Sara C. at 10:54 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Aside form Don's near constant suicidal ideaation and self-destruction, there's really no one in the main cast as nakedly depressive and anxiety ridden as Roast Beef.
posted by The Whelk at 10:54 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Not just crimes, sweetkid. Unmasking ghosts. I was kind of joking when I said this in the last thread. I'm not joking now. Make it happen, Weiner!
posted by .kobayashi. at 10:55 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Isn't Bob Benson the guy from Office Space? He is just there waiting for printers to be invented.
posted by srboisvert at 10:56 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


So I guess Bob is Philippe?
posted by entropicamericana at 10:56 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I like to think they earn these little moments just cause of how far the show goes to avoid them usually. Like I would've bet good money last season would end on "Different Drum", but "You Only Live Twice" is so much more perfect and less on the nose-look-its-the-60s!

Actually all the music in the series is really well chosen. Even the Zany Caper Music Which Foretells Something Horrible About To Happen.
posted by The Whelk at 10:56 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


HERE COMES A SPECIAL ACCOUNTS MAN
posted by The Whelk at 10:57 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


It also makes fundamental sense that Don is Beef, just because Roger/Pete/Don can then map onto the Achewood power trio: Roger and Don, who are tight despite their vast differences of worldview and background, and then Pete, who they hang out with mostly because he's always been there.

But which one is the Professor?
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:58 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Isn't Bob Benson the guy from Office Space?

No. Bob Benson is the man everyone wants Peter Gibbons to be.
posted by saul wright at 10:58 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


HERE COMES A SPECIAL ACCOUNTS MAN

Secret Accounts Man!
Secret Accounts Man!
He's givin' you a coffee,
And takin' away your name!
posted by The Underpants Monster at 11:00 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Yeah, The Whelk. They do such a great job with it that I'm always willing to give them the benefit of the doubt.

I didn't like that one time in Season 1 where they used a Decemberists song, though. Does not work. Need period music, even over the credits.
posted by Sara C. at 11:00 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


oh Peter Gibbons' girlfriend would have LOVED Bob Benson.
posted by sweetkid at 11:00 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


They used Cardigans Season 1 too.

I didn't mind the anachronistic stuff.
posted by sweetkid at 11:00 AM on June 6, 2013


I've never seen an episode of Mad Men (no, not a one), and so the only things about Mad Men that I know are the bits that filter through to me via the stuff folks type or say about Mad Men (in other words, hearsay, which makes me the sharpest seer, because these eyes are virgin eyes) and most of that seems to be about the iconic retro fashion zeitgeist Mad Men tapped into and exploited, which suggests to me that the show ends where that particular flavor of cool ended, which was... where?

Polyester.
posted by notyou at 11:01 AM on June 6, 2013


no, you just have to watch the show.
posted by sweetkid at 11:02 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


[SPOILER] In the next episode, Megan runs off with Sargent Stadanko.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 11:04 AM on June 6, 2013


Yeah, I think the cool retro fashion esthetic was how a lot of people got interested, but there is much more to the show than that.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:05 AM on June 6, 2013


The thing about the zeitgeist of decades is that they bleed together, they're always in transition. Fashions in the first half of Mad Men called back to the '50s, and the second half calls forward to the '70s, which means everyone's already been drowning in polyester for a season and a half. Especially Joan, whose array of feminine superpowers includes an inability to sweat.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:06 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


The link showing the GIF of Pete falling down the stairs is flawed: It doesn't show him slipping that last step on his butt after his fall. That last little step is what makes it art.

Of all the character arcs that are going to unfold, I'm most fascinated to see what happens to Pete. I mean, really, who cares what happens to Don at this point? He'll either make peace with the two parts of his personality (Don and Dick) or he won't. Frankly, given the canon so far, having him learn to love himself wouldn't really be in character.

But Pete. He's finally realizing the futility of trying to succeed in the boardroom world (a realization Ken Cosgrove made some time ago). Maybe after 6+ seasons of watching Don trying to sort shit out, the big payoff is going to be seeing Pete find his bliss.
posted by dry white toast at 11:07 AM on June 6, 2013 [11 favorites]


1. Cooper dies, probably in this season finale. I originally typed Roger Sterling, but I think he is needed.
2. Peggy has some moments with her kid. Where is that kid by the way?
3. I don't really know what will happen with Don, though I imagine we will see more of him becoming less and less attractive to women. Since the show has chronicled his life to such a large degree, it would feel like a bit of a cheat if we don't get to see his ultimate fate.
posted by Kafkaesque at 11:08 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also we're dealing in a very conservative, rich, white miles that is resistant to change- the fact that were seeing trendy what we think of as the 60s looks bleeding into the show is cause, well the look had finally managed to reach even these squares.

Also you could make an argument that the iconic hippie 60s lasted two years, tops. Wasn't there a huge vogue for early 60s stuff in the early 00s?

Also Stan is Lyle on the Achewood map.
posted by The Whelk at 11:08 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Reading Too Much Into ‘Mad Men’: Compelling Evidence That Megan Draper Is Already Dead
posted by whir at 11:10 AM on June 6, 2013 [8 favorites]


Pete and Peggy, Business and Creativity. Making things together at first. Then growing further and further apart until you can't even remember that they used to be joined. Then, what? Something sparks again. An explosion. A new product is born again, to be owned, or given away or sold, or stolen, or loved.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 11:11 AM on June 6, 2013


I don't want to sell anything, buy anything, or process anything as a career. I don't want to sell anything bought or processed, or buy anything sold or processed, or process anything sold, bought, or processed, or repair anything sold, bought, or processed. You know, as a career, I don't want to do that.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:12 AM on June 6, 2013 [12 favorites]


In case you missed it in the other thread: Next on Mad Men Season 5 Supercut.
posted by box at 11:12 AM on June 6, 2013


I think its pretty self-evident. Megan dies. Don marries his secretary.

Next season, he dies of a heart attack, and she takes over. Her first day of work she walks in and says "There's a new Don Draper in town."

Then she winks at the camera and says "Dawn Draper."

End of series.
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 11:14 AM on June 6, 2013 [37 favorites]


LYLE
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:14 AM on June 6, 2013


Next season, he dies of a heart attack, and she takes over. Her first day of work she walks in and says "There's a new Don Draper in town."

Then she winks at the camera and says "Dawn Draper."


Given Mad Men's "ew, gross" approach to black people, that would be pretty shocking.
posted by sweetkid at 11:16 AM on June 6, 2013


I predict the current season will end in Jan. 1969 to include the publication of the then-mind-blowing Apollo 8 blue-marble photos, plus Nixon's inauguration for good measure.
posted by gubo at 11:16 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Something something Archie Bunker.
posted by sweetkid at 11:17 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


notyou, we are already well into the era of polyester and of the principal characters all looking like awkward garish fashion victims most of the time.

Sometimes you get a random guest hippie who looks cool to 2013 eyes, and there are notable exceptions (Megan, sometimes Joan, occasionally Peggy) who still look glamorous. But I think the people who were only watching for the slim cut suits and crinolines turned off a few seasons ago.
posted by Sara C. at 11:18 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I seriously want Betty to start dressing like Hookah Blond. I know there's no chance in hell, but I'd like it.
posted by sweetkid at 11:19 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Harry Crane, fashion victim number one.
posted by The Whelk at 11:19 AM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Then she winks at the camera and says "Dawn Draper."

End of series.


Not the end of the series, because it turns out that Dawn is actually an ancient key that opens a Hellmouth.

So they fire her, because her mouth is annoying as hell everytime she opens it.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 11:20 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think the series will end with Don dead or in jail.

Roger's going to kick the bucket at some point. I'm surprised he hasn't already.

Pete's well on his way to being some cranky old man no one likes already, and I don't see that changing. Likewise with Harry, only he'll be a sleazebag. But despite their personality problems, they're both very good at what they do, so they'll continue to do fairly well professionally.

I hope good things for Joan in terms of professional development and her finding a good man, but she always winds up taking it in the teeth, so I dread seeing her fate play out.

Barring any tragic accidents, Peggy will be fine too, continuing to succeed professionally and either finding the right guy for her or continuing to move from one relatively decent relationship to another. Megan will be fine once she leaves Don. Betty will probably be okay too. I hope Trudy finds a hot new husband who really loves and deserves her. Ken will continue to do well and be the happiest, most stable guy in the Mad Men world, as always.

Sally and Bobby's lives are just beginning, so there's no telling how they'll turn out — the same goes for all the other Mad Men kids, unless any of them die.

Things I want to find out: what's going on with Moira and Bob. And what happened to Sal Romano.

I think the cool retro fashion aesthetic was how a lot of people got interested

It's what reeled me in. I wanted to see what Joan was wearing, because I'd heard so much about how much better she looks on the show than Christina Hendricks usually looks in real life, and as a voluptuous redhead myself I was hoping to pick up on a few tips and ideas.
posted by orange swan at 11:20 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peggy has some moments with her kid. Where is that kid by the way?

It has been established that she put the kid up for adoption.

Did you mean Joan? My guess is that we don't see Kevin much for the same reason we rarely see Gene and have maybe never seen Tammy Campbell -- toddlers are boring, expensive, and hard to direct. I can't think of a storyline Mad Men would do that REQUIRED a toddler to be the focal point of a scene.
posted by Sara C. at 11:21 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Roger's going to kick the bucket at some point. I'm surprised he hasn't already.

Because John Slattery is FANTASTIC. As an actor and director.
posted by sweetkid at 11:22 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


It has been established that she put the kid up for adoption.

Ha. Shows how much I know.
posted by Kafkaesque at 11:23 AM on June 6, 2013


but she always winds up taking it in the teeth, so I dread seeing her fate play out.

Yeah Joan's THING is that she always gets what she wants in the worst possible way, which is why I'm gunning for a bearding-kinda relationship with Bob (who if he's not queer I'll eat my hat, Stonewall is just months away) cause, nice guy who is not trying to get in her fitting blue business suit would be a nice change of pace and give her a measure of stability - although knowing how the show likes to treat Joan I can see it going into a very "A Single Man" place quickly.
posted by The Whelk at 11:24 AM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


She only ever says it blatantly, once, when she tells Pete that it happened after he tries to make a play for her. In season 3 or 4, I think?

And I don't think she uses the word "adoption", but "I gave it up."
posted by Sara C. at 11:25 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, Peggy's sister had a kid around the same time and that was the baby she was holding in a couple episodes. The fact that the babies were born around the same time was partially a plot point to mess with Peggy's resolve.
posted by mikeh at 11:26 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


At some point in the last season Joan has to stab Pete in the neck with a letter opener.
posted by shakespeherian at 11:27 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Speaking of Baby Gene, shouldn't he be old enough to be more of a factor, now? He's got to be at least four at this point. We saw (a version of) Bobby at that age.
posted by Sara C. at 11:27 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


In a thread from last year, I wrote:

If they are going to kill anyone ..., which I don't count as a certainty this season, how about Megan?Don's already had one divorce and already had the wife who just pretended not to see his affairs. We've seen him self-destruct the rest of his romantic relationships in various ways. So if they want to go in a different direction with this relationship...

Well, they didn't kill Megan that season or the next but those sirens are getting louder and louder. Don was actually shouting over them. And everyone was all "Oh, not this again," when it looked like Don was going to blow things up with Megan via Sylvia. On the other hand I think it might inject a bit too much chaos. With her increasing TV screen time, maybe she'll get some sort of California-based movie offer which will lead to a showdown with Don.
posted by mikepop at 11:28 AM on June 6, 2013


Megan Draper had many teeth.
Many teeth had Megan Draper.
posted by Kabanos at 11:28 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Ken will continue to do well and be the happiest, most stable guy in the Mad Men world, as always.

We don't know what's been happening to him in Detroit. We need a comic book spinoff or something.
posted by mikepop at 11:29 AM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


The fact that the babies were born around the same time was partially a plot point to mess with Peggy's resolve.

Also to troll the shit out of everyone, because it's never actually SAID that her sister was pregnant or that that the baby is her nephew. You have to be really observant in the flashback to Peggy's family visiting her in the mental hospital.
posted by Sara C. at 11:29 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Also to troll the shit out of everyone, because it's never actually SAID that her sister was pregnant or that that the baby is her nephew. You have to be really observant in the flashback to Peggy's family visiting her in the mental hospital.

Yeah, that was a beautifully ambiguous piece of writing.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:30 AM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Well, they didn't kill Megan that season or the next but those sirens are getting louder and louder. Don was actually shouting over them. And everyone was all "Oh, not this again," when it looked like Don was going to blow things up with Megan via Sylvia. On the other hand I think it might inject a bit too much chaos. With her increasing TV screen time, maybe she'll get some sort of California-based movie offer which will lead to a showdown with Don.

Yea I felt like we had this huge misdirection where everyone thought Megan would find out about Sylvia and it would be a showdown, but then everything with Sylvia fizzled quickly.

Kind of why I think with the huge arrows pointing to Tate/Megan, there might be a bit more misdirection going on.

Although last season I recognized the misdirection with everyone thinking Pete was going to die and it turned out to be Lane. I don't think Dead Pete would be good for the show, but Dead Lane is working out just fine.

(Sorry I do love you Jared Harris).
posted by sweetkid at 11:32 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


And what happened to Sal Romano.

He adopted Chauncey Phillips.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 11:34 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I saw Jared Harris talk about finding out he was going to die off on the show in LA. He said as Weiner was walking him out of his office, after breaking the news, they passed a sign in the hall that said "Lane Ends." Weiner pointed to the sign and said "That's where I got the idea!"
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 11:34 AM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


That is cold.
posted by sweetkid at 11:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Harry Crane is just going to keep falling up until he's insisting that Superman The Movie have a huge robot spider in it
posted by The Whelk at 11:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [17 favorites]


Also, on most shows, a death going as unmentioned as Lane's would feel like the character was being shuffled under the rug by the creators; on Mad Men it's just par for the repressed and past-smothering course.

I think only Dawn (the only person to express sympathy) and Pete ("two of those men are as dead as doornails") have been the only ones to mention Lane all year. I wonder if anyone ever moved into his office, though.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:35 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think only Dawn (the only person to express sympathy)

What do you mean? Joan seemed devastated.
posted by sweetkid at 11:36 AM on June 6, 2013


I thought they were going to put the staircase in Lane's office, but no. Maybe it's a storage closet now.
posted by donajo at 11:37 AM on June 6, 2013


Ken will continue to do well and be the happiest, most stable guy in the Mad Men world, as always.

We don't know what's been happening to him in Detroit. We need a comic book spinoff or something.


Uptil this season I would've agreed with you, he's getting it in the teeth from the Chevy guys. I expect a full on Roman A'Clef about the ad world published under a pseudonym soon
posted by The Whelk at 11:37 AM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I think they should all become costumed vigilantes.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 11:37 AM on June 6, 2013


yea Ken's coming unglued. I don't know if it matters though.
posted by sweetkid at 11:37 AM on June 6, 2013


Has anyone made a map of SCDP/SC&P? I feel like it would be really helpful to keep track of the shifting power dynamics.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:38 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh, no, Joan definitely was -- I was talking about this season only, after the initial shock. Not quite fair of me to say only Dawn was sympathetic, just that only Dawn was still talking about him sympathetically.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:38 AM on June 6, 2013


I think they should all become costumed vigilantes.


"Dog carcass in alley this morning, tire tread on burst stomach. This city's afraid of me. I've seen its true face. The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood. And when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown. The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout "Save us!"... and I'll look down and whisper "No." Now the whole world stands on the brink staring down into bloody hell. All those liberals, and intellectuals, and smooth-talkers; and all of a sudden no one can think of anything to say. Beneath me, this awful city, it screams like an abattoir full of retarded children. And the night reeks of fornication and bad consciences." - Pete Cambell
posted by The Whelk at 11:40 AM on June 6, 2013 [12 favorites]


Looks like someone did, though it's from a few years ago and doesn't reflect the still-nebulous second floor.

I have a dubious sense of space and never picked up that Don's and Peggy's offices were actually next to each other.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:40 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete Cambell Taxi Driver
posted by Potomac Avenue at 11:41 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Gene was born June 1963, so he's five. Which is how old Bobby was in Season 2.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:42 AM on June 6, 2013


...And now Peggy's as far away from Don as she can get, though next to Ted and across from Joan.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:42 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


They should do one whole episode next season like the Crimer Twitter account.
posted by sweetkid at 11:43 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


...And now Peggy's as far away from Don as she can get, though next to Ted and across from Joan.

Yup. Brilliant.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:45 AM on June 6, 2013


Yea I felt like we had this huge misdirection where everyone thought Megan would find out about Sylvia and it would be a showdown, but then everything with Sylvia fizzled quickly.

Funny, I've now come back around to the idea that Megan will find out about Sylvia and that the whole Sharon Tate/stabby/murder/siren thing is misdirection. I mean, Sylvia and Artie still live in the building. Megan knows nothing so would presumably still be friendly with Sylvia, and socially it wouldn't be appropriate for Sylvia to completely shun Megan. Sylvia and Artie's marriage is still in the toilet. The thing about shitting where you eat is that the shit stays there.

That said I'm not sure where the story goes from Megan finding out. Like, does she find out but forgive him? I doubt it would end their marriage. But maybe it would? They already did the "I want to leave you but now I'm pregnant" thing with Betty, and have already done an abortion story with Joan, so it seems unlikely that they'll rehash either of those.
posted by Sara C. at 11:45 AM on June 6, 2013


I've said it before, I'll say it again: Megan is deaddeaddead. And I call Ginsberg with a knife in the Draper apartment.

Ginsberg is gonna BLOW.
posted by Capt. Renault at 11:46 AM on June 6, 2013


that's a joke right?
posted by sweetkid at 11:47 AM on June 6, 2013


I wonder if anyone ever moved into his office, though.

I wonder if this was the inspiration behind the merger.

If only we had some new people who didn't know about the Lane thing so we could FINALLY fill that office...

There was also that big scene where Joan made a big show of assigning everyone to their new offices. I bet you anything they made sure to put a CGC person in Lane's.
posted by Sara C. at 11:48 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I don't think that map is an accurate portrayal of SCDP, thesmallmachine. Wasn't Lane's office next to Pete's? I thought when he had hanged himself, they discovered him by peeking through Pete's partition. Or am I misremembering?
posted by .kobayashi. at 11:48 AM on June 6, 2013


I don't think that map is an accurate portrayal of SCDP, thesmallmachine. Wasn't Lane's office next to Pete's? I thought when he had hanged himself, they discovered him by peeking through Pete's partition. Or am I misremembering?

Pete and Harry had switched offices by then.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:49 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Gene was born June 1963, so he's five. Which is how old Bobby was in Season 2.

That's weird, I feel like they're still in "help the baby put his shoes on" territory with him.
posted by Sara C. at 11:50 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


And "Peggy's" office next to Don was shared with Stan and Ginzo, of course, which is why it's never been empty.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:51 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete and Harry had switched offices by then.

Ah, well, that'd sort it. There you go.
posted by .kobayashi. at 11:52 AM on June 6, 2013


Gene is kept in storage when not in use.
posted by The Whelk at 11:52 AM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Pete and Harry had switched offices by then.

Did you remember that just, outta your brain? Damn I'm impressed.
posted by sweetkid at 11:52 AM on June 6, 2013


I feel like I had a good sense of the original Sterling Cooper offices but SCDP, especially now on two floors and with a bunch of CGC people to factor in, I have no idea. Aside from Peggy having the pillar office.
posted by Sara C. at 11:53 AM on June 6, 2013


My pet theory is that the show will end with Don jumping off the roof of the building, just like they show in the credits every episode.

Or maybe it's just a metaphor.
posted by Fleebnork at 11:53 AM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Did you remember that just, outta your brain? Damn I'm impressed.

Yeah, actually. The crappy office with the support column sticks out in my mind because so much as been made of it--Pete's fight to get out of it and give it to Harry and now Peggy getting stuck there.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:55 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


My pet theory is that the show will end with Don jumping off the roof of the building, just like they show in the credits every episode.

That was actually supposed to be Harry Crane. He was going to commit suicide at the end of the first season by leaping from the roof, but they decided they liked him too much. At least, that's Rich Sommer's understanding of it:

Q: I read somewhere on the interweb that Harry was actually supposed to die in the first couple of episodes, maybe even jumping off a building a la the opening credits? Is this true? (Also, I'd just like to say that I've seen The Devil Wears Prada approximately 37 times because HBO keeps running it, and I just realized now that you played Doug.)

A: I don't think it was supposed to be in the first couple episodes, but I definitely heard that rumor, too. And I only feel okay talking about it because I was not the one who put that out into the world. It was my understanding that Harry was to commit suicide. Um, thank God he didn't.

posted by Bunny Ultramod at 11:56 AM on June 6, 2013


yea no I remember the office just not the ordering of events. I guess that makes sense though since it was the last ep of season and it the switching happened last season
posted by sweetkid at 11:56 AM on June 6, 2013


I feel like I had a good sense of the original Sterling Cooper offices but SCDP, especially now on two floors and with a bunch of CGC people to factor in, I have no idea. Aside from Peggy having the pillar office.

Part of the problem is that we haven't seen a lot of it. Hell, as of the premiere I was sure that Bert still didn't have an office, until they revealed that his actually has an enormous glass wall and he was not, in fact, sitting in some kind of communal area.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 11:56 AM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Can I just say, too, that the scene where Roger bribes Harry to switch offices is one of my favorites.
posted by .kobayashi. at 11:56 AM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'd just like to say that I've seen The Devil Wears Prada approximately 37 times because HBO keeps running it, and I just realized now that you played Doug

whoa, yeah he was one of Anne Hathaway's asshole friends who were always complaining about her job.
posted by sweetkid at 11:57 AM on June 6, 2013


One way to anchor yourself in the SC&P offices slightly is to realize that the conference room hasn't moved, and the staircase that is now visible from that room was formerly a space for secretary desks. It's also the space where Roger did the sexy Frere Jacques dance the morning after Don's surprise birthday in Season 5. That may not be news to anybody, but it made things make a lot more sense to me when I realized it.
posted by invitapriore at 12:00 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


and now Peggy getting stuck there

Which is interesting because Peggy clearly doesn't give a shit.

That said, I agree that it's better if a creative has that office because they won't be having client meetings there. I think one of the arguments between Pete and Harry on that score was who was more client facing and whether they would be likely to meet with clients in their office specifically.
posted by Sara C. at 12:01 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


...In the first few minutes of "Man with a Plan," Joan is actually in the process of assigning Lane's office ("the second office from reception") to a CGC guy named John Mathis.
posted by thesmallmachine at 12:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I loved how Pete made all the partners come sit in his office with him just to show how much it sucked.
posted by sweetkid at 12:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


I think it's interesting that the reason that office is so crappy is that Roger (and now Ted's) office is huuuuuuuuge.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 12:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hmm actually it seems like that entire floor is probably creative now, isn't it? That makes a lot of sense, since accounts is upstairs, but I'd never really thought about it before.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 12:03 PM on June 6, 2013


The show ends when no one has an office. Just cubicles, as far as the eye can see.
posted by desjardins at 12:04 PM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


I WILL NOT FAVORITE THAT
posted by sweetkid at 12:05 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


It seems weird to me that Harry would have committed suicide in the first season, considering how little we saw of him and how inconsequential he was to basically any plot at all.

I was just wondering about him in the first season and how in every scene he's in he says "IM MARRIED" and then sleeps with Hildy at the election night thing and then gets kicked out by his wife and cries in the Carousel pitch meeting. And these are tiny, tiny moments, yet a whole arc of a character who has barely any screen time. How the fuck would they have justified suicide, there?

And the fact that there was another suicide in the first season -- like, how many suicides can you pack into thirteen episodes of a cable series set in a super-specific universe that it took several episodes to even set up? It's notable that there have been two suicides across the whole span of the series, let alone two in the first season.
posted by Sara C. at 12:06 PM on June 6, 2013


Hey while we're in recap mode I just want to share that this is one of my favorite moments in the show on so many levels. I could watch it over and over.
posted by invitapriore at 12:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


FAVORITING THAT IS A MANDATORY ACTION ITEM TO BE LASER FOCUSED ON
posted by Potomac Avenue at 12:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


The thing to remember when trying to project future outcomes for the characters is that this is still the generation that stayed with one career, and mostly one employer forever. Don and Roger are the type that keep doing what they're doing until the band plays them off stage.

Peggy, Pete and their ilk are more susceptible to change, but still so very much boomers. I mean, for all the talk about Pete going from Company Man to hippie, remember the trend was the other way: hippies spent the 60's partying and then "surrendered to The Man" when the 60's ran out of gas and they needed to pay the bills.

Hell, almost every main character has gotten divorced (Roger twice!) over the arc over the show! While it's not like divorce was unheard of in the 60's, to find so many divorces in a given group of people at the time is really not typical.

My point is that people didn't change tracks easily in this period. In that way, at least Don is true-to-life. So slow evolution is more plausible for each character's narrative then significant upheaval.
posted by dry white toast at 12:07 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


STAY FOCUSED AND KEEP SHIPPING
posted by sweetkid at 12:07 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I just downloaded Man with a Plan real quick, and Joan is actually in the process of assigning Lane's office ("the second office from reception") to a CGC guy named John Mathis.

Chances are, he's since been fired for wearing a silly grin.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:08 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


hippies spent the 60's partying and then "surrendered to The Man"

Did they? I have no idea. I thought they were just in college.
posted by sweetkid at 12:08 PM on June 6, 2013


almost every main character has gotten divorced

Not really, just Roger, Don, and Pete.

While I guess it's statistically unusual, I think they represent a high risk group.
posted by Sara C. at 12:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Joan? Also Betty.
posted by sweetkid at 12:10 PM on June 6, 2013


And Joan.
posted by dry white toast at 12:11 PM on June 6, 2013


Oh, and Duck, if you consider Duck a "main character". But again, he's in that same high risk group.
posted by Sara C. at 12:11 PM on June 6, 2013


Joan and Betty and then Joan.
posted by sweetkid at 12:11 PM on June 6, 2013


I don't consider Duck a main character.
posted by sweetkid at 12:11 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


He's gonna shit in your office for that, sweetkid.
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 12:12 PM on June 6, 2013 [15 favorites]


But Betty is divorced from Don, so that's not statistically unusual that two people who used to be married to each other are both divorced from each other.

Joan I forgot, it's true. She's probably the real outlier case, here, since I'm pretty sure well-off white professional guys living the suburban ennui lifestyle were basically ALL getting divorced in that time period.
posted by Sara C. at 12:12 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


If you're talking about the core from the first season, that only leaves Harry, Ken, Peggy, and Bert (unless Bert is a widower? his status isn't clear to me). So that's half-ish. I'll amend my "almost everyone", but five divorces amongst 8 or 9 people (counting Roger twice) is really high for the 60's. Yes, perhaps a high risk group, but even in high risk groups, that was not the trend at the time.
posted by dry white toast at 12:14 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peggy is sort of divorced now, isn't she?
posted by Sys Rq at 12:16 PM on June 6, 2013


Isn't Bert's sister a silent partner? Did she get bought out? I must have missed that.
posted by readery at 12:16 PM on June 6, 2013


There's a cemetery near my house where I sometimes walk my dog. The graves are from different periods, but there are a lot from the 60's-80's. There are a lot of double-tombstone graves where one member of a married couple died in that period and is buried there (it'll even say "Beloved Wife And Mother"), and then the other side is empty.

For some reason it makes me think of all the people who got married in the 50's and who got divorced in the 60s and 70s.

Forever alone.
posted by Sara C. at 12:17 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


And OMG, yes! "Did you enjoy ze Fuhrer's birthday?" is my favourite line of the show by leaps and bounds. Jon Hamm delivers that line so perfectly.

Although for favourite scene, I have to go with the Lane/Pete fight. So much awesome.
posted by dry white toast at 12:17 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Good catch. She cashed out when they sold to the Brits. But she never came back in when they split off to form SCDP.
posted by dry white toast at 12:19 PM on June 6, 2013


here's a cemetery near my house where I sometimes walk my dog. The graves are from different periods, but there are a lot from the 60's-80's. There are a lot of double-tombstone graves where one member of a married couple died in that period and is buried there (it'll even say "Beloved Wife And Mother"), and then the other side is empty.

For some reason it makes me think of all the people who got married in the 50's and who got divorced in the 60s and 70s.

Forever alone.


Well hey there's my day ruined by sads
posted by sweetkid at 12:22 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yes, perhaps a high risk group, but even in high risk groups, that was not the trend at the time.

They had to get the "50% of marriages end in divorce" stat from somewhere, right?

It has never surprised me that like EVERYONE on Mad Men keeps getting divorced.

That said, my parents are divorced and I see divorce as a totally normal thing. I know it was a bigger deal in the 60's, but again, I think Mad Men is pretty much at the epicenter of the divorce moment in American culture.
posted by Sara C. at 12:22 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


There are a lot of double-tombstone graves where one member of a married couple died in that period and is buried there (it'll even say "Beloved Wife And Mother"), and then the other side is empty. There are a lot of double-tombstone graves where one member of a married couple died in that period and is buried there (it'll even say "Beloved Wife And Mother"), and then the other side is empty.

If sitcoms of the era are any indication, it was very common for beloved wives and mothers to die before their husbands and children back then. (With hilarious results!) So that's probably all that is. A sitcom cemetery.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:23 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Sweetkid, I spend a disturbing amount of time thinking about WHY that person isn't buried next to anyone else.
posted by Sara C. at 12:25 PM on June 6, 2013


They had to get the "50% of marriages end in divorce" stat from somewhere, right?

That figure is actually the result of a misunderstanding of numbers which then turned into a meme.
posted by shakespeherian at 12:25 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


One of the things I like about this show is all the acting done via cigarette. Sometimes Don looks like he has something to say, but instead he lights a cigarette and makes a quizzical face instead.

I also enjoy Pete doing anything. He's like a tightly wound spring made of bitterness and contempt, lightly coated in sweat and Gin. With ridiculous hair. Oh, Pete.
posted by Biblio at 12:26 PM on June 6, 2013 [11 favorites]



They had to get the "50% of marriages end in divorce" stat from somewhere, right?

That figure is actually the result of a misunderstanding of numbers which then turned into a meme.


Yea from what I understand that statistic came from data that said that in a given year there were twice as many divorces registered as marriages.
posted by sweetkid at 12:26 PM on June 6, 2013


I also enjoy Pete doing anything. He's like a tightly wound spring made of bitterness and contempt, lightly coated in sweat and Gin. With ridiculous hair. Oh, Pete.

ME TOO
posted by sweetkid at 12:27 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sweetkid, I spend a disturbing amount of time thinking about WHY that person isn't buried next to anyone else.

Seriously, it's usually just because the other person isn't dead yet.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:27 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


"Did you enjoy ze Fuhrer's birthday?" is my favourite line of the show by leaps and bounds.

The Mad Men actors don't get to play with accents very much. Matt Weiner actually has a rule about accents. He doesn't think anyone ever gets an assumed accent quite right, so he'll only cast roles with actors of the character's nationality. He even has a Canadian playing Canadian-born Megan, though most casting directors will cast North American actors interchangeably. Carla Buono is actually from the Bronx and had to bring back her natural regional accent she had worked so hard to get rid of. So the few times we've seen these actors do accents, it was for a gag, or it was Megan playing Colette with a French accent on a soap opera, so it was okay for the accent to be less than authentic and rather cheesy. How would twins wind up with different accents, realistically? Not to mention that one is a maid and the other is "pure class and sophistication".
posted by orange swan at 12:27 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


One of the things I like about this show is all the acting done via cigarette.

The best bit of the Lane/Pete fight scene is when Roger pops a cigarette in his mouth just as they put their dukes up. Damn, I can watch that scene over and over.
posted by dry white toast at 12:27 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


That figure is actually the result of a misunderstanding of numbers which then turned into a meme.

No, I know, I'm just saying a lot of people were getting divorced around that time and it doesn't strike me as odd at all that there would be a lot of people at SCDP specifically who were dealing with that in the years the show covers. Our main characters are the poster children for "people who got divorced in the 60s". Except, again, for maybe Joan.
posted by Sara C. at 12:28 PM on June 6, 2013


So the few times we've seen these actors do accents, it was for a gag

Also whatever was going on with Peggy saying "PIZZA HOUSE!"
posted by sweetkid at 12:28 PM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


(Megan's french-speaking accent isn't at all Quebecois but then it was explained that her snooty French-From-France parents probably wouldn't stand to have their daughter speak in such a dialect. She does let loose a few Quebecois curses however.)
posted by The Whelk at 12:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Peggy, Stan and Micheal Ginsberg break off to form a new agency.

Two Guys, A Girl, and PIZZA HOUSE.
posted by The Whelk at 12:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


He even has a Canadian playing Canadian-born Megan, though most casting directors will cast North American actors interchangeably.

I always assumed they made Megan Canadian because Jessica Pare is Canadian. Which would explain the weird feint where supposedly her family is "French", but then she's Canadian, but they had to go out of the way to explain that they're not French Canadian.

Re accents in general, I think the main exception here is Elisabeth Moss. Who actually does a great job of giving her accent a Brooklyn tinge here and there without being over the top about it.
posted by Sara C. at 12:32 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yea I think they made Megan Canadian because Jessica Pare is, also. There wouldn't be much reason for them to write in a Canadian.

Wait wait though guys - Julia Ormond's accent is fakety fake fake.
posted by sweetkid at 12:33 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah her speaking French could be .....better.
posted by The Whelk at 12:34 PM on June 6, 2013


Wait wait though guys - Julia Ormond's accent is fakety fake fake.

Seriously. Frenchy's from England.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:34 PM on June 6, 2013


She does let a few Quebecois curses however.

Megan's accent choice is interesting to me. She's European French, but grew up in Quebec. But she most definitely does not speak Quebecois French. She would have been surrounded by it growing up, but I wonder if her mother would have drilled it out of her.
posted by dry white toast at 12:35 PM on June 6, 2013


yea so there goes the "no accents rule."

SWEETKID EXPOSES THE TRUTH
posted by sweetkid at 12:35 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Wait wait though guys - Julia Ormond's accent is fakety fake fake.

When you can get Julia Ormond, you hire an accent coach.
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 12:35 PM on June 6, 2013


Wait...that's Sabrina? I must have a terrible TV. It took me weeks to recognize Harry Hamlin, too.
posted by Biblio at 12:38 PM on June 6, 2013


Megan's accent choice is interesting to me. She's European French, but grew up in Quebec. But she most definitely does not speak Quebecois French. She would have been surrounded by it growing up, but I wonder if her mother would have drilled it out of her.

But has it ever been officially established that they're supposed to be European French, or is that just something we've all decided to believe on account of it's the only way the accents make sense?

When you can get Julia Ormond, you hire an accent coach.

Probably should have sprung for a better one, then.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sorry guys, there are Quebequois curses happening on Mad Men and I'm not aware of this?!

Quebequois swear words are one of my favorite things to nerd out about.

I guess my French listening skills have gotten really shitty over the years.
posted by Sara C. at 12:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, Megan explains to Don early on that she took diction classes when she got to New York to sound more American. So no accent in English for Megan. But the dialect comes out when she speaks French.
posted by dry white toast at 12:38 PM on June 6, 2013


NO AUDREY HEPBURN IS SABRINA.
posted by sweetkid at 12:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Sorry guys, there are Quebequois curses happening on Mad Men and I'm not aware of this?!

Yeah, there's definitely a câlice in there somewhere.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:40 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Sorry guys, there are Quebequois curses happening on Mad Men and I'm not aware of this?!

Last season premiere, before the surprise party, she drops a "Calice!" when fumbling for her keys.
posted by The Whelk at 12:40 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


to sound more American. So no accent in English for Megan.

Except that she actually sounds really Canadian.

And I'm also a little confused about how diction lessons would help someone sound less Canadian, anyway aside from maybe the "aboot" thing.

I don't think most casting directors in 1960-whatever would have cared about someone having a Canadian accent. Most casting directors in 2013 certainly don't. The only time I've ever seen it pointed out is with Robin on How I Met Your Mother.

Maybe she means she took diction lessons in Montreal to sound less like Celine Dion, but the result is that she got an anglophone Canadian accent?
posted by Sara C. at 12:41 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


yea Megan sounds pretty Canadian to me.
posted by sweetkid at 12:42 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pretty sure they finally established that Megan's parents are French French a few episodes ago -- when her mother's talking to Arnold Rosen.
posted by thesmallmachine at 12:43 PM on June 6, 2013



Maybe she means she took diction lessons in Montreal to sound less like Celine Dion

why am I now imagining Megan singing "It's all coming back to me now" with an over the top mad Men set video for it and why can't I stop?
posted by The Whelk at 12:43 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I keep expecting Hamlin to get fired since he's such a well known actor. It's crazy that he got his start playing in Hercules in 1969. Must be surreal being in a show set in a time you lived through that most of the viewers have no recollection of whatsoever.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 12:43 PM on June 6, 2013


Pretty sure they finally established that Megan's parents are French French a few episodes ago -- when her mother's talking to Arnold Rosen.

Yes and no.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:45 PM on June 6, 2013


Huh. Weiner must have made one exception, then. Don't know why they didn't get, say, Juliette Binoche to be Maria Calvet. She's Parisian, and has the right look. At 16 years older than Jessica Paré, she's a little young to play Megan's mother, but she could play a few years older than she is. Oh wait, I just checked. Julia Ormond is a year younger than Juliette Binoche, so the age thing definitely wouldn't be a problem.

Which would explain the weird feint where supposedly her family is "French", but then she's Canadian, but they had to go out of the way to explain that they're not French Canadian.

When was that established? I seem to distinctly recall Maman Calvet explaining to Roger that she is French, but is not from Paris, as she lives in Montreal.
posted by orange swan at 12:46 PM on June 6, 2013


why am I now imagining Megan singing "It's all coming back to me now" with an over the top mad Men set video for it and why can't I stop?

Is she beating her chest in your version? She is in mine.
posted by orange swan at 12:48 PM on June 6, 2013


Don't know why they didn't get, say, Juliette Binoche to be Maria Calvet.

Because if there were then scenes of Mad Men that could have had Juliette Binoche but instead had other, lesser people instead I would FUCKING RIOT
posted by shakespeherian at 12:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Weiner must have made one exception

There are tons of exceptions. I don't think any of the core cast are from where their characters are supposedly from. I mean, none of them are native New Yorkers AFAIK. Jon Hamm is from Missouri, not Pennsylvania. Christina Hendricks is from Tennessee yet they've gone out of their way to imply that Joan is from Washington State.
posted by Sara C. at 12:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Fuck the accent, Julia Ormond and John Slattery had a lot of chemistry.
posted by readery at 12:53 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


They do and now for the first time ever I am considering reading slash.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 12:54 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also Marie is a delight every time she appears on screen to casually wreck things.
posted by The Whelk at 12:54 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Weiner's rule was concerned with nationality, not states or provinces. He would only cast American actors to play Americans, British to play British, and so forth.
posted by orange swan at 12:55 PM on June 6, 2013


At 16 years older than Jessica Paré, she's a little young to play Megan's mother, but she could play a few years older than she is

yeah also Jessica Pare is five years older than Megan.

And January Jones and Jessica Pare are only two years (almost three) apart which always interests me because the younger wife/middle aged lady thing bleeds into social discussion of January v Jessica.
posted by sweetkid at 12:55 PM on June 6, 2013


They do and now for the first time ever I am considering reading slash.

Ther is uh, surprisingly little decent Mad Men fic out there, or so I've heard.
posted by The Whelk at 12:56 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Weiner's rule was concerned with nationality, not states or provinces. He would only cast American actors to play Americans, British to play British, and so forth.

But then there was Ormond. And Father of Megan who is apparently Belgian.
posted by sweetkid at 12:56 PM on June 6, 2013


I just figured it out:
Don is Lucille
Peggy is Michael
Ginsberg is Buster
Ted Chaough is Lucille 2
Bob Benson is Maebe
posted by drezdn at 12:57 PM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


January Jones - from one of the Dakotas, not Philadelphia. Which you can tell from her accent, which doesn't correspond to someone from the Main Line at all.

John Slattery - from Boston, not Manhattan. And in fact his accent, like January Jones', totally betrays this.

Vincent Kartheiser - born in Minneapolis, not Manhattan, but he is clearly putting on an upper crust WASP accent.

Aaron Staton - from West Virginia despite the fact that his character is written specifically as being from Vemont.

I don't think the show has any particular policy on actors, dialect, and character backgrounds, at all.
posted by Sara C. at 12:57 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I heard Matthew Weiner say he had the matching nationality rule on one of the commentary tracks, so yes it does, but obviously he has made a few exceptions.
posted by orange swan at 12:59 PM on June 6, 2013


And, I mean, Peggy? Brooklyn?
posted by Sys Rq at 12:59 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yea I know Main Line people actually and January doesn't sound like them.
posted by sweetkid at 12:59 PM on June 6, 2013


and now the story of a wealthy ad agency that nearly lost everything and the lying philanderer who had no choice but to keep up the pretense of being a functioning human being....
posted by The Whelk at 1:00 PM on June 6, 2013 [12 favorites]


yeah but what's the point of having Americans play Americans if you get all the regional accents wrong?
posted by sweetkid at 1:01 PM on June 6, 2013


Maybe they should have got Patti Smith to play Betty.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:01 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I just wish they'd work harder on the dialogue; there was a particular way of speaking that they mostly don't even attempt. Instead you have people snapping 90isms or later, like "Not an option!" Which is just ruinously bad.

As bad as those Selectric IIs which even as of this season still won't even be invented for three more years, and almost as bad as the velcro binding on the sphygmomanometer in Don's first season exam.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:01 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


almost as bad as the velcro binding on the sphygmomanometer in Don's first season exam.

frymeme.jpg
posted by The Whelk at 1:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


wow you guys are nerds it's just a TV show
posted by sweetkid at 1:04 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Also, shouldn't they be in black and white?
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 1:05 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


I notice the Brooklyn in Peggy's speech when she's had a few drinks or she's angry - which makes total sense to me. My dad grew up in India, going to British medium schools, and and moved to the US in the late 70s, and for all intents and purposes when he speaks English he sounds totally American - until he gets super mad (or super tipsy), in which case the Anglo-Indian affect returns. It's a really nice subtle acting choice on Elisabeth Moss' part, I think.
posted by thereemix at 1:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


And shouldn't the married characters be sleeping in twin beds?
posted by orange swan at 1:06 PM on June 6, 2013


Yeah Peggy def has a light nasal Brooklyn snarl that comes out when she's upset. It's a very neat detail.
posted by The Whelk at 1:07 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


YES THE POINT OF THIS SHOW IS TO PERFECTLY DEPICT THE PERIOD

WE SHOULDN'T EVEN WATCH IT, JUST KNOW THAT IT EXISTS
posted by shakespeherian at 1:07 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Matt Weiner didn't write it DURING the 60s so basically it's garbage
posted by sweetkid at 1:09 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


Guys I think this story is totally made up, it's nothing but LIES.
posted by The Whelk at 1:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [9 favorites]


Just teasing about the blood pressure cuff (though I'm pretty sure the medical appliance industry was way too conservative to adopt velcro until much later, possibly on durability grounds), but I do wish they'd settle on either trying to get the speech right or not, rather than mixing it up, which just looks lazy.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:10 PM on June 6, 2013


I don't think most casting directors in 1960-whatever would have cared about someone having a Canadian accent.

I always thought Jonathan Frid sounded super-Canadian on Dark Shadows. When I heard his natural offstage accent for the first time, I was shocked to discover that he had MAJORLY de-Canadized it for stage and screen after intense dialect coaching at RADA. His natural voice makes maple syrup run out your ears.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 1:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


georgespiggotwaskidding.gif
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don's Brylcreem doesn't even smell.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Realistically everyone the show does have hemorrhoids though.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:12 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


His natural voice makes maple syrup run out your ears.

Since when? I don't want that! /Pete
posted by sweetkid at 1:13 PM on June 6, 2013 [8 favorites]


Maybe they should have got Patti Smith to play Betty.

I'm glad they didn't, since I would have gotten fired from my job and lost my home and become a homeless vagrant hobo because I would do NOTHING BUT WATCH MAD MEN.

(I love Patti Smith and her accent so much.)
posted by Sara C. at 1:15 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


They should have made British people play all the Americans, just like they play the Germans in war movies.
posted by drezdn at 1:15 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I also miss Pete saying "... A thing like that." in the first couple of seasons. That was such plausible verbal nullity for someone of his background and it fit his character at that time beautifully.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:16 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


(I love Patti Smith and her accent so much.)

Sometime I just want to put together a moodboard of the things Sara C. likes.
posted by sweetkid at 1:16 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


You should start following me on Pinterest.
posted by Sara C. at 1:17 PM on June 6, 2013


I also miss Pete saying "... A thing like that."

Too often when making dinner, I think about the scene where Pete first tells Trudy what he wants for dinner... "Steak, in the pan. With butter. [pause] Ice cream."

Then he tells the fellas he'll have dinner waiting when he gets home.

He just seems so truly happy.
posted by sweetkid at 1:18 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]



You should start following me on Pinterest.


AM I NOT?
posted by sweetkid at 1:18 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Just link me right to your "Stories of the Famous" board plz.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:18 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I have a Betty Draper Pinterest Board guys
posted by sweetkid at 1:19 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


40 minutes till I get to leave work for TWO WEEKS more Mad Men theories please I am so fucking burnt out.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:19 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Betty's comeback is the best by the way. The new Betty's like HI H8Rs times 1 million.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:20 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


TL;DP:

- Patti Smith
- bad-ass girl gangs
- album covers
- Leonard Nimoy
- non-Anglophone typography
- pictures of people dancing
- nordic interior design
- rock gig posters
- some clothes, mostly black
posted by Sara C. at 1:21 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Hi I'm betty draper im a skinny-bitch blond & i fuck like a mountain lion then leave u for dead get used to it. Now who wants to burn some fucking bras?
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:21 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Bob Benson is Maebe

Marry me!
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 1:22 PM on June 6, 2013 [8 favorites]


Sweetkid, usually I just favorite the ones that make me laugh, but your "since when? I don't want that!" gave me all the hysterical joy of the original moment and I feel that it is right to say so.
posted by thesmallmachine at 1:22 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I did, in fact, Laugh Out Loud at that "since when? I don't want that!" post.
posted by Sara C. at 1:23 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


tl'dr yet.

I am seriously hoping the next season will have a huge time jump, just for shits and giggles.
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 1:23 PM on June 6, 2013


And by "Burn some bras" I meant "Heavy Metal Records"
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:24 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


OMG guys Bobby and Gene are going to be in the KISS army. I can see it now.
posted by Sara C. at 1:25 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I am seriously hoping the next season will have a huge time jump, just for shits and giggles

But they can't because Kiernan
posted by sweetkid at 1:26 PM on June 6, 2013


I expect a full on Roman A'Clef about the ad world published under a pseudonym soon
posted by The Whelk


Oh, man, I will be so mad if we don't get this now. In fact I want to be able to buy it for reals in a bookstore.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:27 PM on June 6, 2013


Pretty sure it's already online "Somewhere".
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:29 PM on June 6, 2013


If we go by sterotypical 3-child family dynamics it'll go

Sally- Parent-Proxy and "successful/Bossy/put upon", will still treat the others like kids even when they're 40.

Bobby-peacemaker, go-between overlooked middle child who just wants to make everything go smoothly and fix things/people.

Gene - Most Likely to rebel in some strange off the rails way in an attempt to get someone, anyone, to notice him.
posted by The Whelk at 1:29 PM on June 6, 2013


the final shot is a huge bookstore signing for Kenneth E. Cosgrove's best selling satrical novel set in an advertising agency called.... MAD MEN.
posted by The Whelk at 1:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [8 favorites]


There is precedent, of course.
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:31 PM on June 6, 2013


Hopefully not.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:31 PM on June 6, 2013


well what if Don really died in Korea and this is all like an Owl Creek/Jacob's Ladder thing.
posted by sweetkid at 1:31 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


What if its all Sally's flashback while tripping balls on Acid at woodstock 94?
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:33 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


But they can't because Kiernan

I think they could get away with starting in October of '69 or something. She's kind of leveled off now that she's a teenager.

But, no, they can't decide that now it's 1973.
posted by Sara C. at 1:34 PM on June 6, 2013


Bwha ha ha.
After our Milky Way collapses (pulverizing Earth in an instant), it is replaced by the StarCreme NougatSwirl Galaxy. Spawning ground of an orderly and peaceful Nirvana, the new galaxy is based on the voluntary double helix. This is reflected in everything from the shape of its most populous Yape-Sidara Dual Parallel Solar Systems to the reciprocating orbits of Ya-Si's central planetary twins [...]
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:35 PM on June 6, 2013


On a completely different note, I am playing L.A. Noire right now, and the number of characters played by actors who have at least made an appearance on Mad Men is a little silly. I went to L.A. Noire's IMDB page and randomly clicked on cast members (even for a scene) and Mad Men keeps popping up in their Filmographies. Aside from Detective Ken Cosgrove, Accounts, which is obvious:

-Pete
-Paul Kinsey
-Karen Ericson (the nurse who lived across the hall from Don)
-Jimmy Barrett
-at least two other one off guest spots from what I've spotted so far

(also, Holy Crap, Glen is played by Mathew Weiner's son!)

Okay, pulling out of this IMDB rabbit hole now.
posted by dry white toast at 1:39 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


This asshole thinks this season sucks but it has been a great season actually, discuss.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 1:40 PM on June 6, 2013


Yea there are a ton of people from Mad Men in LA Noire. Also a kid I grew up with. Who isn't on Mad Men but went in to read once or twice, cause he's like Average White Guy even though he complains only ethnic minorities work in acting in LA.
posted by sweetkid at 1:40 PM on June 6, 2013



This asshole thinks this season sucks but it has been a great season actually, discuss.


Assholes gonna asshole. But hey The Week follows me on Twitter! When I told a coworker that he was like you?

Thanks guy.
posted by sweetkid at 1:43 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete's story is basically "while you're trying to figure out who you want to be, who you actually are is sneakily taking over".
posted by George_Spiggott at 1:46 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


A friend asked me yesterday, "Do you think people change, or do they just become more who they are?"

My instinct was to say people change, but when I stopped and thought about it, I wondered if it wasn't in fact the later. I'm turning it over in my head, and Mad Men is really a useful meditation on the question.
posted by dry white toast at 1:49 PM on June 6, 2013


It's downright surreal how engrossed I have been with the show through its entire run, yet how little awareness I have of so many of the characters' names.
posted by herbplarfegan at 1:49 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Bwha ha ha.

Our version is better

Also shotgunning a bunch of Mad Men episodes while playing L.A Noire leads to some serious meta-fictional confusion (Peggy's mom even shows up once!)

(also I am now reasonably sure I can get around L.A in the late 40s.)
posted by The Whelk at 1:49 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


that's kind of weird.
posted by sweetkid at 1:49 PM on June 6, 2013


I'm of the opinion that anyone who thinks this season sucks or that Mad Men has jumped the shark was only ever in it for the clothes.

It's true that recent seasons have been a lot harder to watch than early seasons. The characters are a lot less photogenic. The clothes and sets are ugly. People are on the wrong side of history. There's no "and then we all burned our bras" Forrest Gump type stuff. Characters you like do mean things. Characters you don't like are vindicated. The writers aren't pulling any punches.

It's pretty easy to just say "This sucks now" and stop watching now that Don Draper isn't the man all the women want and all the men want to be.
posted by Sara C. at 1:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [16 favorites]


(also, Peggy is in L.A Noire! With an Okie accent! Also Betty's therapist is the coroner!)
posted by The Whelk at 1:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Mad Men is currently tackling the growing pains all small founder run companies go through and the sea change American business went through in general. Founders are different kinds of people than the employees they hire, both are necessary for a business to to be born and continue to survive. You have the founder types, like Roger and Don, that often take crazy risks and do things in an ad hoc way and you have the types that build the company long term Peggy and Bob Benson.

It is also about how we got from then to now. how did we go from the Mad Men of a few years ago, run as a clubhouse for grown men, to the much more polished and inclusive companies of 20 years later. Professionals like Peggy, Bob Benson and Ted. People who are there to work, not simply escape their families in the suburbs.
posted by Ad hominem at 1:53 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


The Whelk how dare you rub my nose in the fact that Steam doesn't have a Mac-compatible version of L.A. Noire.

Gnashing of teeth
posted by Sara C. at 1:54 PM on June 6, 2013


It's true that recent seasons have been a lot harder to watch than early seasons.

It's funny that you say that, because I actually find the early seasons pretty tedious. So much conformity and trying to make things work. The Draper marriage is so much going through the motions and unhappiness for both Don and Betty. I mean, it's interesting, but in ways you have to commit to.

The show's pace picks up dramatically at the end of Season 3 when they form SCDP. It's night and day to me.
posted by dry white toast at 2:00 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


L.A. Noire isn't much of a game, most of the mechanics are ultimately pointless.You may as well watch a play through on YouTube.
posted by Ad hominem at 2:01 PM on June 6, 2013


Thus missing out on the fun of wandering around 1947 L.A on your own? We have very different priorities sir.
posted by The Whelk at 2:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


(I may or may not have also used it as a shopping guide)
posted by The Whelk at 2:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


L.A. Noire isn't much of a game, most of the mechanics are ultimately pointless.You may as well watch a play through on YouTube.

posted by Ad hominem


Eponysterical!
posted by dry white toast at 2:02 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Thus missing out on the fun of wandering around 1947

That's true, except you have to obey traffic laws. Once you realize none of your choices affects the narrative in any way, it sort of turns into a movie in which you can pick different dialog.
posted by Ad hominem at 2:05 PM on June 6, 2013


When you think about it, if one were so inclined, the "Truth/Doubt/Lie" mechanic for investigating crimes would probably translate very well to the office politics of Sterling Cooper etc.

Your move, Rockstar Games.
posted by dry white toast at 2:08 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


dry white toast: A friend asked me yesterday, "Do you think people change, or do they just become more who they are?"

Doesn't this imply fate? In my opinion people change, unless you think things such as "I was suppose to meet you" when you meet someone significant in your life.

I'm only on season 2/heading into season 3 of Mad Men but reading through this thread is so fun. I can't wait to get to season 6.
posted by gucci mane at 2:11 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


When I say "hard to watch" I'm not so much talking about the pacing of the show, which has really picked up. It's also much more dramatic, with higher stakes.

I mean more in the sense of, like, the good people are good, the bad people are villainous, people get what they deserve, things are by and large OK, etc.

The minute Betty Draper slapped Sally across the face for cutting her hair, I think a certain demographic changed the channel and never came back. And I'm fine with that. And extremely happy that AMC is fine with it, too.
posted by Sara C. at 2:11 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


I'm kind of hoping that there is no momentous ending in the cards. Nothing says existential despair quite like life just going on in spite of the national tragedies, heart attacks, suicides, amputations, etc.
posted by ob1quixote at 2:19 PM on June 6, 2013


Doesn't this imply fate?

Not fate so much as the idea that our personalities are formed early in life and don't actually change that much. In the context of Mad Men, it could be said that people don't change so much as their relationships do.
posted by dry white toast at 2:20 PM on June 6, 2013


The minute Betty Draper slapped Sally across the face for cutting her hair

Hey, and that wasn't even the first haircut-related Betty-slap!
posted by Sys Rq at 2:21 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


When you think about it, if one were so inclined, the "Truth/Doubt/Lie" mechanic for investigating crimes would probably translate very well to the office politics of Sterling Cooper etc.

Your move, Rockstar Games.


Considering that my favorite thing to do in that game is obey traffic laws and listen to the King Biscut Flour Hour, I would pay any amount of money to be able to ignore the office politics of an ad agency in 60s era manhattan and just wander around midtown, looking into shop windows and gazing longingly at Old Penn Station ( oh god, could I go on the subway? With the wicker seats? You can take my kidney I only need one.)
posted by The Whelk at 2:25 PM on June 6, 2013 [7 favorites]


The closest you're going to get to Manhattan is Grand Theft Auto IV and it ain't got the Old Penn Station.

Am I right in thinking that there was a scene early in the show where they were marvelling over the awesome New Penn Station plans? I seem to recall steam coming out of my ears.
posted by dry white toast at 2:32 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Even if The Whelk and I do not agree on LA Noire, I agree wholeheartedly we need a free roam game set in 60s New York, could be anything for all I care. If it was a mid 70s, Serprico, French Connection and Panic in Needle Park inspired free roam cop procedural I may never buy another game ever again. Goddamn it rock star, you gave us 2000s New York now do 1976 New York.
posted by Ad hominem at 2:35 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Last episode is Don eating onion rings with his family and a smash to black.

If this happens I swear I'm gonna stab somebody.

I think it will end with Betty giving birth to the baby she conceived with Don at Woodstock.
posted by fuse theorem at 2:36 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


No, it will end with Sally hugely pregnant at Altamont (after having sex with either Stan or Ginsberg at Woodstock), begging a Hell's Angel for a ride to the Haight.

(JK, wanted to see the look on sweetkid's face)
posted by Sara C. at 2:37 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


It ends with Don exorcizing his demons by kicking a horse in the head.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 2:43 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Something something Wicker Man
posted by The Whelk at 2:45 PM on June 6, 2013


Only The Wicker Man is a car account add campaign, and the women don't burn Don, they just refuse to bed him. And the bees are cancer cells.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 2:49 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


It ends with Don, Peggy and Stan being applauded as they march through the office towards Joan who gives each (except Stan) a medal. Pete hops around and makes a funny beeping noise.

The three champions turn and smile. Cue fanfare.
posted by popcassady at 2:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


There are no bees in the Wicker Man. I don't know why people keep saying that there are. Summerilse makes apples. APPLES.
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 2:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


(Oh, Ken's there too. And he's really shiny.)
posted by popcassady at 2:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Weird thing: I'm re-watching the first episode when CGC moves in...when Bert Cooper is reading the letter those kids sent congratulating them, it just randomly ends with "In Closing..." Anyway, when Bert gets to the end of the letter and there isn't an ending, he looks completely terrified. Like he just looked into the abyss and it looked back into him.

Foreshadowing?
posted by dry white toast at 2:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


If only Sally wasn't juuuust a little too young for a The Graduate Ending, cause Drapers always end up marrying too quickly.
posted by The Whelk at 2:54 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


No the ending is mostly everyone leaving or dying or fleeing and then we get a seven minute sequence showing the next crop of ad men and women .....and then cut to five years later and another new crop, with the previous new kids now old wrecks of bosses, and then five years later, and so on and on, fashions and decor changing to fit the period, and everyone keeps having the exact same problems and conflicts, all the way up to the current day ( the name of the agency has changed so many times it's totally unrecognizable ). It's set, of course, to Turn, Turn, Turn.
posted by The Whelk at 2:57 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


So, is there any opinion as to how far forward the final season will time-jump? Will they actually take it into the '70s? Or end it all with man landing on the moon in '69? Or will the end coincide with the Beatles breaking up in 1970?
posted by Thorzdad at 2:58 PM on June 6, 2013


Holy Crap, Glen is played by Mathew Weiner's son!

A friend of mine, who is an actor, was waiting tables when "Glen" and his Dad came in for a bite. She confessed how great she thought Glen was, and what a big fan she was of the show, completely ignoring the dad.

It wasn't until a week later that I broke the news to her who Glen's dad was.
posted by cell divide at 3:00 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


I feel kinda bad for Don after the last episode, especially his encounters at the party. He is beginning to seem like Rabbit Angstrom or Sonny Crawford in Texasville, a middle aged man haunted by his past who is on a slow but steady decline. I don't think he will be Roger as he gets older, I think he will just get mean and resentful.

I hope they fast forward to the 80s I want to see Don snorting coke off the conference room table and wearing one of those Armani suits with the huge shoulders.
posted by Ad hominem at 3:02 PM on June 6, 2013


If Don survives the 60s he'll end up out west, working in politics, and ultimately the Reagan campaign.
posted by The Whelk at 3:05 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]




yeah but what's the point of having Americans play Americans if you get all the regional accents wrong?

Remember the episodes of Frasier where Daphne's family appeared? The boyfriend says that he thinks the wild divergence in accents is a subtle nod to how programmes usually get these things very wrong, but I think that's generous. It always spoilt the show for me, particularly as it is so unusual to hear a regional accent that isn't Cockney in a US TV show. Even if it wasn't Jane Leeves' own and was a bit too '60s Rovers Return.

Also, is Ginsberg getting a little schizophrenic or is he just cracking up from the stress? We already know he doesn't touch drugs - I don't even think he drinks or smokes - so he wasn't high in the last episode.
posted by mippy at 3:15 PM on June 6, 2013


How do you think those apple blossoms get pollinated, Bunny? BEES
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 3:22 PM on June 6, 2013


No the ending is mostly everyone leaving or dying or fleeing and then we get a seven minute sequence showing the next crop of ad men and women .....and then cut to five years later and another new crop, with the previous new kids now old wrecks of bosses, and then five years later, and so on and on

Or you could do this really quickly and simply:

INT. SC&P HALLWAY - DAY

MOIRA leads SANDI (20, badly flat-ironed hair and ill-fitting plaid shift-dress) down the hall towards Peggy's office.

MOIRA: Now this is Creative. It should be organized but it's not, so you'll find both copy and the art department, all mixed together.
(laughing)
Please don't ask me the difference.

MUSIC CUE: The Byrds, "Turn, Turn, Turn"
posted by Sara C. at 3:23 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also, is Ginsberg getting a little schizophrenic or is he just cracking up from the stress? We already know he doesn't touch drugs - I don't even think he drinks or smokes - so he wasn't high in the last episode.

Is it possible he's a Scientologist?
posted by Sys Rq at 3:25 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I hope they fast forward to the 80s I want to see Don snorting coke off the conference room table and wearing one of those Armani suits with the huge shoulders.

Replace "Don" with "Sally" and I see another use of the "Turn, Turn, Turn" music cue.
posted by Sara C. at 3:25 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I feel like Scientology wasn't really in New York yet, but what do I know?
posted by Sara C. at 3:25 PM on June 6, 2013


I can picture Sally standing on a balcony all coked up like Jenny from Forrest Gump.
posted by sweetkid at 3:26 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


In all seriousness I'm pretty sure Moira is Joan 2.0. Like, literally and for real, careerwise. Not the way that every hot young secretary who comes through the place is labeled "Joan 2.0".
posted by Sara C. at 3:26 PM on June 6, 2013


Also, is Ginsberg getting a little schizophrenic or is he just cracking up from the stress? We already know he doesn't touch drugs - I don't even think he drinks or smokes - so he wasn't high in the last episode.

I haven't watched the show in a while; is this character really supposed to have been born in a concentration camp?
posted by clockzero at 3:28 PM on June 6, 2013


I'm still holding on my idee fix that Sally just becomes her father.

While I admire your economical eye for screenwriting, that scene would deny us a parade of various period fashions.

I mean go big or go home.
posted by The Whelk at 3:28 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob Benson, Time Lord, selects Meredith as his Companion.
It is, as Ted would say, Very Groovy.
Except in the darkest timeline.
posted by Dr. Zira at 3:28 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think Ginsberg has panic attacks. It reads as schizophrenia to people because panic attacks aren't shown correctly much on tv. Generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder can cause paranoia.
posted by sweetkid at 3:29 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Clockzero, we don't know, there are very few answers for Ginz.
posted by The Whelk at 3:29 PM on June 6, 2013


Bob Benson, Time Lord, selects Meredith as his Companion

The coffee cup is a TARDIS, that's why he carries two, so his constant cup carrying doesn't seem odd.
posted by The Whelk at 3:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also Moira is paired with Culter, who is the evil universe Roger, in the same way that Joan was paired with Roger in the early seasons.
posted by The Whelk at 3:31 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Culter eh

Nice slip
posted by sweetkid at 3:32 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


If he was revealed to be an Anton LeVey style Satanist, would you be surprised IN THE LEAST?
posted by The Whelk at 3:34 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Actually no
posted by sweetkid at 3:35 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm sadly all too familiar with panic attacks, but his 'insubordination' with Gleeson coupled with the ranting about things being beamed into his head were what made me think something was seriously awry. He's always been a bit chippy, but nakedly insulting your boss in such an inappropriate way was strange indeed.
posted by mippy at 3:37 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Cutler looks like he loves nothing more than to stir up some shit and watch it get bad. And when I say watch, I mean creepily peer through a crack in a doorway as though watching his dead colleague's underage daughter fuck an employee who is high on amphetamines. Like that.
posted by Biblio at 3:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Seriously awry? Yes. Possible mental illness? Yes.

I'm leery of calling it "schizophrenia", though.

The "transmissions beamed to my head" thing seemed very specific to me, but then the 60s was weird. It's really hard to tell whether that moment was just extreme anxiety combined with the general weirdness of him and the time, or whether they are trying to broadcast schizophrenia as a specific pathology.

I think it's somewhat off the tone of the show to be that specific about something like that.
posted by Sara C. at 3:40 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


an employee who is high on amphetamines.

That he supplied to said employee.

After a meeting in which he said something to the effect of "I have an idea..."

I mean I guess people genuinely believed in "magic vitamin shots" back then, but that is like the dictionary definition of shit-stirring.
posted by Sara C. at 3:42 PM on June 6, 2013


Yeah Micheal is ...off, there is something going on there but there's not enough to pin it down to one thing and also, maybe it's a perfectly understandable reaction to how BONKERS PANTSONHEADCRAZY his life and worldview has been recently. I'm not comfortable saying its anything other than SOMETHING but it is there.
posted by The Whelk at 3:43 PM on June 6, 2013


Cutler is exactly the kind of person I imagine attending Bohemian Grove, and all those other shadowy organizations and events people like to use to claim that the illuminati exists.
posted by Sara C. at 3:44 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Yeah, well, I don't want to diagnose by TV, but paranoia and out of character behaviour point to something serious going on. I was watching it thinking 'but back then they basically locked you up for it, didn't they?' and feeling bad for him. If it were Stan, I'd just assume he was on a comedown.

Oh - forgot to ask this in the last thread - what area is Peggy's building in and what's the area like now? Did it get gentrified? I was reminded of Notting Hill, which was considered a near-slum and a place for 'coloureds' to live in the 60s, but is now essentially a Tory stomping ground.
posted by mippy at 3:45 PM on June 6, 2013


I agree Sara C. The "transmissions" thing is a pop culture meme related to schizophrenia. It's kind of too obvious on a show like this.

Also this show has won recognition from advocacy groups on outstanding treatment of mental health issues so I think they wouldn't jump to hacks cliches.

Ginz is an already odd character whose anxiety is heightened by the genuinely crazy stuff going on in the 60s.

And yea again extreme anxiety is extreme.
posted by sweetkid at 3:45 PM on June 6, 2013


mippy, I live near her area, a brownstone in that area now would be worth literally many millions of dollars, Tina Fey lives nearby, there are nothing but nannies and organic yoga places, it's so far beyond gentrified now it's not even on the planet earth anymore. Like, the area she's in was a dog whistle for " Super rich out of touch liberals" in GOP circles a few years back. It is an insanely nice part of Manhattan.
posted by The Whelk at 3:48 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, well, I don't want to diagnose by TV, but paranoia and out of character behaviour point to something serious going on

Paranoia can be caused by anxiety. Google it.

Panic attacks/disorder is "something serious going on."
posted by sweetkid at 3:49 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


So basically the Notting Hill of New York, then.
posted by mippy at 3:49 PM on June 6, 2013


And it's the Upper West Side, to give you an example, in the circa 70s era musical A Chorus Line, a character reveals he's been going up to " 72nd street" and the audience is supposed to gasp, cause its all puerto ricans and gangs and drag bars and fags and drugs.

When they staged the revival, they kept that line in, and no one gasped, cause going to 72nd street means you need some organic produce, or a good dentist or a Montessori daycare.

So, yeah pretty much Notting Hill.
posted by The Whelk at 3:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Why does Don seem to end up collapsing in or near swimming pools whenever he tries to hang with groovy people in California? Interesting also that he's much more comfortable there when he can be Dick instead of Don.
posted by George_Spiggott at 3:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


'but back then they basically locked you up for it, didn't they?'

Yeah, but back then "they" had very different ideas about the type of person who was likely to be schizophrenic, and diagnoses were much less scientific. Ginsberg being a white guy in a professional job makes it much less likely that that would happen.

Re Peggy's neighborhood, yes, the Upper West Side is incredibly fancy now. Like, beyond gentrified. It's one of the most expensive neighborhoods in New York, and mostly full of wealthy families. I think people there tend to be more liberal politically (the UWS was also long associated with leftist politics and academia), but yes, there is a very moneyed, NIMBY, "I got mine so fuck you" outlook with the kind of people who stereotypically live there now.

In fact, the kind of people who live on the UWS now are basically exactly Peggy.

If you're curious about the area, it's the setting of The Panic In Needle Park, a film about tragic young heroin addicts. These would be the sorts of people stabbing Abe and throwing bricks through the window.
posted by Sara C. at 3:51 PM on June 6, 2013


sweetkid - I have bipolar affective disorder, please don't 'educate' me on the seriousness or otherwise of panic attacks, paranoia and hearing of voices. I'm used to TV painting these things with a broad brush - admittedly I'm watching Desperate Housewives at the moment as well - so it was the conclusion I drew.
posted by mippy at 3:51 PM on June 6, 2013


I'm not educating you I'm just responding to your comments like any old person.
posted by sweetkid at 3:53 PM on June 6, 2013


Sara C - yes, that is true. The idea that those with mental illnesses/conditions were not productive members of society.
posted by mippy at 3:54 PM on June 6, 2013


I think it's still that way regrettably
posted by sweetkid at 3:57 PM on June 6, 2013


If you're curious about the area, it's the setting of The Panic In Needle Park, a film about tragic young heroin addicts.

Ah, I've had that in my Netflix queue for like forever. Now think I might get around to watching it finally.
posted by Sys Rq at 3:57 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I used to follow the Notes From The Breakroom blog on the Guardian which helpfully explained all the historical/social detail that a US audience would automatically know, but then they changed the writer and the new one was terrible, so I stopped following.

Watching Good Night and Good Luck earlier in the week made me realise I know not very much about McCarthyism (when Abe cheered the McCarthy for President thing I automatically thought 'hey wait a second, he's practically a Marxist, why does he like Joe McCarthy?') and I am planning to do some reading up on Nixon before we watch All The President's Men.
posted by mippy at 4:01 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


In the 60s in the US, there was a specific association between schizophrenia and African-American men, especially African-American men who had been active in the Civil Rights Movement.

I don't know how stringent that assumption was and whether it would be possible for someone like Ginsberg to end up with that diagnosis, and obviously that has nothing to do with whether we, the viewers, are supposed to see him as being schizophrenic, but it's unlikely that Ginsberg is going to be thrown into the loony bin anytime soon.

My fears for Ginsberg are more along the lines of him joining a cult or getting violent. There's a lot that reminds me of Travis Bickle from Taxi Driver, or of the types of people who joined groups like the Weathermen.

But on the other hand, it was a deeply paranoid time. Ginsberg is not the first character this season where I couldn't tell whether they were mentally ill or just in a really fucked up place because of the times, and the culture, and the politics.
posted by Sara C. at 4:03 PM on June 6, 2013


The inclusion of Jim Cutler (Aaron Echolls) in the main crew this season is obviously meant to scare the wits out of us. It's just like having Ed Baxter played by Ray Wise (Leland Palmer).

I also hope Ginsberg isn't suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, but I wouldn't mind or be surprised if he got mis-diagnosed with it. Like, he goes in and says, "Doc, I'm going crazy! The other day I had to give a presentation, and all of a sudden I panicked and thought someone was beaming transmissions to my head!" Then the doctor says, "Yes, son. You are crazy." And locks him up forever. And then everyone watching has to look at each other and go, "SIXTIES!"

Finally, the series obviously has to end with Joan killing Pete. And Harry. And maybe Roger. And possibly even Don. But definitely, at a minimum, Pete.
posted by brina at 4:03 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I really want Paul Kinsey to come back. His return last season actually made me gasp out loud. I remember his shallow involvement in causes - I'm convinced that he only got a black girlfriend to appear the radical beatnik - and I wonder what the escalating situation in Vietnam has made of him.
posted by mippy at 4:05 PM on June 6, 2013


when Abe cheered the McCarthy for President thing I automatically thought 'hey wait a second, he's practically a Marxist, why does he like Joe McCarthy?

That's Eugene McCarthy, a liberal Democrat. He was basically like if Dennis Kucinich actually stood a chance of ever winning a single primary.

That said, Eugene McCarthy was by no means in any way communist. But he was outspoken against the war, which was a huge deal.
posted by Sara C. at 4:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I wonder what the escalating situation in Vietnam has made of him.

I don't know, but he was in California just in time for the Summer Of Love.
posted by Sara C. at 4:07 PM on June 6, 2013


The series ends with a brand new cigarette causing widespread zombieism and the cast forced to defend the offices.

I think we outlined this a while back, Joan with a rifle and all. THE WALKING MAD MEN.
posted by The Whelk at 4:07 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


And all the zombies are Don.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 4:09 PM on June 6, 2013


That's Eugene McCarthy, a liberal Democrat.

Indeed. Joe McCarthy (the McCarthyism guy) had been dead over a decade at that point.
posted by Sys Rq at 4:12 PM on June 6, 2013


Yeah, I looked it up, then felt very dumb indeed.

I don't get this with Murphy Brown, though I was alive during the Dan Quayle potatoe thing so the political references don't throw me too much. It seems like an American Drop The Dead Donkey, almost.
posted by mippy at 4:12 PM on June 6, 2013


Everyone wants Don to fail. But what if he succeeds? Being a CEO of an interesting company would work well for him, essentially being an icon like Conrad Hilton. He quits drinking and smoking, starts jogging, moves to Riverside, settles into marriage with Megan or someone more age appropriate. He does with other companies what he used to do with women and cars. His history is mostly subsumed by the machine. Every now and then he comes up for air, in a cab downtown or at an Opera, seeing the grey dawn of war that birthed him. The cities crass filth disgusts him though, and year after year he remembers less why he ever cared enough to want to make people desire something beautiful, instead of just celebrate the shining, Conservative lie that the 50s were a golden age of purity and health. His soul almost utterly extinguished, he lives the rest of his life untouchable by everyone except for one person -- his daughter the painter, who can still, on her rare visits to the country, make him angry or happy enough to feel like Dick again.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 4:15 PM on June 6, 2013 [11 favorites]


Megan helps Sally break into acting and she's snapped up to play Marcia on the Brady Bunch
posted by George_Spiggott at 4:16 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


I'm on a train, why?
posted by Potomac Avenue at 4:20 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Don turns 42 in 1968. What was the life expectancy in the 1960s of a heavy smoker/heavy drinker 42 year old male?
posted by Rhomboid at 4:29 PM on June 6, 2013


I am being a jerk and not reading this thread yet because I am two episodes behind right now, but the "Everyone Don slept with in Season 4" link reminded me of how much I liked Stephanie (whom he did not sleep with, so it was totally cheating to include her in the montage) and how I really wish they would bring her back somehow and show us what the hell she's up to in 1968.
posted by naoko at 4:29 PM on June 6, 2013


How Mad Men ends. Lt. Dick Whitman says "Computer, end program."
posted by drezdn at 4:34 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm surprised to learn (from Wikipedia, but still) that soap operas really were shot in New York back then. Possibly still being live had a lot to do with it, as you don't have to get up nearly so early.
posted by George_Spiggott at 4:39 PM on June 6, 2013


I'm surprised to learn (from Wikipedia, but still) that soap operas really were shot in New York back then. Possibly still being live had a lot to do with it, as you don't have to get up nearly so early.

The Tonight Show was shot in New York until 1972.
posted by Thorzdad at 4:42 PM on June 6, 2013


...and it will once again be shot in New York when Fallon takes over next year.
posted by Rhomboid at 4:45 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


You guys someone finally made a Mad X-Men thing.
No Ginsneto yet, though.
posted by Dr. Zira at 4:50 PM on June 6, 2013


Soaps are still shot here
posted by sweetkid at 4:50 PM on June 6, 2013


Sara C.: "I think part of the problem is that "Take Another Little Piece Of My Heart" was in one of those SONGS OF THE SIXTIES compilation commercials back in the mid 90s."

That's one of the things I liked so much about The Americans. The show is set in the 80's, but they didn't use a single obvious 80's hit. I mean, the show starts with Fleetwood Mac's Tusk.
posted by gertzedek at 4:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


(Unless you people think Tusk is an obvious 80s song, in which case I apologize)
posted by gertzedek at 4:53 PM on June 6, 2013


drezdn: "How Mad Men ends. Lt. Dick Whitman says "Computer, end program.""

Bob Benson reveals himself as Q, and Don jumps back and forth in time, trying to figure out the cause of the temporal anomaly.
posted by Chrysostom at 4:57 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


There. Are. Four. Cigarette Lighters.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 4:59 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


This thread is already 390 comments? Oh, boy...
posted by crossoverman at 4:59 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh, boy...

Sam leaps into Don.

AL: Hurry. Megan's on the balcony.
posted by popcassady at 5:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Zou Pushyou Pushyou!
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 5:09 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm surprised to learn (from Wikipedia, but still) that soap operas really were shot in New York back then. Possibly still being live had a lot to do with it, as you don't have to get up nearly so early.

I don't think soaps were live in the late 60s. Certainly the set they've showed Megan working on doesn't look like a live shoot.

Both Guiding Light and As The World Turns shot in New York until they ended their runs just a few years ago.

My understanding of soaps shooting in New York is that it had to do with their roots in radio and the fact that a lot of them are VERY long running -- if you start production in New York in the 40s, and your show is still on in '68, why pay to move everyone to Los Angeles? It was excruciatingly expensive to do things like that back then, unlike today when travel expenses are a tiny fraction of the cost of production.

I also think there were technical reasons to have soaps shooting in New York, possibly related to the fact that they air daily and not weekly. And that, back then, everything was actual physical media, not something you could just DropBox over to the New York office. The networks were all headquartered in New York then, too.
posted by Sara C. at 5:28 PM on June 6, 2013


I've had this thread in the back of my mind today while working on other things, and suddenly hits me:

Ken and Trudy.

Anybody with me?
posted by Space Kitty at 5:34 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


How would Ken and Trudy ever even see each other. Doesn't Ken live in Queens, when he's not in Detroit?

Wait, we're talking about them having an affair, right?
posted by Sara C. at 5:37 PM on June 6, 2013


No, he means: are they the same person?
posted by Potomac Avenue at 5:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


Abe and Trudy.
posted by Sys Rq at 5:38 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Just what IS Trudy doing up there all by herself?
posted by The Whelk at 5:39 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I always thought that Don and Joan are the same person, Fight Club style.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 5:39 PM on June 6, 2013


I just like them and think they would be good together, geography nonwithstanding.
posted by Space Kitty at 5:39 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Trudy/Stephanine unhappy housewife slash shipping, it is now.
posted by The Whelk at 5:40 PM on June 6, 2013


It bothers me that I have no memory of this Stephanie person, at all.
posted by Sara C. at 5:41 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


BTW I was looking up something about Pete earlier and google autocompleted to "PETE CAMPBELL DON DRAPER SLASHFIC"

just sayin
posted by Sara C. at 5:41 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


That would just give Pete another thing about Don to be jealous of.
posted by Rhomboid at 5:43 PM on June 6, 2013


Ken has a very nice charming wife called...uh okay I don't remember her name but she played Alex Mack back in the day.

It's okay, Harry's wife was always more of a theoretical construct.

I...don't want to read Don/Pete fic.
posted by The Whelk at 5:43 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peter Cambell, A Powerbottom's Powerbottom.
posted by Potomac Avenue at 5:44 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


I was looking up something about Pete earlier and google autocompleted to "PETE CAMPBELL DON DRAPER SLASHFIC"

From "PETE CAMPBELL DON DRAPER SLASHFI"?
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 5:45 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


I'd rather read Pete/Joan fic, which given how repulsive I find that that pairing is saying something.

I mean at least there we're in the realm of realisticish hate sex.
posted by The Whelk at 5:46 PM on June 6, 2013


WHAT JENNIFER IS ALEX MACK
posted by Sara C. at 5:47 PM on June 6, 2013


From "PETE CAMPBELL DON DRAPER SLASHFI"?

No, actually from "pete campbe..." which was AMAZING and almost made me want to read slash for the first time in my life just to see what all the google fuss was about.
posted by Sara C. at 5:48 PM on June 6, 2013


Don't. Start. There.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 5:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


Bob Benson reveals himself as Q, and Don jumps back and forth in time, trying to figure out the cause of the temporal anomaly.

Excuse me, I have some Don Draper/Picard slash to write now..
posted by ApathyGirl at 5:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


So I'm reading five seasons worth of Guardian recaps because mippy said that they exist and because I'd love to know what Brits make of 60s American culture, and it turns out that everybody was always beanplating about foreshadowed death. (Read the "notes" section at the bottom. The first bullet point is about whether Don's doctor's appointment is supposed to be ominous or what.)
posted by Sara C. at 5:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don Draper visits the Enterprise as ambassador of America in the 1960s and Counselor Troi immediately falls in love with him.

They fingerbang in Ten Forward while Will Riker is hitting on some dumb ensign with an embarrassing hairdo.
posted by Sara C. at 5:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's...a challenge in a jumpsuit.
posted by The Whelk at 5:58 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I can't believe I forgot Ken's wife.
posted by Space Kitty at 6:00 PM on June 6, 2013


She wore that insane turquoise thing, duh.
posted by Sara C. at 6:02 PM on June 6, 2013


Now if TOS Enterprise picked up Don Draper, he'd fit right in.

Wait, I may have to ...gather some notes here....
posted by The Whelk at 6:03 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Don Draper would actually fit in well in that TNG episode where they find the people who were cryogenically frozen in the 80s. All three of the 20th century folks in that episode are such Mad Men characters.
posted by Sara C. at 6:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I said it before, there is very very little decent Mad Men fic.

You have your TNG crossover fic prompt people, make it so.
posted by The Whelk at 6:09 PM on June 6, 2013


I love Stan. Stan Loves Peggy.
posted by Sweetie Darling at 6:15 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Whoa that link gave me the have your cake and eat it to idea.

Bob Benson, Friend and semi beard to Joan and seducer of Micheal Ginsberg.

The popcorn would eat itself.
posted by The Whelk at 6:27 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


What do you think it's like to wear a bright yellow suit and sit at your desk coming up with margarine pitches all day?
posted by Sara C. at 6:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


It means you take a smoke break in Madison park and have lunch with me at that odd Americana theme place near the Flatiron and bitch about how no one listens to you or gives you any decent work. uh..l He said, with no knowledge of advertising.
posted by The Whelk at 6:33 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Sometimes people in my office wear their client's colors by accident and we laugh at them.
posted by sweetkid at 6:49 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Ken's wife is Cynthia. She's his life, his real life.
posted by purpleclover at 6:53 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


yea Cynthia is Alex Mack not Jennifer. But we've seen Jennifer.
posted by sweetkid at 6:54 PM on June 6, 2013


We saw Cynthia at the party when Don was very masculine and fixed things in an awful coat.
posted by The Whelk at 7:05 PM on June 6, 2013


also like Sara C I don't remember Stephanie.
posted by sweetkid at 7:08 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


You mean the Pete Is Emasculated party?
posted by shakespeherian at 7:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


Don knows how to work with his hands and fix things because he grew up on a farm. I did myself, and that's typical of farm people. There is a lot of fixing and making of things to be done, and there's no money to hire people to do it, so you learn to do it yourself. Pete, of course, grew up in a wealthy home where they would just have called a plumber or whatever kind of tradesman was needed to deal with stuff like that, so he doesn't have such skills. I love how the characterization is so complete, even to little things like that.
posted by orange swan at 7:23 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think one of the reasons both men and women respond to Don in the way they do is that he has that layer of solid competence underneath the charm. He actually knows how to do something, unlike many of the men he encounters. (Except Ken, who can dance.). This makes him more attractive to women, of course, and intimidates other men. Just part of the Don Draper mystique.
posted by Biblio at 7:33 PM on June 6, 2013


It's the confidence. It's always the confidence.
posted by sweetkid at 7:36 PM on June 6, 2013


or at least an outward expression of such.
posted by sweetkid at 7:36 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Stephanie was Anna's niece, the college student. She is the one who picks up the phone when Don finally calls back in "The Suitcase."
posted by Sweetie Darling at 7:40 PM on June 6, 2013


yea watching the clip I figured that out. I just never thought about her name. Cool.
posted by sweetkid at 7:42 PM on June 6, 2013


Oh. Based on context I was expecting someone Don slept with/almost slept with/was maybe going to sleep with.
posted by Sara C. at 7:43 PM on June 6, 2013


yea they got nowhere near. He tried and she was like haha no.
posted by sweetkid at 7:44 PM on June 6, 2013


wow people are super into this whole mad man thing
posted by threeants at 8:09 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


yea dudes it's just a tv show
posted by sweetkid at 8:19 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm pretty sure Weiner has said it ends with Don Draper cradling a bottle of whiskey and a Kodak Carousel singing, "You Make Me Feel Like A Natural Woman".
posted by crossoverman at 8:39 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Carole King or GTFO
posted by shakespeherian at 8:39 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


You're so vain, you probably think this show is about you.
posted by The Whelk at 8:42 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


omg that's it
posted by sweetkid at 8:43 PM on June 6, 2013


Some Joni Mitchell would be great on the show. I think her stuff has aged better than King's or Simon's, or Joplin even, speaking of women musicians.
posted by sweetkid at 8:45 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don is breaking like the waves at Malibu.
posted by The Whelk at 8:46 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Well yes Blue is the greatest album of its generation but that's hardly fair.
posted by shakespeherian at 8:47 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


so undderrated though.
posted by sweetkid at 8:49 PM on June 6, 2013


it ends with Don Draper cradling a bottle of whiskey and a Kodak Carousel singing, "You Make Me Feel Like A Natural Woman".

It ends with Peggy and Joan in a pitch meeting. Peggy says, "You've come a long way." Joan adds, "No, 'You've come a long way, baby.'"

FIN
posted by Sara C. at 8:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [4 favorites]


Grossss
posted by sweetkid at 8:50 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


I love saying advertising cliches because it makes sweetkid die a little inside.
posted by Sara C. at 8:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


why so mean I got nothin but love for ya sister
posted by sweetkid at 8:51 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Someone lies on the floor of the conference room as the camera tilts and "Brain Damage" starts to play. The ripper walks the halls of SC&P. So much blood.
posted by The Whelk at 8:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Better:

It ends with Peggy in a darkened movie theater. An attractive younger guy is sitting next to her. There is a trench coat spread over both their laps.

The film is Nine To Five.

FADE OUT TO STRAINS OF DOLLY PARTON AND TYPEWRITERS CLICKING
posted by Sara C. at 8:52 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


oh but can it say FIN on the screen after the finale? That would be awesome.

Or if it was in the same font as Woody Allen title sequences and jazz plays because 70s!
posted by sweetkid at 8:53 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


The last episode is just the first episode of Growing Pains.
posted by shakespeherian at 8:54 PM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


Wait is Peggy too old to be Sigourney Weaver's character in Working Girl? I think she's like ten years too old.
posted by sweetkid at 8:54 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Cut to an older Sally Draper on an old typewriter and wearing a sweater, we see her smiling as she finishes, a close up on the page she's typing out

"and truly, all of them, my father, my uncles, my mother and friends where all ...MAD MEN."

She pulls it off the typewriter and throws it into the air, freeze frame and production logo.
posted by The Whelk at 8:55 PM on June 6, 2013 [13 favorites]


After Don kills everyone, we cut to a doctor's office where Don is restrained in another room, the doctor explains to the survivors that sometimes men, when in conflict, go mad, and never really recover, something to do with childhood and the mother, and they should put all this mad men stuff behind them- then cut to a swamp, as the car containing the money is dragged out of the muck over the end titles and fanfare.
posted by The Whelk at 8:59 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


The last episode is just the first episode of Growing Pains.

No, no, it would pretty much have to be Bosom Buddies.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:59 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


No no more Hankses on this show
posted by sweetkid at 9:00 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


It ends with Peggy and Joan in a pitch meeting. Peggy says, "You've come a long way." Joan adds, "No, 'You've come a long way, baby.'" "Where's the beef?"

FTFY.
posted by crossoverman at 9:01 PM on June 6, 2013 [5 favorites]


you should see the look on my face while I am reading these last few hacky dream endings
posted by sweetkid at 9:03 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sally, the last survivor of the SC&P massacre by virtue of hiding in the ceiling tiles, comes down into a room with a radio, not knowing with the killer she once called friend is still there. She scrawls a message onto the blackboard in Creative with her nails:

"THE MEDIATOR BETWEEN HEAD AND HANDS MUST BE THE HEART!"
posted by The Whelk at 9:05 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Don crashes Ted's plane, killing them both, Roger quips ""Oh, no! It wasn't the airplanes. It was Bourbon killed the Beast.", cue end titles.
posted by The Whelk at 9:06 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Wow, a new MM FPP and it's zero to 463 in 12 hours!

I have a question I was reminded of by George_Spiggott's comment
Why does Don seem to end up collapsing in or near swimming pools whenever he tries to hang with groovy people in California?

I think it was in the Esquire recap that the writer opined that Don had tried to kill himself by jumping in the pool. For some reason this possibility hadn't even crossed my mind. I guess I thought he'd stumbled into the pool in a boozy daze or something. But I guess it could have been attempted suicide. Anyone have an opinion or thoughts?
posted by torticat at 9:09 PM on June 6, 2013


No, I think it was an accident.
posted by sweetkid at 9:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don hears the shower running. He looks in and sees Lane Pryce soaping up. Seasons 6 & 7 were all a dream.
posted by Chrysostom at 9:10 PM on June 6, 2013 [6 favorites]


LET'S BURN RUBBER BABY
posted by The Whelk at 9:12 PM on June 6, 2013


Lane Pryce soaping up

Stupid Sexy Lane Pryce
posted by sweetkid at 9:12 PM on June 6, 2013 [8 favorites]


Only when he punched Pete, but it was a long-lasting moment.
posted by The Whelk at 9:12 PM on June 6, 2013


Bob Benson smashes his head into the bathroom mirror, looking back at him is the bloodied demonic face of Don Draper, with long matted grey hair.

Bob turns toward the camera cackling, "How's Betty? How's Betty? How's Betty?"
posted by crossoverman at 9:13 PM on June 6, 2013 [10 favorites]


Sorry I can't get a picture of Lane Pryce in the shower with watch and glasses on but otherwise nekkid (bare butt) out of my head.

Wait why am I sorry it should be Chrysostom who is sorry.

I gotta sleep soon WTF
posted by sweetkid at 9:15 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


I REGRET NOTHING
posted by Chrysostom at 9:17 PM on June 6, 2013


If we go with the Lane Pryce ending, I propose we recast with Benedict Cumberbatch.

(I mean no offense, Jared Harris, but I WAS PROMISED BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH IN THE SHOWER)
posted by Sara C. at 9:19 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


PEGGY WAKES UP IN THE HOSPITAL, THIS WHOLE THING HAS BEEN HER TWILIGHT BIRTH DREAM

She goes through haunted by her powers of precognition and ability to see the future.
posted by The Whelk at 9:19 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


We cut to Sally Draper, now 18, about to get married. Everybody is happy. All has been resolved.

And then the band starts to play "The Rains of Castamere."
posted by Bunny Ultramod at 9:29 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


whaat Sally Draper you are going to college young lady. Marriage at 18? No.
posted by sweetkid at 9:30 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


Nice girls* don't marry until they're IN college, so says Our Benevolent Filmstrip Overlords

*Trashy, stupid girls get married so they can HAVE SEX is the subtext in these things.
posted by The Whelk at 9:34 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's been another long day. At home, we watch from behind as Don leans over the bathroom sink, water pouring down the drain, steam fogging the mirror. He wets a washcloth, rubs his eyes, shuts off the mirror. After a long beat, Don reaches over, picks up a hand towel, and wipes the steam from the mirror. The camera pans around him as he stares deep into his own eyes, and we see: Alfred E. Newman.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 9:34 PM on June 6, 2013 [1 favorite]


No, actually from "pete campbe..." which was AMAZING and almost made me want to read slash for the first time in my life just to see what all the google fuss was about.

Are you logged into gmail or google plus or something? Because there is some degree of personalization or fuzzy logic or categorization going on there. I don't get anything like that in autocomplete or suggestions, just the more obvious "pete cambell actor", "pete campbell quotes" and more mysteriously "pete campbell hairline". My hairline is JUST FINE thank you I have never googled anything that might suggest otherwise THANK YOU VERY MUCH GOOGLE.
posted by George_Spiggott at 10:13 PM on June 6, 2013


just admit you want hot sexy pete hairline stories
posted by The Whelk at 10:20 PM on June 6, 2013 [3 favorites]


George_Spiggott - maybe? I have a whole Twitter persona where I tweet about Star Trek and fandoms and such, so it's possible that The Googles know I'm a fangirl in some capacity. Though in general I'm not a fanfic person at all, and my actual gmail account is mostly for work stuff. I do not use G+.

My new hobby is typing "Pete Campbell" and random letters into google and seeing what it autocompletes with. I don't get anything normal like "Pete Campbell Quotes". I get "Pete Campbell Doesn't Smoke", "Pete Campbell Hairline", "Pete Campbell Chip And Dip", etc. Maybe the internet just knows I love Mad Men a lot.
posted by Sara C. at 10:30 PM on June 6, 2013


Interesting. I just tried typing "Pete Campbell Chip And Dip" and for some reason it autocompleted to "Pete Campbell Rifle"
posted by George_Spiggott at 10:33 PM on June 6, 2013 [2 favorites]


Five hundred comments in a midweek MM thread AFTER the hardcore denizens already threw down a few hundred on this week's episode? Sarah Palin, look out.
posted by mwhybark at 10:50 PM on June 6, 2013


"Pete Campbell C" gets me "Pete Campbell Christ on a Cracker" which delights me. (In autocomplete )
posted by Biblio at 4:15 AM on June 7, 2013 [6 favorites]



>I can't believe I forgot Ken's wife.

>>We saw Cynthia at the party when Don was very masculine and fixed things in an awful coat.


IIRC, Megan and Don couldn't remember Cynthia's name at that party.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:33 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


For some reason this possibility hadn't even crossed my mind. I guess I thought he'd stumbled into the pool in a boozy daze or something. But I guess it could have been attempted suicide. Anyone have an opinion or thoughts?

My wife's convinced it was a suicide attempt. I'm 50-50.
posted by COBRA! at 5:42 AM on June 7, 2013


PEGGY WAKES UP IN THE HOSPITAL, THIS WHOLE THING HAS BEEN HER TWILIGHT BIRTH DREAM

She goes through haunted by her powers of precognition and ability to see the future.


Then she decides to raise the baby, and his first words are "Hell's bells, Mommy!"
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:50 AM on June 7, 2013 [2 favorites]


For some reason this possibility hadn't even crossed my mind. I guess I thought he'd stumbled into the pool in a boozy daze or something. But I guess it could have been attempted suicide. Anyone have an opinion or thoughts?

Don collapsed in the previous episode. Heart problem?
posted by popcassady at 5:57 AM on June 7, 2013


The problem with his heart is probably that it's extra buoyant. 'Cause, like, drowning people don't float, right?
posted by Sys Rq at 6:18 AM on June 7, 2013


One thing that struck me on the linked clip above where Roger and Don are making Hitler jokes - when is the last time we saw Don smiling like that? Just affably joking around a bit?
posted by Chrysostom at 6:48 AM on June 7, 2013


just admit you want hot sexy pete hairline stories

So I stumbled on the "Pete and Trudy dance the Charleston" clip from S3 just now, and holy cats is it bizarre to think that was him just five years ago whereas no one else seems to have aged.

also single Ken and single Henryfrancis are weird memories
posted by psoas at 7:22 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


Stan Loves Peggy.

I die.
posted by psoas at 8:02 AM on June 7, 2013


All those Mad Men theories have now been addressed by Jessica Paré, who's obviously a ghost
posted by rewil at 9:31 AM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


the final episode ends with Sal waking up in bed with Ken, saying he just had the worst dream.
posted by The Whelk at 9:57 AM on June 7, 2013 [4 favorites]


Sal in bed with BERT.
posted by Chrysostom at 10:06 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don collapsed in the previous episode. Heart problem?

Crash from the speed they doped him up with at work, and not sleeping for two days.

But, pondering the party scene, I'm leaning more towards suicide attempt. The vision of Dinkins is what pushed me over the edge.
posted by dry white toast at 10:07 AM on June 7, 2013


Ooof, sorry, really unintentional pun there!
posted by dry white toast at 10:08 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


But, pondering the party scene, I'm leaning more towards suicide attempt. The vision of Dinkins is what pushed me over the edge.

Why? I don't think the show would give us a Don Draper suicide attempt without leading up to it with actual narrative and not just imagery (hotel ad, Dinkins).
posted by sweetkid at 10:20 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I feel like it would be a Big Deal and not at all ambiguous if Don were to ever attempt suicide.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:29 AM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


I definitely don't think it was a suicide attempt. I think it was an addled attempt at a swim.
posted by purpleclover at 11:04 AM on June 7, 2013


Really? I feel like Don is trying to kill himself every day, but some days, he just puts a little more effort into it. Or maybe I'm projecting.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 11:04 AM on June 7, 2013 [2 favorites]


The line between self-destructive behavior and an outright suicide attempt is arguably pretty blurry, but I agree that so far Don has just been pushing the envelope with the former.
posted by Superplin at 11:57 AM on June 7, 2013


Yea this. He's self destructive but not suicidal.
posted by sweetkid at 12:00 PM on June 7, 2013


I think it was an addled attempt at a swim.

Yea, also Megan told him he always feels better in the pool. So he was prob feeling out of it, hallucinated her, freaked out and remembered that line.

I think it's interesting that Don cannonballing into the pool in Tomorrowland was our first sign of his commitment/interest to Megan (in my mind, I have a theory about this I've never seen anywhere else).
posted by sweetkid at 12:50 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


Go on...
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 12:56 PM on June 7, 2013


I think if the pool thing were a genuine suicide attempt and not "suicide by living recklessly" or some kind of bizarre approach to self-medicating, the writers probably wouldn't have couched it in drug imagery. Like, if Don is going to try to kill himself, why show him smoking a relatively innocuous variant on marijuana in a groovy setting beforehand? It's not a very elegant way to get the point across.

That said, yeah, of course it could be a subconscious attempt.

(Anyone who really thinks that smoking hash might drive someone to attempt suicide needs to, I don't know, be less square in general I guess.)
posted by Sara C. at 12:58 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


oooh! OK! This is sort of more off the cuff and would be better if I weren't at work and could rewatch quick.

So Don has been really depressed all Season 4 because of Betty and general life shambles. It's the darkest he's ever been. So he goes with Megan and the kids to California, and when they get there the kids are stripping off their clothes with bathing suits underneath (love that detail) and he's kind of like, no no no I'm going inside. So he goes inside and we get a shot of him sitting in his dress clothes, alone, at the edge of the bed. It's (As I recall) just a quiet shot of him sitting there.

Then the next thing we see is him cannonballing into the pool. From that moment on, at least until toward the end of Season 5, he's what we started calling Happy Don. Rushed into marriage with Megan, but didn't cheat, sure he had his weird moods but generally speaking it seemed like a recommitment to life that he hadn't shown all season.

I think when he was sitting there on that bed he decided to make an abrupt, impulsive decision about how life was going to be going forward - he was leaving brooding Don behind and being happy Don, just like he left Dick Whitman behind to become Don, just like he can always just summon up a change in mood and behavior because he wants to.
posted by sweetkid at 1:03 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


But what about now? What changed between mid season 5 and now to bring him spiralling down toward rock bottom again?

Was it Jaguar?

Was it the woman in the yellow dress?

Was it something unseen that happened between Season 5 and Season 6?

Was it Sylvia?
posted by Sara C. at 1:14 PM on June 7, 2013


Wasn't it realizing he couldn't tie every bit of happiness to Megan, because she's her own person with her own goals, so he just decided to resent her instead?

Who is the woman in the yellow dress? The murder fantasy?
posted by sweetkid at 1:16 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]



Was it Sylvia?


It was the goat.
posted by sweetkid at 1:17 PM on June 7, 2013 [4 favorites]


Yes, the murder fantasy.

In yellow.

Which is a color I don't know that we saw a lot of last season, but man is it everywhere this season.
posted by Sara C. at 1:19 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's all of those things and none of those things. It's entropy. Don wears a lot of masks, but eventually, he's always just the overwhelmed kid in the whorehouse, reenacting the same old patterns.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 1:20 PM on June 7, 2013 [4 favorites]


I think I'm rewatching the murder fantasy episode from last season tonight.
posted by Sara C. at 1:23 PM on June 7, 2013


The girl in the yellow dress is auditioning to be the margarine mascot.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 1:24 PM on June 7, 2013 [2 favorites]


Was it Sylvia?

It was the goat.


I think I love you.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:38 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


Man this thread has been really validating for me.
posted by sweetkid at 1:39 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


You and Edward Albee.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:42 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


...and to Edward Appleby. A friend of a friend.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 1:53 PM on June 7, 2013


But mostly me.
posted by sweetkid at 1:54 PM on June 7, 2013


I wanna write a play called Edward Applebees set in a chain resteraunt.
posted by The Whelk at 2:01 PM on June 7, 2013 [4 favorites]


Heaven and Hell and Happy Hour
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 2:08 PM on June 7, 2013


Who's Afraid of Tortilla Soup?
posted by shakespeherian at 2:09 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


I wanna write a play called Edward Applebees set in a chain resteraunt.

It is a damn shame I don't still live in New York. I could probably make this happen.
posted by Sara C. at 2:16 PM on June 7, 2013


I agree damn shame

No I mean spread your wings is what I mean
posted by sweetkid at 2:41 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


The Whelk: "I wanna write a play called Edward Applebees set in a chain resteraunt."

He's got knives, forks, and spoons for hands, right?
posted by Dr. Zira at 3:22 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sporks.
posted by Chrysostom at 4:36 PM on June 7, 2013


I don't want this thread to end.
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 4:37 PM on June 7, 2013


I don't want to close my eyes

I don't want to fall asleep

Cause I'll miss this thread

And I don't want to miss a thing.
posted by The Whelk at 4:51 PM on June 7, 2013 [2 favorites]


Matthew Weiner Addresses Those Bob Benson Conspiracy Theories, Mark Lisanti, Grantland, 07 June 2013
posted by ob1quixote at 6:39 PM on June 7, 2013


A few threads ago, I wondered why we mostly were referring to characters by their first names except for Ginsberg. The consensus was that how he was mostly referred to by the other characters. In the first post-merger episode Peggy introduces him as Ginsberg, so that seem settled enough.

Given his breakdown this week with him yelling "Stop calling me Michael" at Bob I was curious to where the Michael/Ginsberg split began so I went back to season five and jumped around to scenes with him (probably missing other characters referencing him when he is off screen, unfortunately). Here's the breakdown by episode:

TEA LEAVES: He introduces himself to Peggy enthusiastically as MICHAEL Ginsberg. Later Don says "Pleasure to meet you Michael". Immediately after he is hired Peggy refers to him as "Mr. Ginsberg" to Roger.

MYSTERY DATE: Stan calls him "Ginsberg", Peggy calls "Michael" as he leaves in disgust at their reaction to the nurse photos.

FAR AWAY PLACES: Peggy meets his dad in the office and says to him "I work with Ginsberg". This is the episode with the "from Mars" speech which is well worth watching again if you haven't seen it in a while.

DARK SHADOWS: Roger calls him "Michael" twice while meeting with him to get him to come up with a pitch to Manischewitz. (The dialog in this scene simply crackles).

Then in last week's episode Stan calls him "Ginzo" and of course Bob calls him Michael, twice.

Some other tidbits:

Any blue/green color fans should take a look at Far Away Places where Peggy is looking for something in her desk drawer. There is a box of Kodak slide mounts with blue/green rectangles up against each other that mirror the blue/green panels in Pete's city apartment.

Ginsberg likes to quote ominous-sounding literature. Last week we had "Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds" and previously he said of his work on the Snoball campaign "Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

For stabbing enthusiasts, Ginsberg says this exact line in Lady Lazarus (in reference to the not-Beatles music): "It's stabbing me in the fucking heart."
posted by mikepop at 6:42 PM on June 7, 2013 [6 favorites]


For the record and with my apologies, I wrote the comment before I really read the article, and the actual credit should go to Tim Molloy at The Wrap.
posted by ob1quixote at 6:42 PM on June 7, 2013


Potomac Avenue: I keep expecting Hamlin to get fired since he's such a well known actor. It's crazy that he got his start playing in Hercules in 1969.

Er - are you sure you're not thinking of the 1981 movie Clash of the Titans, in which he played Perseus? Because Harry Hamlin was 16 years old in 1969.
posted by tzikeh at 7:03 PM on June 7, 2013 [1 favorite]


Be still and know that I am Bob Benson.
James Wolk reveals his favorite Bob Benson theory.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:55 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


"Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds" and previously he said of his work on the Snoball campaign "Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

My only takeaway here is that somebody on the Mad Men writing staff is a huge fan of Civilization IV.

This totally vindicates the reference to "reticulating splines" in my current project.
posted by Sara C. at 9:51 PM on June 7, 2013 [3 favorites]


My thinking about the pool scene was based on two things:

1) Dinkins saying to him "you should see yourself" or words to that effect when Don asks him why he didn't get his arm back as a ghost after he died

2) My experience with alcoholics is that they are slowly committing suicide (trying to escape some kind of pain). So I was wondering if now that a different drug was calling the shots for a few minutes, his subconscious decided to make a break for it essentially.

And yes, I did think of it as a subconscious attempt. But even if I'm right, I don't think it would be addressed all Special Episode-like. It's just another thing that Never Happened.
posted by dry white toast at 5:05 AM on June 8, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also, they call him Ginsberg to make it clear that he's different because he's Jewish. Tho I think Stan does it as an affectionate nickname.

Growing up in this period, Weiner would have been VERY aware of the subtle ways in which Jews were othered.
posted by dry white toast at 5:10 AM on June 8, 2013 [4 favorites]


You're probably right, dwt, but Don is also referred to as Draper quite often. And Cooper is almost never called Bert. In fact, the only people who are never referred to by their last names only are the women. You don't hear Joan called Holloway or Harris (although Lane called her Mrs. Harris), nor Peggy called Olson.
posted by donajo at 11:47 AM on June 8, 2013


Sara C.: "My only takeaway here is that somebody on the Mad Men writing staff is a huge fan of Civilization IV."

I don't know, I use both of those quotes in real life, and I stopped at Civ II.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:52 AM on June 8, 2013


Yeah, they are both pretty ubiquitous quotes in general, but both of them are used to good effect in Civ IV. Anyone who's played more than a few Civ IV games will know those two particular quotes and have them on the tip of their tongue.

I, personally, am a huge fan of "I am become X, destroyer of Y" and use it constantly. But I will admit that it mostly sticks in my brain because of a video game, not because of Oppenheimer or the Bhagavad Gita.

Googling suggests it's also used in Assassin's Creed. Heh.
posted by Sara C. at 12:10 PM on June 8, 2013 [1 favorite]


Upon re-watching this morning, I only just realized that Stan phoned Bob Benson to get him to come down for Ginsberg's freakout. I find that interesting, but I don't know why.
posted by peagood at 7:19 AM on June 9, 2013


Wait, that doesn't make any sense. Cutler put Bob on the Manischevitz meeting, which Stan wouldn't have known. My read of the scene was that Bob was just going to pick Ginsberg up for the meeting, and that's the scene he found when he got there.
posted by Sara C. at 7:53 AM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I thought Cutler put Bob on Manischevitz after the freak out, not before. That's why he wasn't expecting to see Bob in Creative and yelled at him.

This is the first season I've watched in real time, and I can't believe how excited I get for Sundays. Reminds me of my X-phile days. Except with less fan fiction.
posted by Biblio at 10:45 AM on June 9, 2013


I think my favorite moment from last week was hearing Ginsberg call Stan a mother hen. That was adorable.
posted by palomar at 11:12 AM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Reminds me of my X-phile days. Except with less fan fiction.

The Draper family are seated down to dinner when a thunderous blast blows the flimsy plywood door off its hinges. Spaghetti dinner goes flying as Don tries to leap for the phone before a woman carting a smoking sawed off shotgun enters through the hole in the door.

"NOBODY MOVIE" She loads another shell into the rifle.

"Donald Edward Draper, AKA Richard Abraham Whitman?" Don, cowering on the floor, nods.

"You used to live at 2341 Cheever Drive in Ossining New York?"

Don nods again.

The unknown woman twisted her face into an almost grin. "I knew it. No one else believed me but I knew what I saw. Coming into my backyard - you even left the damn gate open so people would think he ran away."

Don started to nod his head, not because he knew what she was talking about but when a half-crazed young woman shoots her way into your home you say "Yes Ma'am" until the cops arrive.

She cocks the gun and raises it to his head. "Okay, now you better think long and hard

"WHERE IS MY DOG?"

Don opens his mouth and then closes it, trying not to break eye contact.

"Uhhh ...with ..Betty? I think?"

She pulls the trigger and the blast knocks Don straight though those fashionable full-length windows and off the balcony into Central Park East traffic. The unnamed woman cocks the spent shells from her gun.

"That's for Mr. Peanut you son of a bitch."
posted by The Whelk at 12:23 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


My read of the scene was that Bob was just going to pick Ginsberg up for the meeting, and that's the scene he found when he got there.

No, Stan called him, we watched Bob take the call (in his curiously empty office), just before he showed up to talk Ginsberg off the ledge. The sequence was, Cutler put Bob on Manischevitz, Ginsberg freaked out just before the meeting, Stan called Bob, Bob came down to get Ginsberg in shape for the meeting.

Presumably Stan knew about all of it just because he works with Ginsberg.
posted by torticat at 1:19 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh yeah and this...

I only just realized that Stan phoned Bob Benson to get him to come down for Ginsberg's freakout.

It is interesting, peagood, but it could be nothing more that Stan was giving Bob a heads-up that the guy he was supposed to be leaving for the meeting with was a wreck.

Come to think of it though--it is funny on another count that Bob, just before leaving for a meeting that was theoretically kind of a big deal for him, was preparing with nothing more than a self-help book about going from failure to success. And had apparently dozed off.
posted by torticat at 1:27 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


self-help book

Self-help record, even. And it's practically the only thing in his office!
posted by Sys Rq at 1:41 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob Benson is nothing more than a self help book. He is the very embodiment of Dale Carnegie's How To Win Friends and Influence People.
posted by popcassady at 2:22 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


2341 Cheever Drive

Wait Cheever Drive isn't in the show, right? That would be too brilliant. Or too on the nose.
posted by sweetkid at 3:52 PM on June 9, 2013


No that was me being cute.
posted by The Whelk at 3:56 PM on June 9, 2013


It was cute
posted by sweetkid at 3:57 PM on June 9, 2013


(Here's a little thing about the Vega that might be good background reading.)
posted by box at 4:01 PM on June 9, 2013


I think my favorite moment from last week was hearing Ginsberg call Stan a mother hen. That was adorable.

It was cute, but kinda funny since twice in that ep we saw Stan bail on a Ginsberg freakout ("this is my stop" and "I can't watch this").

Or maybe there was some dynamic there I was missing. Honestly I'm just shooting the shit here on Stan and Ginsberg because I'm sad I have to go on MM blackout for 24 hours until I can watch the new episode.
posted by torticat at 5:33 PM on June 9, 2013


Guys, I can't be online for the episode tonight. Nobody make any witticisms until I get back, okay?
posted by Chrysostom at 5:55 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm getting nervous, guys.
posted by mynameisluka at 5:58 PM on June 9, 2013


Okay, get your bets in for end-credit music tonight. I'm going with Gimme Shelter.

Rape, murder. It's jut a shot away.
posted by dry white toast at 6:39 PM on June 9, 2013


Bob Benson is nothing more than a self help book. He is the very embodiment of Dale Carnegie's How To Win Friends and Influence People.

Comment of the thread so far.
posted by dry white toast at 6:41 PM on June 9, 2013


I don't think Dale would recommend two coffee cups
posted by sweetkid at 6:47 PM on June 9, 2013


also every week I forget which channel AMC is for me somehow
posted by sweetkid at 6:52 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm going to go ahead and try to predict tonight's animated gif of the week: Bob Benson steps unsuspectingly into an empty elevator shaft, 2 cups of coffee trailing him down.
posted by .kobayashi. at 6:53 PM on June 9, 2013


According to the descriptive text on my TV guide, Betty is going try to steer Sally's future so I predict she will set her hair on fire.
posted by The Whelk at 6:55 PM on June 9, 2013


OR Bert Cooper cartwheels into the conference room, clicking his heels before landing perfectly in his chair. One of those two definitely.
posted by .kobayashi. at 6:55 PM on June 9, 2013


Since I just shot gunned like three seasons of Supernatural over the weekend I assume someone is gonna be possessed by a demon.
posted by The Whelk at 6:59 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Roger you are an imp
posted by The Whelk at 7:02 PM on June 9, 2013


Manolis oh oh oh
posted by The Whelk at 7:02 PM on June 9, 2013


Berry good!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:03 PM on June 9, 2013


Betty is going try to steer Sally's future

Betty teaches Sally to drive?

Sally is definitely getting to be old enough, especially for 60's levels of old enough.
posted by Sara C. at 7:03 PM on June 9, 2013


WHOA THAT'S COMING BACK
posted by The Whelk at 7:03 PM on June 9, 2013


no just dementia
posted by sweetkid at 7:04 PM on June 9, 2013


Treat Yoself!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:04 PM on June 9, 2013


Yay Sally!
posted by dry white toast at 7:04 PM on June 9, 2013


Another yellow dress!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:04 PM on June 9, 2013


Damnit, Megan's alive.
posted by The Whelk at 7:05 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


all that speculation of "she's 25" was pointless when will we learn
posted by sweetkid at 7:05 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


Veeeeitnaaaaams!
posted by The Whelk at 7:06 PM on June 9, 2013


I wondered when the draft was going to come up. It's been conspicuously absent.
posted by dry white toast at 7:06 PM on June 9, 2013


This one time...at Diplomacy Club....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:06 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


"I wanna live, Ted!" -- Pete Campbell
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:07 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Peggy's all cute about Pete all of a sudden
posted by sweetkid at 7:08 PM on June 9, 2013


I can't decide if drunk Pete Campbell is the best Pete Campbell or the worst Pete Campbell.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:08 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


this has been a weirdly literal episode so far. anyone else? Sally: Daddy supports my dreams. Pete: do you pity me?

What?
posted by sweetkid at 7:09 PM on June 9, 2013


This household is recoiling viscerally from the Pete Peggy scene here.
posted by The Whelk at 7:09 PM on June 9, 2013


everyone is saying what they really mean and think! This is unheard of!
posted by The Whelk at 7:10 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


HELLS BELLS PEGGY
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:10 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


everyone is saying what they really mean and think! This is unheard of!

yea it is
posted by sweetkid at 7:10 PM on June 9, 2013


This is an Unholy Trinity.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:11 PM on June 9, 2013


Sally and Peggy are dressed in the same color, just saying.

Nice Meta joke about only ever seeing one room of that manse.
posted by The Whelk at 7:11 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Maybe literal, but there was some impressive unspoken dialogue between Pete and Peggy.
posted by dry white toast at 7:12 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm wearing yellow too.

Write that down T&LO
posted by sweetkid at 7:13 PM on June 9, 2013 [7 favorites]


What was Don watching on TV?
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:15 PM on June 9, 2013


That was the best scene in all of Mad Men ever. I am now shipping Peteggy. WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO THE WORLD?!
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:15 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


ok let's officially never speculate about coming soon again.
posted by sweetkid at 7:16 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Up is down, black is white, I almost found Pete attractive
posted by The Whelk at 7:16 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


I am now shipping Peteggy. WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO THE WORLD?!

Me too but we have similar sensibilities
posted by sweetkid at 7:16 PM on June 9, 2013


this conversation is so boring man Sylvia things are so boring

IMO YMMV
posted by sweetkid at 7:17 PM on June 9, 2013


I have the same Viking Orb ashtray on my back porch that's in the SC&P offices, omigod omigod omigod!!!
posted by box at 7:17 PM on June 9, 2013


Ladies and Gentlemen we have a Nan sighting!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:18 PM on June 9, 2013


Mitchell is soft. Uncle Mack said Don was soft. Sylvia liked Don because he reminded her of her son. Weird.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:19 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


And we have our theme, Talking about Vietnam without talking about it!
posted by The Whelk at 7:19 PM on June 9, 2013


Nan has very modern hair.
posted by gladly at 7:19 PM on June 9, 2013


Ted's wife has a similar voice to Megan
posted by sweetkid at 7:20 PM on June 9, 2013


this dialogue is exactly like work make it stop
posted by sweetkid at 7:22 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Juuuuuice!
posted by The Whelk at 7:22 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


There's the weaselly, insecure Ted we saw in previous seasons.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:23 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Anyone notice who's directing this episode?
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:24 PM on June 9, 2013


Mitchell Rosen you are bad news in a blouse.
posted by The Whelk at 7:24 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yes, Jon Hamm's wife!
posted by The Whelk at 7:25 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Pete is relaxed and talking back, everything we know is wrong and all is permitted.
posted by The Whelk at 7:27 PM on June 9, 2013


they're not married. unless that just changed. But her film Ira and Abby lays out her case for not getting married
posted by sweetkid at 7:28 PM on June 9, 2013


Is this an opportune moment to point out that Mitchell Rosen is also wearing red and black?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:28 PM on June 9, 2013


Jennifer Westfeldt directed this? Wow!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:28 PM on June 9, 2013


That movie she did with Adam Scott was adorable.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:29 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Suave Manolo is Suave.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:29 PM on June 9, 2013


Also, Betty you are right, all civilization is a pretense to making out.

So..countdown to Sally making her father's mistake and sleeping with a Rosen.

Man Manolo is like a cartoon 40s lothario, is he a romance novel cover come to life.
posted by The Whelk at 7:29 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm just going to pretend Manolo is the Spanish soap opera version of Jack Donaghy.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:30 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


That movie she did with Adam Scott was adorable.

I really love her a lot. She is deliciously weird.
posted by sweetkid at 7:31 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


"A sour little man" - PERFECT!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:31 PM on June 9, 2013


"You are a Sour Little Man" is my new go-to insult.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:31 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don is being political. Someone hold me
posted by dry white toast at 7:32 PM on June 9, 2013


The rat metaphor from the suitcase.

Also you need to get a cat.
posted by The Whelk at 7:35 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


STEGGYYYYYYY!!!!!!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:35 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


STEGGY!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:35 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Why don't you get William F Buckley to kill your rat Peggy
posted by sweetkid at 7:35 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


ALL OF STAN'S VOICES ARE SEXY VOICES
posted by The Whelk at 7:36 PM on June 9, 2013 [8 favorites]


Moshe Dayan sighting.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:36 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


OMG STEGGY?! can't wait can't wait can't wait eeeeee
posted by palomar at 7:36 PM on June 9, 2013


Tonight's Unholy Trinity Count: 2
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:36 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


ALL OF STAN'S VOICES ARE SEXY VOICES

he is really out in front on hot male cast members for me right now
posted by sweetkid at 7:37 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Stan's sexy voice is the secret to his beard growing superpower.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:37 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


God that scene with Pete's mother was a miasma of attacks and passive aggression and fucked up dynamics.
posted by The Whelk at 7:38 PM on June 9, 2013


Time for Peggy to call Pete, her hunter. Now he can prove to himself that he's lovable.

I can't believe that I'm psyched about this.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:38 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete doesn't actually hunt, he only pretends to hunt.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:39 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm waiting for a final scene with Bob and Manolo in bed and Manolo has a total nasally native new York accent.
posted by The Whelk at 7:39 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Any port in a storm, huh Peggy?
posted by dry white toast at 7:39 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Now shipping: Bonolo.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:40 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Is it just me, or are there more booze ads on 'Mad Men' than on the average show?
posted by box at 7:40 PM on June 9, 2013


Any port in a storm, huh Peggy?

of course, it's Peggy.
posted by sweetkid at 7:40 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peggy has a very well organized Rolodex: Guys who would kill for me A-F
posted by The Whelk at 7:40 PM on June 9, 2013 [8 favorites]


Megan is talking in Sally's voice.
posted by dry white toast at 7:41 PM on June 9, 2013


Megan is always inconvenienced by kids when she has to go to work.

I GET IT SHE WORKS WORKING LADY HAS TO WORK
posted by sweetkid at 7:41 PM on June 9, 2013


Sorry, Betty's voice.
posted by dry white toast at 7:41 PM on June 9, 2013


Yes, but half of those booze ads are the same Johnnie Walker ad...
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:41 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Oh just kiss him.
posted by The Whelk at 7:41 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


"Is it your kid" made me LOL like for real out loud.
posted by sweetkid at 7:42 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Hey, I know somebody with a plane who can fly to Canada....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:43 PM on June 9, 2013


Ted needs a time out.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:43 PM on June 9, 2013


Wouldn't it be awesome if Mitchell Rosen grew up to be George W. Bush?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:43 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


This episode is so literal it's so weird
posted by sweetkid at 7:43 PM on June 9, 2013


I'm kind of done with Sylvia.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:46 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


boring Sylvia is so boring

IMO YMMV
posted by sweetkid at 7:47 PM on June 9, 2013


Bob is IN CONTROL.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:47 PM on June 9, 2013


" sit down"

Yes bob, anything you want bob
posted by The Whelk at 7:47 PM on June 9, 2013


omgherewego
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:47 PM on June 9, 2013


whoa Pete took directions from Bob?

He needs a therapist
posted by sweetkid at 7:47 PM on June 9, 2013


OK BOB'S GAY
posted by sweetkid at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Manolo's interests!
posted by box at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013


Okay, that pause and glance on "degenerate" is all the confirmation I need.
posted by gladly at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob is sooo gay. Adorably gay.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013


And in love with Pete?!
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013


Bete?
posted by peagood at 7:48 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


AIIIIIIII
posted by The Whelk at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013


NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


YESSSSSSS!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


It doesn't matter who it is.
posted by box at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013


aw Bob's face
posted by sweetkid at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013


Oh sweet poor Bob!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:49 PM on June 9, 2013


Look if we rewind we can see the exact moment Bob's heart just broke.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:50 PM on June 9, 2013 [14 favorites]


I choo choo choose you Pete Campbell. And there's a picture of a train
posted by sweetkid at 7:50 PM on June 9, 2013 [7 favorites]


This episode was totally worth it for that scene.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:50 PM on June 9, 2013


Manila envelopes.
posted by box at 7:51 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


BOB YOU CAN DO BETTER I AM RIGHT HERE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE SCREEN * GRABBYHANDS*
posted by The Whelk at 7:51 PM on June 9, 2013 [17 favorites]


no no encore presentation of the Killing I need to watch this again
posted by sweetkid at 7:51 PM on June 9, 2013


Poor Bob. You can do so much better than Pete.
posted by donajo at 7:51 PM on June 9, 2013


So did Pete think about it. I think he thought about it.
posted by dry white toast at 7:51 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Again. AGAIN!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:52 PM on June 9, 2013


Pete actually handled that slightly better than I expected, but I'm scared for Bob.
posted by gladly at 7:52 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm Lorenzo. I blog about colors.
posted by box at 7:52 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


No, Pete is too self-absorbed to think about it.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:52 PM on June 9, 2013


he did think about it.
posted by sweetkid at 7:52 PM on June 9, 2013


I think that was mostly Pete being shocked at (to his knowledge) his first encounter with a real life homosexual.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:53 PM on June 9, 2013


Interesting parallels between how Bob came in and took charge of Pete's crisis, and how he handled Ginsberg's meltdown... and Joan's crisis too, come to think of it.

I <3 Bob.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:54 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


Come over to our square Bob IT IS SAFE AND SEXY.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:54 PM on June 9, 2013


The irony is that Manolo being gay solves Pete's problem.
posted by dry white toast at 7:54 PM on June 9, 2013


Sally is about to walk in on something.
posted by dry white toast at 7:55 PM on June 9, 2013


Pete's mother loins problem.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:55 PM on June 9, 2013


Was that doorman on The Sopranos?
posted by box at 7:55 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Okay, how sure are we that Bob's gambit wasn't another power play? Get another partner on his side?
posted by The Whelk at 7:55 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I knew the giant shiny keyring was gonna spell trouble.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:55 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


THE CITY IS DIRTY
posted by The Whelk at 7:56 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


OH MY GOD.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:56 PM on June 9, 2013


Dear God!
posted by box at 7:56 PM on June 9, 2013


Poor, poor kid.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:57 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Child psychologist on the white courtesy phone....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:57 PM on June 9, 2013


that music is scaring the shit out of me
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:57 PM on June 9, 2013


Saly is going to have so many conflicting emotions.
posted by The Whelk at 7:58 PM on June 9, 2013


he's just...not coming back.
posted by sweetkid at 7:58 PM on June 9, 2013


btw, cereals have featured very prominently in this episode
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:58 PM on June 9, 2013


Peggy has a cat, as it should be.
posted by The Whelk at 7:58 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ok we get it. Ted is the opposite of Don.
posted by dry white toast at 7:59 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


i called bob
posted by PinkMoose at 7:59 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sally is going to grow up to be an artist and paint lots of pictures of scenes through keyholes.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:59 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh Megan, you're so good at dealing with functional alcoholics.
posted by The Whelk at 8:00 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


So now Sally knows her father isn't a hero.
posted by sweetkid at 8:00 PM on June 9, 2013


Mitchell!
posted by box at 8:01 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh, I'll BET Sylvia is "overwhelmed."
posted by Dr. Zira at 8:01 PM on June 9, 2013


YAY SALLY!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:01 PM on June 9, 2013


Sally Draper, MVP.
posted by The Whelk at 8:02 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sally's lion pillow is disapproving.
posted by box at 8:02 PM on June 9, 2013


OH NO HE DIDN'T
posted by Dr. Zira at 8:03 PM on June 9, 2013


you idiot Sally isn't five.
posted by sweetkid at 8:03 PM on June 9, 2013


my heart hurts for sally and bob both
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:03 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Bob fly the TARDIS into Sally's room and rescue her.
posted by Dr. Zira at 8:04 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Oh Sally, the only adult you like, is a douche.
posted by The Whelk at 8:04 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete's rifle, on the next Mad Men.
posted by box at 8:04 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


The gun is back!
posted by gladly at 8:05 PM on June 9, 2013


Peggy got a cat instead of schtupping anyone, though. So one happy ending, I guess, though isn't that what her mother said she should do instead of cohabitating with Abe? Hmm
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:05 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


To be fair, the cat is better at solving her problems and fulfilling her needs than Abe.
posted by The Whelk at 8:07 PM on June 9, 2013 [9 favorites]


Oh, Sally. Another plaid dress flopping on another one of your beds.
posted by peagood at 8:08 PM on June 9, 2013


So one happy ending, I guess, though isn't that what her mother said she should do instead of cohabitating with Abe? Hmm

Yes, as she tacitly predicted her daughter's eventual death: "You're lonely, get a cat. They live thirteen years. Then you get another one. Then another. Then you're done." Thanks, Ma!
posted by Elsa at 8:08 PM on June 9, 2013


So, I'm a bit confused at Bob's actions here, he was trying to tell Pete that Manolo isn't fucking his mother, cause Manolo is gay, and trying to gauge Pete's reaction to that much like the GM dinner about the War, but then he full on hits on him ..not that I haven't ...done ...such things, but it seems like a big jump in escalation of dialogue. There is a long way from " no it's fine, Manolo's gay" to " also, I am gay and I am in love with you."

There is still something...off about Bob.
posted by The Whelk at 8:10 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


I didn't expect to be so UPSET on Sally's behalf.

Also...there's no failed gay come-on like a Mad Men failed gay come-on. Jesus Christ.
posted by mynameisluka at 8:11 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Like maybe it's more Bob " pan sexual ambitious social climber" Benson then love lorn closet case.
posted by The Whelk at 8:11 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


Word. Without a lot of confirmation, I tend to think of Bob less as gay and more as, uh, available.
posted by box at 8:13 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, all of my feels are with Sally. She's so smart and grown up for her age kind of totally her father. She is going to be fascinating.
posted by The Whelk at 8:13 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


See also, Sally's waaaay more savvy with interpersonal relationships friend.

She's great at Model U.N, Sally is growing into a proto snarky nerd.

Or political wonk.
posted by The Whelk at 8:15 PM on June 9, 2013


Also Bob being commanding is pretty much up there with Lane hitting Pete in " sudden momentary epic hotness"

Maybe I should get these feelings ..checked.
posted by The Whelk at 8:17 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Isn't it amazing how quickly the whole Mitchell thing went from HEY SALLY THIS IS A THING to Mitchell who? SICK SAD WORLD! *flops on bed*
posted by mynameisluka at 8:17 PM on June 9, 2013


Sally, turn on the Tv, I'm sure sure Amok Time will be playing, it will tell you what to do.
posted by The Whelk at 8:18 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


I mean, the other riple, Bob is trying to prevent Manolo from being fired " so he's a degenerate" kinda closed that deal, but then why follow up with yur person version of The Hunger?

Unless..Bob is ...actually in love with Pete.

*shudder*
posted by The Whelk at 8:24 PM on June 9, 2013


So if Manolo's interests don't go that way, then what exactly is going on between him and Pete's mother?
posted by donajo at 8:25 PM on June 9, 2013


I was never on the Sylvia-hate train before, but after tonight, I'd like an express ticket, please. Ugh.
posted by donajo at 8:26 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


He's giving her lots of time and attension and generally acting like a cartoon version of an old movie lothario, add her addled brain and you get that.

Or he is uh..massaging her. In the manner of old doctors.
posted by The Whelk at 8:27 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Or just a higher end, more hands on version of that Liberace did for a lot neglected working class housewives, the perfect Son/Lover thing,.
posted by The Whelk at 8:29 PM on June 9, 2013


It will dawn on Sally before long that this is why her parents divorced.

And Megan thinks Don stepped up because she got through to him.
posted by dry white toast at 8:29 PM on June 9, 2013


Oh Megan, her life is nothing but weird shit happening in her apartment that she has no context or explanation for. I'd want to spend all day at work too.
posted by The Whelk at 8:32 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


Is Peggy still living in the brownstone? Or is this a new apartment? I couldn't tell.
posted by donajo at 8:39 PM on June 9, 2013


I think it's the brownstone. Judging mostly by the locks.
posted by box at 8:40 PM on June 9, 2013


Peggy's got a whole brownstone with lots of locks.

Spin off series, Peggy is the fussy, put upon landlord of a w80s brownstone with Wacky 70s era tenants.
posted by The Whelk at 8:48 PM on June 9, 2013 [8 favorites]


I'm trying to imagine Bob using that coming on technique with each of the other the other male cast members and amusing myself with the reactions. ( for the purposes of my mental well being, Stan's reaction is let's get really high and see what happens)

( fun fact, I was once the receiver of a totally super WASPy come on like that from an actual prep school student that I didn't register AT ALL cause I grew up where people accidentally touched knees and hugged all the time)
posted by The Whelk at 8:51 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


As I cleaned this up
posted by The Whelk at 8:54 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ferdinand Marcos.
posted by box at 8:58 PM on June 9, 2013


Wacky 70s era tenants

Wasn't everyone wacky in the 70s?
posted by sweetkid at 9:08 PM on June 9, 2013


Of course Diplomacy Club is an excuse to make out it's right there in the NAME
posted by sweetkid at 9:11 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


The references to Ferdinand Marcos startled the heck out of me. By this point my dad was about to ship out for a short tour of duty in Vietnam, leave the Air Force for the Foreign Service, and soon will be on his way to Manila to meet and marry a Spanish-English-Tagalog speaking lady. Having Marcos' name spill out of her mouth felt weird.
posted by PussKillian at 9:12 PM on June 9, 2013


haha on rewatch ted thinks he and don are fred and ginger

seriously when are they making out
posted by sweetkid at 9:28 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peggy, yer barking up the wrong tree, Ted has stalwart, clean-scrubbed apple-cheeked Protestantism on his side and a serious hard on for flouncing onto the bed waiting for Don to call.

Stan is in bed with Someone and treated you like his sister. Because you are.

Pete's getting relaxed enough for you to consider it but he has his whole mirror-maze of sexual fantasia to deal with.

I know you're on the cat-filled rebound (nice cat, btw)but maybe some guy in between people you're professional entangled with and random movie theater handjobs?

Can Peggy have a one night stand? or something? Without a counter to her natural control-freak perfectionist tendencies she's gonna go straight up her own ass.
posted by The Whelk at 9:34 PM on June 9, 2013 [4 favorites]


Now I really want to see a Fred and Ginger movie where Fred punches Ginger in the face all the time.
posted by palomar at 9:35 PM on June 9, 2013


Next on Mad Men -- Peggy goes straight up her own ass!

Can they show that on AMC?
posted by palomar at 9:36 PM on June 9, 2013


Oh Don and Ted
posted by The Whelk at 9:36 PM on June 9, 2013


I was really hoping after the Sally seeing him and Sylvia thing Don would leave the apartment and not come back till next season, where we'd see WTF he was up to.
posted by sweetkid at 9:38 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Now I really want to see a Fred and Ginger movie where Fred punches Ginger in the face all the time.

HBO is developing a series based on Gaiman's "American Gods", where in the premise is all the old gods still exist and walk the world in diminished forms, Kali, Seth, Odin, etc And there are new gods, like Media and Automobile and Atomic, and the god Television appears to people by breaking the 4th wall and inhabiting characters in shows, the main character watches an episode of the Dick Van Dyke show where Dick slaps Laurie across the face and she starts sobbing, promising to never do it again, before turning to talk to him. During a rerun of I Love Lucy, the God Television tries to entice him with "Hey, ever wanted to see Lucy's tits?"

So what I'm saying is, if you're adapting it to a more modern setting, you can have the main character be watching an episode of Mad Men on the Teevee and suddenly have Don turn around, talk to him and say "So, you ever wanted to see Don Draper's cock?"
posted by The Whelk at 9:45 PM on June 9, 2013 [5 favorites]


Poor Pete's mother told him he was always unlovable and that's why he considered Bob for a second.
posted by sweetkid at 9:54 PM on June 9, 2013 [2 favorites]


"nobody loves Pete Campell!" *sob crash sob*

"There there big boy, I love you! Always and forever!"

"Oh thank you Bob, you're a single light in a weary world"

"Now just sign these insurance papers, you're allergic to shellfish, right? I remembered!"
posted by The Whelk at 9:56 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


*cue lobster dinner*
posted by The Whelk at 9:57 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


*sigh*

I thought it was poignant. Poor Pete. I think he's doing his best with his mom on his own.
posted by sweetkid at 9:58 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Is it just me, or does Sally's voice sound A LOT like Darlene on Roseanne?
posted by Chrysostom at 10:09 PM on June 9, 2013


I don't think she sounds like Darlene at all. Darlene sounded 90s surly, Sally's kind of over it all in a rich kid way.
posted by sweetkid at 10:11 PM on June 9, 2013


Sally's friend reminded me of Francine (Betty's Ossining bestie)
posted by sweetkid at 10:11 PM on June 9, 2013


Bob Hits On The Various Mad Men

*knee touch*

Don sits up, buttons his suit jacket.

"Wrong bathroom pal. Look, you're a good kid, and this never happened."

*knee touch*

Roger finishes his drink. Ben hits his knee again. "Seriously, that's your opening move? I'm not a virgin at the box social Bob, yeesh. Not that I'm not flattered, but you want to chase some light loafers you need to be a little more direct. This isn't mayberry or podunk or whatever it is you fell out of. Here's Jane's number, she has some friends. Seriously you're farm teaming it."

*knee touch*

Bert gives Bob a thousand yard stare and pushes Bob's knee back into place.

"Listen I fended off Adulous Huxley and John Maynard Keynes fresh off a benzos bender, you're not trying anything new there."

*knee touch*

"Why are you touching my leg?" Stan furrows his brow.

"I just thought I could have more input into creative if-"

"UUUGH, why does everyone. Here" Stan pulls two joints from his case on the desk. "Relax, be cool, and forget."

A while passes.

"is it true what they say about ...people like you?"

"Say what Stan?"

"like with the oral thing, that's it's...cause it's the same thing."

"Where would've heard that Stan?"

"I keep my ears open."

*knee touch*

"Stop touching my legs it's driving me crazy." Micheal says while sitting and fidgeting.

"It's what I said before, I could help you, comfort you" Bob puts his hand on Ginsberg's leg

"I could be here for you."

Micheal winces and recoils. "No touching, we don't do the touching, and you're hair and hair you have is just freaking me out it's like a bowl of evil brown pasta, just go-"

"Micheal-"

"GO FORTH PASTA MAN. GO!"

*knee touch*

"I just feel like you're so close to cracking Don, you know?" Ted looks like he's a million miles away.

"Enough about Don, what about more ..pressing matters?" Bob puts his leg closer against Ted's own.

"I'm so glad we can have this kind of close relationship, I really feel like we should be a family, able to talk and touch and share." Ted stands up and gives Ben a big bear hug.

"This is the kind of agency I wanted." He pats Bob on the back and sighs.

"What do you think Don is doing right now?"
posted by The Whelk at 10:20 PM on June 9, 2013 [26 favorites]


I'm leaving out Cutler cause that just ends in whippets.
posted by The Whelk at 10:42 PM on June 9, 2013 [6 favorites]


Stan and Bob, on the Piers, after 3 am drinks, furitave handjobs in the dark, as a kind of seeking lost freedom.
posted by PinkMoose at 10:53 PM on June 9, 2013


COOOONSTANT CRAAAAVING
posted by The Whelk at 10:56 PM on June 9, 2013


(and I cleaned that up a bit)

(seriously considering how popular it is, there is a total lack of quality fic about this show, no idea why)
posted by The Whelk at 10:59 PM on June 9, 2013


the animated gif you were hoping for
posted by Rhomboid at 11:11 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


plus some Sally giffage too
posted by Rhomboid at 11:13 PM on June 9, 2013


Bob Benson grindr profile
posted by Rhomboid at 11:14 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


I am annoyed that James Wolk is like a year older than me.

I don't know why.
posted by The Whelk at 11:14 PM on June 9, 2013


Peggy + cat
another
posted by Rhomboid at 11:16 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Drunk with Peggy and Ted is the most charming Pete's ever been. I could watch that Pete every episode.
posted by rewil at 11:19 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


They like to mix 85% reprehensible Pete with 15% sympathetic Pete.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:49 PM on June 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete is the two buck chuck of characters.
posted by The Whelk at 11:53 PM on June 9, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also I want to Call Don out on something here.

Gum.

Now I don't have huge long whiskey fests in the middle of the day (that much) but I keep a packet of violet gum (the literal same brand of gum Peggy uses as a magic totem) in my pocket at all times, to chew in-between meals cause it refreshes and makes my breath not awful. There is no reason to come home to your wife, daughter, and her curiously way to into show business friend with whiskey breath.
posted by The Whelk at 12:08 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob Benson is just a red herring.

(cue Leslie Anne Warren holding a gun)
posted by The Whelk at 12:13 AM on June 10, 2013


(also I take issue, Sal was fired for not prostituting himself to the client, and I'm in the pool that Sal was so closeted, he's never actually...done anything.)
posted by The Whelk at 12:15 AM on June 10, 2013


Oh and I totally mixed up my Jennifers, this was not the Jennifer married to Jon Hamm

It is however the Jennifer that directed The Suitcase so hey hey.
posted by The Whelk at 12:19 AM on June 10, 2013


There are just, too many Jennifers.
posted by The Whelk at 12:19 AM on June 10, 2013


Jesus, that last scene, with Sally finally realizing what her father was, or could be--
posted by PinkMoose at 12:29 AM on June 10, 2013


like she is resolving that being an adult is knowing, and not saying that she knows
posted by PinkMoose at 12:32 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


which was, of course, bookended by her saying Dad understands and looks out for me unlike you! nyah nyah! Poor Sally.
posted by The Whelk at 12:32 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


So much to process. Peggy & Mrs Campbell. Peggy & Pete. Peggy & Stan. Pete & Bob, or Pete/Bob. Bob/Broken Heart. Poor little Sally Draper!
posted by crossoverman at 12:33 AM on June 10, 2013


Don goes to her, and has at least a small conversation, about the nature of this, and they reach an understanding--he treats her like an adult, something that Betty has never done.
posted by PinkMoose at 12:34 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Actually, her Step-Dad may be the most purely positive force she could grab a hold of , esp with the hints of her political leanings, so of course, that will never happen.

I say this as a general fan of Henry Francis and he seems to be , in the most part, Not monstrously evil like most of our mains.
posted by The Whelk at 12:34 AM on June 10, 2013 [5 favorites]


But yes, Don is the only adult who treats her like an adult, he's very good about that.

GEE I WONDER WHY.
posted by The Whelk at 12:35 AM on June 10, 2013


IT'S NOT LIKE HE KNOWS ABOUT GROWING UP FAST OR ANYTHING.
posted by The Whelk at 12:38 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Anyway, Sally is SO her Father's daughter, but she really needs to spend time with Henry Francis or her bestie or just..not that or maaaaan I can see so many awful rich kid futures for her.
posted by The Whelk at 12:39 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


It's a set of triangles

sally and her friend and megan
don and sally and megan
don and sally and betty
don and sally and henry

ted and pete and peggy
pete and his mother and marcos
pete and bob and marcos

peggy and stan and stans girl
peggy and ted and don
peggy and pete and petes mother

the interesting thing is don is never part of those triangles

don and ted but not...
don and roger but not...
don and sally but not...
don and megan but not...
peggy and don but not...

pete has completely dimissed him, as well

the handshake, not as a friendship move, the sunkist vs ocean spray, the being caught in flagrente with his mistress and not his wife, his connections not working, how badly he is working with clients--

you can imagine pete and peggy and ted and bob and stan working some way to surrive the 70s, even roger, who has class (pun intended) and part of that working out is negoting unstable triangles...don cant do that anymore

the three at the first table
the six at the chevy meeting
posted by PinkMoose at 12:40 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


I'd like to say what was said before, Sally sounds snarky teenaged, but she also sounds *rich* and thats a very particular timber and tone. Sally sounds like a teenager from a wealthy family. I think this might come up.
posted by The Whelk at 12:43 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ok--how rich is Don and how rich is Henry Francis and does Betty have her own money, and how much does Meghan have?
posted by PinkMoose at 12:50 AM on June 10, 2013


I got the feeling at the Ocean Spray dinner that Ted saw Ted+Pete+Peggy as the possible nucleus of a new agency.
posted by Chrysostom at 1:03 AM on June 10, 2013 [8 favorites]


Well, Ted basically said that - about the kind of agency he wanted. I just can't see it happening so soon after the merger.
posted by crossoverman at 1:10 AM on June 10, 2013


Love reading these Mad Men threads. Love the show.

Now for my burning question: Why, oh why, does Stan have a huge poster of Moshe Dayan above his bed? I can't figure that out.

When I was a wee lad, back in the dark ages, I would see him and his eye patch on TV and think he must be such a badass. Or whatever the equivalent thought would be for me at that age.

Was he that popular after the Six-Day War in '67? Popular enough for Stan to have a huge poster on his wall?
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 1:45 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


thats who that was, thank you.
posted by PinkMoose at 1:46 AM on June 10, 2013


Most of the time I have a lengthy reaction, but this week I'm just shipping Pete with everyone all of a damn sudden.

I do love that he starts that scene taking orders from Bob, even calming down on command. Pete will do anything for a person who takes care of him, I guess; I can't imagine that this state of affairs can continue now, but maybe Pete is just wired that strongly and Bob will win him back to status quo with coffee and upbeat silence.

It's interesting that Bob's entire schtick is taking care. I mean, he lies too, he's also into lying, but again and again, the way he gets into people's hearts is to encourage and fuss over them. (He gets nowhere near Ginsberg's heart, but at least they get to the meeting.) It's the reason I want him to be at least sort of sincere, against mounting evidence. These people have all been so damaged by lack of care, and/or by inability to recognize it (Pete: both). I'm pretty sure that Bob has that effect in-universe, too, though Joan's eyes have probably always been more open than Pete's.

(I kind of suspected that Bob was in love with Pete based on their last one-on-one conversation, but I don't really take credit for that because I was looking so hard for gay Bob evidence at that point that I was accepting glances that could've meant anything. I still think there are feelings there, though see above under "want him to be sort of sincere against mounting evidence".)

Pete eating cereal at home reminds me of the au pair episode, which is to say a) it reminds me of one of his most disgusting moments and b) perversely, it also reminds me of a general era when I had great sympathy and hope for him and he was actually kind of my favorite character.

Lengthy reaction whaddya know
posted by thesmallmachine at 2:19 AM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


(And to think I shipped Bob/Joan at the hospital. To put it in fanfic terms, I tend to be very moved by hurt/comfort scenarios -- a button which all of Bob's storylines seem designed to push.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 2:27 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


crossoverman: "Well, Ted basically said that - about the kind of agency he wanted. I just can't see it happening so soon after the merger."

Well, this is probably nuance, but I felt like what he SAID was, "Man, you guys are great, it was really good working with you on this pitch." And what he THOUGHT was, "Maybe this could lead to something better."

I mean, I've worked on projects where I'm really happy with the team and thought we did something good, but I'm not thinking of starting a new company with them. Ted seemed to be that step further, and I just wondered if maybe his Don frustrations already have the wheels turning. Could be off here.
posted by Chrysostom at 6:12 AM on June 10, 2013


Peggy has always reminded me of Sally from The Dick van Dyke Show. IIRC, Sally had a big orange cat. (The cat's name was Mr. Henderson.) I love how Peggy and the cat just looked at each other for a brief moment, than back at the TV, like they're entering an uneasy business relationship. I wonder how long it took to get that shot.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 6:13 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Roger finishes his drink. Ben hits his knee again. "Seriously, that's your opening move? I'm not a virgin at the box social Bob, yeesh. Not that I'm not flattered, but you want to chase some light loafers you need to be a little more direct. This isn't mayberry or podunk or whatever it is you fell out of. Here's Jane's number, she has some friends. Seriously you're farm teaming it."

Pure sweet perfection, right there.

Too many Jennifers

Yeeeeeah, I was one of five in my first-grade class in 1975. Blech.

I think it's sort of fascinating, and a testament to the writing and acting, that we still don't know what's going on with Bob. There's been nothing definitive. He hasn't actually said "I'm gay." We've never seen him in a pitch meeting. Matthew Weiner said in an interview linked upthread (or in the previous thread) that Bob is definitely a liar. So I am starting to think everything he does is purely manipulative, and in reality he's a total charlatan. He is Dick Whitman, reborn. (Hell, his BB name and Don's DD are both alliterative. I know, that's pushing it, but still.) We need a scene with Bob and Don where they both realize they're fakers.

And Sally, jesus. I disagree with the notion that Don spoke to her like an adult. "I was comforting her." Come on, Sally's smart as a whip. My favorite line was when she said sonething like "You don't get to talk to me." DAMN STRAIGHT.

One last thought -- I think it was Ted who used the word "asshole." I think this is huge for that time period. I remember when I first saw "Bullitt" a few years ago, and in one scene towards the end, Steve McQueen says "That's bullshit!" My father told the story that at the time (late 60s), that was unheard of, and controversial. So I gasped like a schoolkid when Ted said it: Ooooooooh.

So much to process in this episode. Yay for DVRs.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 6:20 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ted seemed to be that step further, and I just wondered if maybe his Don frustrations already have the wheels turning. Could be off here.

I don't think Ted is in a position financially to attempt a breakaway agency. From what we briefly saw of his home life in this episode it seems like he's still working hard to "put food on the table" etc. and his wife hints that despite all his hard work he is not really a "success" yet. Plus he would be putting even more of a strain on his home life. Pete and Peggy are not yet wealthy enough to help carry the financial risk/burden of starting a new agency. When SCDP broke away Sterling and Cooper didn't have to worry about money and Don (while not as wealthy) still had enough that he was also able to help carry Pete along.

By the end I think was feeling better, believing he had worked through some things with Don. Also loved his line "I'm going to assume you don't have many friends..."

I did think it was interesting that this week Cutler was calmer about all the conflict and Ted was freaking out. What, do they just take turns?
posted by mikepop at 6:47 AM on June 10, 2013





Don goes to her, and has at least a small conversation, about the nature of this, and they reach an understanding--he treats her like an adult, something that Betty has never done.


And Sally, jesus. I disagree with the notion that Don spoke to her like an adult. "I was comforting her." Come on, Sally's smart as a whip. My favorite line was when she said sonething like "You don't get to talk to me." DAMN STRAIGHT.

Yes, COMPLETELY disagree that he was talking to her like an adult. That's not the way adults talk to each other about sex, even related adults. He was talking to her like she was a five year old who didn't know anything about sex yet and didn't understand what she saw.

And then comparing it to Betty? Don does not come across as the favorable parent here. In fact, this whole situation calls back to Betty's yelling "Your father's a hero" because Sally has these rose colored glasses that her father can't do any wrong ,while Betty's putting in all the heavy lifting which is 1) true and 2) a common theme with divorced parents when there's one parent there more for the day to day.

It seems pretty severe to say that Don is doing something positive that Betty wouldn't, or that anything about this scene reflects badly on anyone but Don.
posted by sweetkid at 7:14 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Theory: Mitchell Rosen grows up to become the Mitchell from the film "Mitchell!"
posted by drezdn at 7:19 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


One last thought -- I think it was Ted who used the word "asshole." I think this is huge for that time period. I remember when I first saw "Bullitt" a few years ago, and in one scene towards the end, Steve McQueen says "That's bullshit!" My father told the story that at the time (late 60s), that was unheard of, and controversial. So I gasped like a schoolkid when Ted said it: Ooooooooh.

It might have been hugely controversial to say it in a movie (I think Bullitt was indeed the first to do that), but in real life?
posted by Sys Rq at 7:37 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Who’s the puffy guy who’s a big blurry sex machine?
–Mitchell!
–That Mitchell is one fat …
-Shut your mouth!
–I’m just talking about Mitchell.
posted by Chrysostom at 7:37 AM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


Can Peggy have a one night stand? or something? Without a counter to her natural control-freak perfectionist tendencies she's gonna go straight up her own ass.

I kinda think that in Peggy's mind, one-night stands lead to I Didn't Know I Was Pregnantville, with a side trip to a sanatorium and an adoption agency, and being unable to escape your babydaddy/coworker (through three different work environments) up to the point where said babydaddy's senile mother shows up at your office eight years later and, mistaking you for his wife, makes a lot of noise eerily relevant to the kid you are desperately trying to forget you ever had. So... up her ass ain't so bad, comparatively.
posted by psoas at 7:43 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I was comforting her, I think was on telling Sally why Adults have sex. I dont think anyone was denying that dex was occuring.
posted by PinkMoose at 7:47 AM on June 10, 2013


I think a 14 year old girl knows why Adults Have Sex. I think a more "adult" conversation would have involved him admitting that he made a mistake and acknowledging adults make mistakes, rather than saying he was comforting her with his penis because she was feeling very bad.

He didn't want to have a moment with her, he just didn't want her to tell anyone.
posted by sweetkid at 7:52 AM on June 10, 2013 [9 favorites]


If only Peggy would have called Don to kill the mouse. "This never happened. It will shock you how much it never happened."
posted by drezdn at 7:53 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


IT WAS A RAT big diff
posted by sweetkid at 7:53 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


That is the first time I ever saw Pete come across as fun and personable. I never wanted Pete and Peggy to get together or thought it would happen, but now I'm thinking it may be a possibility. I still don't want it to happen, though. You know if they get together they'll be the most horrible pig-headed Republican couple you ever saw by the eighties. Peggy needs to be with someone more liberal.

"Sour little man." Sing it, Mother Campbell.

I love that Peggy got a cat, and I hope the cat becomes a regular on the show. That's why I got my cat, though thankfully it was to deal with mice, not rats. Men are for sex, Peggy. On all other fronts you can come up with your own solutions.

I like that Ted has a good wife and a workable marriage.

Bob, WHY would you be interested in Pete? WHY?!!!

I was expecting the whole Sylvia & Don thing to blow up in Don's face, but I never saw it blowing up quite that way.

Sally, go into politics. You will. You must. But dump that friend of yours. Her signing your name to that letter and giving it to Mitchell was a major backstab. Also, Mitchell may have talked to your friend because she was talking to him, but he was looking at you.

I was hoping to see Mitchell Rosen post-haircut.

Jon Hamm could comfort me any time. I am in great need of comfort.
posted by orange swan at 8:05 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


I seem to recall Peggy having a fairly positive one-night stand with an engineering student she picked up in a bar. But maybe I'm forgetting some negative aspect of it.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 8:11 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


The quick cut of Sylvia and Don was so hyper-fucking, like in rut. Definitely weird for a fourteen year old. Remember when you first get the gist of sex? Especially as it relates to your parents? You picture a lot more kissing and tenderness.

This may have been acutely obvious to me as I was watching with my somewhat shy and awkward sixteen year old daughter. We knew what was up as soon as the keys became a plot point, but WHAM!
posted by readery at 8:18 AM on June 10, 2013


Any guesses on what Peggy named her cat?
posted by drezdn at 8:18 AM on June 10, 2013


I really dislike Sylvia anyway, but her insta-hyper-freakout "oh God oh God oh God" that was All About Her was just really pathetic and gross.
posted by sweetkid at 8:19 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Possible names for Peggy's cat:

Sublimation!
posted by The Whelk at 8:21 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Tom and Lorenzo have suggested Ralph, Waldo and Emerson as names for the cat. Heh!

I do disagree with them that Sylvia's freakout had anything to do with guilt. That was an "oh shit there are going to be consequences now" moment.

Oh, and as soon as I saw Roger juggling oranges, I thought, "GIF of the week."
posted by orange swan at 8:22 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Jesus. A single woman gets a cat, 350,000,000 sexual frustration jokes follow. No wonder people are afraid of being single.
posted by sweetkid at 8:24 AM on June 10, 2013 [5 favorites]


Groucho Meowx
posted by drezdn at 8:26 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Honestly I think she has a better chance of future emotional stability with the cat.

Cats rarely throw money in your face, bang hippies in the office, or get all self righteous when you stab them.
posted by The Whelk at 8:27 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Cats rarely throw money in your face, bang hippies in the office, or get all self righteous when you stab them.

Or anything Ducks do
posted by sweetkid at 8:28 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


No, the cat's name is Something.

Some poor thing without a name.....
posted by The Whelk at 8:28 AM on June 10, 2013


So while we're all in our own Bob Benson shaped freak out, can we get a running tally on the number of Favors called on and in this Episode and how many reciprocal relationships are shown cause its A LOT.


Hell the episode is called " Favors" and I'm untangling the meanings of that word ( from, a gift you do for someone to being in someone's good graces to ..the concept of capitalism.)
posted by The Whelk at 8:31 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh man just that first sentence of the T&Lo recap made me not want to read further. I read the Sepinwall review first this time.
posted by sweetkid at 8:34 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Some poor thing without a name.....

Hey, Peggy's cat looked just like Holly Golightly's "no name slob" of a cat, and you know Peggy's seen Breakfast at Tiffany's.
posted by orange swan at 8:35 AM on June 10, 2013


I like how Peggy's cat took up half the couch. My cat does that and I always look at him and think - how are you doing that? You weigh ten pounds and you have tiny legs and your nose is smaller than my thumb.
posted by sweetkid at 8:39 AM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


I just figured it out:
Don is Lucille
Peggy is Michael
Ginsberg is Buster
Ted Chaough is Lucille 2
Bob Benson is Maebe


I think it's pretty well settled now that it's Pete who's the Michael.

("I don't want Mom mixed up with the sort of creep that would have her as a fetish.")

And maybe Sally is the GOB? Is that possible?

Further reading.
posted by Sys Rq at 9:04 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Heather Havrilesky's recap from Salon; the A.V. Club recap.
posted by orange swan at 9:20 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Really liking Heather's take on Pete:

Pete is deathly accurate about so much of what’s going on around him (naturally he would be the first to notice that Ted and Peggy are in love), but his closed-mindedness clouds his vision about anything that’s too close to home. He may be the most disgusted and the most outspoken when he feels some injustice is in the mix (he had the strongest reaction to JFK and MLK assassinations), but he’s also unexpectedly rigid and old-fashioned. And he’s such a bratty little baby to boot! In his first scene, drunk with Peggy and Ted, we get flexible, lovable, honest Pete. He generously tells Peggy that Ted is in love with her, and then, instead of giving her a hard time or acting jealous about it, he very vulnerably asks her if she hates him.

This is what makes Pete so fascinating. Also like a real person, even if an often unlikeable one. I think sometimes when people claim they want to punch or kill Pete or Betty, or want bad things to happen to them, or think when bad things happen to them it's a victory instead of just how life goes, they don't want to admit that people are like Pete or Betty in real life, or that they themselves might have strange mixes of petulance, arrogance, warmth, anxiety, humor, compassion, etc.
posted by sweetkid at 9:28 AM on June 10, 2013 [11 favorites]


I think Peggy's cat will probably be called Kitty or The Cat. Possibly Tabby or Tom.

IIRC, Morris the Cat debuted in 1968.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 9:31 AM on June 10, 2013


and you know Peggy's seen Breakfast at Tiffany's.

I cannot allow Peggy Olson to be the official beginning of people slobberingly misunderstanding Breakfast At Tiffany's.

Besides, she probably read the book.
posted by Sara C. at 9:32 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


How would she be misunderstanding Breakfast At Tiffany's by naming her cat Cat?

I don't think she would but
posted by sweetkid at 9:33 AM on June 10, 2013


Am I the only one who saw Jonesy handing out keys willy nilly and thought, "Well, yeah, no wonder someone broke in..."
posted by Sara C. at 9:34 AM on June 10, 2013 [8 favorites]


He probably thought Ida looked like a fashion model! No prob not.
posted by sweetkid at 9:34 AM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


I'm not so much talking about the cat thing, but that whole ongoing trend of people idolizing Holly Golightly and the way that movie is, in the public imagination at this point, like, a copy of a copy of a copy of the actual work.

What I'm saying is, I don't think Peggy would name her cat after something some hooker in a movie named a cat.
posted by Sara C. at 9:36 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


And OF COURSE Tom & Lorenzo's main takeaway from the whole episode is that Bob is gay, and OF COURSE they're taking full credit for it as if they're the only people who saw it coming.

Meanwhile, Mad Men is totally on the nose, amirite?

Seriously they have a lack of understanding of how television works that disturbs me.
posted by Sara C. at 9:39 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


(By the way guys, I spent the weekend watching the first season of Deadwood, and the current level of cryptic that Mad Men is running on makes Deadwood look like Sesame Street.)
posted by Sara C. at 9:40 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete's got a certain moral farsight. He can be really progressive and prescient and insightful, but he's so grasping, self-indulgent and petulant that he'll never be able to make much use of the fact that he can read the writing on the wall. This may be a stretch, but he reminds me of JFK somewhat: a personally corrupt man who functioned much better on an objective level than he ever would in his private life.

And yeah, the whole TLO "WE WERE RIGHT ABOUT BOB BENSON BEING GAY" victory dance was just silly. Everyone thought it was highly probable, guys. You're letting all this internet attention go to your heads.
posted by orange swan at 9:42 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


And OF COURSE Tom & Lorenzo's main takeaway from the whole episode is that Bob is gay, and OF COURSE they're taking full credit for it as if they're the only people who saw it coming.

And, I mean, it still hasn't been established that he actually is gay. He may have been attempting to entrap and blackmail Pete once it became apparent that the scheme to get his mother to bequeath her (unbeknownst to him, nonexistent) fortune to a gigolo wasn't going to work out.
posted by Sys Rq at 9:44 AM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


BTW my take on the Pete's mom/Manolo thing was that probably he gave her a back rub or something and she accidentally had her first ever orgasm. And she's completely unable to fit that into any kind of Appropriate 60s Relationships framework, yet also completely unable to self-censor.
posted by Sara C. at 9:44 AM on June 10, 2013


Did Don leave his keys in the door when he came home after getting caught by Sally?
posted by drezdn at 9:44 AM on June 10, 2013


Did Don leave his keys in the door when he came home after getting caught by Sally?

I noticed that! It's just a sloppy cut. You don't see him pull the keys out, but they're jingling in his hand afterward. (I'm pretty sure...)
posted by Sys Rq at 9:46 AM on June 10, 2013


Sara C.: "Am I the only one who saw Jonesy handing out keys willy nilly and thought, "Well, yeah, no wonder someone broke in...""

Jonesy is like a bizarre homage to Joe E. Ross.
posted by Chrysostom at 9:49 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


A thought about doormen, New York, the 60s, urban blight, etc. in general:

It just dawned on me that, before the 70's, rich people in New York had doormen to facilitate their lives. Call me a cab, sign for my packages, let my kid into the apartment when she forgets her key.

Now people have doormen to act as a gatekeeper, and to an extent as security. The whole POINT of a doorman now is that they'd never let anyone into your apartment, or even give someone access to the building beyond the lobby. When I've visited doorman buildings in New York, usually they want to call up to the apartment and announce my presence/ask if I'm expected. They still do all the package and cab stuff, of course, but there's an assumed security aspect to it that I just realized with this episode was not present, once upon a time.
posted by Sara C. at 10:00 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm not so much talking about the cat thing, but that whole ongoing trend of people idolizing Holly Golightly and the way that movie is, in the public imagination at this point, like, a copy of a copy of a copy of the actual work.

Did you read Fifth Avenue, 5 am about the making of the movie? I really loved it.

Also yea agreed Peggy wouldn't idolize Holly.
posted by sweetkid at 10:01 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


No but that sounds right up my alley.
posted by Sara C. at 10:01 AM on June 10, 2013


I see what you did there.
posted by sweetkid at 10:02 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


How did you guys take Don doing a favor for Mitchell?

I keep seeing recappers say that it was a sympathetic and generous thing to do. But I can't help but think it was either done out of guilt for fucking the kid's mother or the hope that it would lead to EXACTLY what it led to -- Sylvia letting him back in.

A lot of Don's behavior re Mitchell being 1A reminded me of his behavior during the riot episode, where he doesn't really give a shit about anything but is worried about Sylvia in DC. For example my read of the Chevy dinner was that the one guy said something about Ontario and he just completely forgot he was at a business dinner and felt an uncontrollable urge to unburden himself. I mean, it was alluded to that people at Chevy could pull strings, but I think that if Don was in control of himself he would know that bringing it up in the middle of dinner wouldn't be the way to facilitate that.
posted by Sara C. at 10:07 AM on June 10, 2013


I completely think he did it for Sylvia. I feel like the show made this super clear during his dialogue with Sylvia, dialogue with Ted. He didn't even tell Megan about it. I don't know where the recappers are coming from thinking he was doing a nice thing.
posted by sweetkid at 10:10 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


A lot of Don's behavior re Mitchell being 1A reminded me of his behavior during the riot episode, where he doesn't really give a shit about anything but is worried about Sylvia in DC

This is exactly how I saw it. I never got the feeling that Don had a great love for Megan, but that she offered what he needed at the time. For whatever reason, he is besotted with Sylvia. And he also likes and admires her husband. This will cause him to become unhinged.
posted by readery at 10:11 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I agree that Peggy wouldn't identify with Holly Golightly. I was, instead, thinking Peggy's cat looking like Holly's might have been some kind of meta reference. Holly was a prostitute and a renter who "doesn't know who she is", her cat is a kind of symbol for herself (i.e., she says they're both "no name slobs" and she won't name him until she finds herself with the life she thinks she's supposed to have), and the relationship she winds up with is presented as being her salvation; Peggy has a legitimate career, owns the apartment building she lives in, she grows more confident in her abilities all the time, her cat is a solution to a specific problem the men in her life were no use in solving, and any relationship she winds up in is going to be just a part of her already nearly full life, not its sole purpose.
posted by orange swan at 10:11 AM on June 10, 2013


But I can't help but think it was either done out of guilt for fucking the kid's mother or the hope that it would lead to EXACTLY what it led to -- Sylvia letting him back in.


That was my take, too. Although it was less manic, of course, his obsession with it reminded me of his fixation on winning Sylvia back in "The Crash."
posted by The Underpants Monster at 10:12 AM on June 10, 2013


I was thinking Peggy's cat looking like Holly's might have been some kind of meta reference.

Could be, but cats on film tend to be either black, orange tabby, or seal point Siamese because those markings make it a bit easier to pass one stunt cat off as another. So, you have three cats that do three different tricks, all playing the same feline character.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 10:17 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


I keep seeing recappers say that it was a sympathetic and generous thing to do. But I can't help but think it was either done out of guilt for fucking the kid's mother or the hope that it would lead to EXACTLY what it led to -- Sylvia letting him back in.

This, this, this. I mean, the kid basically already had a sure deal through Megan, and Don immediately put the kibosh on that. Why else but to play hero himself?
posted by Sys Rq at 10:17 AM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


Oh, and Sally's interest in Model UN totally vindicates my Sally Draper = Ina Garten theory.

She's going to Dartmouth to major in Poli Sci, after which she'll become a think tank policy wonk specializing in something really Cold War ish. She marries an investment banker. After the Berlin Wall comes down, she "retires" to run a catering company in the Hamptons.
posted by Sara C. at 10:20 AM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Agreed about Don's motives re: Sylvia, but I also feel like he approached the string-pulling awkwardly because he's timid and naive about it. There are aspects of having power that Don's never become comfortable with, and part of that is stumbling bass-ackwards into even knowing who to ask. Not that Pete isn't an obvious early target, but that he had to be pushed into thinking of the Chevy guys at all.

Don and Pete and Pete's friend at the DOD is yet another callback I didn't expect, and it's striking in light of the callback that Pete is totally dismissive of Don. Once again, as orange swan pointed out above, Pete is the dude who has a perfect read of the general situation, but is blind to the things closest to him -- hence why he was one of the first in the office to stop taking Don seriously, though he might still take him seriously enough to enact petty revenge for Don ignoring him at the damn margarine meeting. He recognizes Don's checked-out irrelevance, but he's still way too Pete to 100% stop caring about his approval, if only as a gauge of how the senior partners treat him.
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:22 AM on June 10, 2013


the kid basically already had a sure deal through Megan

Yeah, but I can see how Don's deal is better than Megan's deal. I think life was pretty hard for a nineteen year old draft dodger.

Also, people were angry about draft dodging for decades after the war -- I remember hearing people ranting about it when I was a kid in the 80's. I can't imagine how serious it must have been taken at the height of everything.

I also think it's an interesting contrast to Don's own past. In a way, the only altruistic part of what he did was to prevent Mitchell from spending the rest of his life on the run, replicating his mistakes.
posted by Sara C. at 10:26 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


part of that is stumbling bass-ackwards into even knowing who to ask. Not that Pete isn't an obvious early target, but that he had to be pushed into thinking of the Chevy guys at all.

Sure, but I think even Don knows that you don't blurt it out at dinner. You share a cab with one of them or corner one of them at the coat check and unburden yourself in a subtle type manner.

Don shat all over that dinner, and he didn't have to, and he should have known he didn't have to whether he's good at working his connections or not. It's not at all surprising that Ted would suspect sabotage.

It's also an interesting contrast to Joan's meetings with Avon last week. Suddenly her "Oh I uh well I'm really good at anticipating stuff" doesn't look so bad.

In personal news I had a meeting this week where I had to talk about my work and what I do, and I TOTALLY Joaned. It was the worst. I knew I was doing it as it happened, too!
posted by Sara C. at 10:29 AM on June 10, 2013 [5 favorites]


(I also think Pete makes the right call, and isn't just being self-pitying, when he tells Peggy that she's more "important" in the company than he is. He's a partner and a major accounts presence, sure, but he knows he's not taken seriously. A company's emotional functioning isn't always reflected in the titles and numbers. Peggy is still a central creative force, for all that it falls to her to quietly salvage Royal Hawaiian in the support-column office while Don and Ted lock horns like majestic stags.)

ALSO, Pete has switched from the abundant Cocoa Puffs of eternal childhood to the empty Raisin Bran of adult melancholy.
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:31 AM on June 10, 2013 [8 favorites]


But then again, it's not until Dr. Rosen calls his son "soft" that Don has his about-face re: helping Mitchell.

Also, people were angry about draft dodging for decades after the war -- I remember hearing people ranting about it when I was a kid in the 80's. I can't imagine how serious it must have been taken at the height of everything.

That may be the case south of the border, but, well, a lot of draft dodgers still live in Canada. Several of my friends' fathers were draft dodgers. The life isn't one of living on the lam, but rather of getting on with their lives as normal in a very slightly different country. And, hey, any life is more than they might've had otherwise.
posted by Sys Rq at 10:31 AM on June 10, 2013


I've Joaned too. Not in a job interview but I've definitely Joaned. That's how you know it when you see it - it is bad!

(I'm sure you did fine).

But yea agreed Don screwed up at that meeting.
posted by sweetkid at 10:32 AM on June 10, 2013


All I remember hearing about Vietnam as a kid in the 80s was that people spit on the soldiers as they were coming home. I've always considered myself a liberal but I have this sort of visceral dislike for the whole idea of "hippies" - in my mind they were fakey fakers who didn't really care about anything, like really, and ended up thinking Manson was cool or getting jobs when they got off all the drugs. Like the whole image of a chick on drugs waving flowers and saying "peace, man" when I don't think they were thinking about napalmed Vietnamese children at all.

That said I wasn't raised by American born boomers so didn't have much context outside media. My friends' parents weren't exactly "gather round, children and hear about Vietnam..."
posted by sweetkid at 10:35 AM on June 10, 2013


This, this, this. I mean, the kid basically already had a sure deal through Megan, and Don immediately put the kibosh on that. Why else but to play hero himself?

Right, I was just about to say joining the National Guards would be a better long-term solution, because it was the "honourable", legal way out — if Mitchell ran off to Canada, he'd be spending his life as an exile as far as they knew.

I think Don's motives for helping Mitchell were probably complex. I mean, there's a lot going on there. Don seems to genuinely like and care about Arnold; he probably also really does care about Sylvia and he knows how much she loves her son. It's also likely there's at least some self-interested hope that there will be a payoff for him when Sylvia's feeling grateful. And then there's his feelings regarding his own desertion; Don probably genuinely doesn't want to see an innocent young man doomed to experiencing what he himself ran away from and to spending his life on the run, particularly when he himself believes the Vietnam war is wrong. This all quite reasonably adds up to, "I have to do something."

It's too simplistic to say Don saved Mitchell to be nice, and too unfair to say he only did it to be able to screw Sylvia again.
posted by orange swan at 10:40 AM on June 10, 2013 [17 favorites]


It's not at all surprising that Ted would suspect sabotage.

Especially if Ted knows about Jaguar, as he probably does. Don is building up a great history of shitting on client dinners.
posted by thesmallmachine at 10:41 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also Ted just really wants to make out with him.
posted by sweetkid at 10:43 AM on June 10, 2013


Sys Rq, to clarify I'm not personally against draft dodging at all and bear no ill will towards people who did it.

But compare spending one weekend a month learning to fly planes and being forced to have a square haircut to living illegally* in a different country without the ability to go home or be in contact with your family. I know that draft dodging worked out OK for people, but at the time it was a pretty dire thing to do. Regardless of the moral aspects.

Also, Don et al don't have the benefit of our hindsight, so for all they know the draft dodgers will be persona non grata forever and spend their lives evading the feds. There's nothing wrong with living in Canada, but if Canada hadn't welcomed them, the situation could have been really bad.

*This would be illegal, right? I mean did the draft dodgers undergo official immigration to Canada, or did they just cross the border and not go home?
posted by Sara C. at 10:43 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've always considered myself a liberal but I have this sort of visceral dislike for the whole idea of "hippies" - in my mind they were fakey fakers who didn't really care about anything, like really, and ended up thinking Manson was cool or getting jobs when they got off all the drugs. Like the whole image of a chick on drugs waving flowers and saying "peace, man" when I don't think they were thinking about napalmed Vietnamese children at all.

FWIW I think you might be confusing hippies and anti-war activists, here. There absolutely WERE people who were against the war on principled grounds and who endured a lot in service to their beliefs. There were people who protested the draft and went to jail over it.

Hippies were just counterculture kids. I think the general vibe was for liberalness and being against the war/against war in general, but it was not an explicit principled Here Are My Political Thoughts kind of thing. It's a little like how over and over we assume that Geek culture is liberal and socially enlightened and then women get sexually harassed at comic con.

I've always been curious where the "spitting on soldiers" trope came from, and whether it's an urban legend or rooted in something real. From where I stand I don't think people treated returning Vietnam vets badly at all, on a personal level. They just weren't considered the conquering heroes that, say, WWII vets were. Because the culture had changed, and the nature of the war was different. Also I think that the government did not do right by the veterans, but that's something you can lay directly at the feet of Republicans so I don't know where it fits in the jingoistic "spitting on soldiers" narrative.
posted by Sara C. at 10:51 AM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


FWIW I think you might be confusing hippies and anti-war activists, here.

I know there were legit anti war activists but think my comment definitely conflated them with hippies because I suddenly got on 'and another thing! damn hippies!'

And yeah I have also heard no one really spit on the soldiers, it was just probably my first exposure to people's feelings on Vietnam.

That said, as a society we still treat all veterans like crap, even if we cheer them when first home. Veterans' services, PTSD treatment is abysmal.
posted by sweetkid at 10:56 AM on June 10, 2013


Manual For Draft-Age Immigrants To Canada
posted by Sara C. at 10:58 AM on June 10, 2013


Wikipedia's entry on the role Canada and Canadians played in the Vietnam war is interesting. Apparently Canadian immigration policies of the late sixties and early seventies made it easy for draft dodgers to obtain citizenship if they wanted it. It also says about half of the draft dodgers that escaped to Canada settled permanently in Canada; the other half returned after Jimmy Carter pardoned deserters in 1977. There were also deserters who escaped to Canada and who eventually worked out their legal problems, and who can now safely travel to the U.S.
posted by orange swan at 10:59 AM on June 10, 2013


Yes, the "returning Vietnam vets were spat upon" looks like it was basically an urban legend. Not to say it never happened ever anywhere, but evidence is non-existent.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:20 AM on June 10, 2013


Sylvia saying something like "I've been so bad to you, and you've been so good to me" was on the nose, but was exactly what Don was looking for.

The most heart-breaking thing about the Pete/Bob thing is that Bob sees and admires in Pete the things that Pete wishes everyone else saw in him: how hard he works, strives, how he tries to keep the firm's ship floating, despite his unlikability. All qualities, we see Bob attempting to emulate and aspire to.

But this is a man who he accompanied to a brothel, and one who A SENTENCE PRIOR called homosexuals degenerates! Oh Bob.
posted by stratastar at 2:23 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


James Wolk did a great job in that scene. It could have been so cheesy, or dull, or just weird.

Also T&Lo - can't believe how they think they "called it" on Bob being gay. Ridiculous. I admit when I heard he was cast I thought about how he played Grant, the gay boyfriend everyone liked on Happy Endings and wondered if he was brought on to play gay again as that seems to happen often enough.

Also Pete's 'degenerate' line - it was hard to hear, but I'm not sure it was hearfelt. As we can see two minutes later when he was like, "maybe?"
posted by sweetkid at 2:30 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Degeneracy is a product of the times. What would be weird is if characters took homosexuality in stride. If I remember correctly, Sal spoke the same way. It was a sad and awful time.
posted by readery at 2:34 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


TL did mention one thing that I haven't seen in other reviews that rings true, Bob seems a lot more enmeshed into a " gay culture" and self aware where Sal was so deeply closeted and self-loathing I still hold out that's he's a virgin.
posted by The Whelk at 2:46 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


yea I agree, that makes sense
posted by sweetkid at 2:49 PM on June 10, 2013


seems a lot more enmeshed into a " gay culture"

Where the fuck are they getting that?

I agree that Bob seems more self-aware, and is clearly referring to some kind of past relationship with the "sometimes, when someone really cares for you like a whole lot, it doesn't matter who they are" thing, but it's not like he had a Barbra Streisand poster on his office wall or anything.

I also don't know that he seems more In Tune With Gay Culture than Sal did (I mean, cottaging existed in the early 60's, too), but from information that we know from outside the show, it's true that Gay Culture was a different thing by the late 60's. I don't think Sal was a virgin by any means but I agree that he was closeted in a different and much more ironclad way than Bob is.
posted by Sara C. at 3:14 PM on June 10, 2013


Right Pete's comment may have been read by Bob as half-hearted / of the common vernacular of the age(thus cutting its edge to our ears). I can't say, or know.

But as Pete is often used as a foil to indicate cultural change* something has changed. I don't think this will lead to Pete getting Bob fired like Sal was.

*A wake to Don's speedboat
posted by stratastar at 3:14 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Re-watching, Pete was surrounded by homoerotic nods the whole episode -- not only Bob's knee move and Manolo checking out his ass, but also Peggy joking that Pete's in love with Ted, and Pete wryly replying that, well, he could use an account and Ted's been generous. I'm assuming that she's talking about Pete's oddly boyish good cheer during the same conversation, as I don't think we've ever seen Ted and Pete directly interacting before. (He really did have a flirtatious vibe with Ted, but then all three of them were flirting with each other throughout -- they're coming close to consummating a new client relationship and they're happy to let it go to their heads.)

Also, I don't think this is super-important, but Peggy drops a conspicuous "I do" to Pete's "you really know me" -- it reminds me of her "I do" to Abe when he asked her to live with him, and Don's reply to Aimee (admittedly, a generic Draperism in response to any "do you..." question). On a show where everyone's always rushing into marriages and relationships and mergers, I guess it's no surprise that this is a common linguistic tic, but it points to the web of work-marriages that connects all the characters by now.
posted by thesmallmachine at 3:17 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think part of it comes out of the implication that Bob knows at least one other gay person.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 3:18 PM on June 10, 2013


But Sal wasn't fired for being gay, per se. Don knew Sal was gay long before he was fired. Sal was fired for not cooperating with Horrible Lucky Strike Asshole.

Basically, he was fired for refusing to do what Joan ultimately did.
posted by Sara C. at 3:18 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think part of it comes out of the implication that Bob knows at least one other gay person.

I'll just remind everyone that we actually saw Sal hook up with a dude. Who was presumably also gay.

We also saw Sal on a date, of sorts, with another gay man. Who he knew to be gay.

We also saw Sal test the waters of whether Ken might be gay.
posted by Sara C. at 3:19 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think part of it comes out of the implication that Bob knows at least one other gay person.

Yeah this is closer to what I was trying to say.
posted by The Whelk at 3:21 PM on June 10, 2013


Also it is a nice touch that Peggy calls Manolo "Manuel."
posted by thesmallmachine at 3:22 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think what is actually implied with Bob isn't so much that Bob has had sex and/or knows other gay people (both were true of Sal), but that he has at least one relationship in his past.

If Sal had a former lover or partner, we never knew about it. He certainly never confided as much to any other character on the show. But Bob seems somewhat comfortable implying to an obviously straight guy that he has a romantic past that isn't entirely heterosexual.

I also think it's significant that Bob's revelation is made in the context of love, whereas Sal's entire outing arc is in the context of casual sex.
posted by Sara C. at 3:24 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I guess what I'm getting at is that Bob, for all his brief scenes, doesn't seem to be a bottomless well of self-loathing.
posted by The Whelk at 3:25 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


You can actually pinpoint the moment where his heart rips in half.
posted by crossoverman at 3:25 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh, yes, that FOR SURE. (which, on preview, is a reply to The Whelk.)
posted by Sara C. at 3:26 PM on June 10, 2013


I guess what I'm getting at is that Bob, for all his brief scenes, doesn't seem to be a bottomless well of self-loathing.

But he may be a bottom.
posted by crossoverman at 3:27 PM on June 10, 2013


Yes, that, Bob can kind of hint that he's had actual same sex relationships, whereas Sal was just involved in casual, furtive sex, which is actually a huge change in how gay men where able to conceptualizer thier interpersonal lives. ( I mean there are always exceptions, Joan Crawford successfully petitioned her Beverly Hills neighborhood board to allow her best friend and his partner to buy a house there...in the 40s, but not everything happens all at once uniformly.)
posted by The Whelk at 3:28 PM on June 10, 2013


( Edmund White wrote about hiw thrilling and exciting and transgressive it felt to be a gay owned resteraunt in the village in the 60s, like on an actual date, well into his late 20s, cause previously his only experience had been hiring prostitutes, rough trade, and the like. The idea that you could have a romantic date with another guy in public was so totally alien to him. Actually White's autobio is a good guide to gay life in NYC in the 60s. The Seven Year Itch could joke about " two designers who live upstairs" but that was what it was, a joke.)
posted by The Whelk at 3:34 PM on June 10, 2013


Today I learned, or possibly re-learned, that The Beautiful Room Is Empty is a novel, not a memoir.

Either way, folks, if you like this stuff, read The Beautiful Room Is Empty. So good.
posted by Sara C. at 3:42 PM on June 10, 2013


But if you forgo his memoir you miss all the " I had totally consensual sex with my grandfather" stuff.
posted by The Whelk at 3:45 PM on June 10, 2013


Yeah I just don't know what to do with that at all. And yet I would possibly still read his memoir.
posted by Sara C. at 3:48 PM on June 10, 2013


I think part of it comes out of the implication that Bob knows at least one other gay person.

I'll just remind everyone that we actually saw Sal hook up with a dude. Who was presumably also gay.

We also saw Sal on a date, of sorts, with another gay man. Who he knew to be gay.

We also saw Sal test the waters of whether Ken might be gay.


I think T&Lo's argument is that Bob not only knows a gay person but may be connected to the gay community, while Sal isn't. Those other gay men Sal knew? Let's see: a bell hop, whom he would never see again; the Belle Jolie lipstick account rep, from whom he ran away in fear; Ken Cosgrove, who is not gay and to whom Sal never gave an indication of being gay; and that asshole Lee Garner Jr., who put the moves on him and then got him fired when Sal wouldn't play ball. Sal does not have gay friends so far as we know. By contrast, we have Bob's putting in a word for Manolo to get him a job, and since we know there's something hinky going on about Bob's story that Manolo "nursed his father back to health" when he'd previously said his father was dead, the reality may be that Bob and Manolo are former lovers, friends, or have otherwise become acquainted through the larger social circle of gay men, i.e., Manolo may have nursed an older gay man Bob knows.

Bob is closeted, but seemingly for reasons of pragmatism rather than because he can't accept that he's gay and/or hates himself for being gay, which is miles ahead of where Sal was. I still hate that Sal ran away from the Belle Jolie guy, who seemed to be a genuinely sweet person (i.e., he bore no grudge against Sal for rejecting him, probably because he knew Sal did it out of fear). Sal missed out on what would have probably been a really positive experience or relationship, and it was heartbreaking.
posted by orange swan at 4:19 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


may be connected to the gay community, while Sal isn't.

But we don't actually know this from the show.

What we know is that Bob alluded to a previous same-sex relationship in a conversation with a straight guy.

Which I agree is HUGE. And is not something that Sal could have done in 1962.

But I think to jump from there to him being part of a wider gay culture that Sal was not part of, I just don't think those are assumptions we can make. Nor are they assumptions that are interesting to make in light of the far more interesting things that are actually on the screen. Which is where I tend to depart from Tom & Lorenzo on most things. Lately they seem so much more interested in things that aren't really there, and distracted from talking about what actually is there.

There's no textual evidence that Bob and Sal have different relationships to gay culture. There's TONS of evidence that Bob and Sal have different ways of understanding their sexuality, different feelings about it, different levels of openness, and different ways of relating to straight/mainstream culture. And that's HUGE.

Sal missed out on what would have probably been a really positive experience or relationship, and it was heartbreaking.

FWIW I'm pretty sure Bob wouldn't engage in a relationship with a client, either. Though I guess he's making sort of a pass at Pete here, which is a comparable level of shitting where you eat? I'm not sure that's related to how open he is about being gay, in any event.
posted by Sara C. at 4:32 PM on June 10, 2013


I still read Bob's overtures as naked power plays but that's just cause I can't imagine someone falling for that hairline.
posted by The Whelk at 4:43 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


But I think to jump from there to him being part of a wider gay culture that Sal was not part of, I just don't think those are assumptions we can make. Nor are they assumptions that are interesting to make in light of the far more interesting things that are actually on the screen. Which is where I tend to depart from Tom & Lorenzo on most things. Lately they seem so much more interested in things that aren't really there, and distracted from talking about what actually is there.

While I agree with you about T&L, I gotta disagree with you here. It's not that Bob implied that he's been in a relationship with Manolo--it's that he implied that he knows about Manolo's sexuality. Which implies some sense of community, friendship, openness (not necessarily that he dated Manolo himself), all of which we know that Sal wouldn't have had with another man during his tenure on the show.

Manolo.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 4:46 PM on June 10, 2013


It's not that Bob implied that he's been in a relationship with Manolo--it's that he implied that he knows about Manolo's sexuality. Which implies some sense of community, friendship, openness (not necessarily that he dated Manolo himself), all of which we know that Sal wouldn't have had with another man during his tenure on the show.

No, we don't know that about Sal at all.

All we really know is that Sal wasn't free to make implications about this sort of thing to straight people, or to talk openly about any of this in public, with anyone, ever.

Which, to me, says a lot more about the two characters, the times, queer consciousness, etc. than who has more gay friends or likes Judy Garland more or is more sexually experienced or whatever.
posted by Sara C. at 5:05 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


No, we don't know that about Sal at all.

Yes, we do.

We actually saw Sal's (completely repressed) home life, and his (likewise repressed, dysfunctional, and scared) interactions with other gay men. His life might have changed around the time he was cruising in the park at the end of his tenure on the show, but I feel pretty safe asserting that he didn't have gay companions and therefore likely had absolutely nothing to do with larger gay culture throughout most of the early series.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 5:43 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


Of course we can't be positive that Sal didn't know any other gay men and we can't be positive that Bob does, but judging from the text it seems very likely that this is the way it was.

Sal actively pretended to be straight and married a woman. In every case where he's seen interacting with a gay man, he's terribly frightened. Does that indicate a guy who has any gay friends to you?

Bob, by contrast, knows this man Manolo and recommends him for a job and — this is important — he also knows that Manolo is gay (when Pete complains Manolo has taken advantage of his mother, Bob says something like, "His tastes don't run in that direction"). Manolo is from a different culture than Bob, and is doing what would be considered a menial job while Bob is white collar. Does it seem likely to you that these two men would have met and become friends, or at least gotten to know each other well enough for Bob to know Manolo is gay, under normal circumstances in the sixties, and if they did, why did Bob lie about how he met him? It seems clear to me that Bob had to have met Manolo through some sort of gay scene circumstance, either through hooking up themselves at a gay bar (and how likely would Bob have been to have kept in touch with him given that scenario?), or as seems more likely, through mutual gay friends or acquaintances.
posted by orange swan at 6:17 PM on June 10, 2013


We actually saw Sal's (completely repressed) home life

But that was after he married. Now, of course, the difference between a world where gay men feel the need to get married and a world where they don't is HUGE. This is what I mean by talking about the interesting stuff that is actually on the screen rather than some bizarre extrapolation about "gay culture".

and his (likewise repressed, dysfunctional, and scared) interactions with other gay men.

What interactions with other gay men did we see besides encounters with gay clients (not a good idea, regardless of orientation), the bellhop (completely based around sex, but otherwise not dysfunctional), and the time he had a crush on Ken (can definitely still happen even in 2013)? I mean, I'm happy to admit it if I'm missing a big Sal escapade that proved that he didn't know other gay people, didn't have access to gay culture, etc.

I think one thing that is getting talked past here is that gay culture definitely existed prior to the mid 60's. It was, in a lot of ways, a culture of shame, repression, and fear. That's something that started to change in Bob's generation, and I think Mad Men's depiction of those subtle changes, even pre-stonewall, is incredibly interesting. However, I think that by pretending said culture didn't exist, or that dysfunctional gay people were by definition not part of gay culture, it sort of erases the interesting thing the show is doing.

Especially since we don't really see who Sal is within gay culture outside of work before he gets married. For all we know, Sal and Bob have very similar personal histories. But what's difference is their ability to talk about those histories outside of extremely cloistered spaces. Sal never in a million years would have felt comfortable hanging out with Joan socially without needing to make it a big sexual pantomime -- hell, one of Sal and Joan's few interactions on the show is a big sexual pantomime. In contrast, Bob seems completely open with her. I mean, who knows how much Bob's told her, but you don't see that tight vigilant "I better act like a macho asshole or someone might figure it out" thing that Sal had going on.
posted by Sara C. at 6:18 PM on June 10, 2013


and I think Mad Men's depiction of those subtle changes, even pre-stonewall, is incredibly interesting.

I think we all fundamentally agree on this, cause it is super interesting and the huge changes starting to happen in queer confusion ess where just reeving up. ( poor Kurt, too much of an outsider to warrant notice " you don't know what you're saying" )
posted by The Whelk at 6:23 PM on June 10, 2013


Or Peggy's Time Life photo editor editor.
posted by The Whelk at 6:23 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


In every case where he's seen interacting with a gay man, he's terribly frightened.

In public, you mean.

I mean, we don't see Sal hanging out with non-work friends. We don't see Sal in a gay bar. We don't see Sal with his college roommate, or taking drawing classes in the Village, or in any of the (somewhat) safe places that absolutely did exist for men like Sal in the late 50's and early 60's.

Now, it could be true that Sal is simply so self-hating that he can't ever participate in any of that. But there were plenty of men like Sal who did. We just don't see enough of his private life to know.

But what we do see with both Sal and Bob is their different way of behaving in public and among presumably straight people who for professional reasons they can't be completely open with. And in those situations, as you guys say, the contrasts are fascinating. Because you absolutely can see the difference that a few years makes. And you can see how Stonewall would happen just a year later.

And, again, the difference isn't the existence of homosexuality, or of gay culture, or of love between gay men. The difference is whether it's possible to be even the slightest bit open about that with people outside that world, as well as what the consequences are for the slightest slip-up on that front. There's a reason Sal got married, and it's not that he hates himself. It's that, with a wife, the pressure is off. Sal desperately needs to relieve that pressure. Bob doesn't. I find that so much more compelling than "Sal is dysfunctional" or "Bob is more a part of gay culture".
posted by Sara C. at 6:27 PM on June 10, 2013


However, I think that by pretending said culture didn't exist, or that dysfunctional gay people were by definition not part of gay culture, it sort of erases the interesting thing the show is doing.

Who is saying that gay culture didn't exist or that dysfunctional gay people were by definition not part of gay culture?
posted by orange swan at 6:28 PM on June 10, 2013


I don't know, Sara C. I usually find your readings of the show pretty astute, but I can't shake the feeling that you're not picking up on the broader implications about both characters' personal lives--what it meant for Sal to maintain that facade both at work and in public, what it means for Bob to drop casual references to knowledge about another man's sexuality. I agree that these also reflect the changing mores of the time, but everything about Sal's characterization suggested that he was deeply afraid of his own sexuality. In fact, if I remember correctly, his interaction with the lipstick rep suggested that at the time, he was a virgin.

And yes, we do see his private life; we see him in private with his wife, who was a childhood friend.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 6:29 PM on June 10, 2013 [7 favorites]


what it meant for Sal to maintain that facade both at work and in public, what it means for Bob to drop casual references to knowledge about another man's sexuality.

No, I absolutely know what it meant, which is why I'm trying to argue against Tom & Lorenzo's facile "Bob is obviously a kewl gay dude" analysis. There are huge differences, those differences are fascinating to think about, but they're not really about who has more access to gay culture or who is more self-hating.

In fact, if I remember correctly, his interaction with the lipstick rep suggested that at the time, he was a virgin.

I think this is where our takes diverge, because I don't think the show ever implied that at all. In fact, quite the opposite. And I think that to assume Sal is a virgin because he is not comfortable with his sexuality is an impediment to thinking deeply about how the show handles homosexuality.
posted by Sara C. at 6:33 PM on June 10, 2013


his interaction with the lipstick rep suggested that at the time, he was a virgin.

He was. In the commentary track for the episode with the incident with the bell hop, whoever commented on it was saying things like, "Poor Sal, it's his first time and it ends like this."

I think this is where our takes diverge, because I don't think the show ever implied that at all. In fact, quite the opposite.

I disagree that the show didn't imply it, and as the commentary I quoted from above stated, those who made the show intended it that way.

And I think that to assume Sal is a virgin because he is not comfortable with his sexuality is an impediment to thinking deeply about how the show handles homosexuality.

Nonsense. Sal is one gay man's experience. Each gay person on this show has a different story to tell us, and denying the narrative of any one character's experience isn't the way to "thinking deeply" about it.

In public, you mean.

How was the bellhop encounter public (pre-fire alarm, anyway)? And Sal was definitely very frightened or at least nervous.

And I just don't buy that Sal didn't take the Belle Jolie guy up on his offer because he was a client. Don got involved with plenty of clients. They just would have had to be very discreet, that's all, but as gay men they would have had to be discreet about all their relationships.

There are huge differences, those differences are fascinating to think about, but they're not really about who has more access to gay culture or who is more self-hating.

I find those differences to be very much a part of Sal and Bob's stories and the differences between them. Isolation and self-hatred are huge factors in closeted gay life in mid-century.
posted by orange swan at 6:39 PM on June 10, 2013 [4 favorites]


whoever commented on it was saying things like, "Poor Sal, it's his first time and it ends like this."

OK, if this is actually true, and was said by a writer or Bryan Batt, I'll take it. It's not at all how I read the situation, but sure.

Isolation and self-hatred are huge factors in closeted gay life in mid-century.

I'm absolutely not saying they're not. I'm just saying that those aren't the primary contrasts between Bob and Sal, and in order to really say anything interesting about Sal's isolation and self-hatred in contrast to Bob, you have to add a lot to the text that (in my opinion, obvs) just isn't there.
posted by Sara C. at 6:44 PM on June 10, 2013


I think this is where our takes diverge, because I don't think the show ever implied that at all. In fact, quite the opposite. And I think that to assume Sal is a virgin because he is not comfortable with his sexuality is an impediment to thinking deeply about how the show handles homosexuality.

It's in "The Hobo Code."

"Elliot, I have thought about it. I know what I want. I know what I want to do."

"I know what you're thinking. I'll show you."

[Sal, firm head shake.]

"What are you afraid of?"

"Are you joking?"

And then he leaves.

It doesn't seem, at all, like the rejection comes because it's a business situation. I just rewatched the scene, and it's . . . really really clear that by "I'll show you," Elliot means he is willing to help him through the hiccups of a sexual interaction he has no experience with. And I don't think reading it that way is an impediment. It seems to be right there, in the text.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 6:44 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


"What are you afraid of?"

"Are you joking?"


I guess I just saw these as the key lines of dialogue, and not whether Sal has, like, specifically hooked up with a client during a business dinner in a public place where they've both been seen by people who might know Sal. Which, you know, would be an awful idea whether Sal was a virgin or not.

I can see that others are taking away that Sal was a virgin, and that maybe there was a commentary somewhere where this was implied by somebody, but it's absolutely not made clear, and I don't think it's terribly important.

Though I agree, if it's the case, it does make a strong point that Sal couldn't possibly have been part of gay culture in New York in the early 60's.
posted by Sara C. at 6:47 PM on June 10, 2013


I mean, I don't think TO's " Bob is a cool with it gay dude" is right or accurate, I just think we're seeing a different approach to queerness in Bob, in just that he's not totally, bone shatteringly terrified of it.
posted by The Whelk at 6:54 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


Anyway long story short we're in one of the golden eras of Drag so I want to see some. So there,
posted by The Whelk at 6:57 PM on June 10, 2013


Change of subject!

Hey, how about that Meet The Chaoughs segment? Does that portend anything, like, "Ted's going to have a big ol' meltdown, and here are all the people it's going to affect," or is it just that he's in the main ensemble now so we see his homelife?
posted by Sys Rq at 6:59 PM on June 10, 2013


Oh, super agree on both counts, The Whelk.

I don't know about what Meet The Chaoughs portents for Ted, but is it just me or do I see Sally's surly blond future homecoming date in front of the TV?
posted by Sara C. at 7:01 PM on June 10, 2013


I think Sal's virginity was implied in that scene and then confirmed in the bellhop scene, not in dialogue necessarily but in the subtleties of the acting and direction.

(And Elliot tries to steer Sal to someplace private several times, to be fair.)

But I think it is an important character detail, though. It's telling of the generational divide, sure. Sal would never ever imply that he knew someone else wasn't into ladies because it might imply that he is not into ladies--not even when he starts to lose his composure because of his feelings for Ken. His whole persona was about upholding the closet, and Bob is likewise an actor of sorts but an entirely different sort of actor. It's not even a major question for him, to recommend another gay man for a job and then be like "Oh, he wouldn't hit on grandma campbell. He doesn't swing that way."

I found his speech to Pete interesting, incidentally. It's not clear whether he's appealing to Pete's sense of importance, casting Pete as the caretaker and himself as Pete's mom--or if he's saying that he thinks Pete is in love with him because he's taken such good care of him.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:02 PM on June 10, 2013


Sal would never ever imply that he knew someone else wasn't into ladies because it might imply that he is not into ladies--not even when he starts to lose his composure because of his feelings for Ken. His whole persona was about upholding the closet, and Bob is likewise an actor of sorts but an entirely different sort of actor. It's not even a major question for him, to recommend another gay man for a job and then be like "Oh, he wouldn't hit on grandma campbell. He doesn't swing that way."

Oh, for sure, and this is exactly what I was talking about when I was saying that deciding that Bob is a cool-and-with-it gay dude and Sal was a self-hating and dysfunctional gay dude ignores a lot of the really awesome nuance.

Like, Bob is definitely still in the closet, here. He's not running around SC&P saying HEY EVERYBODY I'M GAY WOOOOOOOOOOOO. But he can sort of nudge around it and talk about homosexuality in general without crashing and burning.
posted by Sara C. at 7:15 PM on June 10, 2013


I can see that others are taking away that Sal was a virgin, and that maybe there was a commentary somewhere where this was implied by somebody, but it's absolutely not made clear

You're claiming that others are making assumptions without textual evidence to support them, but to me it seems like you're the one who is determined to ignore the textual and other evidence for the facts of the narrative. I mean, I told you that I heard in a commentary track that the bellhop incident was explicitly described as "Sal's first time", and you describe this as "maybe there was a commentary somewhere where this was implied by somebody". I mean... really?

I've looked at the DVD, and there were two commentary tracks for that episode (season 3, episode 1, "Out of Town"). Bryan Batt and some of the other actors were one one, and Matthew Weiner and some of the other key production people were on the other. It was definitely stated on of those tracks that it was Sal's first time, though I don't recall which one. And then there's the Belle Jolie guy conversation. You're claiming that "I don't think the show ever implied that [Sal's virginity] at all. In fact, quite the opposite." But you don't give any evidence for that. If you don't think Sal's experience or lack thereof is important, fine, but why argue the point against all evidence?

You're also mischaracterizing Tom and Lorenzo's arguments unfairly. Here's what they said:

Bob comes across “culturally gay,” as in, he isn’t like Sal Romano, who was a totally closeted gay man. His friendship with Manolo indicates someone who socializes in the gay community (such as it was in 1968)

I don't see how this was in any way incorrect or how it can be fairly characterized as "Bob is a totally cool and with-it gay dude".
posted by orange swan at 7:15 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah, I think T&L are really spot on here. It's such a small, telling detail, but it kind of speaks the world about the cultural differences between the two characters, and the company they keep. I say that kind of grudgingly, too. You know what I've thought of their commentary this season. But I think they're absolutely right about this.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:19 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


I don't really see that their is anything to be read into the Meet The Chaoughs bit. It was a clear contrast with Don. Ted has the same distractions and opportunities (ie with Peggy), but his actions drive home the fact that these people have a choice about which path they follow.

Don's inner rot is all the more sharp because he has stated before he holds to that view. You make your own luck. He understands he has a choice, but he's so broken he can't bring himself to make the right one.

If there is anything dark implied in Ted's home life, it's how it contrasts with his weird angsting over connecting with Don.
posted by dry white toast at 7:54 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also, Ted's spending a lot of time at work feels like a genuine effort to build something, whereas Don is avoiding going home.
posted by dry white toast at 7:59 PM on June 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


I loved that Ted really listened to his wife and she to him, that they were actually communicating about their differences and getting down to what really mattered. And then that he showed a willingness to make some changes by coming home somewhat earlier the next night — if not in time for dinner, at least in time to put his sons to bed.

his weird angsting over connecting with Don

My best guess as to what is going on there is that Ted's a guy who is very used to having good working relationships and to being on top of situations and that it bothers him that there's this dark horse in the firm who just does his own thing. His response to that is to try to tame and manage Don, to try and get him to work in harness with the others. And good luck with that, Ted. I mean, you seem like a pretty good guy who theoretically could show Don how to be a different kind of alpha male, but you know what happened the last time Don met a successful, decent man he admired? He banged the guy's wife.
posted by orange swan at 8:10 PM on June 10, 2013 [7 favorites]


I don't really see that their is anything to be read into the Meet The Chaoughs bit. It was a clear contrast with Don. Ted has the same distractions and opportunities (ie with Peggy), but his actions drive home the fact that these people have a choice about which path they follow.

Yeah also Nan and Ted had a normal healthy conversation about the state of their relationship and their individual frustrations...unlike...basically everyone else on this show.
posted by sweetkid at 8:11 PM on June 10, 2013


where are the music links here? Sheesh.... so, I give high marks for including this in the Tale of Two Cities episode.... The Fly-Bi-Nights, Found Love.
posted by wallstreet1929 at 9:26 PM on June 10, 2013


I haven't seen any discussion on what TV shows the characters were watching this week - there was something playing at the Draper apartment early in the episode and later, there's something playing at the Chaoughs that is also playing at the Drapers? Any ideas?
posted by crossoverman at 10:11 PM on June 10, 2013


OK, if this is actually true, and was said by a writer or Bryan Batt, I'll take it.

Hey! How come when I brought up two actors' commentaries last week in defense of my position, it got me nowhere? :)

But in seriousness, Sara C, you criticized TLo,
Lately they seem so much more interested in things that aren't really there, and distracted from talking about what actually is there
but it seems to me that's what you're doing, positing possible offscreen scenarios beyond what we see on the screen (e.g. a contrasting private life for Sal never suggested or alluded to in the show), in order to support your takeaway.

Sal's gradual acceptance of his own homosexuality was pretty slowly and clearly laid out over many episodes, starting (in his personal chronology) with the explanation of his marriage growing out of a childhood friendship, suggesting he didn't have an active gay life before marriage or marry Kitty as a beard. Up to the time of the show he had simply conformed to the expectation of heterosexual marriage--and clearly he thought he had a good one with Kitty. I am not sure that he even realized the full nature of his attraction to Ken Cosgrove at the time of the dinner; remember the bedroom scene afterwards, when he's acting out "Bye bye birdie," and Kitty's lying in bed with that "Oh. Shit." expression while Sal himself is completely oblivious?

Then as has been said above you have the Belle Jolie guy whom he ran from in fear even though that guy was a catch and Sal clearly liked him; then the bellhop (with the pen bursting as a funny symbol of an overexcited virgin); then the Lucky Strike jerk that led to his firing. And finally, the park cruising, which suggests that at this point he clearly knows what he wants and is willing to get it, but is not tied in with any social scene where he could pursue it in a less furtive and anonymous way.

Obviously I had the same feeling last week, when you were suggesting activity that could have been going on behind the scenes but with no textual evidence that it was. So much on Mad Men does happen offscreen, or is communicated in elliptical exchanges on screen, that scenes often lend themselves to differing interpretations. However I think that as the story progresses each season, a lot of the ambiguity clears up, and it becomes evident what's been going on all along.
posted by torticat at 10:57 PM on June 10, 2013 [3 favorites]


Catching up...

The Whelk:
Unless..Bob is ...actually in love with Pete.
*shudder*


Hm, I think he actually is in love with Pete. I had thought that would explain why he's been hanging around downstairs, but then I realized Pete's office is upstairs (duh). Now I want to go back and rewatch all the previous scenes with the two of them. It seemed like Bob was kind of tailing Pete for a while there, waiting for him in the brothel (and offering to pay, wtf), buying him TP for his bachelor pad. Also, he did speak well of Pete to Joan. But the main thing is, why would he make a pass at Pete if he weren't genuinely interested? What would the objective be in alienating Pete? Especially after just recently ingratiating himself with Pete by recommending the nurse.

He hasn't actually said "I'm gay." We've never seen him in a pitch meeting. Matthew Weiner said in an interview linked upthread (or in the previous thread) that Bob is definitely a liar.

flyingsquirrel, but he also hasn't denied it when directly questioned. And again, I don't see what upside there would be for his pretending to be gay? Also, do you have that link to the Weiner interview? I missed that and am very interested. At some point someone suggested (before this ep) that if Bob were gay, he could have been referring to former partners when he spoke of his dead "father" and his restored-to-health "father"--which would render that lie pretty innocuous. But have we seen him lie at other times?
posted by torticat at 11:56 PM on June 10, 2013 [2 favorites]


sweetkid
all that speculation of "she's 25" was pointless when will we learn

Oh man never again. I was howling as each of those snippets came up...
Peggy rushing out of her apartment [away from a rat]
Ted & Peggy drunk at dinner [with Pete]
Dead Megan [trying to help out the neighbor]
Ted walking in a bedroom [where his wife & kids are on the bed]
posted by torticat at 12:04 AM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


One way that Bob could have gotten to know Manolo was when Manolo nursed his father back to full health.

Since we know Wolk's off the show, was Pete firing him in that scene?

I agree the TV programming needs to be fingered. I made Burt Lancaster, I think, in the little segment where we cut from one party watching the film in black and white to another in color. I'm sorry, I don't recall the viewers.

What book was that that Ted's wife was sleeping under?

Lastly, Stan's choice of a Dayan poster as bedroom décor must be parsed down to a nubbin! What is he saying?
posted by mwhybark at 12:31 AM on June 11, 2013


And Ted flopping onto the couch, "But I don't want HIS juice, I want MY juice!"

Not having kids, my assumption is that this is some sort of juicebox childrearing joke.
posted by mwhybark at 12:32 AM on June 11, 2013


Since we know Wolk's off the show, was Pete firing him in that scene?

Wait, you mean when Pete offered the month's severance he was talking in the third person about Bob, not Manolo? Just continuing in the manner Bob had been speaking about himself?

Oh! I didn't get that, if that's what was happening. i thought Pete was reverting back to the ostensible topic of their conversation, which was whether Manolo was morally fit to care for Pete's mom.

Is it definite that Wolk's off the show?
posted by torticat at 2:14 AM on June 11, 2013


It's definite in the sense that Wolk starred in a CBS pilot that was picked up. It's possible that his schedule and contract might allow for a guest episode or two, but more likely not, and certainly not at the level of participation he's had this season.
posted by Rhomboid at 3:18 AM on June 11, 2013


I'd hope the show can get Wolk back at least as much as they can get Alison Brie - or more than that, if necessary.
posted by crossoverman at 3:54 AM on June 11, 2013


Apropos of not much you guys have just been talking about James Wolk looks like a young Kyle Chandler in this pic crossoverman posted.
posted by sweetkid at 6:48 AM on June 11, 2013


FWIW cable series shoot on a different schedule than network series. It's entirely possible he could be back next season. Though I agree he'll probably be less prominent.
posted by Sara C. at 6:52 AM on June 11, 2013


I just want to look at him on my television. And not just because he's attractive - I think he's got a great career ahead of him. Something special about him.
posted by sweetkid at 6:57 AM on June 11, 2013 [4 favorites]


Yeah, if Alison Brie can play both Annie on Community and Trudy, which she has been doing for several years, they can probably keep Bob around if it serves the plot.
posted by dry white toast at 7:37 AM on June 11, 2013


I feel like there's no reason to keep him unless he gets a good chunk of season 7 plot, which he might not have time for with the other show.
posted by sweetkid at 7:41 AM on June 11, 2013


Yeah, if Alison Brie can play both Annie on Community and Trudy, which she has been doing for several years

Also FYI she is amazing. Somehow those characters are ten years apart in age and it's all in intonation.
posted by shakespeherian at 7:48 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I can't help but think all the slow character exposition they've done with Bob is a bit of a waste if his big narrative payoff was to hit on Pete.
posted by dry white toast at 7:50 AM on June 11, 2013


Agreed, Brie is seriously underrated. She has genuine depth as Trudy, and her comedic talents on Community seem to get overshadowed by the other actors.
posted by dry white toast at 7:52 AM on June 11, 2013


I don't think she's underrated. I hear a lot about her and people seem to love her characters.
posted by sweetkid at 7:56 AM on June 11, 2013


Most of the attention directed her way on the internet seems to be of the skeevy variety, unfortunately, which sometimes overshadows whatever actual admiration for her talent there is.
posted by shakespeherian at 8:04 AM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]



Most of the attention directed her way on the internet seems to be of the skeevy variety, unfortunately, which sometimes overshadows whatever actual admiration for her talent there is.

Yea but that's like, true for most famous women on the internet.
posted by sweetkid at 8:06 AM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also Pete's 'degenerate' line - it was hard to hear, but I'm not sure it was hearfelt. As we can see two minutes later when he was like, "maybe?"

Pete was definately not thinking "maybe". The degenerate line wasn't heartfelt, but he did not consider Bob's come on for a milisecond. We have seen 8 years of Pete; he's extemely focused on women, to his own undoing. He was totally caught off guard by Bob, and he's actually not enough of a bad guy to punch him or fire him, but I think you're projecting.

basically had a sure thing with Megan

There wasn't anything sure about the Canada thing, and living in exile until Jimmy Carter's presidency is not an optimal outcome.
posted by spaltavian at 8:30 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


He was totally caught off guard by Bob, and he's actually not enough of a bad guy to punch him or fire him, but I think you're projecting.

Projecting what? I don't think he considered like, having sex with Bob, no, but I think the little speech about having someone care for him triggered something in him and was a callback to his mother saying he was always unlovable. I think he felt a strong emotion in that moment he didn't totally understand and thought, is it because I want this? and decided no.

I don't know what 'projecting' has to do with it, I have a different read than you do.
posted by sweetkid at 8:41 AM on June 11, 2013


basically had a sure thing with Megan

There wasn't anything sure about the Canada thing


Yeah I agree. The Megan thing didn't sound sure at all.
posted by sweetkid at 8:42 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, my read of Pete's reaction to Bob's knee was: "I know what you are doing right there, and there is zero chance whatsoever. I'm not going to be an asshole and call you out on it or fire you or anything, but forget about it."
posted by Chrysostom at 8:44 AM on June 11, 2013


Yeah, plus the National Guard option basically means he won't have to vanish from his parents life.

I actually thought the conversation between Don and Dr. Rosen about the difference between them and Mitchell's generation was interesting and well done. It touched on a lot of the key differences between World War II, Korea, and Vietnam.
posted by dry white toast at 8:45 AM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also, in thinking about it, I'm less convinced that Don's actions were about getting Sylvia back. I think he could see the impact it was having on Dr. Rosen, and he realized in that conversation that what made this different is his feeling that the war is wrong. When he calls the Rosens with the news, he initially asks to speak to him (IIRC).

Not that it makes his actions thereafter any less sad.
posted by dry white toast at 8:50 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think Don wanted to help Mitchell and Dr. Rosen, but it's impossible to untangle that from him knowing that Sylvia would also appreciate it. I think he firmly moved Sylvia into the "never happened" portion of his brain. If Sylvia hadn't answered the phone to hear his news, I don't think he would have went to her and said "Well, I saved your kid so how about you reconsider your rejection of me?" Even in the phone call he is not doing this. But once she gives him an opening he takes it.

So he had to know that it might lead to something with Sylvia, but I don't think it was his primary reason for taking it on. But it's all an emotionally tangled mess that can't easily be separated.
posted by mikepop at 9:01 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Aww, Bob got a show? Awesome if too bad for MadMen. I like my pet theory of him bearding up with Joan. If he's bi, and she gets by as well as "gets bi", they could work something out and it might not be totally bearding, especially if he replaces Campbell and they both end up powerhouses and stakeholders in SC&P.

And I totally think he does enjoy being helpful, and his admiration for Pete and the pass was part "Hey why not" and maybe a bit of power play. But I'm not a pansexual/gay/bisexual (or however Matt ends up using him) man in the 60s, so.

Thinking about Manolo and the name/nationality choice (perhaps too much) - Manolo - "exotic" name but diminutive/familiar of Manuel-Emmanuel; religious name being an alternate for Jesus.

In a predominately WASPy English speaking part of the world, it would have likely been pronounced Man Ewe Ell instead of Mahn Well; Manolo is "easier" for english-speakers to pronounce in my experience than mangling Manuel.

And Manolo is a "life saver" for Pete's Mom (the Widow Campbell nee Dykeman which is a weird convergence, though it's original meaning is of course a job, just like Cooper and Stirling and Draper - and has nothing to do with the modern slang usage of dyke).

But what's in a name? I only noticed it because of my experience with having names pronounced different ways for different cultures and "picking" one that "everyone" could use equally comfortably. On things where I don't care what I'm called but want to save the "how to pronounce things" conversation, I just go by "Tilly" instead of "Till Day" or "Teel Deh" or "Till Duh".

Now that I think about it, I taught my kids to say my name in "English" (Till Day) since we are around English speakers mostly instead of "Till Duh" or "Teel Deh" as I grew up hearing 80% of the time (5% of the time when I summered with primary English speakers)

Don - Mitchell - I think it wasn't to get back with Sylvia, but he didn't mind it so much that it helped. More to keep the kid from being on the run and as an admiration kissup/silent apology to Arnold.
posted by tilde at 9:02 AM on June 11, 2013


I think he firmly moved Sylvia into the "never happened" portion of his brain.

I thought he had, too, but all his interactions with Sylvia made me think otherwise. Calling her sweetheart, talking about what had happened between them, etc.
posted by sweetkid at 9:04 AM on June 11, 2013


Err Dyckman (I don't get subtitles on Apple TV) ... but I'm assuming people are going by ear ...
posted by tilde at 9:13 AM on June 11, 2013


especially if he replaces Campbell and they both end up powerhouses and stakeholders in SC&P

I don't think this is going to happen, for casting and story reasons.
posted by sweetkid at 9:20 AM on June 11, 2013


Well, true, sweetkid. I believe my original theory was setting up with Joan to give them both stability and as a way to at least be a stakeholder by proxy. If he's looking up to Pete and that gun comes out again ... I know for a while I thought Joan was gonna shoot Pete, or Lane, or both (I don't think suicide is possible with that gun? I know nothing of guns).

Bob likes to help people; it gives him "power" but not a "power complex" of exerting power over people. "Power" that feeds him and his self esteem. Maybe the "power" of fitting in when he might not feel he does (again, not a gay/ish/what? man of the 60s). Also, the "self help" records; to pump himself up or for lack of proper mentoring? Not sure, I'm not tuned to that stuff, though I did do Dale Carnegie at a boss' behest, albeit reluctantly.

Also - no "next times" for me-Apple TV. I see it all Mon night, then the "behind the scenes" after.

Cutler - job name (knife maker), Chaough - bird / crow is the closest I can find, Gleason - color (blue, green) and place (Ireland).

Contrasting Bob and Sal - Not only is it several years later (8-10) - I also get the impression that Sal was at least 10 years older then than Bob is now, so nearly a generational difference going on there as well, if they are say ... 15 years apart in age.
posted by tilde at 9:31 AM on June 11, 2013


Wah, wandered off. There could be a vacuum if Chaough, Campbell, and Olson set up their own little company again; Bob moves into Campbell's spot whether or not he socially hooks in with Joan, they work respectfully together and with each other favorably.
posted by tilde at 9:33 AM on June 11, 2013


(I don't think suicide is possible with that gun? I know nothing of guns).

It's a .22, right? It's possible. It wouldn't be my first choice, but it's possible.
posted by entropicamericana at 9:42 AM on June 11, 2013



Someone mentioned to me that the Vulture recap is outstanding this week and it really is. I recommend checking it out. It focuses mainly on Bob and Don's motivations, but specifically Bob's and has the following about the knee incident:

And something in Pete’s face during the knee exchange suggests that he’s not rejecting Bob’s monologue out of hand. Maybe there’s something to what the younger man is saying, and on some level Pete knows it and can’t handle it right now, but has absorbed it and knows that at some point he’ll have to consider it. Variations of “perversion” and “degeneracy” keep popping up in Pete’s dialogue this week; he’s talking about Manolo and his mother, the possibility that the old woman isn’t fantasizing, but maybe the words mean something else, too — maybe they’re his way of rejecting his true nature, which is bubbling up. Maybe that’s why, when he goes home to his swingin’ bachelor pad, he chucks the empty cereal box at the wall in rage and sadness. Maybe he’s not just reacting to the fear that his mom was right about him being unlovable, and that his mother is partly to blame for his unlovability. Maybe he’s reacting to what Bob said. Maybe it struck him in the heart. “Please tell me you don’t pity me,” Pete says affectionately to Peggy. “Because you really know me.” What if Peggy doesn’t know him as well as Bob, who barely knows him at all?

Really, there's so much more in the review too that I wanted to quote. It's some of the best writing on this show I've seen.
posted by sweetkid at 9:45 AM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


“Bob is a wonderful salesman,” Manolo says, understating like a mofo.

Chances Bob used to be a hustler?

I mean, the whole Wharton MBA thing makes it a stretch, but you never know.

I definitely like the idea of Bob having a sordid past to match Don's, or, if you take the mirror twin thing literally, Bob having an ongoing double life, or slipping deeper into a double life, as a counterpoint to Don's past.
posted by Sara C. at 10:22 AM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh man if I was running season 7 and had James Wolk at my disposal I would SOOOOO do a huge subplot where we follow Bob as he becomes more and more fascinated with burgeoning gay culture, culminating with Stonewall. Though I probably wouldn't want him to be actually at Stonewall since everybody claims to have been at Stonewall and none of them were.

Sort of mirroring what happened with Robert Mapplethorpe around the same time, where he was "straight" but just super fascinated with gay life (and especially hustlers), and then hey, maybe this is an experience I want to have even though I def have a (TOTALLY PATTI SMITH) girlfriend, and oooooh, maybe this isn't just a creative fascination but who I am, and yeah, OK, I'm gay. Over the course of a few years.

(Bob's good looks and ambition are definitely reminiscent of Mapplethorpe, though he was desperate for success in the art world, not the business world.)
posted by Sara C. at 10:30 AM on June 11, 2013


Oh man if I was running season 7

Hmm so many ideas for this
posted by sweetkid at 10:37 AM on June 11, 2013


Sorry for the late replies here:

> It might have been hugely controversial to say [asshole] in a movie (I think Bullitt was indeed the first to do that), but in real life?

Good question, Sys Rq. My reaction was based on the scarcity of cursing on the show -- it's used so sparingly, it really stands out. I don't know how common it was in real life at that time (though based on my own extremely limited experience as a toddler with pseudo-hippie parents in the very early 1970s, it wasn't nearly as prevalent/common as it is now). But given that the language of Mad Men tries hard to be faithful to the social habits of the time, I think it was meant to be pretty shocking. In 2010, the New York Times focused one of its "On Language" columns on the language of Mad Men. It includes this: "Though cursing on 'Mad Men' isn’t as rampant as it was on 'Deadwood' or 'The Sopranos' (on which Weiner previously worked), it has its place in the show and promises to become more prominent as the characters move through the ever-liberalizing ’60s." To me, it felt like an intentional part of Ted's confident, laid-back vibe.

> flyingsquirrel, but [Bob] also hasn't denied it when directly questioned. And again, I don't see what upside there would be for his pretending to be gay? Also, do you have that link to the Weiner interview? I missed that and am very interested. At some point someone suggested (before this ep) that if Bob were gay, he could have been referring to former partners when he spoke of his dead "father" and his restored-to-health "father"--which would render that lie pretty innocuous. But have we seen him lie at other times?

torticat: Here's the interview with Weiner, in which he says: "Yeah. He's definitely a liar. I hope that you caught that. And I hope that you caught that he -- you don't think he seems like an ambitious person jockeying for a job?" And then: "...he is definitely mysterious. And that's deliberate."

He may very well be gay (and in love with Pete / *shudders too*), but I think it's fascinating that after so much hinting and speculation, he's ultimately just as much of a mystery - even with the knee touch - as he was when we first saw him. I mean that scene in the hallway with Cutler a few episodes back... what the hell was that?? There's something deep below the surface going on - be it his slightly-more-than-semi-closeted lifestyle, or a Dick Whitman-style charade, or some highly organized scam involving coffee and shorts - whatever it is, the not-knowing-what-it-is is driving me bonkers. B.O.N.K.E.R.S.

p.s. Thank you, thesmallmachine, for the visual image of "Don and Ted locking horns like majestic stags." Every time I think of this I squeee a little, and my mind draws a disturbingly realistic picture.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 10:52 AM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


I don't know how everyone else felt about it but I thought the Tommy reference was pretty compelling for how it casts a pall over Sally's future in much the same way as the star shirt did for Megan.
posted by invitapriore at 11:09 AM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


The thing that jumped from the Vulture review for me was the parallel between Dick's experience at the whorehouse and Sally catching him. More bad portents.

I know everyone is fascinated by Bob this week, but Sally's experience is resonating much more with me. I keep thinking back to the Season 4 episode when she took the train to visit him and the time they had.

And the fall out scenes were so well done. Kiernan Shipka was fantastic. With most other actresses that age, they wouldn't have been able to write more than her flapping down on the bed in tears. Seeing them pressed against either side of the door was heartbreaking.
posted by dry white toast at 11:32 AM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


Kiernan Shipka was fantastic. With most other actresses that age, they wouldn't have been able to write more than her flapping down on the bed in tears. Seeing them pressed against either side of the door was heartbreaking.

Seriously. I was wondering if her great work as a child actor was just a lack of guile or some natural talent that sometimes start to fade as kids become teens but no. She just gets better and better. What a find.
posted by sweetkid at 11:35 AM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


My only problem with the Sally storyline was that her manipulative friend was a little distracting from a parsimony-of-narrative-means standpoint. Otherwise, yeah, that whole subplot was one of the best things that the show has pulled off in recent memory.
posted by invitapriore at 11:40 AM on June 11, 2013


The "Sally sees Don in flagrante delicto" subplot really upset me, honestly. I knew exactly what would happen the minute she showed back up at the door of the building, and I started yelling, "nonononono" out loud.

Sally's been through enough crap, dammit, she didn't need that.
posted by Chrysostom at 11:51 AM on June 11, 2013


But her manipulative friend pushed her to go back and kiss Mitchell without which she wouldn't have seen Don and Sylvia.

I really liked the character and actress of Sally's friend and didn't see her as distracting at all. It was a good way to get more "kids in the 60s" detail, too. Also their teasing each other about their crushes and sexual desires was revealing, too. No more little Sally Draper.
posted by sweetkid at 11:53 AM on June 11, 2013


Yeah, I mean, I see why she had to be there and you're right that she brought out some interesting things in Sally, but all the moments with her getting under Megan's skin just made me go "wtf?" and kind of took me out of the moment a little bit. Maybe they were necessary to establish that aspect of her character so that the Mitchell thing came off right, but it didn't work for me.
posted by invitapriore at 11:59 AM on June 11, 2013


But her manipulative friend pushed her to go back and kiss Mitchell without which she wouldn't have seen Don and Sylvia.

I thought she went back to get back a letter the friend had supposedly left "by Sally" to Mitchell.

Also - nice Vulture link. A "good" sociopath ... interesting characterization.
posted by tilde at 12:01 PM on June 11, 2013


She went back not to kiss Mitchell, but to retrieve the letter her friend had sent, which made explicit her (their) vague crushy feelings. So at the very moment she was trying to take back the letter/repress this foray into sexuality and adult/grown-up feelings, she was greeted with the sight of something sexual/adult she'll likely deal with repressing in one way or another (squashing down those feelings, acting out) for some time to come.
posted by mothershock at 12:03 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


I love Sally's manipulative little frienemy cause we rarely see her interacting with peers.

Chances Bob used to be a hustler

I'm imagining some lurid soap opera past where a John dies on top of young Bob and he goes and assumes the guy's much nicer indenity.
posted by The Whelk at 12:03 PM on June 11, 2013 [5 favorites]


Basically I want Bob to be Thomas Ripley.
posted by The Whelk at 12:05 PM on June 11, 2013 [6 favorites]


yes you're right she went back to get the letter. sorry! still she wouldn't have gone back had it not been for the friend.
posted by sweetkid at 12:08 PM on June 11, 2013


True, she would not have gone back if not for the machinations of the shoehorn friend.

I agree with the assertion above that the friend was distracting and manipulative; nearly shoehorned into the storyline without actually fitting.. But what is the alternative to get her there?

Option 1: Have her feeling like she wants to make out with him and pursue him herself with no friend wedged into the storyline? That'd "punish" her for trying to be "too adult" and possibly eff her up even more, like girls who first kiss a boy and get their period with no foreknowledge of the whole menstruation thing. That happened to a peer, and we're younger than Sally is, comparatively - the peer thought it was a punishment from her God for kissing a boy.

Option 2: Have her and him and the friend go back to his place innocentlyish enough (maybe with the friend and he a bit of an item) and all three of them walk in (or Sally, leading the pack while the other two lag behind to make out)?

Option 3: Actually, I can't think of a third way. The way they did this seems to be the least illogical.

Yeah, I remember that Glen was with her when she first got her period, but at least she knew what was happening once it di, even if she couldn't cope with it on her own.
posted by tilde at 12:15 PM on June 11, 2013


( quietly considers yet another Mad Men fillet: The Talented Mr. Benson).
posted by The Whelk at 12:19 PM on June 11, 2013


I love Sally's manipulative little frienemy cause we rarely see her interacting with peers.

This. Also I thought it was interesting that Megan hates being called Mrs. Draper.
posted by sweetkid at 12:20 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


If I was the costume designer I'd probobly be unable to resist putting Sally in a red dress and pearls for one scene at least.
posted by The Whelk at 12:21 PM on June 11, 2013


A strapless red dress? With pointy hair?
posted by sweetkid at 12:23 PM on June 11, 2013


A red and black dress.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 12:29 PM on June 11, 2013


what are we talking about
posted by sweetkid at 12:30 PM on June 11, 2013


I meant the Lisa Simpson joke yes
posted by The Whelk at 12:32 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


ok so no black then
posted by sweetkid at 12:34 PM on June 11, 2013


Apologies, the Whelk's comment made me flash on all the red and black color themes this episode. For awhile all I saw was yellow, now this. Pointless obsessive derail henceforth rescinded.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 12:42 PM on June 11, 2013


you should feel really, really bad.
posted by sweetkid at 12:44 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Every time someone mentions Dr. Rosen I can hear Chevy Chase in my head saying "Dr. Rosenrosen".
posted by Fleebnork at 12:51 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


you should feel really, really bad.

*gets into elevator with sweat-streaked hair and furrowed brow, takes a deep breath, and looks to the left*
posted by flyingsquirrel at 12:59 PM on June 11, 2013


I thought you were making a reference to the novel Le Rouge et Le Noir and was like, wouldn't it be Bob wearing the dress?
posted by sweetkid at 1:01 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Holy crap, I wish I HAD made that reference -- for Sally, Bob, Megan, hell everyone!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 1:05 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Meh, Sally's friend seemed like a typical friend of a young teenage girl. And the payoff was so huge, she immediately faded into the background for me.

You people fixate on weird stuff.
posted by dry white toast at 1:14 PM on June 11, 2013


I liked the Charterhouse of Parma okay, how is le Rouge et le Noir?
posted by Chrysostom at 1:18 PM on June 11, 2013


You people fixate on weird stuff.

Is that like a joke?
posted by sweetkid at 1:18 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Well, not really. I'm saying I genuinely don't get how a plot-serving, one-off character can be distracting enough to draw focus away from a core character's life altering event, just because she calls Megan "Mrs. Draper."
posted by dry white toast at 1:33 PM on June 11, 2013


But we all fixate on weird stuff, it's like the point of being fans of this show and writing about it here and also reading recaps, which is why I thought it was a joke.
posted by sweetkid at 1:35 PM on June 11, 2013


I thought you were making a reference to the novel Le Rouge et Le Noir and was like, wouldn't it be Bob wearing the dress?

It makes me think of the RCMP.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:36 PM on June 11, 2013


IF we didn't fixate on weird stuff we wouldn't have a complete itemized breakdown of how much the main characters make at their jobs.

(Note, someone make me an itemized breakdown of how much the Drapers/Francises/Olsens/Sterlings/etc are worth)
posted by The Whelk at 1:38 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


I get that sweetkid. I engage in it as much as anyone. It's totally part of the fun. I'm just surprised to see people say that minor details like that could lessen the impact of the bigger narrative. But maybe that's just me fixating on weird stuff. :)
posted by dry white toast at 1:40 PM on June 11, 2013


Sally's friend wasn't in the scene where that happens, though. I mean, it sounds like you're surprised that the emotional force of the scene where Sally sees Don in bed with Sylvia wasn't sufficient to make me forget something I noticed idly earlier in the episode. Not sure where fixation enters into it, especially now that we're more in the long tail of having already discussed the larger scale things.
posted by invitapriore at 1:41 PM on June 11, 2013


Speaking of plot nitpicks, what is Peggy's job title these days? I thought Don and Ted had the "Creative Director" title, even though that's what I'd guess her position is otherwise.
posted by invitapriore at 1:46 PM on June 11, 2013


She's "Coffee Chief", obviously.
posted by dry white toast at 1:47 PM on June 11, 2013 [4 favorites]


Chief Copywriter. It says so on her office door.
posted by orange swan at 1:47 PM on June 11, 2013


Oh right. Damn, looks like I'm getting demoted to the Nitpickers Junior League.
posted by invitapriore at 1:49 PM on June 11, 2013


Junior Leaguers have to do all the coffee runs. No sugar please.
posted by sweetkid at 1:53 PM on June 11, 2013


And take minutes at the Nitpickers Partners meeting. Wearing purple poke-a-dot dress with bow on the front, optional.
posted by dry white toast at 1:54 PM on June 11, 2013


(Note, someone make me an itemized breakdown of how much the Drapers/Francises/Olsens/Sterlings/etc are worth)

I'm not at all the person to do this, but I want it with the Chaoughs, Cutlers, and Campbells too. And Joan, because I'm curious, and the the inflation-adjusted present-day dollars too, because I won't understand it otherwise.
posted by gladly at 1:58 PM on June 11, 2013


Wearing purple poke-a-dot dress with bow on the front, optional.

I welcome this chance to shine.
posted by invitapriore at 2:03 PM on June 11, 2013 [5 favorites]


I'm not at all the person to do this, but I want it with the Chaoughs, Cutlers, and Campbells too. And Joan, because I'm curious

When they were contemplating the IPO, and Pete told Joan that at minimum her share could be worth nearly $1 Million, I immediately flashed back to Lane's advice to her about taking the partnership over the $50k. Amazing what he did for her with those few words, compared to what his wife got after his suicide.
posted by dry white toast at 2:06 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


dry white toast:
And the fall out scenes were so well done. Kiernan Shipka was fantastic. With most other actresses that age, they wouldn't have been able to write more than her flapping down on the bed in tears. Seeing them pressed against either side of the door was heartbreaking.

Wow, totally agree. Her face and the little backward stumble she did when she first walked in on Don and Sylvia were amazing too.

Also regarding readery's observation further upthread,
The quick cut of Sylvia and Don was so hyper-fucking, like in rut. Definitely weird for a fourteen year old. Remember when you first get the gist of sex? Especially as it relates to your parents? You picture a lot more kissing and tenderness.

In most (most) Don sex scenes you do get a fair amount of kissing and tenderness. Also, Don usually has clothes or sheets on. They shot that scene to make him look more exposed than we usually see him (thigh and butt uncovered*), a sight that NO 14yo would want to see of her dad.

BTW my husband noted last night that Sally also walked in on Megan's mother giving Roger a blowjob. Maybe now she understands that Marie was probably just comforting Roger. (Ugh)

*Also it's kind of funny that earlier in the episode her friend said to Sally, re Mitchell, "His ass? How did you see that?"

Poor Sally.
posted by torticat at 2:10 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also it's kind of funny that earlier in the episode her friend said to Sally, re Mitchell, "His ass? How did you see that?"


Actually, another thought I had about that bedroom scene: after the friend said she calls Megan "Mrs Draper" because she hates it, she says, "Can you imagine? He's just down the hall" or similar.

At first I thought she was talking about Don.
posted by sweetkid at 2:13 PM on June 11, 2013


BTW my husband noted last night that Sally also walked in on Megan's mother giving Roger a blowjob.

Yeah essentially Sally is now under the impression that the entire adult world is just inappropriate sexual couplings behind closed doors at all times.

She will never open another door as long as she lives.
posted by shakespeherian at 2:15 PM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


The Doorway

dun dun dun
posted by sweetkid at 2:17 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah essentially Sally is now under the impression that the entire adult world is just inappropriate sexual couplings behind closed doors at all times.

She will never open another door as long as she lives.


To be honest I've had a few experiences recently* that have me thinking that basically most people in committed relationships are ready to cheat on their SO at the drop of a hat, and I am much older than Sally. Maybe I am exceedingly impressionable.

* Thankfully not firsthand, but unfortunately they did happen to people I care about.
posted by invitapriore at 2:21 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


yep, a lot more people are cool with cheating/actively trying to cheat than I think most people think.
posted by sweetkid at 2:23 PM on June 11, 2013


When they were contemplating the IPO, and Pete told Joan that at minimum her share could be worth nearly $1 Million, I immediately flashed back to Lane's advice to her about taking the partnership over the $50k. Amazing what he did for her with those few words, compared to what his wife got after his suicide.

Amazing what the merger may have cost her then, too. Although I guess her share's value would be even higher if/when SC&P eventually goes public.
posted by gladly at 2:38 PM on June 11, 2013


BTW my husband noted last night that Sally also walked in on Megan's mother giving Roger a blowjob.

Yeah essentially Sally is now under the impression that the entire adult world is just inappropriate sexual couplings behind closed doors at all times.

Yup. Without getting into details, I can share that, as a little kid, I knew all sorts of dirty deeds my parents were up to (both when they were married and when they were divorced, with partners/one-night-stands who were married and some of whom were not). I may not have walked in on them, but that didn't stop them from telling me of their exploits in grisly detail, completely devoid of any sense of appropriateness or parental filtering. (The 70s were such a glorious time.)

As a kid, all you know is that it feels weird and uncomfortable and icky and mysterious and wrong, but you don't know why.

Then you grow up, and you date, and you realize how fucked up your own understanding of sexuality is, and you start therapy, and you begin to understand why.

So yeah. IRL, that shit will fuck you up for life.

(Trust me.)
posted by flyingsquirrel at 2:41 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


I found myself dressing for a party tonight and narrating my clothing choices and options in the same internal voice I used to read the mad style posts
posted by The Whelk at 3:01 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm not at all the person to do this, but I want it with the Chaoughs, Cutlers, and Campbells too.

Well, the Chaoghs have a plane, but then again they apparently live in one bedroom and half a foyer, so it's all tradeoffs. Just like Pete can afford two rows of buttons on his vest but not a new box of raisin bran.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 3:05 PM on June 11, 2013 [6 favorites]


after the friend said she calls Megan "Mrs Draper" because she hates it, she says, "Can you imagine? He's just down the hall" or similar.

At first I thought she was talking about Don.


Same here. Because the "he's just downstairs" part was a non sequitur in their conversation and has a different meaning (Don) in the overall story. The writing on this show is so good (and so manipulative).
posted by torticat at 4:18 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm really hoping Tom and Lorenzo can shed some light on Pete's double-breasted vest in the Bob scene. Actually, I wish they'd shed some light on any of his clothes this season, beyond the fact that he's started wearing three-piece suits like Roger. He's consistently looked strange to me this year, not at all like any of the other men on the show. Straight-hemmed vests, mildly bold striped shirts, pattern-on-pattern, all cumulating in this pale-gray Watchmen thing. His older co-workers aren't wearing anything like this, and yet all the looks are very stuffy -- it's hard to believe that they were considered youthful or trendy business styles (Harry is the one whose clothes are trendy), or that Pete has any interest in fashion. What would clothes like this connote at the time?

(No bonus to Tlo for just observing that the vest is armor-y or that his suit looks smothering and awkward. I want to talk about buttons.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 4:24 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Wait, what Tommy reference with Sally? What?
posted by Sara C. at 5:21 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I am Rewatching - Peggy joking Pete is in love with Ted, Pete just putting it off to his need for the account Ted is throwing his way.

I haven't seen the Tommy moment referenced.
posted by tilde at 5:39 PM on June 11, 2013


Nice points about the draft :"He's gonna be on a list for the rest of his life" "on the run for the rest of his life" didn't know, of course, about Carter.

I love how Ted & his wife fight. Took me a lot of practice to get to that level of ability (& still not yet that good).

I love Teds boots!

Julie has a Snoopy bedroll!
posted by tilde at 5:48 PM on June 11, 2013


I was eyeing Ted's boots, too. He's a dapper man; no other word for it.
posted by thesmallmachine at 5:52 PM on June 11, 2013


Sara C., that's how I read "Sally, can you hear me?" I mean, at first glance it's anachronistic but obviously Don wouldn't be thinking about that anyway. But it fits metrically and thematically.
posted by invitapriore at 6:00 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Holy crap, almost sounded like Peggy was suggesting a threesome.

Yeah, Bob is smitten. No call on Pete but man is he dooooown. But reading back to Bob & Joan, they look wonderful together, especially as he puts her a SUCH ease.

Ohhhh I love the cab scene! We never see the outdoors.

Made myself watch the rat scene. Peggy's gonna need a bigger cat.

That last scene between Don, Sally, & the doorways. Dayum.
posted by tilde at 6:17 PM on June 11, 2013


Sara C., that's how I read "Sally, can you hear me?"

I don't think that's a Tommy reference.
posted by sweetkid at 6:40 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sara C., that's how I read "Sally, can you hear me?"

I don't think that's a Tommy reference.


I thought of Tommy when Don told Sally she didn't see what she thought she saw.

You didn't hear it, you didn't see it!
You won't say nothin' to no one,
Ever in your life.
You never heard it.
How absurd it all seems, without any proof!

You didn't hear it, you didn't see it!
You never heard it, not a word of it!
You won't say nothin' to no one,
Never tell a soul what you know is the truth!
posted by The Underpants Monster at 6:59 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's compelling but Tommy didn't come out until 1969.
posted by sweetkid at 7:07 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


We never see the outdoors.

Except for the many, many times we do. Although, less in New York - more when they travel elsewhere.
posted by crossoverman at 7:23 PM on June 11, 2013


Well, and I wish I had a good short phrase for this, but you know that thing that period pieces sometimes do where they kind of rib the characters by having them react short-sightedly to a historical inevitability? Something like when someone expresses disbelief at the notion of Ronald Reagan running for President for example. This feels similar in that the subtext relies on us knowing about something that happened in the future, but that doesn't it make it strictly anachronistic in my eyes.
posted by invitapriore at 7:24 PM on June 11, 2013


like when someone expresses disbelief at the notion of Ronald Reagan running for President for example.

That's not the same thing as Tommy will come out in a year.

I mean sorry but "Can you hear me" is a pretty common phrase. If he said "Sally, you sure play a mean Pinball," then I might see it.
posted by sweetkid at 7:28 PM on June 11, 2013 [6 favorites]


I'm actually really enjoying imagining Don telling Sally that. But I think what made it less ambiguous for me is the inclusion of "Sally" beforehand, which just makes it sound so much more like that line. I mean, my interpretation could very well be just the product of my own biases, but it struck me that way immediately. I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one.
posted by invitapriore at 7:42 PM on June 11, 2013


It's funny, when I read "Sally, can you hear me?" I think "Papa, can you hear me?" from Yentl.

I will leave it up to debate whether the issue is that all of Mad Men is looking forward towards a future where Barbra Streisand sings, acts, directs, and produces a movie about a cross-dressing Yeshiva Girl, or if perhaps I'm just a huge dork.
posted by Sara C. at 7:47 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


all of Mad Men is looking forward towards a future where Barbra Streisand sings, acts, directs, and produces a movie about a cross-dressing Yeshiva Girl,'

cannot stop laughing
posted by sweetkid at 7:57 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Maybe he's just REALLY ahead of his time and is referencing Verizon's "Can you hear me now? Good."
posted by sweetkid at 8:00 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


I am so glad to hear that I wasn't the only one scheming on Ted's boots.
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 8:23 PM on June 11, 2013


Are we ready to go down the oranges rabbit hole?

Ideas about oranges/the color orange:

- Roger juggles oranges, seemingly for no real reason, and he and Don even joke about the fact that he can't juggle/failed at juggling, until suddenly he is able to juggle the oranges. Roger has also had some possibly death-tinged subplots this season, like losing his mother, feeling shut out of both his son and his grandson's lives, and being totally irrelevant in California. Maybe his next heart attack is the big one?

- Sylvia's whole kitchen is orange, and I believe she is shown in orange prints in all her scenes this episode, except the scene where she interrupts Mitchell, Julie, and Sally's little moment in the lobby. In that scene, she's a black column. I also feel like Sylvia's death would be just out-of-left-field enough.

- Quick: has Megan worn orange lately? (The link mentions the orange sherbert, which was a fricking year ago so IMO doesn't count)
posted by Sara C. at 8:39 PM on June 11, 2013


Roger juggles oranges, seemingly for no real reason

I know there might be a deeper meaning (probably), but i just thought this moment was "hey! John Slattery is adorable!" Because he is.
posted by sweetkid at 8:42 PM on June 11, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah, but it was a pretty prolonged moment. I know the idea was for them to be riffing and then have Ted come in and be pissy about Sunkist, but they riffed for a long ass time.

Then again, I thought there was also a lot of pointless riffing with Julie and her desire to piss off Megan, so maybe this episode just had some pointless riffing for tone or pacing purposes. Sometimes pointless riffing is a good thing.
posted by Sara C. at 8:47 PM on June 11, 2013


We discussed this up thread opinions are mixed on whether Julie's riffing was pointless (personally I love her and her bratty snarky crap. She's a mini Francine to Sally's mini Betty).
posted by sweetkid at 8:51 PM on June 11, 2013


they riffed for a long ass time.
posted by sweetkid at 8:57 PM on June 11, 2013


Yeah, I'm not so much talking about Julie's moments with Sally, which I think are needed to establish who she is and what her dynamic is like with Sally. I also agree that it gives us some nice teenager moments with Sally. I especially loved the contrast between the two of them, so on the one hand Sally is maybe more openly sexual, but also less experienced and more bookish/earnest about school stuff. Which I think is a pretty interesting combination.

I just sort of didn't get the whole "Sally goes to take a shower" thing where Megan and Julie have this scene pretty much for no reason, except for the fact that it diverts our attention from the fact that she's slipping the love note under the door while she takes out the trash. I just don't get the purpose of Julie's desire to get under Megan's skin, and asking her about her agent, and all.

And, again, I have no problem with any of this and assume it probably is in the story for a reason that isn't apparent right now, or just to establish the pace of the episode.
posted by Sara C. at 9:06 PM on June 11, 2013


Someone was on an orange couch, in that office with the orange wallpaper.
posted by Sys Rq at 9:12 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Wasn't that same someone the very person who was pissed about the Sunkist account and said "I don't want his juice. I want my juice!"

A dedicated beanplater could make a case for the cranberry being a blood metaphor, but I think that's a bit much. Still, I have to wonder, is this the moment that orange cranberry juice was invented?
posted by Sara C. at 9:31 PM on June 11, 2013


Peggy's orange cat (Jonesy, obv).
posted by mwhybark at 9:53 PM on June 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Are we ready to go down the oranges rabbit hole?

Not me but that's because I was burned by the whole "next week on" discussion and have to take a timeout on predictions. I do agree that the sherbet thing is a streeeetch.

I kinda think that applies to the other points made about Mad Men in that Uproxx column and the Vulture video it links to, though. The column says the video shows "all the instances that we missed foreshadowing the death of Lane," but all it really shows is a ton of death foreshadowing, nothing much specific to Lane.

And what's the point the writer is trying to make about the hand gesture? That Lane did that once in last year's premiere, and Don made a similar gesture after Lane died AND in this past episode? Huh? (Sally makes the same motion when Don is talking to her through the door. Is it supposed to be significant?)
posted by torticat at 10:59 PM on June 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Oh, yeah, the hand gesture thing is super weird.

But I think the oranges thing is really interesting, specifically. Especially since, if a character were to die, Roger would be an interesting choice.
posted by Sara C. at 11:09 PM on June 11, 2013


Alright we just did our rewatch and damn if I'm not right down the rabbit hole. I won't make predictions, though, just observations.

- You're right, Sara C., about Sylvia's orange blouse and kitchen. Their whole place is orange, the door, the floor, the wallpaper, the wallhangings!

- Ted's office has lots of orange, as noted above-- wallpaper, lamp, sofa. Ted's bedroom is also orange. But Ted himself just wears his mustard yellow.

- Bob's tie in the "true love" conversation is orange-brown striped (also blue to echo Pete's; Pete is all in blue this episode). I think this is about blending with Pete and Pete's office, though, which I'm sure TLo will comment on.

- Of course there's a ton of orange in the Drapers' place too, down to the table setting in the last scene. Megan wears black & red (both outfits).

- More scary, Sally's room has orange bedspread, pillows, and wallhangings.

Okay so, maybe Janie Bryant was just having fun with orange on the Sunkist episode, just as there was a lot of yellow on the margarine episode?

Also I have a hard time seeing orange as a big signifier for a show depicting the seventies. But no question there was a LOT of it.
posted by torticat at 12:57 AM on June 12, 2013


If during an episode called "Favors" Sally is completely devastated when confronted by her father's true nature, what kind of emotional bloodbath is going to take place in an episode named "The Quality of Mercy?" It's going to be grievous.

On a lighter note, Elisabeth Moss says Peggy Olsen is "totally a cat lady."
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 2:23 AM on June 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


I've been pondering Pete and Bob. Upthread I said my read was that Bob was genuinely in love with Pete and I wanted to go back and watch their interactions earlier in the season. So yesterday I did that, and now I'm certain Bob's in love with Pete (and related, obviously, that he's truly gay). Anyway here are some observations for what they are worth.

Ep 3 Bob was stopping by Pete's office after hours to compliment him ("first in and last out, I don't know how you do it") and offer to pick up anything he needed at the deli.

Ep 6 he is at the brothel with Pete (why? no apparent reason except he's hanging out near him), not partaking but offering to pay for Pete.

Ep 9 he is getting ready to go to the beach with Joan. She says she wishes she could get a beach house and he asks "Doesn't Pete Campbell have a beach house?" (Is he fishing for info here?) He also compliments Pete ("he's generous"). Since Pete's not there, this can't be part of any plan to manipulate him.

At the end of that episode he gives Pete the Manolo information and tells him Joan is concerned about him and that "your wellbeing is also an interest of mine," an interestingly personal way to put it.

In the most recent episode, in the knee-touching scene, he echoes that line in painting the picture of a person in love, "your wellbeing is his only thought."

In both these scenes, he's wearing (different) brown and blue striped ties that tie in with Pete's office and with Pete's own blue ties. I normally pay attention only to the basic obvious stuff with the color coding, but even I can see this signifies two people in accord, not at odds with each other (especially when it's repeated in two scenes with echoing dialogue).

Okay, so Pete. On rewatch I honestly didn't see revulsion in his reaction to Bob's come on. He continued with the party line (Manolo's fired, and tell him it's disgusting), but he said it in quite a gentle way. I don't know what to make of this except that he actually likes Bob and was maybe moved against his will by what Bob said? Also, in the followup scene, he discovers he's out of cereal and throws the box in frustration. I don't know if he consciously realizes there, or not, that he lacks EXACTLY the kind of caretaking partner that Bob just described to him.

Back to Bob--regarding Matt Weiner's "he's a liar, glad you noticed" comment, I'm going to assume at this point that that was Weiner's tricksy way of noting that Bob is hiding something (that interview was before the last episode), but that now we know the secret was just that Bob was gay. All Bob's lies have been white lies, and "closeted" seems to fit with that better than anything more sinister.

And finally: there is a funny little triangle with Bob and Pete and Joan. Joan and Bob have helped each other out, obviously. I assume Joan knows Bob is gay (we know she has functioning gaydar). Pete has asked Joan for advice about his family relationships, and Bob's interested in one with Pete. I think Joan's going to play into this story line again. Or maybe I'm just hoping so.
posted by torticat at 3:33 AM on June 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


Peggy named that cat Stan, no doubt. I mean, he's so furry and ginger this season. It would just be a (copy) writer's vengeance for a minor non-existent, friendship infraction.
posted by moody cow at 4:11 AM on June 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh my, Sally as Yentl. I am dying over here. It's a bit of a think to think on.

To me it sounded like he gave her an explaination without quite going into "It will shock you how much it never happened", but still a similar idea.

I too, torticat, want to/can see Bob / Joan / Pete triangle. Especially if Ted / Pete / Peggy break out on their own (what would they do with the kids? I don't think they can break up Stan and Ginsberg, and the lady with them doesn't seem to have significant contributions we've been allowed to see).

Speaking of missing people, where is Peggy's secretary?

Started rewatching the season again, just to look for Bob.
posted by tilde at 5:24 AM on June 12, 2013


Actually, I wish they'd shed some light on any of his clothes this season, beyond the fact that he's started wearing three-piece suits like Roger. He's consistently looked strange to me this year, not at all like any of the other men on the show... What would clothes like this connote at the time?


I've been pondering on this one. All I can think of is that maybe Trudy was the one who always took care of his wardrobe. They've been coming apart since the end of last season, so it's likely that he's been dressing himself all year, and is probably scraping the bottom of the wardrobe barrel.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:34 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


Or could the clothes be part of his overall impotence to stem the tide of change; his wife isn't 'behaving' the way he wants*, his FIL has turned on him*, he's losing out accounts and still not a named partner, and so he's trying to dress the part he think he should have now if it were 10/15 years ago. But things are changing and he's noticing but sometimes trying not to (ref argument about things changing he had with Don when Don told him to get out of the industry a few episodes back).

I think he is getting and buying richer clothes, but that they aren't being fitted to him well, but they fit the illusion of who he thinks he wants to be / should be. Dressing the part; like now a days we say (and maybe then, too!) you dress the part of the job you want to be not the job you are.

And with no woman in his life to take care of things, he's getting bad advice (and falling behind on his shopping).


Mmmmm ... I have a hankering for some oranges.
posted by tilde at 5:42 AM on June 12, 2013


[* They aren't following what he sees as the rules for his path of success that Don (who he used to near worship and flatter like Bob but less subtle) has forged for himself (sans Dick Disillusionment) and other successful men seem to have followed. The others are breaking the "rules" while he is doing what he knows is the right way to do things.]

Remember, Pete spent a lot of time trying to fit in with the guys his age, but was acting like the guys older than him from the beginning. Groping the gal at the burlesque club to the point where she objected seriously. Hopping on Peggy and treating her cruelly afterwards (and not noticing she was effing pregnant). Trying to be "one of the guys" and not doing it that well, and I think they putting up with him because he was an accounts man with connections (which is why he was hired and not fired that one time) and not on his personal strengths (like Kenny, though wasn't he "the girl on prom night" when they were testing out the deodorant spray on).

Which reminds me - where the hell is Ken? We've seen precious little of him.

And Pete spent a lot of his early years buttering up Don and trying to be like him until the government thing came down the line and Pete had to fix it for him (which was paid back by Don covering part of his partner contribution).

And I didn't keep track of all the numbers, but names on the door aside, isn't he a Junior partner still, though not as Junior (stake size wise) than Joan?
posted by tilde at 5:51 AM on June 12, 2013


The Mad Style post for "Favors" is up, and it's really good!
posted by orange swan at 6:12 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


I haven't seen anyone online mention these two similar scenes.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 6:15 AM on June 12, 2013


Whoa, that Mad Style bit, it's like they've been reading our conversation.

( in thier discussion of Bob in the context of his time and place I am struck with how closely I can identify with Mr. Benson despite growing up nearly half a century later in a very different world, I'm pretty certain that If I had gone into law like I was * supposed* to, I'd be carrying two coffee cups and working through self-help books too. It's ..kind of unsettling really)
posted by The Whelk at 6:35 AM on June 12, 2013 [5 favorites]


Also, how did I miss that Manalo is wearing an ASCOT.
posted by The Whelk at 6:39 AM on June 12, 2013


Huh, so Pete's ahead of the game, fashionwise. He's just so frowny faced all the time it totally looks off to me; I still see him as a younger guy dressing old. Plus, I only really looked at his outfit when he was throwing Raisin Bran around.

T/L confirmed Pete is still a Junior partner, with more guys ahead of him (the three from CCD) than before.

The "best little boy in the world" syndrome is of interest to me; I've seen it in real life, but usually paired with some kind of learning disability that made it maddeningly impossible.
posted by tilde at 6:50 AM on June 12, 2013


While there is probably less "deflect questions about your sex life by being super busy and on top of things at all times" out there today there is still a lot of "Well huge swaths of the populace think I'm worthless/not worthy of rights/degenerate/etc so I'm going to beat them. I'm going to be fitter, smarter, richer, and more accomplished then they are because I've externalized my entire self-worth." just from personal experience.
posted by The Whelk at 7:15 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


Peter is wearing high-end conservative men's fashions. It may look stuffy to us and hopelessly square to the counter-culture types around him, but it'll play well in certain social circles and in the arena where Pete wants to succeed. And he'll never ever look like the total douche Harry does or have reason to cringe at family photos of himself in later years. If there are any family photos of Peter.
posted by orange swan at 7:50 AM on June 12, 2013


Are we ready to go down the oranges rabbit hole?

Yessssssss. I immediately thought of Megan's ridiculously fabulous crochet jumpsuit, which was more of an orangey-red -- but her costar (and, later, suitor) definitely wore orange.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:02 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


Huh, so Pete's ahead of the game, fashionwise. He's just so frowny faced all the time it totally looks off to me

Also keep in mind that, for the men now as well as the women, we're heading into a time period where the entire aesthetic is the definition of frumpy and awful to contemporary eyes. I have the same problem with Peggy, where I think she looks awful and matronly, but really she's probably dressed in what passes for fashion forward professional lady clothes in 1968.
posted by Sara C. at 9:09 AM on June 12, 2013


Megan's ridiculously fabulous crochet jumpsuit, which was more of an orangey-red

I was going to point that out, but on my screen it really red more like something in the world of burgundy or raspberry. You may be right, though -- Amazon's video interface is pretty awful and I've missed a lot of subtle things like that this season.
posted by Sara C. at 9:11 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


we're heading into a time period where the entire aesthetic is the definition of frumpy and awful to contemporary eyes

True, but I feel like Megan pulls everything off because of her fashion-model body.
posted by sweetkid at 9:13 AM on June 12, 2013


Yeah, Megan is the exception to the rule, like the girl you see walking down Bedford Avenue dressed like Jackie from Roseanne who is somehow pulling it off.
posted by Sara C. at 9:19 AM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


I am actually friends with a 21 year old model on Facebook. She dresses way 90s. Like John Lennon glasses + hats + scoopneck velour tops + patent leather oxfords + leather cord necklaces + cuffed denim shorts. And looks consistently amazing.
posted by sweetkid at 9:25 AM on June 12, 2013


Yeah, I had this extremely hip PA last year who I'm facebook friends who pretty much exclusively wears leggings as pants, patent leather doc martens, and huge baggy Nirvana t-shirts. If I were to wear this, I would look like a filthy shlub. But she manages to look adorable. We are waaaaaay off the topic at this point.

I guess what I'm saying is that I feel Peggy Olson's pain.
posted by Sara C. at 9:31 AM on June 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also keep in mind that, for the men now as well as the women, we're heading into a time period where the entire aesthetic is the definition of frumpy and awful to contemporary eyes.

A little from A, a little from B - though I do have some period costuming experience (given my age I don't have direct adult memory but I'm not a kid any more, eek! Mostly second-hand memory from family albums and cleaning out closets from the era). I still think that even with buying up like he is (Sterling looks soooo good it's hard to see he's the outdated one) Trudy could do better than he does on his own. And the unmasked sour face /posture he's got going on even with his aging/"aging" just makes it worse.
posted by tilde at 11:17 AM on June 12, 2013


Having read this week's Mad Style, I have to say that I think TLo and I are on the same page about Sal and Bob. Their tone about the whole Bob Is Gay thing in their recap (which is where that whole part of the piece really belongs, not in Mad Style) was too glib, and they were so focused on Toldja So that they couldn't actually make their point.

I'm still wondering how reliable a narrator Bob is about his immediate past, though. While Don, Roger, Pete, etc could easily check out his bona fides, they probably wouldn't. I also think the lies probably aren't in the names he hefts around, but in the way he uses them. He uses them as a sort of armor or a passport to prove something about himself. Which is a little bit unusual.
posted by Sara C. at 12:23 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


There's a new FPP on the Mad Style post for 'Favors.'
posted by sweetkid at 12:57 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


which is where that whole part of the piece really belongs, not in Mad Style

Seriously, they did that snotty Toldja So on Monday and then wrote this really moving, interesting thing on Bob and wedged it in Mad Style? I can see how they maybe needed more time to work on it. But it could have been its own thing, it's their blog.
posted by sweetkid at 1:33 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


Every time an ascot clings another Manolo gets his wings.
posted by Dr. Zira at 4:13 PM on June 12, 2013


I already miss this thread. Those fly-by-night posters that are jumping on board the Bob Benson discussion train are making me cry. No extra cup of coffee for them!
posted by crossoverman at 4:29 PM on June 12, 2013 [5 favorites]


We liked Bob Benson before it was cool!
posted by The Whelk at 5:09 PM on June 12, 2013 [5 favorites]


LET'S JUST STAY HERE
posted by sweetkid at 5:15 PM on June 12, 2013 [2 favorites]


I do want to be Bob for Halloween. I'm not sure how well I could do boy drag though, esp WASP drag.
posted by sweetkid at 5:16 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


jumping on board the Bob Benson discussion train

The Bob Benson Bandwagon, surely!
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:51 PM on June 12, 2013 [3 favorites]


People who have turned down gay passes:

-Joan
-Sal
-Peggy
-Megan
-Pete

And the one that hit on Megan was half of the swinger couple that hit on her and Don, right? If that means they swing a little differently than we might've assumed at the time, throw Don onto the list too.

Did I miss anyone?
posted by Sys Rq at 6:42 PM on June 12, 2013


I'd say Don counts! I assume both members of the swinger couple are interested in both Drapers -- after all, Mel was the one enthusiastically asking Megan where she'd found a man like Don, exclaiming that he could cast him.
posted by thesmallmachine at 7:03 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


(My memory may not be perfect on that one. Was it Arlene who asked where Megan had found this man? Mel definitely had the "cast him" line, though, and they were both zeroing in.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 7:07 PM on June 12, 2013


I do want to be Bob for Halloween. I'm not sure how well I could do boy drag though, esp WASP drag.

Easy! All you need are two cups of coffee, short shorts, and a goofy, endearingly melancholic smile.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:08 PM on June 12, 2013 [4 favorites]


Easy! All you need are two cups of coffee, short shorts, and a goofy, endearingly melancholic smile.

I know but people will be like but boobs and your tan, tan skin.

Both of which are some of my favorite features but not good for costumes.
posted by sweetkid at 9:04 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


Easy! All you need are two cups of coffee, short shorts, and a goofy, endearingly melancholic smile.

Actually you need the coffee, the "dry-look" schoolboy cut, a navy traditional blazer with brass buttons and thin lapels (I know he has a dressier black jacket but he's kinda the only office character to wear blazers a lot so it's more iconic), white dress shirt with a loose (read broad, not stiff) but button-down collar, stripped club-style tie and tan to sandy chinos or dress pants and probably (although we never see them) a dark brown shoe like a chukka boot.

Not..that..I own..these things.
posted by The Whelk at 9:15 PM on June 12, 2013 [3 favorites]


dear god there is a reason there is an authentic 1941 field officer uniform in my closet isn't there?
posted by The Whelk at 9:20 PM on June 12, 2013 [4 favorites]


Not..that..I own..these things.

Mad Men cosplay at The Whelk's house. I'm coming as Joan.
posted by crossoverman at 9:59 PM on June 12, 2013 [3 favorites]


I'll be Trudy. Or Joan's mom. If I come as the latter, I'll need someone to be my swarthy young handyman.
posted by Superplin at 10:05 PM on June 12, 2013 [1 favorite]


I have been thinking about this last episode all night, and I've come to one conclusion. I think we're going to see Sal again. I know, everyone has said that's not possible. But I have this feeling that the Bob Benson storyline will end up giving us a glimpse of gay culture outside of the office, and we'll briefly see Sal again. Or he'll run into them at another agency, (I can't decide if he'll be in glass closet, or still in the closet but more comfortable with himself. I hope it's not him in the closet and miserable and scared.) But there have been too many people from earlier seasons coming back to not see Sal again. What I'm not sure is if they'll do it in the next two episodes, or if it will be next season. But I almost think it has to be this one.

Also, Damn you metafilter! I never obsessed over Mad Men as much as this season; which is coincidentally when I started following the MM threads. Sunday is so far away. . .
posted by [insert clever name here] at 12:16 AM on June 13, 2013


I've been predicting the return of Sal for ages, and nobody ever agrees with me.

I don't need him to be out. I'd just like to see him working as a commercial director, and maybe having somehow found a little peace.
posted by Sara C. at 12:25 AM on June 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Yeah, I'm sure your comments are where the idea gestated. I just keep thinking about not only the story arch this season but how Weiner likes to misdirect, and this season seems more so.

Or maybe Bob Benson is Sal's kid from his loveless marriage, sent back from the future to slowly destroy the agency that slowly destroyed his father through the guilt and shame and living in a loveless marriage. Because we've all decided that part is at least true, right? That Bob is some form of time traveler?
posted by [insert clever name here] at 1:30 AM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'd love to see Sal again. But I wouldn't want to know too much. I'd like some moment or a scene. Not a subplot like Paul Kinsey got last season, but just a cameo sometime. I admire Weiner's restraint, but I'd like him to give into temptation, just this once.

But do it next season. Do it in 1969. Don't put him at Stonewall, that's what Bob is for. Or maybe have them at Stonewall in early 69, before the riots.

Ugh. Now it's sounding like fanfic.
posted by crossoverman at 4:17 AM on June 13, 2013


Knowing this show if we ever see Sal again he'll be working for Nixon or something.
posted by shakespeherian at 5:07 AM on June 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sally will walk in on him and Henry.
posted by drezdn at 5:50 AM on June 13, 2013 [5 favorites]


and your tan, tan skin.

Get a friend to dress as Bob and you can be Manolo.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:55 AM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


I noticed for the first time when scrolling through the Mad Style post that Sally's paper that her friend addressed to Mitchell is leaned up against a bottle of wine on the counter. I wonder what happens to it? Sylvia throws it away because that's one complication they DON'T need? Seems weird that she put it there in the first place.
posted by torticat at 6:29 AM on June 13, 2013


I noticed for the first time when scrolling through the Mad Style post that Sally's paper that her friend addressed to Mitchell is leaned up against a bottle of wine on the counter. I wonder what happens to it? Sylvia throws it away because that's one complication they DON'T need? Seems weird that she put it there in the first place.

Well, remember, Don told Sylvia that Mitchell would just have to sign his name to a letter. Maybe she thought that was it? (Plus, what's she gonna do, leave it on the floor?)
posted by Sys Rq at 6:34 AM on June 13, 2013


Oh, I guess I assumed she would have looked at what it said. It looks childish, all folded over and over, not like a normal letter.

She wouldn't have thought it was the air national guard letter, because Don would have just given that to her, not slid it under the door!

But yeah, it's true if she didn't read it it would make sense for her to leave it on the counter for Mitchell. But then... poor Sally!
posted by torticat at 6:55 AM on June 13, 2013


Maybe she thought that was it? (Plus, what's she gonna do, leave it on the floor?)

It would be hilarious if she sent that to the Air National Guard.
posted by drezdn at 6:57 AM on June 13, 2013 [3 favorites]


I have a feeling that Weiner has specifically been trolling us by having characters like Danny resurface but not Sal.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:07 AM on June 13, 2013


I wonder what happens to it? Sylvia throws it away because that's one complication they DON'T need?

She gives it to him with a sideways glance and a smirk and says, "Someone slipped this under the door for you."

He glances at it, blushes, and throws it away (or possibly slips it into his sock drawer to enjoy again later when he needs a self esteem kick or a laugh). "Kids..." he thinks to himself. He will now have trouble making eye contact with Sally Draper for the rest of the summer. He tries to avoid her, but fails once or twice. Once they share an elevator ride, and Sally might have noticed he was blushing if she'd been able to actually perceive reality through her deep aura of humiliation.

aaaaand scene. I really don't think it would affect him one way or the other, nor do I think Sylvia would care about it. Sally is a lot younger than Mitchell, and he has a whole other world of stuff going on. I mean, imagine yourself at 19, and then imagine that a 13 or 14 year old slips you a note like that.
posted by Sara C. at 7:24 AM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


Thanks to the other thread I was thinking more about the timing of Bob's knee-tap right after Pete delivers his "degenerate" line. Here's how I think it makes sense: At that point, all the extra cups of coffee and errand-running and helping out in the world is not going to sway someone, so Bob feels he may as well step it up and give it the right place all the time, power of positive thinking big pitch. At minimum, I think he believes Pete will not fire him. I think Bob truly believes that he can persuade Pete that he is not a degenerate.

It's a calculated risk, but still a risk. But "love/lust makes people take unnecessary risks" is a pretty common happening in the world in general and in the Mad Men world in particular.
posted by mikepop at 7:48 AM on June 13, 2013


When Pete delivers his "degenerate" line Bob figures if that's his stated position he may as well make his case for true love knows no boundaries and be done with it.

I was thinking of it more like... Pete, whether he was gay or not, wouldn't be likely to openly express any sort of acceptance for homosexuality in a business environment, so the fact that he referred to it as 'degenerate' doesn't necessarily mean he isn't open to it. He could be totally gay and just covering it up. More important than what Pete says is the fact that Bob realizes that the topic of conversation has been steered towards homosexuality, which gives him an opening to drop a suggestive nonverbal cue into their interaction. If they had been talking about baseball or an account, the knee thing would have been a non sequitur. As it is, he still has plausible deniability, but he's made his feelings pretty clear.
posted by showbiz_liz at 11:34 AM on June 13, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah, I also was thinking it was along the lines of seizing the opportunity, since one like that might not ever present itself again (Bob's been tailing Pete looking for one for months). But I like your analysis too, mikepop. It could be both.

Related to that, TLo said they would "leave it to others to theorize as to whether Pete might be open to the idea of something less heterosexual in his life." Should we pick up the mantle?
posted by torticat at 12:02 PM on June 13, 2013


Related to that, TLo said they would "leave it to others to theorize as to whether Pete might be open to the idea of something less heterosexual in his life." Should we pick up the mantle?

I have a hard time imagining it, personally... but then, this is the same uptight WASP who smoked a j last episode, so I suppose anything's possible.
posted by showbiz_liz at 12:36 PM on June 13, 2013


My first inclination is that any guy who cheats on his wife (with other women) that much probably isn't gay. But that doesn't rule out his being somewhere in the middle of the Kinsey Scale.
posted by Sara C. at 12:39 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


I find that pretty plausible. When you're as interested in women as Pete is, and you're also somewhat interested in men, and you come from a social context where the former is rewarded and the latter is vilified, it's pretty easy to keep the latter out of your life and your consciousness. Who knows how many of the men at SC&P have entertained a fleeting thought or two, then hastily redirected their gaze towards a secretary's ass? I think some part of Harry will always be at that nude meeting with Charlton Heston.
posted by thesmallmachine at 1:25 PM on June 13, 2013


I have a feeling that Weiner has specifically been trolling us by having characters like Danny resurface but not Sal.

It will be interesting to see if Weiner will give that small gift to the MM audience. A gesture of appreciation, however briefly Sal may appear, before the show ends next year. If he does, I'm really curious how he will do it.
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 2:17 PM on June 13, 2013


I really don't think Pete is gay. I think he considered what Bob was saying for a second because it was about open acceptance and love, and his own mother had just told him he was always unlovable.

Poor Pete.
posted by sweetkid at 2:23 PM on June 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also: I really hope Sal doesn't come back. It's like the BRING FIREFLY BACK of Mad Men.

If he does come back he should be wealthy but incomprehensibly cruel like Heathcliff when he returned to Wuthering Heights.
posted by sweetkid at 2:24 PM on June 13, 2013 [11 favorites]


OK, I laughed out loud.
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 2:30 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's like the BRING FIREFLY BACK of Mad Men.

At least Firefly got a movie!

Serenity: The Sal Romano Story

posted by crossoverman at 4:54 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


eponysterical
posted by sweetkid at 4:55 PM on June 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Yeah, Megan is the exception to the rule, like the girl you see walking down Bedford Avenue dressed like Jackie from Roseanne who is somehow pulling it off.

You've seen this, right, Sara?

I don't think that Pete even consider what Bob was saying in the context of himself, but rather processed it as "this guy is saying something that resonates given my shitty-ass position right now," then realized it was about himself and bristled up with his degeneracy comments. That's my take, anyway.
posted by mynameisluka at 5:05 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yes I was specifically alluding to that but too busy at work to link it. So thanks!
posted by Sara C. at 6:21 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


I thank whoever took the time to not only make that correlation, but turn it into Tumblrness.
posted by mynameisluka at 6:30 PM on June 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


"Agreed, Brie is seriously underrated. She has genuine depth as Trudy, and her comedic talents on Community seem to get overshadowed by the other actors."

Don't watch 5 year engagement guys, her British accent will have you reconsidering the judgement you have in your own tastes...

here's me prior to blowing my brain out from 2.5 hours of unedited meandering awful appatow/seagal dreck : "oh emily blunt! I like her, doing a brit! that's nice... oh she has a sister... YAY allison brie! ... waaaait a minute, how's this going to work, is she adopted?? is she going to to an acceeennnnnnnn----t?"

*promptly breaks out into Vader-Wilhelm NNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO"*
posted by stratastar at 12:01 AM on June 14, 2013


At minimum, I think he believes Pete will not fire him. I think Bob truly believes that he can persuade Pete that he is not a degenerate.

Here's another thing, I think Pete does make a concession as a result of Bob's speech. He offers Manolo a month's pay, which is not something I think Pete would give someone he was firing for cause. (The severance pay makes it seem more like "this arrangement isn't working out" than "he's a degenerate rapist," which is where Pete started out in the conversation.)
posted by torticat at 5:26 AM on June 14, 2013 [2 favorites]


Did anyone else see The Good Wife plot parallel, by the way? Peter Florrick hired a probably gay nurse companion, the Cuban Cristian Romano, for his slightly stroke addled mother. They got along fabulously well and his mother was happier than she's ever appeared on the show. Alicia Florrick and her son discovered that Jackie had googled "What are brands of condoms" on their computer and were all stricken and staring at each other until Alicia found a solution. "WE WILL NEVER SPEAK OF THIS AGAIN." Both nod, and exit the room in different directions.

Peter on his part became suspicious from other signs that the guy was sleeping with his mother. He offered him money to disappear from his mother's life. Cristian took the money but didn't quit his job. Peter was not happy. I'm amazed that Mad Men even used this plot when The Good Wife had already done such a similar one, but perhaps they came up with it before The Good Wife aired theirs and it was just too far along in production to change it.
posted by orange swan at 10:26 AM on June 14, 2013


Previously.tv compared the two episodes side-by-side, and gave the advantage to The Good Wife.
posted by donajo at 1:27 PM on June 14, 2013


If that's a coincidence, it's an astounding one. I mean, both men are named Peter! Both have snobbish, high-handed and addled WASPy mothers! Both nurse companions are Spanish-speaking! The parallels are so many and so exact that I think it has to be a coincidence because no show would deliberately copy another like that, especially not one of the calibre of Mad Men.
posted by orange swan at 3:40 PM on June 14, 2013 [1 favorite]


The Good Wife does rip from the headlines though, albeit more COTW-like. Maybe Spanish nurses and elderly WASP ladies getting it on is a thing? Although it's more likely, as you said, sheer coincidence.
posted by moody cow at 2:59 AM on June 15, 2013


T minus an hour and 13 minutes. Bust out the short shorts.

(Assuming this is still the MM thread of record... yes?)
posted by flyingsquirrel at 5:49 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


(Assuming this is still the MM thread of record... yes?)

There is another thread, but I for one would prefer to keep the general chatter to this already-pretty-general thread.
posted by Sys Rq at 6:45 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm eating pizza and fresh from four seasons of Supernatural this is now the Mad Men thread.
posted by The Whelk at 6:46 PM on June 16, 2013


Ha, we're almost finished watching "Terminator 2" on Netflix. It's like having dessert before dinner.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 6:47 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


LETS DO THIS
posted by The Whelk at 6:51 PM on June 16, 2013


I agree this is the thread k thanks
posted by sweetkid at 6:51 PM on June 16, 2013


I predict lots of vague things will happen to rich white people and it will be meaningful, or not.
posted by The Whelk at 6:55 PM on June 16, 2013 [4 favorites]


And Don will say "What?"
posted by flyingsquirrel at 6:56 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also True Blood is on after and seriously they should have a crossover.

Just imagine the Pam and Joan interaction.
posted by The Whelk at 6:57 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


If what might happen does end up happening, can we please call it CAMPSON?
posted by Sys Rq at 6:57 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don Draper is a Whatosaurus.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:00 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Did anyone bring juice?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:01 PM on June 16, 2013


"Something has to change"

*breathes into paper bag*
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:01 PM on June 16, 2013


Who are these Jaquemettons and why does it take two of them to write this?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:01 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Okay I've fallen asleep on the couch cause I didn't want to wake SO by getting into bed, what?
posted by The Whelk at 7:02 PM on June 16, 2013


You look terrible.
posted by The Whelk at 7:02 PM on June 16, 2013


he really does look terrible.
posted by sweetkid at 7:03 PM on June 16, 2013


NO ONE SHOOT KEN
posted by The Whelk at 7:03 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


They have showers in 1968, right?
posted by dry white toast at 7:03 PM on June 16, 2013


OH SHIT!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:03 PM on June 16, 2013


WHAT
posted by sweetkid at 7:04 PM on June 16, 2013


... Too late?
posted by rewil at 7:04 PM on June 16, 2013


OMG, they killed Kenny!
posted by dry white toast at 7:04 PM on June 16, 2013 [10 favorites]


Okay I've fallen asleep on the couch cause I didn't want to wake SO by getting into bed, what?

He was asleep on Sally's bed.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:04 PM on June 16, 2013


It concerns Sally.
posted by The Whelk at 7:05 PM on June 16, 2013


Father's Day episode. Interesting.
posted by sweetkid at 7:06 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Aw, Vaughn Meader.
posted by rewil at 7:08 PM on June 16, 2013


get your hand outta my face.
posted by The Whelk at 7:08 PM on June 16, 2013


Why are people still talking when Ken's been shot? These Jaquemettons are minions of Beelzebub.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:08 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Why did I tell you that?
posted by The Whelk at 7:09 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


No one loves Harry.
posted by rewil at 7:09 PM on June 16, 2013


Oh Rosemary's Baby callback.
posted by sweetkid at 7:10 PM on June 16, 2013


ROSEMARY'S BABY
posted by The Whelk at 7:10 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don Draper has a judgey face!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:10 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


I like how Megan was all OMG
posted by sweetkid at 7:11 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


That building is the Dakota and Yoko Ono lives there
posted by The Whelk at 7:11 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


So is it me or does Megan dressing way older?
posted by dry white toast at 7:11 PM on June 16, 2013


MEGAN I AM HAVING FEELS FOR YOU. This isn't fair, she's trying so hard.
posted by sweetkid at 7:12 PM on June 16, 2013


Well I for one, am not drinking Minnie's drink any more.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:12 PM on June 16, 2013


No one eat the chocolate moose
posted by The Whelk at 7:13 PM on June 16, 2013


Okay, so now please to be explaining what happened to Ken.
posted by dry white toast at 7:13 PM on June 16, 2013


As much as it also fills me with a sense of doom, seeing both Peggy and Ted all smiles fills me with happy.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:15 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pirate Ken!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:16 PM on June 16, 2013


Hot.
posted by rewil at 7:16 PM on June 16, 2013


KEN
posted by The Whelk at 7:16 PM on June 16, 2013


Fact: The tears of Ken Cosgrove cure cancer.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:17 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hey, how about Bob Benson to handle Chevy.
posted by dry white toast at 7:18 PM on June 16, 2013


Not dead, just Cheneyed.
posted by gladly at 7:18 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, send Pete. He can shoot back.
posted by rewil at 7:18 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


THAT'S A 22
posted by The Whelk at 7:20 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Nononononononononononononono. STEP AWAY FROM BOB.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:22 PM on June 16, 2013


Yes, this is Bob Benson's moment to shine.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:22 PM on June 16, 2013


We are always finding someone who likes Bob
posted by The Whelk at 7:22 PM on June 16, 2013


JUST KEEP SHAKING THAT HAND
posted by The Whelk at 7:23 PM on June 16, 2013


Bob Benson will cut a Pete.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:23 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


WOW. BOB. WOW.
posted by sweetkid at 7:23 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


Bob's backbone is quite fetching.
posted by gladly at 7:24 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


PALINDROMES
posted by sweetkid at 7:24 PM on June 16, 2013


Bob Benson is gaslighting Pete.
posted by dry white toast at 7:24 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hell hath no fury like a bob scorned apparently.
posted by The Whelk at 7:24 PM on June 16, 2013


It's Superbob!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:24 PM on June 16, 2013


The one-eyed man watches us all.
posted by rewil at 7:26 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


KEN MUST NOW GO TO THE ODINSLEEP
posted by The Whelk at 7:26 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Why would they be sharing a hotel room? They should have their own (this was also an AskMe)
posted by sweetkid at 7:28 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Meghan is wearing Red which means she is going to give birth to a cacodemon.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:28 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


DUCK! No really, it's Duck.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:29 PM on June 16, 2013


BOB BENSON SPEAKS PERFECT SPANISH YOU GUYS
posted by The Whelk at 7:30 PM on June 16, 2013 [7 favorites]


Ted and Peggy are such nerds
posted by sweetkid at 7:31 PM on June 16, 2013


"Hijo de puta!"

I think I dislocated my jaw, it dropped so fast.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:31 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


YOU'RE THE BABY DON
posted by The Whelk at 7:31 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


OMG I want to see outtakes from this scene
posted by sweetkid at 7:31 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


BUDGET. You have to send a producer with them dammit.
posted by sweetkid at 7:32 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Slam that door Pete, you know how unlovable you are.
posted by The Whelk at 7:34 PM on June 16, 2013


When did Mad Men turn into The Crush?
posted by dry white toast at 7:35 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, totally starting up the talented mr. Benson theory.
posted by The Whelk at 7:35 PM on June 16, 2013 [5 favorites]


Team Bob Benson Conspiracy.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:36 PM on June 16, 2013


Also, totally starting up the talented mr. Benson theory.

Totally.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:37 PM on June 16, 2013


Sally is trapped in an episode of Gossip Girls.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:40 PM on June 16, 2013


OH GOD IS ONE OF THEM A DEMON?
posted by The Whelk at 7:40 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Sally is trapped in an episode of Gossip Girls.

It's just Girl singular Gossip Girl
posted by sweetkid at 7:41 PM on June 16, 2013


GLEN!!
posted by dry white toast at 7:41 PM on June 16, 2013


Jesus, I hate Glen.
posted by gladly at 7:42 PM on June 16, 2013


I KNOW HOW TO MAKE A TOM COLLINS
posted by The Whelk at 7:42 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


She knows how to make a Tom Collins because of her fine Draper upbringing....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:43 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Wait Glen got a little hot.
posted by sweetkid at 7:43 PM on June 16, 2013 [5 favorites]


If I was a 15 year old girl I would like Glen
posted by The Whelk at 7:43 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Oh ho, Mr. Bob.
posted by rewil at 7:44 PM on June 16, 2013


THE TALENTED MR. BENSON IS ON!!!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:44 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


Great Caesar's Ghost Mr. The Whelk was right!
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:44 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


OH GOD OH GOD BEN IS NOT BEN HE IS KENNETH FROM THRITY ROCK OH GOD
posted by The Whelk at 7:44 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


THE TALENTED MISTER BENSON
posted by The Whelk at 7:45 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


"I have...DRAPER"
posted by sweetkid at 7:45 PM on June 16, 2013


Wow, I wondered a few episodes ago if Bob was another Dick Whitman. WOW.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:45 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Glen's still a bad actor though.
posted by sweetkid at 7:46 PM on June 16, 2013


"Diplomacy Club" IS SO ON
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:46 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


SHE'S LIKE 15 DUDE
posted by The Whelk at 7:47 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sally wins.
posted by dry white toast at 7:47 PM on June 16, 2013


Love Sally's smile. That apple does not fall far from the tree...
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:48 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


I DON'T WANT TROUBLE TO HAPPEN TO SALLY
posted by The Whelk at 7:48 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


That Rollo is bad news. He is going to grow up to be a manservant.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:49 PM on June 16, 2013


So is this season it for Bob Benson? WAH.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:50 PM on June 16, 2013


My love for Sally is pure and wholesome.
posted by dry white toast at 7:50 PM on June 16, 2013


Sally has the weirdest life,
posted by The Whelk at 7:52 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Jon Hamm is busting out all of his face acting for this episode.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:54 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


no producer in this meeting grr
posted by sweetkid at 7:54 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


I know what you want to hear.
posted by box at 7:55 PM on June 16, 2013


Mr Plow? That name again is Mr Plow.
posted by sweetkid at 7:55 PM on June 16, 2013 [6 favorites]


Uuuuh don?
posted by The Whelk at 7:55 PM on June 16, 2013


He is not.
posted by rewil at 7:55 PM on June 16, 2013


Oh God don no
posted by The Whelk at 7:56 PM on June 16, 2013


Oh no you didn't Don Draper you did not just steal Peggy's CLIO.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:56 PM on June 16, 2013


Oh don you did so many awful things with one sentence.
posted by The Whelk at 7:57 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


Don's one to talk.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:57 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


IS THIS FANNFIC WHUT
posted by The Whelk at 7:58 PM on June 16, 2013


Mr. Plow does not approve.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:58 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


THIS IS NOW FANFIC
posted by The Whelk at 7:58 PM on June 16, 2013


Now all of those AMC Black Swan ads seem very timely....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:59 PM on June 16, 2013


Pete!
posted by box at 8:00 PM on June 16, 2013


FANFIC
posted by The Whelk at 8:00 PM on June 16, 2013


WHAT THE HELL
posted by The Whelk at 8:00 PM on June 16, 2013


PANFIC!
posted by Dr. Zira at 8:01 PM on June 16, 2013


Pete now owns Bob.
posted by dry white toast at 8:01 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Pete learned something and modified his behavior slightly! This is a big day!
posted by rewil at 8:01 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


What the I don't even

(No really)
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:01 PM on June 16, 2013


Sally wut oh god, FANFIC THIS IS FANFIC
posted by The Whelk at 8:02 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Here Sally, have some cancer YOU'VE EARNED IT.
posted by Dr. Zira at 8:02 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


You're a monster.
posted by The Whelk at 8:03 PM on June 16, 2013


Theme from head!
posted by The Whelk at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013


Closed Captioning tells me that (Porpoise Song) the theme from Head is playing. Don.
posted by peagood at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013


More awesome things from John Hamm's face.
posted by dry white toast at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Fetal position FTW.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013


Both the women Don really loves are rejecting him.
posted by sweetkid at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013 [4 favorites]


Cue 'Everybody Hurts.'
posted by box at 8:04 PM on June 16, 2013


Well, now I officially don't understand anything.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 8:05 PM on June 16, 2013


Exactly sweetkid.
posted by dry white toast at 8:05 PM on June 16, 2013


This is the original context of this week's closing music.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:06 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob Benson wants to do bad things with you.
posted by The Whelk at 8:10 PM on June 16, 2013


I'm starting to wonder if these MAYBE BOB'S NOT EVEN GAY people were right.
posted by sweetkid at 8:11 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Bob is going to be made by Philip Jeymour Hoffman
posted by The Whelk at 8:13 PM on June 16, 2013


I love how, in a single episode, Bob went from being two-dimensional to seventeen-dimensional. Shit got real, people.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:14 PM on June 16, 2013 [7 favorites]


James Wolk. One to watch. FANTASTIC work tonight.
posted by sweetkid at 8:16 PM on June 16, 2013 [4 favorites]


So, can someone please explain why Pete acquiesced the way he did? I get that he was referencing Don/Dick, but "I give up"? What would he lose by outing Bob's shady past? Is it the fear of being found out that he hired Bob without checking references?
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:19 PM on June 16, 2013


Bob's going to endorse a limited-edition Chrysler. Or maybe a Lincoln.
posted by box at 8:19 PM on June 16, 2013


So, can someone please explain why Pete acquiesced the way he did? I get that he was referencing Don/Dick, but "I give up"? What would he lose by outing Bob's shady past?

Besides his mother, you mean?
posted by Sys Rq at 8:21 PM on June 16, 2013


Besides his mother, you mean?

I don't get the sense that her welfare is what motivates him. But I don't know -- seriously, that whole scene confused the hell out of me.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:27 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


(Much in the same way Bob seemed confused, come to think of it.)
posted by flyingsquirrel at 8:27 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


So, who did hire Bob Benson?

I think Pete thinks he now has an evil minion with a secret that he can manipulate. He is seriously underestimating Bob.
posted by readery at 8:28 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


The question now is who will be the next hunting accident victim?
posted by Sys Rq at 8:30 PM on June 16, 2013


It seemed like finding out about the shady past changed his mind. I'm not sure why though - it didn't change anything for Draper when Pete told Cooper because it's Draper. With Bob, sure the others like him but enough to keep him on with all the lies? On a big account? But Pete's "i give in" seemed to imply he didn't believe he could get rid of the guy based on the Draper outing experience.
posted by sweetkid at 8:30 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


Did Don and Ted trade uniforms in the theatre? Odd to see Ted in a shirt and tie and Don in a turtleneck.
posted by peppermind at 8:37 PM on June 16, 2013


It seemed like finding out about the shady past changed his mind. I'm not sure why though - it didn't change anything for Draper when Pete told Cooper because it's Draper. With Bob, sure the others like him but enough to keep him on with all the lies? On a big account? But Pete's "i give in" seemed to imply he didn't believe he could get rid of the guy based on the Draper outing experience.

That's the way I read it as well. Plus Pete's got enough dirt on Bob to keep him at bay if things start to go bad. Pete can cause a lot of trouble for Bob if he chooses to or if his hand is forced.
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 8:37 PM on June 16, 2013


I think he's trying to get out of the situation with Bob what he failed to get out of the situation with Don. Don was too valuable to manipulate that way.

But Pete's calculation is that Bob is vulnerable enough to be controllable. Pete hasn't been able to control anything since the merger. But now he has Bob in his pocket.

But he's essentially gambling his future at the firm on it. And given that Bob will be the point man for their biggest account, and given how calculating Bob showed himself to be in tonight's episode, it's a pretty big fucking risk.
posted by dry white toast at 8:38 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


I was just reading Sepinwall's review, and his take on it matches my initial thoughts quite a bit.

It's a big thing for Pete -- he's approaching the situation differently, realizing that he doesn't have the social skills that Don or Bob have but this time he can maybe maneuver things so those skills can benefit him instead of work against him.

It is basically a douche move and the long term implications could hurt him badly, but then Pete can't change completely.
posted by rewil at 8:41 PM on June 16, 2013


Yeah it's a risk. How powerful will Bob become?
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks at 8:42 PM on June 16, 2013


Peggy's SC&P press note, on letterhead, via AMC's Mad Men Twitter account. Note the superseventieslicious new logo, featuring, of course, the color orange.

https://twitter.com/MadMen_AMC/status/346465039873626112
posted by mwhybark at 8:47 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Also True Blood is on after and seriously they should have a crossover.

Just imagine the Pam and Joan interaction.


The Entire Premise of True Blood Explained in 36 GIFs
posted by homunculus at 8:49 PM on June 16, 2013


A smidge about the Jacquemettons. From season 5.
posted by purpleclover at 8:49 PM on June 16, 2013


Peggy's SC&P press note, on letterhead, via AMC's Mad Men Twitter account. Note the superseventieslicious new logo, featuring, of course, the color orange.

Anyone else hoping she would just write "Adventurous Girls Do" and then dance around her apartment to Robyn?
posted by sweetkid at 8:53 PM on June 16, 2013 [3 favorites]


For the season finale, I'm putting my money on Dick Whitman truly catching up with Don. That's where we started the season, and I think the whole Bob thing is foreshadowing. Why bring a new character in just to repeat Don's narrative (granted it could just be for Pete-related plot development)? It only seems useful if it moves Don's narrative further along.

Alienating Sally and Peggy (and Megan) isn't going to get resolved in one episode, it will probably take most of next season. So the only thing left to do with Don this season is to lay every last thing bare. I think Megan will leave too.
posted by dry white toast at 9:11 PM on June 16, 2013


Dr. Zira: “Love Sally's smile. That apple does not fall far from the tree...”
I developed a new appreciation for Kiernan Shipka tonight. The face she makes when she pulls that lying-ass power move on Whatshisface to get Glen to beat him up. Her coy look to the side, eyelash bat, and nose wrinkle after the blonde said, "You like trouble, don't you?" Those are totally Betty moves, and Shipka pulled them off flawlessly. You can direct the motivation, but you can't direct that performance.
posted by ob1quixote at 9:16 PM on June 16, 2013 [2 favorites]


Peggy's SC&P press note, on letterhead, via AMC's Mad Men Twitter account. Note the superseventieslicious new logo, featuring, of course, the color orange.

Sorry, no I cannot accept a draft that does not start out "The firms of Margaret Olson and This Is Some Bullshit would like to announce ..."
posted by purpleclover at 9:17 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


"You like trouble, don't you?"

SALLY IS US
posted by Sys Rq at 9:34 PM on June 16, 2013


I'm mentally editing last week's "Next week on Mad Men" promo to feature Ted and Don crying like babies and Joan offering up chicken soup.
posted by palomar at 10:28 PM on June 16, 2013 [1 favorite]


There is some weird time stuff going on this season. So many callbacks to the past throughout, and now "Next week on Mad Men" is basically "Previously, on Mad Men."

Maybe it's a "what goes around, comes around" kind of thing, with a twist. Pete handles the Benson reveal just a little differently than he did with Don. Sally handles the discovery of her dad's betrayal by taking control instead of passively responding the way young Dick did in his day. So next on Mad Men is more of what we've seen before, but with a different outcome in these different times.

I have no idea what all this means, but, uh. Time. It's a thing.
posted by Superplin at 10:53 PM on June 16, 2013


Whelk was right about Miss Porter, but Madmen being Madmen, of course nothing is as it seems, and the sheer cruelty of those scenes, are unrelenting.
posted by PinkMoose at 11:41 PM on June 16, 2013


So, are we to infer that Sally planned the whole ordeal from the start -- telling her mom and the interviewer just what they wanted to hear to secure the overnight stay with no intentions of actually attending, and then playing innocent at first with the girls before eventually letting on that she could deliver boys, alcohol, and weed -- all just to have some party time on her own away from Betty and the mansion?

Or did she actually desire to attend the school so that she wouldn't have to make excuses not to see her dad any more, and was just really good at improvisation and manipulation when the reality of the interview became evident? I'm kind of leaning towards the latter.
posted by Rhomboid at 11:58 PM on June 16, 2013


the social circle was small enough for glenn to be part of it, and he did say keep in touch, which is ambigious, because we dont know how much sally has been in touch or not.
posted by PinkMoose at 12:03 AM on June 17, 2013


Did anyone else's heart make a leap when the school director used Carla's name? I mean, it could have happened, right? I was all like OMG CARLA SALLY REUNION

But no.

I am also completely confused about what happened with Pete and Bob. Will have to rewatch.
posted by jokeefe at 12:43 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


given how calculating Bob showed himself to be in tonight's episode

How calculating did Bob actually show himself to be? I'm not so sure about that. He was very pissed at Pete when Pete tried to get him off Chevy, yes, but he had reason to be. He denied having come on to Pete, but we all knew he'd aimed for plausible deniability, and obviously the come-on didn't go over well. He has a CV "like steam," but does that make him a bad guy? He could just be a poor kid from the sticks who did what he had to do to make a go of it, no? And gay to boot, things can't have been easy for him in Va or WV or wherever he came from. He was ready to run when Pete confronted him with his background; but what else would he do?

Also, I'm gonna say, and maybe I'm completely CRAZY, but I thought there was serious chemistry between B&P in that last scene. Not that Pete knew it exactly (or was aiming for it), but it was there. I could be nuts; mighta been all the Ted and Peggy love in the air.
posted by torticat at 12:54 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


So, are we to infer that Sally planned the whole ordeal from the start -- telling her mom and the interviewer just what they wanted to hear to secure the overnight stay with no intentions of actually attending

Why would she not be attending? I thought everything looked good on that front.

As for how the night played out, I don't think she planned anything, just called Glen for a favor when she needed it.

I LOVE Glen. Have never understood all the hate for that awesome kid. How could Sally have a better friend? He's always there for her, he understands her, he converses with her and never tries to push their friendship into anything icky. Love him.
posted by torticat at 1:02 AM on June 17, 2013 [5 favorites]


Here's how I understand the pieces to fit together.

Bob says, "I don't care how nice she is," when he's speaking on the phone in Spanish and calling Pete a son of a bitch. Later, Pete's mother shows up at the office and reports that she ran into Manolo, who asked her to implore Pete to stop treating Bob badly. Therefore, I think we can assume that Manolo was the person Bob was speaking with and "she" is Pete's mother. The two of them (Bob and Manolo) are likely in some kind of relationship, as they both are advocating for each other -- Bob trying to finagle a severance deal from Pete, and Manolo using Pete's mother to convince him to let Bob continue working on the big accounts. This would mean that Bob's flirty knee thing in the previous episode was more about appealing to Pete's ego and his need for admiration/attention/love/respect/whatever than it was about having any kind of actual romantic feelings for him.

You can tell that Bob has gotten this read on Pete because even when he's being busted for fraud, he still gets in that line about "it was the best day of my life, that day you complemented me on my tie." As an aside, I think that Pete was probably a contributing factor to his hiring in the sense that he didn't raise any overt objections when meeting him, but he probably was not the one that actually signed any paperwork or anything. Bob is again manipulating Pete by suggesting that he was responsible, because he doesn't yet know that Pete isn't going to fire him and so he's grasping for anything that might convince him to keep it quiet. He knows that Pete probably wouldn't even remember a single thing about the hiring or interview process regardless of how much participation he had.

Ultimately I think that all this manipulation was successful. Pete realizes that he can get what he actually wants -- the avoidance of any kind of further sexual advances from Bob ("I'm off limits!") -- without having to risk anything that's associated with a firing for fraud, such as the embarrassment of the hiring process. It helps that he was burned in this situation in the past, and thematically it of course ties in to the rest of the episode, but I think ultimately it was just a mental excuse that Pete allowed himself; his reasoning certainly made no sense whatsoever to Bob. It really is Pete's best case scenario to allow Bob to continue working with him. He gets his ego stroked in that way that only Bob Benson can, the partners will see it as Pete just putting aside his grievances and getting along, the client will be happy with continuity, the sexual advances will go away, there is no chance for blame or recrimination, and he can continue using the threat of exposure for future gains, if necessary. Both parties end up getting what they wanted out of this deal.
posted by Rhomboid at 1:12 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


Why would she not be attending?

A young girl volunteering to abandon her entire social circle and go off to a boarding school where she won't know anyone and will ostensibly be under stricter rules and scrutiny? I always imagined that as being something that was forced on a kid for bad behavior or for other reasons outside of their control. It's a very cynical read, that she would go to all the trouble of setting up the interview as an excuse for a party without the intention of following through. And as I said, it's probably wrong.
posted by Rhomboid at 1:25 AM on June 17, 2013


Also, I'm gonna say, and maybe I'm completely CRAZY, but I thought there was serious chemistry between B&P in that last scene. Not that Pete knew it exactly (or was aiming for it), but it was there.

You're not alone, especially when Pete stepped forward. I'm really sad that Wolk has committed to something else and will likely not be around much next season. The variety of tensions that are building up around Pete and Bob, the nuance we're finally seeing in Bob's character, just don't seem like things that can be resolved in one more episode unless the whole damn thing is about him.

A lot of people here get credit for calling Bob's backstory (including -- I assume this is the intended reading of the "manservant" thing -- the relationship with an older executive who served as his entry into this world).

Why do I admire Sally for entering the world of nasty excess and power-tripping that I admire Ken for leaving? Part of it is that, with her mind and the connections she's going to make at that school, she's going to get the power her mother never had, and that seems right. Whatever Betty said about Sally getting what Betty wanted for herself, it might've been the first time I've ever seen a mother say a line like that in fiction and had good feelings about it -- partly because, whatever Betty's flaws as a parent, she's neither a pushy stage mom nor someone who'd undermine her daughter out of envy. Sally made this decision for herself, and Betty falls into step with her, using all of her skills and connections to help make it happen.

I suppose the Avon thing worked out (and we were just meant to assume it worked out), because Joan is acting as an accounts person with St. Joseph's, right? She's helping plan the pitch, closely involved with the budget, present at the meeting, stepping in with the traditional "I'll show you out" at the end.

There was just so much "holy shit" this week that I feel barely able to react to Peggy's "you're a monster," which was mind-blowing and felt like the cumulation of their whole arc together -- the cumulation of the series. Where can things even go from here, apart from firings and quittings and actual deaths?
posted by thesmallmachine at 2:00 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


This would mean that Bob's flirty knee thing in the previous episode was more about appealing to Pete's ego and his need for admiration/attention/love/respect/whatever than it was about having any kind of actual romantic feelings for him.

That doesn't explain Bob's interest in Pete through the whole season, before Manolo came on the scene. Pete's been really down and out--talking to Duck about other job possibilities, pleading with Peggy not to pity him for god's sake. Not that Bob knows all that, but certainly Pete's not presently the kind of power player at SC&P that an ambitious schemer would try to attach himself to. I don't think there's any explanation for Bob's interest in Pete except for a personal one (and I actually believe the story about the tie).

Bob and Manolo might have had some kind of relationship in the past, but my read is they're just friends now. Bob didn't exactly finagle that severance on purpose; he'd segued to his own interests by that point in the conversation, and was lucky Pete turned things back to Manolo and offered the severance instead of punching him in the face.
posted by torticat at 3:24 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think ultimately it was just a mental excuse that Pete allowed himself

Coulda been a mental excuse covering up for the latent attraction Pete feels toward Bob. ;)
posted by torticat at 3:31 AM on June 17, 2013


At the very least, Bob was calculating enough that he has ambitions, saw Pete as standing in his way, and used Manolo to try to deal with Pete.

An again I say, nothing in the history of the cast and the show suggests that Wolk getting a regular spot on a series means he can't still be involved in the show next season. But beyond that, yes, while the Bob storyline has been fascinating, you have to admit it's taken a way screen time from a lot of other characters, particularly Joan. There's a trade off to making him prominent.
posted by dry white toast at 3:52 AM on June 17, 2013


I haven't minded the Bob screen time because Wolk is great but also because his time involves Pete, and Vincent Kartheiser is so fantastic. And I'd far prefer to watch him locking antlers with Bob than having an affair with that moon-eyed what's-her-name.

Re: Joan, I was trying to think last night which characters the finale will focus on, and I think Joan & Avon will be revisited. And maybe we'll get a bit more on Ginsberg and his mental problems? I'm guessing we're done with Betty and Sally for the season. Though I suppose we could see the crisis when Betty finds out what's eating Sally, which is probably inevitable, but I hope it's next year.

Definitely hoping Ted & Peggy will stay in the spotlight. That "you're a monster" line was, as thesmallmachine said, devastating.
posted by torticat at 4:50 AM on June 17, 2013


Hard to say with Betty and Sally. Betty was obviously still feeling chemistry with Don in their phone call. Plus, she was wearing a total Betty Draper dress. But we probably won't get anything more than hints.

Don's running theme of trying to make problems go away with money continues. When Betty raises boarding school, Don immediately jumps in with "I'll pay for it!" Dude does not know how to create, sustain, and particularly rebuild emotional connections with people.

The fascinating contrast to me between Peggy's and Sally's renouncement of Don was that, in Peggy's case, Don was genuinely trying to help her. My sense of his relationship with her was that he mentored her but didn't protect her from the sometimes ugly realities of the ad business, because protecting her wouldn't do her any favours. In most of her confrontations with Don this season, I've been on her side, but this time I was totally on Don's. But he still pays essentially the same price for being right as being wrong.
posted by dry white toast at 5:05 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


protecting her wouldn't do her any favours

I agree that Don was in the right, both in a business sense and in a mentor sense as you say. However--he wasn't completely thinking with his head either. There was no need to humiliate Ted; that had more to do with Don's jealousy, and he had to know it was going to alienate Peggy. I think the price he paid with her wasn't so much for messing with the account but for the brutal way he went about taking Ted apart.
posted by torticat at 5:18 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


In most of her confrontations with Don this season, I've been on her side, but this time I was totally on Don's. But he still pays essentially the same price for being right as being wrong.

I think he's more paying the price for the way he handled it. Instead of sending the budget over during casting and then giving Ted an anxiety attack as he ambiguously unfolded his secret plan to save the meeting (which he did, as much as it could have been saved) he could have handled it in a much less dramatic fashion.

First, he could have pulled Ted aside privately after he realized his feelings for Peggy were affecting the work/budgeting negatively and had more or less the same talk with him they had after the meeting. Then after Ted had time to digest that, have Ted deliver the new budget to the client and hear his and Peggy's plan to address the client's objections in the meeting (Jim Cutler would also be in this meeting). After listening to their ideas propose the radical last-resort "dead partner" strategy to be used only if all else fails. Even modify the story so that Peggy co-created the idea so she can still get the CLIO. Jim was all for jumping on the idea when it seemed to be working. Then Don doesn't even have to be in the meeting. Ted and Jim and Peggy can take care of the whole thing.

Instead, he did it the way he did it to maximize chaos and confusion and to give Ted a heart attack in the meeting. And not just to help Peggy but to destroy Ted. He puts his plans in motion as soon as he can after seeing them at the movies when he calls Harry Crane back. Previous to that he nixes the Tropicana deal, tries to start being focused with Megan by going to the movies. After the movies his focus moves entirely to Ted and everything else is left behind.
posted by mikepop at 5:29 AM on June 17, 2013


Also, I caught the groovy new logo on the wall of the office but thanks for the letterhead link! Notice how Cooper is being squeezed out already. As much as he is seen as irrelevant to the firm's operations these days I wouldn't be surprised to see him die before the show ends and this death be a catalyst for things falling (further) apart.
posted by mikepop at 5:33 AM on June 17, 2013


Rhomboid: "A young girl volunteering to abandon her entire social circle and go off to a boarding school where she won't know anyone and will ostensibly be under stricter rules and scrutiny? I always imagined that as being something that was forced on a kid for bad behavior or for other reasons outside of their control. "

Actually, I would have killed for the opportunity to get way from my parents, even if it meant all those things, because my mother was cray cray and my father ineffectual. But in the context of the show, for all we have seen of Sally's social circle, the girl from last week's episode was not portrayed as a particularly close or desirable friend. Whereas Glen, who was banished from her life by Betty, turns out to be a true friend. Rocking up with the booze and the dope, giving her cred with the mean girls and coming to her defense against his own friend.

Also, rules or scrutiny is not what I think Sally wants to get away from. She hates her mother, because she's awful to her, which is not news to us. But now she also wants to get away from her father who in last week's epi shattered whatever faith she had left in parental figures -- and adults in general, I imagine.
posted by moody cow at 5:39 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


The kicker with Don's little stunt at the meeting (and it really was a low point even for Don - it was practically grave-robbing) is that now Peggy can't get the credit she deserves for waht everybody recognizes as a great ad.

Add the side dish of hypocrisy (Don's spent how many years getting the life or death of the firm caught in his zipper?) and he deserved Peggy calling him a monster.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:46 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


It's Monday morning why has the Internet not yet delivered Don Draper "Waaaaaa" gifs?
posted by Dr. Zira at 5:50 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


I cannot see how Don was "helping" Peggy. The concept for the commercial was hers, and she hoped it was good enough that she'd get a Clio for it. Then Don claimed in the meeting that the idea was Frank Gleason's idea. Now Peggy won't get any credit for her idea outside the firm. She won't be getting the Clio even if the commercial wins one, and she can't even put the commercial in her book.

I think it's true that Ted needed a wake up call about the effect his feelings for Peggy was having on his work, but Don should have taken him aside and spoken to him privately about it. Instead he pulled the rug out from under Ted and Peggy in a way that devastated Ted and made Peggy hate him. Don's own feelings for Peggy blinded him here, and as Peggy said, he can't handle the fact that Ted's a good man. Don saw something he couldn't have and that threatened him, and his response was to try to destroy it. It was, as Peggy said, monstrous.
posted by orange swan at 5:51 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


This episode was like 80% ominous smiles.
posted by The Whelk at 6:09 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Dr. Zira, will this do?
posted by peppermind at 6:18 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


I love that Betty's finally happy. We're actually seeing her doing some decent parenting now. Singing Father Abraham with her son — when have we ever seen her doing anything playful with Bobby? She's actually trying to ferret out the reasons for Sally not wanting to see her father and thinking about her well-being ("I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing"). She was trying to talk to Don about it in an effort remedy the situation, though of course he was no help. And while she isn't entirely happy about the idea of Sally going to boarding school (what mother would be), she remembers that she wanted to go herself and doesn't want to thwart Sally's goals for herself as her own were thwarted, and so she does her best to help her get accepted. She was proudly quoting Henry's opinion that Sally could be an ambassador. I'm actually really impressed with that — a 1968 housewife hoping for a political career for her daughter? That's awesome.

Then in the car with Sally, Betty was really trying to talk to her, and being quite patient with Sally's attitude. She may even have actually succeeded in getting Sally to tell her a few things about the school by first telling her what the headmistress had said about Sally. Betty will never be the mother of the year, but I think we may see her become a half-decent one, that she'll do better with her teenaged children than she did when they were grade school-aged, because she's so much happier and because she finds them more interesting.

The scenery in the Betty and Sally car ride looked so fake.

I kept waiting for Sally to get busted during the dorm room scene. Boys, booze and pot in your room the first night at school, Sally? Pace yourself, honey. I love that you were tough enough to turn down that boy, and get him beat down when he was a pig about it. Don't lose that confidence or that insistence on what you want.

Glen's actually a stand-up guy who genuinely cares about Sally. I still think Marten Holden Weiner can't act worth beans, though.

Poor Ken! I hope he doesn't lose his eye. Good for him for refusing to deal with those Chevy pricks. ("They wanted to stop the ambulance to have lunch!")

Poor Megan. She's trying so hard to save her marriage, and Don's just dead weight. You can't row that boat alone, babe.

Can't wait for more revelations about Bob Benson. Because you know there's more there.

I'm waiting for the spin offs: Bob Benson, Clean-Cut Man of Mystery, and Duck Phillips, P.I..
posted by orange swan at 6:38 AM on June 17, 2013 [6 favorites]


Oh, and...

Don: What, did you find a hooker who will take a traveler's check?"

Harry: [muttering] I should never have told you about that.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!
posted by orange swan at 6:40 AM on June 17, 2013 [15 favorites]


The scenery in the Betty and Sally car ride looked so fake.

They used authentic period green screen techniques.
posted by mikepop at 6:47 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


I think it's true that Ted needed a wake up call about the effect his feelings for Peggy was having on his work

And Peggy didn't need a wake up call about the same problem? I see what people are saying about how it could have been handled differently, and recognition for Peggy's idea. Fair points all, but having Ted think all of Peggy's ideas are great (which he was doing with everything, not just St. Joseph's) isn't actually a constructive creative process or business strategy.

It's interesting thinking about how badly Don has done in pitch/client meetings this year. That's historically when he's been on the ball, regardless of whatever else is happening in his life. But starting with the Hilton meeting in the season premiere, the boundaries he used to be able to draw between personal drama and business have crumbled.
posted by dry white toast at 6:49 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


They used authentic period green screen techniques.

The scene earlier this season with Don and Ted in the plane was also shot in a way that made it look like a period film. I felt like I was watching North by Northwest. It's a nice touch that they add every once in a while.
posted by dry white toast at 6:51 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


Tom and Lorenzo's and the A.V. Club's recaps of "The Quality of Mercy" are up.
posted by orange swan at 7:00 AM on June 17, 2013


but the odd twist at the last second into a psychosexual master-slave scenario is utterly mind-blowing. Pete may act like he’s repulsed by Bob’s proclivities, but he’s clearly delighted to have his own little gay Don Draper doll to do as he’s told. We were in love with our “Best Little Boy in the World” theory of the character but we have to admit, this twist is infinitely more interesting – and as far away from Sal Romano as the show could possibly get in devising a new gay male character.

I kept thinking we where going to go to a very dark "The Servant" Dick Brograde place there.
posted by The Whelk at 7:06 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


When Sally went to the blond girl's bedroom door, I was sure she was about to walk in on another couple in flagrante.

Also, how adorable was Pete's "Annie Oakley" comment to Hildy?
posted by The Underpants Monster at 7:16 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]



Tom and Lorenzo's and the A.V. Club's recaps of "The Quality of Mercy" are up
.

Blech, Freud.


Ok, I'll read on.
posted by sweetkid at 7:19 AM on June 17, 2013


AV's reviews really seem like a stream of consciousness sometimes, considering how Todd spends several paragraphs on Shakespeare and Freud. Though he also references Nixonland which I happen to be reading along with this season, and it's a great companion book. I second the recommendation.

Also strongly agree with his point that Don's been adrift since Anna died, which I've mentioned in the past. She was what allowed him to resolve his internal contradiction, or at least hold both parts of himself in tension and keep it together, even if he still caught others in his wake. He thought Megan could do that for him, but not so much. Maybe that hasn't really been on option since "nobody loves Dick Whitman."
posted by dry white toast at 7:39 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


TLo's recap is pretty good, I'd say. And they were fairly humorous about acknowledging the flaws in their assessment last week, which I commented on in the other thread.

Regarding the Clio, do we really know that Don endangered Peggy's shot at it? She's still credited with the ad; does it matter where the inspiration for the idea came from?

He thought Megan could do that for him, but not so much

That's a nice observation, dwt. Poor long-suffering Megan. It would be good for her sake if she "woke the fuck up" as TLo said, but I'd rather see Don change his ways and give her the relationship she deserves. Not that that's likely. But I really do like them together. For all the angsting way back about their marriage, she interacts with him in a mature and compassionate way, and I think he truly admires her.
posted by torticat at 7:50 AM on June 17, 2013


why do I keep thinking of Tina Fey shouting "No! Me baby!" on 30 Rock wrt this week's episode?

Happy Father's Day Don Draper! You're a monster!

Also, pet theory, Megan is putting up with this and being the best damn enabler ever cause she's covering the guilt she feels for an affair of her own thats going on in the background.
posted by The Whelk at 8:00 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


I love Sally and Glenn. The two of them are totally going to run off and get married as soon as Sally's legal.

I had a dream last night that the show ends with Pete and Bob founding Benson & Campbell. It was a good dream.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:02 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I love Sally and Glenn. The two of them are totally going to run off and get married as soon as Sally's legal.

No, no they're not.

For one thing, I think they're friends (although I feel like he's only being shoehorned in here because he's Weiner's son, which is really annoying). Also, I don't think Sally is getting married as soon as she's legal. I mean, that will be 1972. She'll be on her way to college. Getting married as an upper class young woman from Rye/Manhattan...nope. Not just about Glen, I've seen "Sally's getting married at 18" come up a few times and it seems weirdly gendered and off character to me.

I had a dream last night that the show ends with Pete and Bob founding Benson & Campbell. It was a good dream.

I'd be cool with this.
posted by sweetkid at 8:07 AM on June 17, 2013


I love Sally and Glenn. The two of them are totally going to run off and get married as soon as Sally's legal.

I think I saw someone comment here that Sally's smirk when Glen attacks his friend was one of manipulation, but it came off to me as feeling special that he was defending her. How did others see it?

I mean, remember this is coming off the moment where she feels utterly abandoned by the man who she thought was looking after her. And here she has someone protecting her after all. I enjoy that Sally and Glen are clear on what their relationship is and isn't. I thought for sure Sally would feel betrayed when Glen went off with the other girl, but A) she seemed cool with it, and B) he put her safety over getting lucky...something her own father can barely be bothered to do.
posted by dry white toast at 8:11 AM on June 17, 2013 [5 favorites]


I think I saw someone comment here that Sally's smirk when Glen attacks his friend was one of manipulation, but it came off to me as feeling special that he was defending her. How did others see it?

I read it as her feeling special. She's hooked up with boys before, and she and Glenn keep protesting that they're like siblings, but (despite young Weiner's acting), they have pretty palpable chemistry. It feels mostly like something Glenn is doing to save face, largely because he never gives Sally the time or space to actually react to her, at least not in their last few encounters. But her actions (asking Megan for relationship advice, goading Glenn into defending her) suggest she actually likes him. And his actions suggest that too.

I don't think her getting married young is at all off-character or inaccurate for the times. Sally is rebellious, in small and significant ways. Getting married to someone her mother hates (who is nevertheless fairly uppercrust and well-educated herself) would be one easy and appropriate mode of rebellion, of taking charge of both her life and her sexuality in a way that would send a clear message to her parents. And it doesn't preclude her being college educated, either.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:19 AM on June 17, 2013


Can be a prequel series where we just follow a 20 year old Bob around the capitals of Europe
posted by The Whelk at 8:21 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


Oh, and I think it's unclear whether Sally was okay or not with Glenn and the blonde hooking up. She interrupts them, after all. Though I would have probably, too, if I got stuck with Rollo.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:24 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


They used authentic period green screen techniques.

The scene earlier this season with Don and Ted in the plane was also shot in a way that made it look like a period film. I felt like I was watching North by Northwest. It's a nice touch that they add every once in a while.


North by Northwest, and other movies of the period, used rear projection (basically a movie screen outside the window) for that sort of thing. It generally looked like obvious phony shit, but it would have looked better than this horrible green screen, where you can see the blurry halo around Betty's face, and where the passing foliage seems to stutter for some reason.

I think it's a little too generous to attribute it to homage when it's clearly just half-assed corner-cutting.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:25 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah I don't like the evaluation of Sally as being all manipulative in that scene--she's also described as lying about the other boy "forcing himself on her." Which, I dunno, she could have been being sly, but I thought she was genuinely feeling cornered and a little scared. She definitely didn't want to fool around, and the kid wasn't taking no for an answer.

Her smirk might have been a bit bloodthirsty, but poor kid, she's entitled.

However, here's a question, last episode she and her friend were talking about getting to second base and all that. You'd think Sally might be curious enough to want to fool around just to get the experience. So why does she refuse: because at heart she's young and doesn't feel ready, and she's centered enough to say "no" instead of giving in (yay sally); or because what she saw with Don and Sylvia soured her on the whole idea (sad sally)? I hope the "frigid" comment wasn't supposed to point to the latter.
posted by torticat at 8:27 AM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


I think Sally's handling of the boarding school situation should lay to rest any thoughts about Sally turning on and dropping out. Whatever baggage her parents have given her, she knew how to keep her wits about her. I mean, she could have gone Pete's route and blazed up, but instead she used her access to boys, drugs, and booze to get what she needed out of the situation. Up until now, I thought Sally was heading for a Lindsay Weir ending. Instead I think this episode points to her being an ambitious and cold woman who will eat anyone in her way. Not that that's not a damaged outcome in its own way.

For torticat's question, I think it's a little from column A, a little from column B. Her exposure to grown up sex has so far been strongly negative.
posted by dry white toast at 8:31 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


On non-preview: Sally's hooked up with boys before? I don't remember that.
posted by torticat at 8:32 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


According to the conversation with her friend, she's kissed boys. Which we've seen, but I took it (maybe incorrectly) as meaning something more recent than that. "Hooking up" doesn't necessarily mean sex. I just meant that she's probably made out with some dudes.

I just thought she really didn't like the guy.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:35 AM on June 17, 2013


I think I saw someone comment here that Sally's smirk when Glen attacks his friend was one of manipulation, but it came off to me as feeling special that he was defending her. How did others see it?

I think that whole scene was about jealousy re: Glen and what's-her-face. While Glen thinks of Sally as a sister, I think Sally has other ideas about the nature of their relationship. So, as much as that other dude was for real a total sleaze that she needed to get away from, going and knocking on the door was more about getting Glen out of there, and would have happened even if the guy was a dreamboat and a gentleman. And then Glen was all heroic and she was all "He does love me!"

Not like that, Sally. :(
posted by Sys Rq at 8:35 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ha, that's funny because I totally read Glenn as being into Sally, just defensive of her possible rejection of him.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:37 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Sally and Glen have set their relationship status as "It's complicated" on Facebook.
posted by dry white toast at 8:41 AM on June 17, 2013 [12 favorites]


Yea, I totally think Glen sees Sally as a sister.
posted by sweetkid at 8:44 AM on June 17, 2013


I've seen "Sally's getting married at 18" come up a few times and it seems weirdly gendered and off character to me.

I don't know about gendered, but, yeah, I'd be surprised if Sally ever got married. She must have built up some pretty hardcore cynicism about the institution by now that I don't see her shaking anytime soon.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:45 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ha, that's funny because I totally read Glenn as being into Sally, just defensive of her possible rejection of him.

Yeah, that could work too.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:50 AM on June 17, 2013


I'm taking bets that Bob has an engraved personalized silver cigarette case given to him by his old "boss".

I'm willing to believe he has several
posted by The Whelk at 8:50 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Ha, that's funny because I totally read Glenn as being into Sally, just defensive of her possible rejection of him.

If that's true, he's missed some pretty glaring signals.
posted by dry white toast at 8:53 AM on June 17, 2013


I might be reading into it having had a really similar friendship/flirtation throughout my adolescence with a boy who actually looked a lot like Glen Bishop. Our failure to ever do anything more than hold hands was clearly rooted in an adolescent failure to communicate and terror over rejection, but in retrospect we pretty obviously wanted to jump each other's bones. Being a teenager is hard.

Of course, there's a pretty narrow window for that kind of relationship. If it doesn't happen past, say, age eighteen, GB will totally be relegated to odd family friend who Sally laughs about to her college friends to save face.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 8:59 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


From T&Lo: We’re not so sure Peggy’s Rosemary’s Baby ad was as Clio-worthy as Ted said. For one, it was creepy as hell. For another, ads based entirely on current pop culture references aren’t what one would consider a masterpiece of the form. Plop-plop, Fizz-fizz is a masterpiece because it was wholly original and ran for over a decade. Peggy’s St. Joseph’s Aspirin ad would be dated within 6 months. And we question whether any mother would find the ad, with its references to demonic babies, as comforting as it should be. It’s bold, certainly; but it strikes us as the wrong ad for that client.

Yep. Also: Racist.
posted by Sys Rq at 9:06 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


When Peggy and Ted were acting it out, it was so weird to see that awkward dynamic. They were a non-stop train of goofy Rosemary's Baby=better baby aspirin. To anyone else it was creepy.

Were they going ahead with it at such force to make their "movie date" seem more plausible?
posted by readery at 9:18 AM on June 17, 2013


One bit I found telling is Don flipping through the channels on his sick day and coming across Megan's soap. Granted, he'd prefer her not to be an actress and has never shown much interest in her and this show aside from the crazy I-will-come-to-your-set-and-glare episode. No one has VCRs yet and he's rarely home during the week and probably never watching TV if he is. So he comes across his wife on TV dressed as her own evil twin and he's not even curious enough to pause and see how she is an as actor or to even just take in more than ten seconds of what his wife spends all her time working on. The best part is that he flips to the next channel just as her character is yelling at the other person in the scene to pay attention to her.

Not sure how that relationship will implode but certainly there is more than ample ground laid for Megan getting a Hollywood movie offer and not feeling like anything is compelling her to stay in NYC.
posted by mikepop at 9:22 AM on June 17, 2013 [7 favorites]


Is it just me or does the phrase master blackmailer not really fit with the word Pete Campbell?
posted by The Whelk at 9:22 AM on June 17, 2013


When Peggy and Ted were acting it out, it was so weird to see that awkward dynamic. They were a non-stop train of goofy Rosemary's Baby=better baby aspirin. To anyone else it was creepy.

It was SUCH a perfect counter to the cool whip pitch. Peggy can act, too, when she's in love!
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 9:24 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


You guys, I like Betty so mch better now!

And I think Sally has a burgeoning, if grudging, respect for her mother now, too, after being so rudely and suddenly disillusioned by her father. Girls rebel against their mothers in their teens as a matter of course, and Sally certainly has plenty of reason to rebel against Betty! Yet Betty is clearly happier now in her marriage to Henry, and I think it is making her a better mother. When she was with Don, nobody criticized the way she raised her kids. Henry's family, though, have made it clear that her children fearing her is NOT the sign of a good mother, and Betty seems to have softened up a great deal. Yes, she is strict about diplomacy club, but I think she's right that, for Sally, diplomacy club was an excuse to hook up with boys, and Betty saw right through that. Sally, pre Don-and-Sylvia, wanted to hook up with guys just to be rebellious. It's pretty clear that other than the short-lived Mitchell crush, Glenn is the only guy she's actually had any feelings for, because we've never been introduced to any of the guys she's supposedly been going to "second base" with.

Apres Don-and-Sylvia, Sally, I think, is beginning to get a glimpse of her parents' divorce from Betty's perspective. Note that when the other girls are talking about remarried fathers and 'fat' mothers, it is Megan who Sally throws to the wolves along with Don, not Betty, derisively noting he's remarried someone "my age". Sally is transitioning from poor little rich girl to ambitious young woman.

Betty was perfect in that boarding school interview, too, just perfect! She's really coming into her own now. Her marriage to Don, with all the anger and frustration and heartbreak she went through, only prepared her all the better to become an ideal politician's wife (the real "Good Wife!), and the butterfly metamorphasis from frumpy and fat to chic and sophisticated is just half of the equation, the superficial side. We're witnessing an overall maturation, inside and out, for her character.

Her one-night tryst with Don at camp put the final icing on the cake. For Betty, it was a healthy release, offering closure on her past life in a seriously gratifying way. Now it is Don waking up alone and lonely and wanting more, while Betty is happy and fulfilled by her busy, important life. And the fact that she didn't feel the need to gloat or revel in sweet revenge, but actually felt compassion for Megan, just shows how far Betty has come. Well done, Matt Weiner! And yeah, even January Jones gets kudos from me for that storyline.

So now we have the rebellious daughter, Sally, taking a page from her mother's (of all people!) book, and graduating from the Don Draper hero worship fan club. She's gone from passionately entreating for a trip allowing her to hang out with lots of boys to choosing an all-girl boarding school. Sally's perfectly poised to fully take advantage of all the new possibilities opening up to smart young women now. Though Don and Betty may still feel that involves Sally making a good marriage down the line, it's pretty clear that Sally herself is not going to put up with any bullshit from men, the way her mother did for so long.

If Betty is our Laura Petrie, Sally is our Mary Tyler Moore. I'm surprised the end credits weren't "You're Gonna Make It After All".
posted by misha at 9:32 AM on June 17, 2013 [5 favorites]


Re: Sally and Glen (is it one n or two?):

It was painful, watching Sally trying to make polite conversation while Rollo just ignored all the obvious cues and tried to roll (heh) right over her boundaries, but WOW the way she called him on it ("That's bullshit!") made me cheer inside.

I do think there was a little manipulation going on there, but to me it was born out of Sally being jealous of the roommate and wanting to prove to herself that Glenn was "hers". She saw her Dad cheating on Megan; he already abandoned her and her mom. She did not want Glenn choosing another woman instead of her.

When Sally put him to the test, Glenn chose her, and she took, yes, a slightly malicious pleasure in that. But I see that as a result of her needing reassurance, after Don just devastated her, that there were men in her life she could still trust. And Glenn passed the test.

So yes, Sally was pleased, but not because she likes trouble, though she let her roommate believe that. Why not? Much betterto be Sally, the femme fatale who has two guys fighting over her, than Sally, the jealous little girl scheming to get her childhood friend away from the competition.

Sally is definitely growing up.
posted by misha at 9:38 AM on June 17, 2013 [5 favorites]


Not sure how that relationship will implode but certainly there is more than ample ground laid for Megan getting a Hollywood movie offer and not feeling like anything is compelling her to stay in NYC.

Possible redemptive ending to this season (or the series): Megan gets a Hollywood offer, Don sees there's nothing keeping him in NYC and they head to California together, where they'll both be happier.

So, he runs away like he's always thought about doing. Only this time he does it with his wife. I doubt that's likely based on the current trajectory, but that's an optimistic possibility.
posted by dry white toast at 9:55 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


St. Joseph's Aspirin is a) orange in color b) weirdly artificial orange flavored

Re: logo

I have vague memories of seeing piles of old large-format, possibly tabloid-size, saddle-staple and squarebound trade mags around the creative and typesetting shops of my youth. Some of these were clip-art magazines, some were actual AdWeeks or similar news-oriented magazines, and some, if I recall correctly, were a type-and-design publication which featured either the new logo's large, display type ampersand or a similar one.

I seem to recall these publications dating mid-seventies to the eighties (which is wehn I would have seen them).

Am I imagining things? Was there a typography magazine called "&"? Was it perhaps called something which included an ampersand and that element was pulled out as the primary logo element?

As you can imagine, Googling for stuff about that character is a particularly tricky thing to do.
posted by mwhybark at 9:58 AM on June 17, 2013


Here's an interview with Vincent Kartheiser from a couple days back about Pete and Bob and the season in general.

I'd really like to see him as Mr. Darcy.
posted by rewil at 10:10 AM on June 17, 2013


This episode was interesting, too, for the way it placed everyone's relationships "out of context," which (I think) forced decisions that characters might otherwise not have made. Obviously Ken with those dudes, getting shot in the face and deciding to quit the account. But also Don at home while Megan's at work (which he can see on TV, and makes him uncomfortable/jealous); Peggy and Ted at the movies instead of at work, and Don and Megan at the movies seeing them and noting a new dynamic (which also makes Don uncomfortable/jealous); Sally and Glen in the context of a totally different setting, with other people (so they're no longer just kids who are neighbors maybe liking each other, but performing as teenagers hooking up, smoking, drinking, unsupervised by adults, playing the role of "grown ups")("I can make a Tom Collins!"); Peggy and Ted and their work relationship being thrown into a new light by Don's jealousy (causing Peggy to call him on his bullshit and confront her own anger towards him); the whole team in an uncomfortable situation with a client, giving Don the opportunity to act boldly and rashly in a way that nominally serves the client but really accomplishes his goal of putting Ted (and Peggy) in his place; and of course Pete and Bob (whose fabricated resume and Pete's knowledge of it pushes their relationship in a new direction—one that Pete thinks he has control over, though I doubt he really does); and Bob and Bob (his confrontation with Pete resulting in him allowing us to see his good-guy persona at work—that handshake conversation—making that phone call in fluent Spanish, allowing us to see yet another side of his character). Basically, all these moments of characters being pushed in uncomfortable, "fish out of water" directions, forcing them to improvise (sometimes poorly), act impulsively, and ultimately reveal things to us about who they fundamentally are.
posted by mothershock at 10:21 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Don's giving credit to Gleason for the awful Rosemary's Baby ad might have been a way to protect her from the backlash when it fails. The dead guy had the bad idea. (Peggy and Ted, of course, did not see it this way.) Like, in Don's head it was chivalrous plan, if misguided and cruelly deployed.

I forgot that Rosemary's Baby was a Roman Polanski film. Creepy.
posted by purpleclover at 10:47 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don's giving credit to Gleason for the awful Rosemary's Baby ad might have been a way to protect her from the backlash when it fails. The dead guy had the bad idea. (Peggy and Ted, of course, did not see it this way.) Like, in Don's head it was chivalrous plan, if misguided and cruelly deployed.


Hmm good point.
posted by sweetkid at 11:07 AM on June 17, 2013


Mr Plow? That name again is Mr Plow.

I am guessing Abe Plough won't be thrilled with the Rosemary's Baby allusion to sell baby aspirin, and Don will have saved Peggy, but yeah he didn't have to dismantle Ted to do it. The Sunkist account would have been enough.

Interesting how Cutler is just utterly, utterly mercenary. Given the choice between backing Ted on principle and $$$, he will always go for the money.
posted by ambrosia at 11:08 AM on June 17, 2013


Mr Plow? That name again is Mr Plow.

I am guessing Abe Plough


No but it was more fun my way.
posted by sweetkid at 11:18 AM on June 17, 2013


Is it just me or does the phrase master blackmailer not really fit with the word Pete Campbell?

Quite. When push comes to shove, and Pete makes this great secret known, then what?

1. Sal said something like that once and look where it got him
2. "Yes, and he's the best damn gay fraud in the business!"
3. It turns out Bob and Joan are engaged and everyone think's Pete's a crazy asshole
posted by Sys Rq at 11:27 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


But the guy from St. Joseph's problem wasn't the content of the ad right? It was the budget inflation.

On an unrelated note, I just remembered wondering aloud in the last thread whether Ken would get caught up in any of the Detroit riots. Instead he got shot by his old white clients.
posted by dry white toast at 11:28 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Instead he got shot by his old white clients.

Don't forget they also put their hands over his eyes when he was trying to drive them somewhere, causing a car accident. I can't understand why they'd act that way towards him. I mean, if it were Pete we could also understand why they might hate him or have an utter contempt for him, but Ken?
posted by orange swan at 11:33 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


But the guy from St. Joseph's problem wasn't the content of the ad right? It was the budget inflation.

I think Don believes the ad will either fail the next level of management up or be a public embarrassment. I do not think his intention was to snatch the Clio from Peggy's hands and lay it on the grave of Frank Gleason. He does not think there will be a Clio.
posted by purpleclover at 11:36 AM on June 17, 2013


Okay so Detroit = Vietnam, right?
posted by Sys Rq at 11:37 AM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Reading the wiki article on Schering-Plough ambrosia linked to: They are idiots for trying to take advantage of St. Joseph's this way. If they continued to coddle them they could end up with Maybelline (and Peggy could win her Clio with "Maybe she's born with it. Maybe it's Maybelline.")
posted by purpleclover at 11:39 AM on June 17, 2013


"Hooking up" doesn't necessarily mean sex. I just meant that she's probably made out with some dudes.

Yeah, PhoBWanKenobi, I was assuming you were talking about fooling around not sex. But I'm not sure Sally's even done that. She mocked her friend's experience, "going to second base twice," and her friend said "that's a lot more than you've done." I doubt she's ever kissed a boy.

Sally still comes across young to me. I also don't think she was jealous of the other girl with Glen; her ingenuous "do you two know each other?" when they were flirting didn't sound possessive, but naive. Likewise "we grew up together," which is an utterly innocuous, childish description compared to the special knowledge she could have claimed of Glen if she'd wanted to lay claim to him.

I do think Sally & Glen are a perfect match, for a later time. :) Just don't think Sally's there yet.
posted by torticat at 11:41 AM on June 17, 2013


Although if Don doesn't think the work is good and is trying to do the right thing in the wrong way, he's being a colossal dick when he encourages the work (even saying that it escapes the black hole of cultural-reference humor) rather than critiquing it in the early meeting. Maybe he just doesn't see the sense in trying to talk Ted and Peggy down?

Really nice use of the classic Mad Men "offered hand" gesture in the ad -- Peggy the happy, helpful young mother reaches out to child-Don, but on Ted's cue. That's got to hurt, and this is coming from someone who subscribes to the most negative possible interpretation of Don's actions (though I also think the ad is awful -- I just think it's supposed to be seen as good in-universe).
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:43 AM on June 17, 2013


Oh, wait, Schering-Plough already owned Maybelline. And the slogan is from 1991. (I should read things.)

Don is fucking up the relationship with Ted right and left: making promises he shouldn't about backing up the work he and Megan agree is ill-conceived, agreeing to let go the huge Sunkist account go (and then reversing course); what ever happened with Fleischmann's?
posted by purpleclover at 11:48 AM on June 17, 2013


I don't even think Don is capable of judging lately. The shots of him pouring vodka in to his morning OJ while Megan's getting ready for work, wasting her time worrying about poor, sick, overworked Don are just creepy. He's becoming unwound like he was right after the split with Betty when he was sitting alone in his dumpy apartment. But now he's living in a swanky place, married to a beautiful young TV star. This does not bode well.
posted by readery at 11:50 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Although if Don doesn't think the work is good and is trying to do the right thing in the wrong way, he's being a colossal dick when he encourages the work

Agreed, I believe we're to assume the work is good. Don wouldn't back an idea he thought was shit in a meeting with the client. Well, he did with Jaguar, but in an underhanded way that achieved his goal of nixing the idea. In this case he saved the idea (with a reduced budget).

Also Ted told him "the work is good and you know it" and Don didn't argue the point at all. He did tell Megan he thought the ad was disturbing, but that was to deflect Megan's interest in Ted & Peggy.
posted by torticat at 11:51 AM on June 17, 2013


I can't understand why they'd act that way towards him. I mean, if it were Pete we could also understand why they might hate him or have an utter contempt for him, but Ken?

Well, as the partners reminded Ken, clients will sometimes get their kicks off of their ad men, who just have to sit there and take it.

The hilarious part to me is how willing Pete is to sign up to take it..."You mean you don't want to take buckshot in the face?!? GET ME MY .22!!!"

It's great having Ken and Pete both doing accounts, since they are such a studied contrast in how to build a happy, successful life. Actually, they pretty much use Ken as a contrast whenever they want to portray the lengths someone will go to get his due.
posted by dry white toast at 11:56 AM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Re: Don fucking up his relationships: I was particularly impressed by the call to Harry after the movie, which manages to screw Ted and Peggy and also deliberately insult Megan, who's been insisting that he shouldn't work today. Likewise, at least according to my call of the situation, the "Frank Gleason's last idea" move humiliates both Peggy and Ted (and wounds Ted by reminding him of his dead partner), along with screwing Peggy out of the credit for an ad the client loves. If we go on the assumption that the ad's no good and Don knows it, he's also screwing everybody long-term by allowing work to go forward that would've died a natural death without him.

The man is a born multitasker.
posted by thesmallmachine at 11:57 AM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


Bob Benson Twitter
posted by readery at 12:09 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I've been debating with myself whether Don thinks the ad is good, but I suspect that he's no longer capable of either judging or caring. First he backed out of active creative work; now he's punting on the managerial role which he said he'd retreat to. I'm not surprised that he's been pushed off the letterhead -- he's resigning from all of it.

What's really sad is that nobody at work would think of trying to help Don. He's alienated them too shatteringly, or exhausted them too thoroughly, and the last surviving part of Don is his ability to project competence.

In retrospect, I feel like Roger's admonition to Don to "be slick, be you" (or whatever the exact line is) actually is Roger's version of trying to help. It's just that Roger is childish and shallow and can only "help" by asking Don not to deteriorate further. I also imagine that there's anxiety there about Don's drinking as it relates to Roger's drinking -- so long as Don can drink and stay slick, then Don and Roger are bon vivants, but if Don is slurring and fucking up, then Don and Roger are alcoholics.
posted by thesmallmachine at 12:14 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


torticat: "Also Ted told him "the work is good and you know it" and Don didn't argue the point at all. He did tell Megan he thought the ad was disturbing, but that was to deflect Megan's interest in Ted & Peggy."

He said that based on the idea alone, though, before he knew the full concept. I agree that the sound of "baby aspirin commercial inspired by Rosemary's Baby" sounds pretty batshit disturbing, but the way it was conceived was more a humorous pop-culture wink toward the movie, but with a happy ending. I think most mothers of young children can relate to the frustration of feeling crowded by people pushing their childcare ideas, so holding up St. Joseph's as an empowering ally to "fight back the forces of darkness," even if those are just nagging family and neighbors, sounds like a solid ad idea to me.
posted by Superplin at 12:16 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Agreed, I believe we're to assume the work is good. Don wouldn't back an idea he thought was shit in a meeting with the client.

He says to Peggy and Ted when they act it out that the ad stands on its own even if you haven't seen Rosemary's Baby. I don't think we've ever seen Don lie about liking creative work to spare the talent's feelings before, and I don't think he's doing it here. What he should have done in that same moment was bring up the budget to them at the same time. Instead, he creates this unnecessary plot that winds up undermining and humiliating Ted and taking credit for the ad away from Peggy.

This all follows on him breaking his promise to Ted about Sunkist after he saw Ted and Peggy at the movies. Don is just as childish as Ted was last episode when he flopped on the couch and whined about "his juice." Don is just much more devious and willing to fuck over people to get what he wants.
posted by gladly at 12:17 PM on June 17, 2013


Just to bring things back around to the old saw: Rosemary's Baby featured Mia Farrow (the star of the soap opera Peyton Place who cut off all her hair), who earlier that year had visited the Valley of the Saints in India with The Beatles, who released "Helter Skelter" in November 1968. (Where are we in Mad Men time?) Rosemary's Baby was directed by the husband of Sharon Tate, the star of Valley of the Dolls who was murdered by a group who would scrawl "Helter Skelter" on the wall and cut off all their hair.

Oh, and on a more this-might-actually-be-something tip, Mia Farrow's much older husband (Frank Sinatra) served her with divorce papers after she refused to quit Rosemary's Baby and work with him instead.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:21 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Pretty sure we're in October 1968. Fall colours outside, people are wearing coats, but the election hasn't happened yet because we saw a Nixon campaign ad.

Actually the timing the season finale with the election would work nicely to tie-it-in with the narrative span of the season.

Just remember, for many people the election of Nixon was when the 60's died.
posted by dry white toast at 12:26 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's late October, too, Sepinwall noted that the episode takes place after Jaqueline Kennedy married Aristotle Onassis, October 20, 1968, but it's still before election day.
posted by gladly at 12:44 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


So we should be seeing some awesome Halloween costumes next episode. Halloween-Election Day (Nov 5th). Just a reminder that George Wallace got 46 electoral votes!
posted by mikepop at 1:13 PM on June 17, 2013


Just a reminder that George Wallace got 46 electoral votes!

Total derail, but in reading Nixonland, my favourite thing about the Wallace campaign was his abortive search for a VP candidate. His first choice was Happy Chandler, a senator from Kentucky who appealed because he was more moderate and would dampen the air of extremism around the campaign. Except that Chandler had been the Commissioner of baseball when Jackie Robinson broke the colour barrier, and Wallace's supporters screamed that he was an integrationist. So next he went with Curtis LeMay, the retired Air Force Chief of Staff. But in his first press appearance, he went off about how people shouldn't be so scared of nuclear weapons.
posted by dry white toast at 1:39 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Rosemary's Baby didn't come out until June 12th, 1968. Gleason died at least a few months before that, I believe.
posted by cell divide at 1:53 PM on June 17, 2013


I was sitting there contemplating the fact that Don is drinking ORANGE juice, and then it happened.

THEY KILLED KENNY.

Fucking literally?

One million lawnmowers.
posted by Sara C. at 1:57 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


What he should have done in that same moment was bring up the budget to them at the same time.

Creative guys don't bring up budget.
posted by sweetkid at 1:59 PM on June 17, 2013


I was sitting there contemplating the fact that Don is drinking ORANGE juice, and then it happened.

THEY KILLED KENNY.

Fucking literally?


Wait you're not done.
posted by sweetkid at 1:59 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Rosemary's Baby didn't come out until June 12th, 1968. Gleason died at least a few months before that, I believe.

Gleason's funeral was after RFK was assassinated on June 6, 1968, so the timing is pretty close but there was a book before the movie, no?
posted by ambrosia at 2:00 PM on June 17, 2013


Yes there was a book before the movie.

Sally is reading it when Ida breaks in.
posted by sweetkid at 2:01 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


There was a book before the movie, but I thought the ad was a specific visual reference to the film. I had thought that the funeral was before the RFK assassination though so who knows, anyway it's close enough for plausible deniability and I doubt the St. Joseph's people would do the math, etc. it's just something I (thought I) noticed at the time.
posted by cell divide at 2:04 PM on June 17, 2013


Oh Ida. In a season full of crazy moments, you out crazied them all.

"are we negroes?"
posted by dry white toast at 2:07 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


I like how Don quite literally turned off from watching Megan being good at being really bad at being the alter ego of her performed self.
posted by iamkimiam at 2:08 PM on June 17, 2013


I like how Don quite literally turned off from watching Megan being good at being really bad at being the alter ego of her performed self.

What do you mean? I can't parse this comment.
posted by sweetkid at 2:15 PM on June 17, 2013


Ha, yeah it's somewhat unparseable. I meant that Don was watching Megan act a part on TV. The part she was playing was the twin sister (the alter ego) of her main character on the show, who has a really bad French accent. Megan was doing a really good job of performing her (not real) 'self', in which the job required her to do a really bad impersonation of a French-American woman. And Don didn't like it.

Probably for lots of reasons, but there's irony in that Dick is currently being sincerely and honestly bad at performing his new real self, Don, out there in the world. And Megan sees it, too. But she doesn't turn away (change the channel, so to speak) and actually gives him advice (lay off the throttle, etc.). And of course he rejects that too.
posted by iamkimiam at 2:43 PM on June 17, 2013


Don doesn't seem to like seeing Megan (or Peggy, for that matter) being good at *anything* – acting...even if it's a bad role, being a loving and supportive wife (reminded of Betty saying "Poor Megan, she doesn't know that loving you is the worst way to get to you"), making dinner (has he ever eaten a dinner she's made?) and on.
posted by iamkimiam at 2:48 PM on June 17, 2013


realizing that he doesn't have the social skills that Don or Bob have but this time he can maybe maneuver things so those skills can benefit him instead of work against him.

It is basically a douche move and the long term implications could hurt him badly, but then Pete can't change completely.


So Pete is Nixon?
posted by Sara C. at 2:53 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


isn't going to get resolved in one episode, it will probably take most of next season.

Or they'll just drop the whole thing. Like they tend to, with big plot developments in the last couple episodes of the season. We will flash forward far enough into the future for these nerves not to be quite so raw anymore.
posted by Sara C. at 2:58 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]



You guys, I like Betty so mch better now!


I've only read the Vulture and Sepinwall reviews and only skimmed comment sections so far, but Betty is getting almost universal acclaim for her behavior this episode, even with/including the cigarette offer, which is standard issue bad parenting for 2013 but less so then.
posted by sweetkid at 3:01 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


A young girl volunteering to abandon her entire social circle and go off to a boarding school where she won't know anyone and will ostensibly be under stricter rules and scrutiny? I always imagined that as being something that was forced on a kid for bad behavior or for other reasons outside of their control.

FWIW, I did this, once upon a time. When I was exactly Sally's age. And for some of the reasons that Sally might want it. I've always thought it was odd that Boarding School is portrayed as this big scary punishment in the American media, when actually boarding school was the best thing that ever happened to me and some of the happiest times of my life.
posted by Sara C. at 3:02 PM on June 17, 2013



Or they'll just drop the whole thing. Like they tend to, with big plot developments in the last couple episodes of the season.


Exactly, kind of like how no one is exactly grieving over Lane.
posted by sweetkid at 3:02 PM on June 17, 2013


the connections she's going to make at that school

FWIW -- and I don't know a ton about Miss Porter's specifically -- those sorts of schools were more finishing schools for girls of a certain social class than they were places for someone to Make Important Connections. The idea in decades before Sally would have been that girls from Miss Porter's would go to Seven Sister colleges and marry promising Ivy League men. We're looking at the life plan that made the protagonist of The Bell Jar want to kill herself. Not a beeline to the corporate ladder or a political career or whatever people are thinking.

That said, my guess is that this is something that would have been changing around Sally's era, and that the girls we saw in this episode might have been expected to be more ambitious. Certainly by the time this generation of girls is college age that would have been the case. Hillary Clinton went from Wellesley to Yale Law, not to being a society lady.
posted by Sara C. at 3:11 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


First, he could have pulled Ted aside privately after he realized his feelings for Peggy were affecting the work/budgeting negatively and had more or less the same talk with him they had after the meeting.

Yes, but remember that, for the Mad Men writers, it's always better to make a choice that involves people screaming at each other in the conference room.
posted by Sara C. at 3:15 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Given how much of this season has been about reflecting the past, I think it's perfect that the season finale will probably deal with Nixon's election and the fallout from that - given the first season was partly about Sterling Cooper working for the Nixon campaign leading up to the 1960 Kennedy v Nixon election. And, of course, look at the difference eight years made - for Nixon, the world and SC... &P.

Lovely parallels.
posted by crossoverman at 3:22 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


And while she isn't entirely happy about the idea of Sally going to boarding school (what mother would be), she remembers that she wanted to go herself and doesn't want to thwart Sally's goals for herself as her own were thwarted, and so she does her best to help her get accepted.

I read Betty's whole throughline here as being ultimately more of the same and not really any kind of parenting breakthrough.

You've got:

- wanting to live vicariously through Sally.

- having trouble relating to her daughter as an adult to a child rather than as chums.

Not to mention the fact that getting your kid into a school like Miss Porters would be seen as a total coup for someone like Betty Hofstadt-Draper-Francis. For one thing, it would be a status symbol in general. For another thing, Betty has ALWAYS worried about Sally's ability to get by in a world of strict gender norms, and being accepted at Miss Porter's would, in Betty's mind*, be an obvious mark in the SUCCESS column. And what's more, conservative institutions like a New England prep school would have been closed to a child from a "broken home" probably right up until this point. Betty has to worry what her divorce would do to Sally's fate, and acceptance at Miss Porter's would be a big sigh of relief there.

I don't think Betty's positive feelings here are entirely mercenary, but it's really simplistic to read this as some kind of Isn't Betty A Great Mom and not a much more complicated situation.

*Remember Betty wasn't there for the boozy dorm room scenes and doesn't know that she's not sending her daughter into a chaste world of Hall Matrons and tea dances.
posted by Sara C. at 3:25 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


THEY KILLED KENNY.

You know it's funny, someone in the other thread noted that Weiner had said in an interview that Megan wasn't going to die this season. I thought the lede was kinda buried there, as he actually said that NO ONE is going to die this season. I know Weiner can be very misleading, but does he ever outright lie?

It ruined the worst suspense of the Ken shooting, for me (not that the suspense lasted long). Why would Weiner do that?
posted by torticat at 3:26 PM on June 17, 2013


Why would Weiner do that?

Just like the reference to 30 Rock earlier in the season, my immediate thought was that they did that precisely to make a nation of viewers yell "OMG! They killed Kenny! You bastards!" at the TV.
posted by ambrosia at 3:36 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


I hope the "frigid" comment wasn't supposed to point to the latter.

I can't speak to Sally's specific choice not to fool around with Rollo, but the moment is a common trope of the period in second wave feminist/Women's Lib literature. My understanding is that, at least in certain circles, there was no sense that a woman had the right to choose which guy to fool around with or whether she felt like doing it in this particular instance or not. Either you were "liberated" and would go with pretty much any dude, or you were "frigid" which meant there was something psychologically wrong with you.

My guess about Rollo in general was that her idea was to have Glen bring a friend for the two older girls, and that she'd recede into the shadows once they were occupied with dudes and substances. Then the brown haired one peaced out, and she found herself in a situation she didn't anticipate. I think Sally is still young enough that she forgets that she is old enough to be a player in this stuff, and doesn't quite realize that guys might think of her sexually. She expects to play the "little sister" role, and it freaks her out when she can't. Hence why she turned to Glenn when the situation got out of control.

I also was a little freaked out by Sally's smile at Glenn beating up Rollo, and for half a second I expected her to let it get totally out of hand, the scene ending with Glenn beating Rollo's bloody corpse (I mean keep in mind the episode began with Ken Cosgrove getting shot in the face, for chirssakes). I also definitely got shades of Manson out of the whole vibe between Sally and Glenn. We joke about Sally becoming a hippie, and she seems to be enveloping herself in all the trappings of tradition and conservatism, but what if she snaps? A lot of those little Manson girls and other young women who ended up in cults in the 70s were definitely looking for protectors and family.
posted by Sara C. at 3:37 PM on June 17, 2013 [7 favorites]


We're looking at the life plan that made the protagonist of The Bell Jar want to kill herself.
Derail but that's really simplifying what's going on in the Bell Jar.
posted by sweetkid at 3:44 PM on June 17, 2013


he's not even curious enough to pause and see how she is an as actor or to even just take in more than ten seconds of what his wife spends all her time working on.

Which is an interesting contrast to the way last season ended, with Don watching Megan's screen test and deciding he did want to help her in her career. And, if Matt Weiner is to be trusted, thinking that she was so talented he needed to do anything in his power to bring her brilliance to the public's attention.

Now he can't be bothered to watch 30 seconds of a soap opera she's on, while she is actually on the screen. Like, he changes the channel in the middle of her line, while her face is on camera. That's almost as powerful as the scene in an earlier episode where he mentally mutes her as she's talking about how she wants to take time away to devote to him.
posted by Sara C. at 3:44 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


that's really simplifying what's going on in the Bell Jar.

Wasn't intended to be a sweeping discussion of The Bell Jar. It's just probably the widest known cultural reference to the world Miss Porter's represents. In the 60's it wasn't like it is now, where schools like that are assumed to be The Best In America in some kind of grand meritocracy. It's just a school where Old Money families send their daughters in order to prepare them for lives as Old Money wives.

Again, I think that's something that would be starting to change by Sally's day, but the idea that this is a springboard to important connections for Sally's future career really wouldn't be on anyone's mind in 1968. Betty would be excited because it means easy entry to the right kind of college, and a beeline to the right kind of marriage, without any distracting questions about Sally's background or family situation.
posted by Sara C. at 3:49 PM on June 17, 2013


My guess about Rollo in general was that her idea was to have Glen bring a friend for the two older girls, and that she'd recede into the shadows once they were occupied with dudes and substances. Then the brown haired one peaced out, and she found herself in a situation she didn't anticipate. I think Sally is still young enough that she forgets that she is old enough to be a player in this stuff, and doesn't quite realize that guys might think of her sexually. She expects to play the "little sister" role, and it freaks her out when she can't. Hence why she turned to Glenn when the situation got out of control.

I don't think she put that much thought into it. I bet it was more like, "Oh, shit, I have to find a way to get these girls some booze and cigarettes. Maybe Glen could help?" And then Glen showed up with a friend, because he needed a ride.
posted by donajo at 4:05 PM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


Didn't Don change the channel as she walked in? Like he didn't want to get caught enjoying seeing her on tv and being successful.

THEY KILLED KENNY.

As we started the episode on the DVR last night it took serious willpower to avoid this thread. I didn't want to be spoiled if they had indeed, killed Kenny.
posted by Big_B at 4:07 PM on June 17, 2013


The reason I thought she "put that much thought into it" is that Glen only showed up with one friend. She obviously called him up and set up something for the other two girls and not herself.

Though I don't know if "putting thought into it" is really apt -- I think Sally doesn't consider herself part of the group in something like this. She's still framing it in the same way she'd have thought about mixing her parents a couple of Tom Collins, not like "Ladies, let's go out and find some dudes!"
posted by Sara C. at 4:09 PM on June 17, 2013


Didn't Don change the channel as she walked in? Like he didn't want to get caught enjoying seeing her on tv and being successful.

Don watched a lot of TV this episode. In the afternoon, Don saw Megan on the soap while Megan was out at work on the soap. He flipped around the channels then turned it off when the phone rang- Betty calling to try to talk about Sally.

Later on he was watching TV later, and Megan came in and pointed out there was a TV in the bedroom, he could watch there. But that was late at night.
posted by ambrosia at 4:15 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Pardon my misreading of what the school is supposed to do for Sally. My understanding of modern prep culture, much less Sixties prep culture, is limited. I assumed from a couple of cues -- most prominently Betty's proud remark about Sally having the potential to be an ambassador -- that for the ambitious girls, the school was seen as the first step towards upper-class careers as well as upper-class marriages. In retrospect, I suppose that Betty was just talking up Sally (and the harmony of the Francis family: "Henry says...") rather than expressing any particular hopes for how the school might help her daughter's career.

Though I still do feel like Betty has changed over the years and would be legitimately supportive of a career for Sally; otherwise, she wouldn't have admiringly brought up her husband's support of the idea. Her "I wanted it for myself, way back when" at the interview comes close on the heels of "an ambassador someday," so close that I initially assumed that "it" refers to the exciting diplomatic job rather than the place at an elite girls' school. I wouldn't be surprised if both were true once, whether or not Betty consciously knew it at the time.

(As always, my Mad Men opinion is driven by an inherent optimism that's rarely borne out by what happens to these people next week.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 5:23 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I don't know where this Pete and Bob thing is going, but it's weirdly hot.

He said that based on the idea alone, though, before he knew the full concept. I agree that the sound of "baby aspirin commercial inspired by Rosemary's Baby" sounds pretty batshit disturbing, but the way it was conceived was more a humorous pop-culture wink toward the movie, but with a happy ending. I think most mothers of young children can relate to the frustration of feeling crowded by people pushing their childcare ideas, so holding up St. Joseph's as an empowering ally to "fight back the forces of darkness," even if those are just nagging family and neighbors, sounds like a solid ad idea to me.

I agree. I think the ad is actually pretty good!
posted by showbiz_liz at 5:38 PM on June 17, 2013


As a producer in advertising I was totally distracted by the fact that it sounded like a lot of people, would take a long time to cast and get approvals and would be a huge budget not to mention that by the time testing was done the cultural reference might be dated so I'll have to watch again to see what I think about if it's a good creative idea or not.
posted by sweetkid at 5:40 PM on June 17, 2013


Rewatching. Betty's got a package and glass of Carnation Instant Breakfast on the counter as she talks to Don. It is truly the season of RECURRING DRINKS.

(Was it around this time that juice was re-codefied as a health food rather than a treat? Instant Breakfast is certainly a Sixties re-codification of a sweetener as a food, though they throw some nutrients in with the sugar.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 5:41 PM on June 17, 2013


I don't think Betty would specifically not be supportive of a career for Sally, it just wasn't expected of young women in the way that it is today.
posted by Sara C. at 5:41 PM on June 17, 2013


As a producer in advertising I was totally distracted by the fact that it sounded like a lot of people, would take a long time to cast and get approvals and would be a huge budget not to mention that by the time testing was done the cultural reference might be dated so I'll have to watch again to see what I think about if it's a good creative idea or not.

Yes, thank you, more than anything I thought " uuuuh that sounds like a lot of people, and shots, and effort, like commercials typically have a cast of ...two." The Ted and Peggy stuff just seemed like they where so infatuated with thier idea/each other so no one was being the "adult" and Don wants to watch them crash and burn so no one is saying no to anything.
posted by The Whelk at 5:46 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Re the ad, I didn't think it was either spectacularly brilliant or awful. It reminded me of a million other ads of that period. I don't think it's going to win anybody any awards, but if I was the client I'd be wondering why I needed to spend more than triple the agreed-on budget for this ad. Ted and Peggy are clearly extremely high on each other in a way that isn't necessarily conducive to the best work the agency can do, let alone good business sense.

Re the Rosemary reference, my guess is that a better take on this idea would be to distill it down more so that it's not really about the movie. There's something there, about the Old Ways vs. the New Ways, groupthink vs. individuality, authority vs. making your own choice. And the thing about young parents not wanting to feel old is spot on. I just don't think it needs to be about a Satanic coven to get the idea across.
posted by Sara C. at 5:47 PM on June 17, 2013


Yes, but remember that, for the Mad Men writers, it's always better to make a choice that involves people screaming at each other in the conference room.

Most definitely. I was just outlining a possible sequence of events for an alternate universe where Don wanted to be helpful vs. what he actually wanted/did this episode.
posted by mikepop at 5:48 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


My God, this week was so good that I forgot about the goddamn delivery of "Kenny, you know, I once had a client cut my wife's breast."
posted by thesmallmachine at 5:55 PM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


I... I think that was "cup."
posted by showbiz_liz at 5:58 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


Also, Bob's micro-reaction to "Lee Garner, Jr. made me hold his balls" -- he just drops out of the conversation for a contemplative moment.

...shit, is it "cup"? I still hear "cut," and I could imagine Jim saying "cut" or pretty much any other word in the exact same tone, but...I'm relieved to hear that.
posted by thesmallmachine at 6:00 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's definitely cup but I've seen commenters elsewhere that heard "cut" too
posted by sweetkid at 6:01 PM on June 17, 2013


I thought it was "cut" as well, which was rather disturbing, but also didn't seem too out of place coming out of Harry Hamlin's mouth.
posted by palomar at 6:04 PM on June 17, 2013


Bert never managed to offload that Rothko, and everyone's wearing shoes in his office.
posted by thesmallmachine at 6:07 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I noticed everyone wearing shoes too! When did that change?
posted by ambrosia at 6:08 PM on June 17, 2013


The fact that we can very easily buy that he said cut tells us something about his character.
posted by The Whelk at 6:10 PM on June 17, 2013 [4 favorites]


I heard cut, and think it makes more sense, because the next anecdote is also a cupping of an intimate body party. I don't think the writers would have both anecdotes involve bathing-suit-area cupping.
posted by Sara C. at 6:14 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


(Also "cut breast" is so fucking Manson Murders, guys.)
posted by Sara C. at 6:14 PM on June 17, 2013


I don't think the writers would have both anecdotes involve bathing-suit-area cupping.

Why not? It seems like typical Roger one-upmanship to me. So you let someone cup your wife's breast? Big deal...
posted by mikepop at 6:16 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Why not? It seems like typical Roger one-upmanship to me. So you let someone cup your wife's breast? Big deal.

Agreed, makes more sense for it to be cupping because then Roger shares his own cupping.

Also, pretty sure even in the 60s you'd get arrested for cutting someone's breast.
posted by sweetkid at 6:18 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


It was definitely "cup my wife's breast", and it makes total sense to play the word again in the next comment. I am sure Roger never had to cup Lee Garner Jr.'s balls! When it came to Roger, Lee Garner Jr.'s bullying took the form of, "You'll have a Christmas party and play Santa because I say so."
posted by orange swan at 6:19 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, Bob's micro-reaction to "Lee Garner, Jr. made me hold his balls" -- he just drops out of the conversation for a contemplative moment.

Ahaha I went back to watch that moment. He totally startle-laughs and then looks down with a little smile on his face. BOB IS MY NEW FAVORITE
posted by showbiz_liz at 6:31 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


So, thinking about Bib's motivations in light of his revelations, we have a slick, intelligent, multilingual "manservant" who spent time in Europe who has seemingly transformed himself into an ideal version of a WASPy ad men. In his sights, a fussy little out of place wi connections to New York aristocracy who lives apart from his wife in the city. A wife he never talks about. Cause he doesn't seem to have any friends.

To Bob, Pete has a big huge SUGAR DADDY banner dropped over his rounded shoulders, and I'm think Mr. Benson is very good at making sure the people he's interested in are totally at ease.
posted by The Whelk at 6:36 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


I found it interesting that Kartheiser pointed out (in the interview linked above) that Bob's greater physical strength is one reason Pete didn't explode on him when he made the pass, because rewatching the Endless Handshake, it's pretty plainly Bob weaponizing the shake as a show of force, rather than the mutual fight I initially saw.

Why (other than the plot requirement for him to find out Bob's backstory) does Pete call Duck for help finding Bob another placement? I honestly can't think of any reason other than altruism: he recognizes that it would be a dick move to push Bob out for no performance-related reason and not even give him a job lead. It seems kind of extraordinary that Pete would act altruistically towards Bob at this point, when he's feeling intimidated and belittled, but then it's important for Pete to take the moral high ground (and Bob and Pete's relationship is rapidly developing such a complicated power dynamic that a lot of motivations are becoming very blurry).

(With tongue only somewhat in cheek, it's possible that Pete called Duck because this was the only possible context in which Pete could remark that Bob is handsome.)
posted by thesmallmachine at 6:48 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


I can't speak to Sally's specific choice not to fool around with Rollo, but the moment is a common trope of the period in second wave feminist/Women's Lib literature. My understanding is that, at least in certain circles, there was no sense that a woman had the right to choose which guy to fool around with or whether she felt like doing it in this particular instance or not. Either you were "liberated" and would go with pretty much any dude, or you were "frigid" which meant there was something psychologically wrong with you.

I was about the same age in the Mad Men timeline as Bobby, rather than Sally, but I can affirm that this is absolutely true.

You can check the list of prominent alumni from Miss Porter's here. Note Jacqueline Bouvier, and numbers of presidents or Board members of charitable organizations (also a Walker Bush). Tuition is currently about 52K a year.
posted by jokeefe at 6:59 PM on June 17, 2013


Yeah going to Miss Porter means " Hi, we are very rich and very fancy and have been for a while, our daughter may want to be be the head of the Met's donor board or marry someone with a serious chance at becoming President."
posted by The Whelk at 7:01 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


( kind of like the current difference between the Upper West and Upper East sides, one is full of people who are the head of Accounts at thier law firm, the other is for people who own the law firm)
posted by The Whelk at 7:03 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


Yeah, slight derail: I grew up completely ignorant of American East Coast private school culture to the point that a few years ago I was talking with someone who I knew from her bio had gone to Choate, but I pronounced it "Cho-ate" as in "inchoate". She thought it was amusing, but I was not making a joke: I'd just never heard of the place before.
posted by jokeefe at 7:07 PM on June 17, 2013 [1 favorite]


Re why Pete would call Duck:

So he's just been in this meeting where he tried to get Bob axed from the account and was turned down point blank by every single other person in the room, all of whom outrank him. He probably knows that if he starts crying about how Bob's a queer, that's not going to go over well.

So the idea is to do Bob a "favor" that is really a favor for Pete.
posted by Sara C. at 7:16 PM on June 17, 2013 [2 favorites]


Yeah, I was skimming Wikipedia's list of prominent Miss Porter's alums to see if I could find a moment when it stopped being "There is a wing of the Met named after my husband" types and started being ambitious young Hillary Clinton types. The answer is that this moment does not exist. (Though there is one famous ambassador, from the Carter administration.) I think the best one can really boast is that a lot of former Miss Porter's students hung out with Andy Warhol at one point or another.
posted by Sara C. at 7:20 PM on June 17, 2013


I mean, obviously not to knock the place or anything. I'm sure it's not only a great school, but a million times better than the somewhat-elite* boarding school I attended.

*But in a totally different sense of elite. My boarding school was publicly funded, co-ed, and most alums are software engineers or doctors.
posted by Sara C. at 7:22 PM on June 17, 2013


It's you can say Hogwarts.
posted by The Whelk at 7:41 PM on June 17, 2013 [3 favorites]


Hey you guys. I didn't get to watch the show live with you this week, because I was busy adopting a rescue puppy (His name is Dashiell. He's awesome.) I've only just seen it, and haven't read the thread yet. Here are my thoughts.

1) Did someone make a Bob Benson/Tom Ripley joke upthread? Because if it didn't happen, I'd be colossally disappointed in you all.

2) So glad they didn't kill Ken. Absurd what's happened to him in the open of this episode and the amphetamines episode. But it will make for a great short story later.

3) Watched this episode with my Mom, who wanted to see it even though she is only partway through season 2. Her confusion, and her observations about the characters really drove home how strange the changes from 60-68 have been.
posted by .kobayashi. at 8:36 PM on June 17, 2013


I think the best one can really boast is that a lot of former Miss Porter's students hung out with Andy Warhol at one point or another.

Ooh, something to contribute! A good friend of mine graduated from MPS c. 2000 (but she was a sort-of townie and I think only went as a day student?), and my recollections from her anecdotes are that:
1. her best friend had a surname for her first name (oh, come on, you guys)
2. most of her friends were lesbians (or maybe proto-LUGs) and there was plenty o' pot
3. the students were fond of obnoxious chants ("We do as we please 'cause we do as we please...")
4. Tommy Hilfiger's daughter came in for an interview and was blasé about the whole thing, but the T-bag himself was just as overweening as you'd expect.

(My friend is now working for an educational nonprofit in a college town and trying to open a bar, so is maybe not the typical alum.)
posted by psoas at 8:38 PM on June 17, 2013


Going thru that list, i was suprised that Elizabeth May was on it, and she didnt go to like bishop strachan.
posted by PinkMoose at 9:00 PM on June 17, 2013


My understanding is that, at least in certain circles, there was no sense that a woman had the right to choose which guy to fool around with or whether she felt like doing it in this particular instance or not. Either you were "liberated" and would go with pretty much any dude, or you were "frigid" which meant there was something psychologically wrong with you.

My experience has been that this sort of attitude is still very common among men, though the terminology has changed slightly — I've never heard a man call a woman frigid or a tease. I don't know how many conversations I've had with men who wanted casual sex from me, and when I said no, that we were looking for different things, that I wasn't interested in being with someone who was never going to call me again, I got some really condescending bullshit lecture about how I should be okay with that, how there was something wrong with me if I wasn't, that I was too uptight, taking it too seriously, needed to free my mind, etc. Seriously, I've had that essential conversation at least a hundred times. And it makes me so angry that it was really cathartic to watch a fictional guy like that get a beat down for it. There are so many asshole men out there who just can't get it through their heads that they aren't entitled to get action from women and that they need to respect her right to say no. Most of them won't go so far as to use force, of course, but the prevalence of this attitude is why there are still so many rapes.
posted by orange swan at 9:09 PM on June 17, 2013 [6 favorites]


I kind of think that Don thought he was helping Peggy throughout this. If he's the only one who understands her, he's going to be worried about her shooting herself in the foot with this flagrant office affair. This of course is 1000x sadder since his attemps to "help" are so ham-fisted and alienating.

Also, I am really starting to feel for Megan. Imagine coming home to that day after day.

Finally, I nearly died when the gun made its appearance. To me, it represents the dread that has been mounting on this show since Season 1. And all because of that chip 'n dip.
posted by mynameisluka at 9:21 PM on June 17, 2013


I think that's why I loved Clara's "That's a 22! What are you going to do, shoot squirrels?" comment.

I can totally see Clara secretly being from Pennsyltucky and practicing her perfect upper class elocution every night after work.
posted by Sara C. at 9:25 PM on June 17, 2013 [7 favorites]


Am I imagining things? Was there a typography magazine called "&"? Was it perhaps called something which included an ampersand and that element was pulled out as the primary logo element?

You're maybe thinking of U&lc (Upper & Lower Case) magazine. A pretty substantial .pdf collection which can be found here. The art director of U&lc until 1981 was Herb Lubalin, one of the co-designers of the typeface Pistilli Roman, which is where the ampersand in the new SC&P logo comes from. Lubalin's typographic style is a pretty solid "late 60's/early 70's" reference point.

It's much better production design than using a House Industries "Rat Fink" font on an ocean spray comp that Peggy was carrying around last week.

These are the things I'm noticing while everyone else is paying to things like plot and character motivation.
posted by billyfleetwood at 9:59 PM on June 17, 2013 [8 favorites]


Yeah, I was skimming Wikipedia's list of prominent Miss Porter's alums to see if I could find a moment when it stopped being "There is a wing of the Met named after my husband" types and started being ambitious young Hillary Clinton types. The answer is that this moment does not exist.

I was actually a bit surprised at how... scanty that notable alumni list is. I saw perhaps two or three academics, one which is an assistant professor (not to knock assistant profs of course), a few corporate types, and a couple of owners of small businesses. I'd expected the list to be a little bit more high-powered, considering the family connections and wealth in evidence (and also with what I assume is an excellent education and likely Ivy League admission to follow).

I can see, in the context of the show, how boarding school would make a perfect escape for a girl of Sally's class and complicated family life.
posted by jokeefe at 11:35 PM on June 17, 2013


Also like how this episode had just about everybody in it. (except Henry and the Rosens I think)
posted by iamkimiam at 12:20 AM on June 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


I wonder if the works of David Algonquin post-1969 start to include a certain proclivity towards scarred, embittered protagonists who were just trying to do their goddamn job.
posted by fight or flight at 2:32 AM on June 18, 2013 [6 favorites]


Peggy's always been Don's "work daughter." Given that he's just lost his relationship with his real daughter, I guess it's no surprise that Peggy's closeness to Ted and distance from Don would be especially grating for him.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 6:03 AM on June 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


I feel the need to point out one of Miss Porter's more infamous alums.
posted by The Whelk at 6:17 AM on June 18, 2013 [4 favorites]


Clara is at least 50% giraffe.
posted by Chrysostom at 6:20 AM on June 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


This week's GIF's.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 7:14 AM on June 18, 2013 [3 favorites]


I was actually a bit surprised at how... scanty that notable alumni list is.

Until I read that Vanity Fair article linked upthread, I didn't realize that Pema Chödrön is an alumna.
posted by palomar at 11:31 AM on June 18, 2013


I was sitting there contemplating the fact that Don is drinking ORANGE juice, and then it happened.

THEY KILLED KENNY.
- Sara C.

A couple thoughts here. One, I think that may have actually been grapefruit juice - on my screen, at any rate, it was not orange. And, please note - Tropicana, not Sunkist. Fucking Don and his goddam obstreperousness.

Secondly, the Kenny joke is solid gold, orange harvest sunset gold. Did anyone else notice the next scene is Ken pulling drapes to hide his face behind? Orange drapes? What color is Kenny's hooded coat, which he uses to hide his face? That's right!


You're maybe thinking of U&lc (Upper & Lower Case) magazine. A pretty substantial .pdf collection which can be found here. The art director of U&lc until 1981 was Herb Lubalin, one of the co-designers of the typeface Pistilli Roman, which is where the ampersand in the new SC&P logo comes from. Lubalin's typographic style is a pretty solid "late 60's/early 70's" reference point.

It's much better production design than using a House Industries "Rat Fink" font on an ocean spray comp that Peggy was carrying around last week.
- billyfleetwood

That is exactly what I was thinking of and thank you for tracing out that link to Lubalin. I noticed the wrong font use on those Ocean Spray comps too, it was grating. I couldn't even figure out how to complain about it to my wife, which made it more bothersome. Exigencies of battle, I suppose.
posted by mwhybark at 4:47 PM on June 18, 2013


The Whelk: "I feel the need to point out one of Miss Porter's more infamous alums."

My God...it's full of headscarves.
posted by Dr. Zira at 5:55 PM on June 18, 2013


Team CranPrune.
posted by Dr. Zira at 6:11 PM on June 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


You can't spell CRAnpRUnE without CRAnp.
posted by Sys Rq at 6:18 PM on June 18, 2013


That Duke University Libraries Flickr feed has serious Mad Men shoutouts because the feed also has period ads for traveler's checks (perfect for paying hookers) and St. Joseph's Aspirin and shotguns and a handsome turtlenecked fellow with an eye patch and a Smirnoff screwdriver (best use of orange juice) and Nixon/Agnew.
posted by Dr. Zira at 6:41 PM on June 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


And Partners Make Seven - Brand New on the new SC&P logo
posted by mikepop at 7:01 PM on June 18, 2013 [2 favorites]


HEY! Eurostile Extended! That is a freaking Star Trek shoutout!
posted by mwhybark at 8:55 PM on June 18, 2013 [1 favorite]


Meanwhile in The Cabin In Maine, we've combined Southern Comfort and cranberry juice - A Carpet Bagger.
posted by The Whelk at 2:54 AM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Like, he changes the channel in the middle of her line, while her face is on camera. That's almost as powerful as the scene in an earlier episode where he mentally mutes her

Yes, he actually changes it as she says, "I'm talking to you. Don't you dare ignore m--"

Ha. Probably what TLo would call "on the nose," but I think it's funny.

But poor Megan, she is so kind in this episode, with no thanks whatsoever. Dealing with Don's drinking alone, leaving all his other issues aside, could be a relationship-threatening problem. Twice we've seen her react to the liquor on his breath when she's kissed him. That detail is so realistic and so sad.
posted by torticat at 6:51 AM on June 19, 2013


You can't spell CRAnpRUnE without CRAnp.

Seriously, that is some hideous typography. And probably indirectly to blame for the ughness of dELiA's.
posted by psoas at 7:06 AM on June 19, 2013


This week's Mad Style is up.
posted by palomar at 8:52 AM on June 19, 2013


I'm surprised they didn't mention how at odds with the Miss Porter's setting Sally's outfit was. They usually comment when a character's clothes either pull them together with their setting or divide them from it, and despite the sense that Sally will get into Miss Porter's, she certainly isn't tied to the place through her clothes. My prediction is that Sally is getting in over her head, or that this is actually a pretty rash decision that her parents aren't recognizing for personal reasons.
posted by Sara C. at 9:32 AM on June 19, 2013 [2 favorites]


that this is actually a pretty rash decision that her parents aren't recognizing for personal reasons.

This is my feeling. Although I do think Betty was at least trying to get some information out of her about why she was interested.
posted by sweetkid at 9:55 AM on June 19, 2013


Sally is about the age of my older sister so I am acutely aware of how she dresses, as a little sister is aware of an older sister's wardrobe. Sally dresses like we did, a little behind the times and a bit too young for our ages. We had hand me downs from a cousin who's mother was extremely conservative. The dresses are more like late fifties/early sixties shift dresses.

Betty is still dressing in that same way, everything looks like it just needs some nice pearls to dress it up. Megan in a t-shirt is such a contrast, we can't even imagine Betty in a t-shirt. It will be interesting to see what she wears when the character is showing her own style.
posted by readery at 10:02 AM on June 19, 2013


What Sally will wear, I mean.
posted by readery at 10:07 AM on June 19, 2013


My prediction is that Sally is getting in over her head

Wait, why would you think that? Sally showed herself to be WELL up to the challenges ahead! She got the better of everyone who tried to push her around--the schoolgirls, Rollo, Betty. (Well, not that Betty really tried to push her around, but she did try to get information out of her, and Sally didn't give it up. She shut Betty up rather nicely with that "I know that my education is more important" line.) Plus it's clear she's still got an excellent ally in Glen.
posted by torticat at 10:09 AM on June 19, 2013 [2 favorites]


Let's play Crazy Finale Prediction Time: Sylvia is pregnant. (She's ultra-Catholic so probably not on the Pill; her son is at least 18, so she figured she was past childbearing age, although she could feasibly be only 37 or 38.)

I spent more time than I care to admit thinking about this last night during an insomniac jag.
posted by purpleclover at 10:24 AM on June 19, 2013


Betty is pregnant and for some reason it is immediately apparent that the baby is not Henry's. This becomes especially difficult as he is in the midst of a political campaign and does not want to be going through a divorce/separation while running for office.

Good times ensue. - this may not happen until next season though.

And I keep thinking something is going to happen to Roger, leaving Don even more adrift. Shot by Pete's gun?
posted by readery at 10:37 AM on June 19, 2013


Something happening to Roger: My worst fear. I'd have to give up Mad Men altogether, Game of Thrones-style.
posted by purpleclover at 10:51 AM on June 19, 2013


torticat - I didn't get the sense that she wasn't up to the level of the other girls or anything, but, well, spending a night at boarding school is a different thing from going to boarding school. Maybe it's my own boarding school experience talking, but that was a LOT of conflict and discord for something that is supposed to feel natural and like where you belong. Boarding school isn't supposed to be a big scary punishment, and the kids who end up there because of that or because their parents thought it was a feather in the family cap or because they're running from something usually don't do well.

I would have a better read of the situation if Sally had at least been wearing the same color palette as the other girls, or had seemed visually at one with her setting, or even if her preppy plaid dress could be seen as "speaking to" the interviewer lady's outfit. She's costumed as being totally at odds with both the interviewer and the other girls, and completely out of place in her setting. Despite wearing a totally normal and even preppy outfit that should have fit in perfectly.

Interestingly, Glenn's plaid shirt has a nice little dialogue with her plaid dress.
posted by Sara C. at 10:52 AM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Crazy predictions:

Megan is pregnant*. (I also like "Sylvia is pregnant", and I'll raise you BOTH ARE PREGNANT.)

After all that Detroit craziness, Ken steps off the curb to cross the street and gets hit by a bus. No, better, run down by a Jon Deere while fleeing a mugger in Central Park.

Bert Cooper dies. (Is this too Miss Blankenship, though?)

Bobby takes Betty's diet pills as a joke.

Bob runs into Sal at his friendly neighborhood glory hole.

*That said, my big Megan Pregnant prediction was that she'd get pregnant and then have to deal with the fact that a baby basically means retiring from acting. I don't think we have time for that in one episode unless it's a very Megan-focused one. It's also a little similar to Betty's arc during the Cuban Missile Crisis, AND Joan's situation with Roger. I think the show would be more likely to deal with a Megan pregnancy by having her very pregnant at the beginning of season 7, just in time to freak people out more with the Sharon Tate stuff.
posted by Sara C. at 11:08 AM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


I feel like we've been building up to some major act of violence. And Wolk has a new job. Maybe Bob gets killed, or gets put away for killing someone.

Or maybe the accidental stabbing was all we're going to get.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 11:21 AM on June 19, 2013


I feel like we've been building up to some major act of violence. And Wolk has a new job. Maybe Bob gets killed, or gets put away for killing someone.

Granted, it's not like Trudy Campbell was a core character, but Alison Brie managed to hold down a full-time role on Community through the past four years of her appearances on Mad Men. Based on its air-timing (late spring to early summer), I'd imagine the MM shooting schedule picks up right around the time most network shows wrap up.
posted by psoas at 12:23 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Never mind Alison Brie...Elizabeth Moss played a principle character in a series shot in New Zealand without it interfering with Mad Men's timetable. I'm sure they can squeeze Wolk in. Not that his storyline couldn't very well wind up in the season finale, but his other role wouldn't be the reason why.

Don and Megan have to hit some kind of catharsis. Either she leaves, or he has some sort of breakthrough that allows them to re-connect and move forward. She has to be at the end of her rope. And killing her off just feels like more than Don could realistically recover from.

If we're doing crazy predictions though, I'm going to go with Don and Joan hooking up.
posted by dry white toast at 12:39 PM on June 19, 2013


Alright, regarding deaths, and referring back to my comment/question above, Weiner explicitly said that no one is dying this season. Does he lie outright sometimes? (And if not, why would such a notoriously tight-lipped producer say something like that, especially after all the heavy violence foreshadowing?)

Regarding pregnancies, I don't know, I feel like they've Done That enough times. Peggy, Joan, Betty, Trudy. I realize that IRL pregnancies happen all the freaking time, so it's not like it would be unrealistic; it just seems like narratively they might not go back to that well.

I haven't thought about crazy predictions, but in the non-crazy category, I think we have to find out more about Joan and Avon, and that we'll find out definitively whether Ted & Peggy are having a (physical) affair. (I don't think they were, yet, in the last ep, but that is just a guess. But partly based on how Peggy talked about Ted to Don.)

I am really hoping for more Pete & Bob, but think that storyline could be wrapped up for the season (i.e. not concluded, but set up for next season). I am really not especially hoping for more of Sylvia & Arnie, but there might be another shoe to drop there. Or not. All of that could have been set up to cause the crisis/rift with Sally; it doesn't really need to have further resolution.
posted by torticat at 1:03 PM on June 19, 2013


Yeah, most cable series shoot at a different time of year from most network series. Also, in an ensemble show like Mad Men, even relatively major characters are often booking a day here, a day there in terms of their actual time commitment to work. (For example, Community being an ensemble piece means that Allison Brie might actually go there to film two days a week, if even. She probably books a sporadic day here and there on Mad Men.) That said, if he's the protagonist of his new show, this could be difficult. It could also be difficult if the new show doesn't shoot in Los Angeles.

When I was shooting Admission, which had Paul Rudd as a costar, he was also shooting this new Judd Apatow Seth Rogan end of the world thing that is about to come out. The assistant directors just scheduled around it. It's absolutely not at all rare for actors to be doing multiple projects at the same time.

The real issue is exclusivity, bit clearly Mad Men has shown that it's not a big deal. The question is whether it is for CBS.
posted by Sara C. at 1:04 PM on June 19, 2013


The more I read the crazy/noncrazy predictions the more I feel like I have no idea what's going to happen next episode. I can't come up with anything that I feel like will definitely need to be resolved.
posted by sweetkid at 1:07 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Based on the promo, it sure looks like Robin Williams is the lead of that show, not Wolk.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 1:25 PM on June 19, 2013


I feel like the biggest thing hanging over SC&P is their inability to merge (both from a business and personality standpoint). Don has broken his short-lived truce and humiliated Ted just when it looked like they might be able to work together, Peggy is furious with Don and who knows what is going to happen with Pete (and Bob) in Detroit. In the background of all this is Cutler who is presumably still scheming about splitting the company, whatever that may mean exactly (but that clip was referenced again in the preview for next week). I think we're in for a lot of office chaos next episode.
posted by mikepop at 1:26 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Question: if the merger fell apart, would both agencies lose Chevy, or could one conceivably scoop it from the other and hold on to it?

My bet is if SC&P does collapse, Pete goes with Cutler and Chaough.
posted by dry white toast at 1:31 PM on June 19, 2013


I like TLo's point about the contrast between Joan and Peggy re office affairs: Joan carrying one on for years without letting on, and Peggy (who may not have even actually consumated anything with Ted yet) carrying on for the whole office to see.
posted by dry white toast at 1:33 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


The season opened with Don reading Dante's Inferno, handily loaned to him by his mistress. Since the innermost circle of Hell according to Alighieri is reserved for betrayal, it would fit thematically to have the season culminate in the reveal of Don and Sylvia's affair (beyond Sally, possibly by her blurting it out, or in some other way). That was a betrayal of both his wife and, possibly, only friend. His refusal to really be a team player can see as a betrayal of his partners, employees, and the firm; Peggy already sees him as having betrayed her trust in every way, to the point of calling him a monster.
posted by Superplin at 1:34 PM on June 19, 2013 [3 favorites]


If Don is Dante, who is Satan?

If Don is Satan, who is Dante?

Actually I think Don = Satan works better, because the central conflict at this point is Don being trapped, and the harder he tries to escape the more trapped he becomes. The three faces thing is interesting. If Dick is one, and Don is another, what's the third face?

There's also this nice quote from Wikipedia via Lawrence S. Cunningham:

“the deepest isolation is to suffer separation from the source of all light and life and warmth.”
posted by Sara C. at 2:10 PM on June 19, 2013


I don't actually see Don as either Dante (a tourist through the netherworld, but not of it), nor as Satan (ruling overlord of hell, fallen angel). I see him as one of the condemned.
posted by Superplin at 2:14 PM on June 19, 2013 [2 favorites]


In The Divine Comedy, Satan is one of the condemned.
posted by Sara C. at 4:01 PM on June 19, 2013 [2 favorites]


Oh what have I done.
posted by The Whelk at 6:01 PM on June 19, 2013 [5 favorites]


I love it, Whelk! This is canon to me now.
posted by thesmallmachine at 6:31 PM on June 19, 2013


Sara C.: "In The Divine Comedy, Satan is one of the condemned."

Ah, you're absolutely right. That's what I get for not refreshing my memory. It's been a long time since I last read it. Don't know how I managed to retain that horrifying final image but forget that it was Satan's punishment. Still, I don't know that Don is so much a gnawer as a gnawee.
posted by Superplin at 7:07 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


Wow, I was in the middle of reading this Grantland review of season six, which says:

Weiner cut his teeth working on The Sopranos, and I can't help but detect a whiff of David Chase in this season's depressing spiral. The Sopranos boss was famously furious with the way his audience seemed to love his main character more in equal proportion to all the terrible things he did. Weiner seems to have pushed Don to a similar extreme this year

...and thinking of this comment I made several weeks ago arguing kind of the opposite (re Weiner), when I heard James Gandolfini had died. I am so sad and shocked. Whatever Chase's objectives were, we sure did love Tony Soprano. And Gandolfini was just a great guy.
posted by torticat at 7:08 PM on June 19, 2013


Fuck, Whelk, you can write.
posted by PinkMoose at 9:50 PM on June 19, 2013 [1 favorite]


That is why we call him Mr. The_Whelk. That and the unsettling time travel anecdotes. And the drinking.
posted by mwhybark at 10:08 PM on June 19, 2013


(from your lips to agents' ears pinkmoose)

(look for Straw House, coming to a bookstore near you in 2014 ...ish )

posted by The Whelk at 6:49 AM on June 20, 2013


hey guys look at this awesome tumblr. It's Mad Men with stuff written on it.
posted by sweetkid at 12:33 PM on June 20, 2013 [3 favorites]


this might be my favorite
posted by sweetkid at 12:36 PM on June 20, 2013 [2 favorites]


I just figured it out:
Don is Lucille
Peggy
Pete is Michael
Ginsberg is Buster
Ted Chaough is Lucille 2
Bob Benson is Maebe


Ted - juice obsession
Ken - injury/pirate costume
Don - A MONSTER!!!

It's a Buster off!
posted by Sys Rq at 12:53 PM on June 20, 2013 [3 favorites]


(And yes, Bob is totally the Maeby.)
posted by Sys Rq at 12:54 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


" okay now I'm just lying for no reason."

Also, from the linked blog

Ugh. happiness.
posted by The Whelk at 1:03 PM on June 20, 2013


Apropos of the macro at the top of that tumblr --

Crazy Death Prediction: Ginsberg.
posted by Sara C. at 1:18 PM on June 20, 2013


Not gonna lie, if the last season isn't just a parade of increasingly insane death scenes I'm gonna be kinda let down.
posted by The Whelk at 1:23 PM on June 20, 2013 [3 favorites]


Crazy Death Prediction: Ginsberg.

No why.

But if we're just wishing I wish Sylvia. Sorry Sylvia.
posted by sweetkid at 1:24 PM on June 20, 2013


Oh no I don't wish Ginsberg dead. In fact, he's probably the background character I want to know the most about.

I just feel like we've seen him steadily in a worse and worse place, emotionally, throughout the season. And we've been left with questions: "what's up with Ginsberg? is he schizophrenic or something?"

That said, I don't think he'd kill himself, since obviously the show has done that before, and recently. But he seems deeply not OK. And I think that the last episode of the season might deal with that. And it wouldn't surprise me if they dealt with it in a really surprising and catastrophic way.

That said, I don't know how we get from mentally ill to dead without going back to the suicide well.
posted by Sara C. at 1:32 PM on June 20, 2013


yea I don't think that's where the Ginsberg story is going. I also don't think he's schizophrenic. He was fine last episode right? Did I miss something?
posted by sweetkid at 1:35 PM on June 20, 2013


Was he even in this past episode?
posted by Sys Rq at 1:36 PM on June 20, 2013


I don't necessarily think Ginsberg is schizophrenic. But there's obviously something up, and the fact that we're seeing it, and both episodes that have had Ginsberg subplots have been about that, implies to me that this is a Thing.

That said, I don't think Ginsberg is actually going to die. I just threw it out there as an off the wall prediction.
posted by Sara C. at 1:37 PM on June 20, 2013


Was he even in this past episode?

Yes, in the CranPrune part.

But you know who wasn't?

Stan.
posted by Sara C. at 1:37 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


Off-the-wall prediction: Roger leaves SC&P to take up residence at Esalen.
posted by ambrosia at 1:47 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


Bob swinging an axe into Pete's head " Try to get a table at the 21 Club now!"
posted by The Whelk at 1:51 PM on June 20, 2013 [2 favorites]


First 5 minutes of first episode of final season: Don Draper is murdered. Cut to three months earlier, begin rest of season as we wind down to that final moment. Throughout the rest of the season, Don will periodically fantasize about and dream about his death. We wonder as the season progresses if we will even be able to tell whether the murder was real.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 6:04 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


I keep returning to the first few minutes of this season, which were edited to make the viewer think Don Draper is dying.
posted by Sara C. at 6:16 PM on June 20, 2013 [6 favorites]


I keep kinda daydreaming about the last episode including a montage showing the general direction the characters are heading (Betty at some kind of political rally, helping Henry campaign; Sally dressing up as David Bowie; Peggy attending the founding meeting of Ms. magazine; Pete doing... something Pete-ish; Roger signing up for some kind of proto-Est seminar; Don drinking in an empty apartment; Megan on a plane heading to Europe, newly signed divorce papers in hand, etcetera). Then a smash cut to Florida, 1999, where a 76 year old Don is living with the fifth Mrs. Draper and a round the clock oxygen feed. Joan comes to visit and we get to find out what happened to all the characters ("Remember Ken?" "Yeah, I saw the obit in The Atlantic. Imagine, a lawnmower accident-- must have been fate.") Joan sneaks a slug of vodka into his orange juice, and they reminisce. There's a slow pan over family photographs-- Sally with kids, Sally's graduation from law school, and so on. Closure! We learn what happens to everyone! And then Don dies. The end.
posted by jokeefe at 6:59 PM on June 20, 2013 [2 favorites]


I kind of don't want to know what happens to everyone. I just want to imagine stuff. I didn't like that bit of Six Feet Under.
posted by sweetkid at 7:10 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


I kind of don't want to know what happens to everyone. I just want to imagine stuff. I didn't like that bit of Six Feet Under.

I LOVED that bit of Six Feet Under. If any show gets to do what it did, it's a show called SIX FEET UNDER. That said, I never want to watch that sequence again. I sob so much I can't see the screen.
posted by crossoverman at 7:19 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


uh, yeah sure it "gets" to, but I wasn't a fan of it. The montage, I mean not the show
posted by sweetkid at 7:24 PM on June 20, 2013 [1 favorite]


The only thing I didn't like about the ending of SFU was that most people got gauzy happy endings or such, if it was me I'd have more random run over by trucks at young ages. More in line with the spirit of the show.
posted by The Whelk at 8:07 PM on June 20, 2013 [2 favorites]


That's true. The black guy gets murdered. And everyone else lives into their old age.
posted by crossoverman at 8:14 PM on June 20, 2013


I kept expecting Nate's kid, of whom much has been made, to like die of something totally stupid and random at like 13 . Bleh.

In my Mad Men montage, Sally becomes Donna Tartt. Look inside yourself you know this is true.
posted by The Whelk at 8:22 PM on June 20, 2013 [5 favorites]


Another random thought I had this morning for the finale is that Cutler puts some sort of plan into play but it backfires and he ends up out of the agency. Unfortunately whatever happens I may not get to watch until Monday night!
posted by mikepop at 6:42 AM on June 21, 2013


Unfortunately whatever happens I may not get to watch until Monday night!

Count yourself lucky. I'm leaving the country and won't be able to watch it until like the 30th. It's kind of killing me.
posted by COBRA! at 7:13 AM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Cutler puts some sort of plan into play but it backfires and he ends up out of the agency.

His head can bear the blinding majesty of his hairdo or the weight of his magnificent spectacles no longer, and implodes in a bloody shower that defiles Roger's all-white office in crimson rivers of gore.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 7:16 AM on June 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


In my Mad Men montage, Sally becomes Donna Tartt. Look inside yourself you know this is true.

You're obsessed with this Donna Tartt thing it's madness madness I say
posted by sweetkid at 7:16 AM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm not sure Sally would write The Secret History, but I'm not sure anyone else could have written The Little Friend. I mean, we're tracking down Carla next season, right?
posted by purpleclover at 7:22 AM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's more plausible then Sally Draper, Demon Hunter.
posted by The Whelk at 7:25 AM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Mad Men Soup: 15 Groovy Words From Season 6 (from the wordnik blog)
posted by iamkimiam at 7:39 AM on June 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


The Nerdist has a chat with Weiner all about season five up as well.
posted by The Whelk at 7:41 AM on June 21, 2013


Ooooooh, thanks! Just found it. Here's the link: Nerdist Writer's Panel Mad Men S5 in Review

posted by iamkimiam at 7:45 AM on June 21, 2013


And perfect timing, as the Mad Men Happy Hour Podcast has really been disappointing and problematic for me lately and I gotta get some weekly audio Mad men analysis somehow or I'll just never be motivated to get on my bike and go anywhere at all.
posted by iamkimiam at 7:49 AM on June 21, 2013


Speaking of Trek.
posted by mwhybark at 9:25 AM on June 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


And everyone yells at him! Ken, Jim, Pete … did you ever feel like the resident punching bag?
It’s funny. There are so many pressures on these guys. You see them dealing with so much. And then Bob comes in smiling ear to ear. He’s an easy target, quite frankly. But he’s confident in himself. That’s something the producers told me: “You don’t become bashful about your own sense of self. He has real confidence.” Even though there’s an affable quality to him, there’s also a confidence, a steely resolve to take those punches and roll with them, which I loved.
-- Vulture interview with James Wolk.
posted by rewil at 12:30 PM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's true. The black guy gets murdered. And everyone else lives into their old age.

Not everyone. Let's remember there had already been three deaths in the Fisher family in the previous five years. Lisa, who was, you know, white, was murdered as well, at a much younger age than Keith, who was 59 when he got shot. Nate died of a stroke at 40. Nathaniel Fisher Sr. was hit by a bus at 57. It just wouldn't be realistic to have too many people from one family die tragic deaths.
posted by orange swan at 2:27 PM on June 21, 2013


But it would have been entertaining
posted by The Whelk at 2:31 PM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'll give you that.
posted by orange swan at 2:36 PM on June 21, 2013


Mad Men Soup: 15 Groovy Words From Season 6 (from the wordnik blog)
Wendy [to Don]: “Do you want to get it on?”

“The Crash,” May 19, 2013

Anachronism alert! While this episode takes place in 1967, the term get it on, or to have sex, didn’t come about until 1971, according to the OED, appearing in B.B. Johnson’s Blues for a Black Sister: “She gripped him with her legs and they got it on.” But if anyone can antedate this term, please let us know in the comments.
Hmm. There must be an earlier example, but I'll be darned if I can think of one. "Bang a Gong (Get it On)" was also 1971, as was Chase's "Get it On"; "Let's Get it On" was 1973.
posted by Sys Rq at 3:22 PM on June 21, 2013


I got stuck in traffic so I had time to think about this.

Sally Draper: Demon Hunter.

INT - LIVING ROOM - NIGHT

We open on a pitch-perfect 70s suburban house, shag carpet, wood
paneling, orange accents, the whole Brady Bunch deal. We take in the
scene and move to an adorable moppet in pig-tails sitting at the
kitchen table and being served dinner by a doting mother. The kid,
about ten or so, is juice-commercial perfect and beaming while the
mother looks pale and harried. Mom puts the plate down in front of the
kid.


GIRL:

MAY I HAVE SOME MILK PLEASE MOMMY?

Mom nods and walks behind the kid to the fridge. She slowly and
quietly takes a butcher knife out of the drawer while the kid sits
smiling, looking off into the distance. We follow a close shot of the
Mom creeping up on the kid, knife in hand.

Just as Mom is directly behind the kid, butcher knife beginning to
rise, the door to the house busts in, revealing a now 20-something
SALLY DRAPER banishing a very large and ancient looking crossbow and
wearing huge welder's gloves.

SALLY:

GET AWAY FROM HER.

There's a half a beat of confusion before Sally launches a crossbow
bolt into the kid's chest. The kid screams and drops to floor before
lifting her head up and revealing her large, inhumane fangs and
blood-red eyes. The kid-monster wails like a banshee and crouches into
a leap just as FRANK and VALERIE charge into the room. Sally shoots
another bolt into Kid-Monster, causing it to leap across the room
toward Sally but Kid-monster drops like a stone when VALERIE (short
hair, big glasses, long sweater) starts reading aloud from a worn
paperback in her hand.

VALERIE:

(Spooky sounding Latin chants)


Kid Monster writhes in pain on the floor, its features less and less
childlike. Mom is still standing in the kitchen, having backed herself
against the wall, still holding the knife. SALLY turns to FRANK (White
polo shirt, blonde, jockish, medical bag over his shoulder).

SALLY:

GARLIC!

FRANK digs in his bag and throws a garlic bulb to SALLY who takes in
her hands and shoves into the fanged Kid-Monster mouth. VALERIE
continues to chant while Kid-Monster goes into a full frothing
seizure.

SALLY:
(to Fred, pointing at the Mom)

CHECK ON HER.

(To VALERIE)

CAN WE PICK UP THE PACE A LITTLE VAL?

VALERIE:
(Stops chanting)

IF WE PICKED HER UP ON HER WAY HOME FROM SCHOOL LIKE I SUGGESTED-

SALLY:

I HAD TO BE SURE. HOW'S SHE LOOK FRANK?

FRANK is walking slowly toward the obviously in shock Mom, hands up,
palms out, all smiles.

FRANK:

MRS. WILLARD? BABARA WILLARD? HELLO, MY NAME IS FRED HANCOCK AND THESE
ARE MY FRIENDS SALLY AND VALERIE, AND WE'RE HERE TO HELP YOU. I KNOW
THIS IS CRAZY AND YOU HAVE A LOT OF EMOTIONS YOU'RE DEALING WITH NOW
AND THAT'S COOL YOU'RE ALLOWED TO JUST FEEL WHATEVER YOU WANT TO FEEL,
IT'S OKAY BUT I'M GOING TO HAVE TO ASK THAT YOU TRUST ME SO WE CAN GET
YOUR DAUGHTER THE HELP SHE NEEDS-OKAY? SO MAYBE WE COULD PUT THE KNIFE
DOWN A LITTLE AND TALK A BIT MORE ABOUT OUR-

FRANK keeps talking until Mrs. Willard has lowered her knife and he'd
gotten close to enough to blow a handful of red powder in her face.
She drops to the ground in a swoon and FRANK checks her neck, finding
two large bite-marks.

SALLY:

HAS SHE TURNED?

FRANK:

NOT YET. LOOKS LIKE MOM WAS JUST A MEAL TICKET FOR NOW.

SALLY:

WHAT IS TAKING SO LONG VAL?

VALARIE:

MAYBE IF I WASN'T BEING INTERRUPTED EVERY FIVE MINUTES - DEMON'S IN
TOO DEEP I CAN'T GET IT OUT WITHOUT RISKING BRAIN DAMAGE.

SALLY:

FINE.

SALLY grabs her crossbow and shoots Kid-Monster dead in the heart.
Kid-Monster yelps and goes limp. Blood begins to pour onto the
deep-pile shag carpet. Sally turns to walk about. FRANK points to the
sleeping Mrs. Willard.

FRANK:

WHAT ABOUT HER?

SALLY:

NOT OUR JOB.

FRANK begins to say something but VALARIE stops him.

VALARIE:

DON'T. YOU'RE NEW, YOU DON'T KNOW.

FRANK:

KNOW WHAT?

VALARIE:

SALLY AND BLOODSUCKERS. SHE'S GOT A THING ABOUT THEM. HAD TO PUT HER
OWN MOTHER DOWN DURING HER SENIOR PROM. HOW SHE GOT INTO THE BUSINESS.

FRANK:

SHE BLED HER OWN MOM?

VALARIE:

YEP. THEY NEVER SEEM TO FIGURE OUT THAT 'YOUTH AND BEAUTY FOREVER"
THING COMES WITH STRINGS ATTACHED. C'MON, LET'S GET A SNACK, I'M
STARVING.

And then Sally meets the last member of their gang, Glen Bishop, who
is now a huge stoner with a dog who drives them around from mystery to
mystery.

In a van.
posted by The Whelk at 4:26 PM on June 21, 2013 [10 favorites]


You horrible, beautiful man. For the record, I KNEW YOU WHEN.




on the internet
posted by mwhybark at 4:38 PM on June 21, 2013


The Whelk, I think your "Sally Draper, Demon Hunter" script needs a catchphrase indicating how deeply the dominant culture remains in denial about the soul-draining demonic possessions that pervade our nation, something to show that our heroes operate unthanked in silence, some phrase that shows the weight of silence and sorrow that Sally and her crew carry with them all their days and nights.

Something like, I dunno, "This never happened."
posted by Elsa at 5:02 PM on June 21, 2013 [9 favorites]


I fully agree Elsa, and of course the cover business they use to hide in plain sight is a simple generic business....


PIZZA HOUSE.
posted by The Whelk at 5:23 PM on June 21, 2013 [6 favorites]


Scooby had better appear in his Venture Bros. incarnation.
posted by invitapriore at 6:01 PM on June 21, 2013


Harry Crane is some kind of litch, the team of Peggy " The Impaler" Olson and Stan " Smoke Bomb" Rizzo taught Sally everythi she knows, the big bad is obviously Peggy and Pete's kid who is an Antichrist/Damien type, and Ginsberg is a hermit who was cursed with visions in a deal with the devil ( who was wearing Don's dead body )

Ken supports the whole demon hunting enterprise via the best selling book series he writes based on Sally and Co's adventures.
posted by The Whelk at 6:05 PM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yes I've been shot gunning a lot of Supernatural episodes lately why do you ask?
posted by The Whelk at 6:10 PM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


Re "get it on" (and possibly other anachronisms) -- I guess you can argue that Megan wouldn't have been using such an expression, or that Don would have rolled his eyes at such slangy nonsense, but I think it's generally accepted as a truism that a word's first appearance in print isn't the same thing as its appearance in the language.

That said, there are a ton more period correct and super awesome/weird/dated expressions for sex that might have been a better choice. I'm honestly shocked that the expression "ball" hasn't been used on the show so far. I remember reading it plenty in Second Wave Feminist and other New Left literature from this period, so if it's not in common use in 1968, it's very close.
posted by Sara C. at 6:11 PM on June 21, 2013 [2 favorites]


Re "get it on" (and possibly other anachronisms) -- I guess you can argue that Megan wouldn't have been using such an expression, or that Don would have rolled his eyes at such slangy nonsense, but I think it's generally accepted as a truism that a word's first appearance in print isn't the same thing as its appearance in the language.

Yeah, I absolutely agree that it was almost certainly in use in 1967-8, especially among with-it New Yorkers. Four years isn't such a long time. But it's weird that there's no written evidence, considering how much was written in the common vernacular in those days.

And, yes, "ball" one word I see a lot in authentic 1960s contexts and have absolutely no "Aw, I wish people still talked like that" nostalgia for.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:00 PM on June 21, 2013 [1 favorite]


I remember " ball" coming back for like five seconds in partytimer Brooklynite circles in like 06' , just long enough for me to go "ew that is an awful word."
posted by The Whelk at 8:15 PM on June 21, 2013


The Whelk: "Ken supports the whole demon hunting enterprise via the best selling book series he writes based on Sally and Co's adventures."

Is it called Sally, Slayer of the Daemons (pronounced de-MONS)?
posted by Superplin at 6:52 AM on June 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yes, with hilarious pastel painted covers.
posted by The Whelk at 7:28 AM on June 22, 2013


As Grover Banes. Or maybe Kate Cotswolds.
posted by mwhybark at 9:38 AM on June 22, 2013


invitapriore: "Scooby had better appear in his Venture Bros. incarnation."

So this is why Ted keeps saying "Groovy"!
posted by Dr. Zira at 10:58 AM on June 22, 2013 [1 favorite]


Is this still the chosen thread for post-finale action later tonight?
posted by Rhomboid at 9:22 AM on June 23, 2013


Yes
posted by sweetkid at 9:31 AM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm on a delay because I am In The Woods so I may have to check in with y'all tomorrow.

Unless of course something awesome happens then just send up a flare and I'll get in my hovercraft.
posted by The Whelk at 9:35 AM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


(although finales on this show are usually contemplative yes? The pants on head crazy usually occuring in the middle of the run?)
posted by The Whelk at 9:38 AM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Is there not already a Whelk-symbol searchlight mounted on a choice rooftop somewhere in Manhattan? I have to admit I'm a little disappointed.
posted by invitapriore at 9:39 AM on June 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


So I follow the stanlovespeggy tumblr now, as one does, and earlier today they reblogged this breakdown of Stan and Peggy's relationship that was interesting enough but really, just scroll down to see Ted and Stan juxtaposed. I would like to see this explored in full-on Mad Style fashion plz.
posted by rewil at 9:43 AM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'm on a delay because I am In The Woods so I may have to check in with y'all tomorrow.

I'll also be on delay tonight; The Fella's working 'til midnight and I'll be waiting to watch with him. I'm hoping we'll get to it tonight, or I'll be covering my ears a lot at tomorrow's meet-up.
posted by Elsa at 11:08 AM on June 23, 2013


I'm on my usual Amazon-related delay, but I'm working from home tomorrow so WOO 9AM MAD MEN VIEWING! I'll probably be blowing up this thread around 10AM, pacific time.
posted by Sara C. at 11:23 AM on June 23, 2013


Esquire: How the finale might go.
posted by The Whelk at 11:36 AM on June 23, 2013


I'm on my usual Amazon-related delay

I know what you mean but this makes it sound like you'll be hanging out with parrots and swinging from trees or something

WOO 9AM MAD MEN VIEWING!

Oh good because there is like a hole in my soul until I know you've seen it and what you think (this is only slightly hyperbolic)

I have a date tonight but gave him reasons I need to be home by 10. I didn't include Mad Men, too early for that.
posted by sweetkid at 11:40 AM on June 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


sweetkid, if you're late tonight or on a delay, I'm throwing out my TV and deleting the internet.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 1:28 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I'M SCARED, YOU GUYS.

(And I'll probably wait an hour to watch it on DVR so I don't have to wait through commercials.)
posted by mynameisluka at 1:36 PM on June 23, 2013


I'm pretty sure my 24 hour gym with the TV treadmills is in collusion with AMC, because wouldn't you know it that Sunday evening is the only time they're not open during the nine o'clock hour.
posted by invitapriore at 1:45 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


I AM NOT READY FOR THIS TO END (for the year)!

And now I'm contemplating how I'm going to feel next year.

Oh god.
posted by crossoverman at 2:13 PM on June 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


One of the nice things about being on the West Coast is knowing that by the time I get home tonight after visiting with my mother, the finale will already have been uploaded by the friendly folks at [redacted].

I buy the DVDs when they are released. I don't own a TV.
posted by jokeefe at 2:47 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


I wish there were a way to watch Mad Men with The Whelk comments popping up at the appropriate time.
posted by drezdn at 3:55 PM on June 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


Alternate universe DVD commentary track.

( I have seriously thought about doing VoiceOver for one episode in the style of Wizard People Dear Reader)
posted by The Whelk at 4:06 PM on June 23, 2013


Get on it, VH1!
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 4:07 PM on June 23, 2013


Mystery Mad Men Theater 1960......
posted by The Whelk at 4:15 PM on June 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


Let's play Crazy Finale Prediction Time:

OKAY! My major Outlandish Prediction isn't necessarily finale-specific; if Bob Benson sticks around, even off-screen, this could happen next year.

Since Bob Benson's first few appearances, I've been thinking that his well-meaning/self-serving assistance and errand-running is going to have dire consequences for Don. Specifically, I think that Don's hidden identity is going to be made suddenly more precarious by some small, favor-currying, and previously unseen (by us and by Don) act of Bob Benson's.

I can't put my finger on what initially drove this suspicion, but since "Favors," I'm doubly convinced. We know that Bob is always trying to do (what he thinks are) favors for his superiors, quietly learning what he can about them and trying to provide desired services, whether that's providing a cup of good coffee or sending a deli delivery to a memorial service or finding a trained nurse to charm the heck out of an aging patient. However benignly Bob Benson may intend it, this kind of well-intended interference isn't always welcome. As Pete bursts out when confronting Bob about Manolo: "In fact, I never told you anything! You were just doing some digging!"

I see Julie, Sally's sleepover frenemy, as a stand-in for Bob Benson in Sally's life: she comes out of nowhere as far as we're concerned, she performs little helpful tasks for Megan (taking out the trash, serving more lasagne) while displaying flattering attention and apparent respect. And I think that just as Julie's (not entirely benign) interference in Sally's life led to a terrible discovery and a great breaching of secrets, Bob's interference is going to lead to a terrible discovery and an unleashing of Don's secrets.

If you're persuaded by wardrobe analysis, note that the bright green and white dress Julie wears when she delivers the note (off-screen, but she's wearing the dress immediately before and after) echoes the colors Bob Benson wears (bright green shirt, white print shorts) in the scene at Joan's apartment when he learns about Pete's mother.

If you scroll down the T&L style analysis for "Favors" (their photos don't seem to be linkable, sorry), you can see that Dawn also wears the same color green, which makes me wonder if Bob managed to hound Dawn into handing over that lighter that she so confidently said she'd return to its rightful owner, thus involving her, however unwittingly, in this mess that I believe he's making for Don. Or maybe Janie Bryant is just making the most of a then-popular color.

This has been Elsa's Outlandish Prediction Corner. Thank you for joining me, and I look forward to all of your Outlandish Predictions.
posted by Elsa at 4:45 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Wait, do the predictions have to be outlandish? I'm gonna try more of a newspaper-horoscope approach, where a broad enough aim will mean that, unless the whole episode's a dream sequence where Don's a traveling salesman named Kevin Finnerty, something's bound to hit. Here goes:

Something unexpected happens in Don's building!

A new development makes an SC&P employee reconsider their place in the firm!

When somebody learns a secret, there are shocking repurcussions!

A surprising event prompts questions that won't be answered until next season!
posted by box at 5:28 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


box, add in a "WHAT?" and that's every "Next time, on Mad Men" teaser.
posted by Elsa at 5:34 PM on June 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


In retrospect I think the Peggy-fearfully-attempting-to-escape-her-apartment clip in the Next Time On was just a master stroke of audience trolling, especially given all the foreboding death and violence vibes this season. And then it was a mouse.
posted by invitapriore at 6:12 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Can you sense my disappointment at not being able to read The Whelk's commentary 24 hours prior to being able to watch the show?
posted by computech_apolloniajames at 6:57 PM on June 23, 2013


Directed by Matthew Weiner!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:02 PM on June 23, 2013


Can someone explain my irrational hatred for Roger's daughter?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:03 PM on June 23, 2013


That's not irrational hatred.
posted by palomar at 7:03 PM on June 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


I need that mug.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:04 PM on June 23, 2013


Here is a litre of vodka for Kevin.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:04 PM on June 23, 2013


By which I mean, Roger's daughter has always seemed rather spoiled and bitchy to me.
posted by palomar at 7:05 PM on June 23, 2013


Oh God why does Megan look like a character from Bewitched all of the sudden?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:05 PM on June 23, 2013


Sorry, Don has a 10am BURN.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:09 PM on June 23, 2013


That sound you heard was the sound of Peggy's ovaries weeping.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:11 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Wow, Pete loses one parent on a plane and another on a boat?!
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:11 PM on June 23, 2013


"Lost at sea" - metaphor, much?
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:12 PM on June 23, 2013


So, Pete's parents should just have avoided taking trips.
posted by rewil at 7:12 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Manolo would have pushed her and ran off with her jewelry.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:12 PM on June 23, 2013


I don't know. If Roger Sterling was my father, I'd want to be paid for hassle.

Wow, Pete loses one parent on a plane and another on a boat?!

"To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness."
posted by gladly at 7:13 PM on June 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


That's why Pete never ever wants to leave New York City.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:13 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Score one point for Esquire and its predictions.
posted by rewil at 7:15 PM on June 23, 2013


Guess we know what next season's about.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:17 PM on June 23, 2013


OMG he's stealing Stan's idea. Asshole.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:17 PM on June 23, 2013


Yes, but our dreams of Steggy live on....
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:18 PM on June 23, 2013


Of course, his warning to Stan remains: if it crashes and burns no one will want to work with him again. I'm sensing an unhappy ending for the show.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:19 PM on June 23, 2013


You eat that sandwich, Stan.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:20 PM on June 23, 2013


11:00 a.m. BURN brought to you by STAN who is made of balls.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:20 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


"NOT GREAT, BOB!" might be my favorite line of Pete's ever.
posted by gladly at 7:21 PM on June 23, 2013 [10 favorites]


I am so going to miss this show.
posted by rewil at 7:21 PM on June 23, 2013


WHY IS PEGGY DRESSED LIKE A HOOKER?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:22 PM on June 23, 2013


Oh boy oh boy.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:23 PM on June 23, 2013


Payback's a bitch.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:24 PM on June 23, 2013


The winner so far is Sally, by a mile.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:25 PM on June 23, 2013


So Pete's inability to drive stick is a metaphor, right?
posted by kickingthecrap at 7:25 PM on June 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


This is why you pay attention in driver's ed.
posted by rewil at 7:25 PM on June 23, 2013


The Campbells should just be kept away from transportation in general.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:26 PM on June 23, 2013 [9 favorites]


@Dr. Zira: I assume so Ted can gag on her eleganza.
posted by kickingthecrap at 7:27 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Pete and Bob are totally heading either towards a hate fuck or murder.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:27 PM on June 23, 2013


I hate it when I feel sorry for Pete.
posted by donajo at 7:27 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


This comeuppance brought to you by BURN Benson.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:27 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Teggy!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:30 PM on June 23, 2013


Is it possible for Ted Chaugh to be less sexy?
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:30 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, Ted is gross. Also, poor Bets.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:31 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Black turtlenecks are mysterious. Blue turtlenecks are for TeeVee game show hosts.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:32 PM on June 23, 2013


Please stop this relationship is an abomination.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:33 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


More like, "Oh sweetheart, you're working Peggy too hard..."
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:34 PM on June 23, 2013


Ted's cheating is almost more depressing than Don's cheating. Almost.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:34 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I think it's worse because Ted's supposed to be better than this.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:36 PM on June 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


I actually fell for it, and believed he was serious about leaving his wife, until he got home, got in bed with her, and held her in the exact same way he'd held Peggy. Ugh.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:38 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Yeah, it's pretty transparently bullshit. What Ted cares about is owning things other people can't--I don't know how much he actually cares about the things themselves.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:40 PM on June 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


Now everyone wants the juice.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:40 PM on June 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


So Sally just has to hang in the infirmary until Don gets around to picking her up?
posted by donajo at 7:41 PM on June 23, 2013


She does have beer.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:41 PM on June 23, 2013


God fighting over this measly scrap of hope like it matters. Buncha assholes. This episode has reached maximum asshole.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:42 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Clearly, Don's a Cadbury's man.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:43 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:44 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Most. Awkward. Pitch Meeting. EVAR.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:46 PM on June 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


Hoooooly crap.
posted by rewil at 7:46 PM on June 23, 2013


BUH! Jesus, Don!
posted by ob1quixote at 7:47 PM on June 23, 2013


Good man, Don. For once. Is he going to off himself? What's haaaappening.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:48 PM on June 23, 2013


What the I don't even
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:48 PM on June 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


I'm a sucker, but I really hope this tide of honesty is carrying him to go get Sally.
posted by gladly at 7:48 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Me too! My heart wants him to quit, go get Sally, talk it out with Megan, and, you know, become someone he's not.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:49 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Inexplicably, Ted wants to move to a whorehouse.
posted by Dr. Zira at 7:50 PM on June 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


You realize we're all going to have to come back to this thread once The Whelk, sweetkid, and Sara C. get in on this... Because, seriously. Holy shit. And there's still not-quite-ten minutes to go!
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:52 PM on June 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Don's plot is feeling kind of done. I am worried.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 7:53 PM on June 23, 2013


Don't call me Shirley.
posted by flyingsquirrel at 7:53 PM on June 23, 2013


Gah now we have to watch Peggy's heart break.