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Reviews that mention hangover in San Francisco
July 2, 2013 5:37 PM   Subscribe

The new Yelp Wordmap uses review keyword density to depict which big city neighborhoods are the most "sketchy", "yuppie", "hipster", "bacon" and much more.
posted by changeling (33 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
BYOB bars? That's a new one.
posted by DU at 6:05 PM on July 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


I assumed it meant BYOB restaurants.
posted by octothorpe at 6:16 PM on July 2, 2013


Also available for NYC (and DC, Paris, etc). Who would have ever guessed that Williamsburg and the Lower East Side were the hipster epicenters? Meanwhile, the Ace Hotel, Stumptown and the Breslin are the beacon of hipsterism in midtown.
posted by autopilot at 6:21 PM on July 2, 2013


But what if I don't interact with the world through this narrow minded and suffocating taxonomy? What if I want to go to a neighborhood that's late 90s Flaming Lips, bergamot and young crazy love?
posted by Foci for Analysis at 6:26 PM on July 2, 2013 [6 favorites]


Branché is the French word for Hipster? Google tells me it's Bobo.
posted by cazoo at 6:44 PM on July 2, 2013


I suppose I shouldn't be surprised to that nearly every keyword is centralized above Chicago's Roosevelt Road, though I still feel obliged to bristle the South Sider's bristle.
posted by aintthattheway at 6:48 PM on July 2, 2013


I admit it. I live in sketchy... but I also live in cheap and noodles too!
posted by markkraft at 6:54 PM on July 2, 2013


I have a huge problem with the "hipster" results for Portland. There are big blobs in Old Town where extremely non-hipster dance clubs dominate. I suspect it's because the Yelp reviews in those areas say "no hipsters" or "hipster free".
posted by chrchr at 6:57 PM on July 2, 2013


And here's Portland coverage of this from the stuffier of our two alt weeklies.
posted by chrchr at 7:02 PM on July 2, 2013


Branché means plugged-in. It can mean literally plugged in like to an outlet, and also in the sense of being aware of trends.
posted by Pruitt-Igoe at 7:15 PM on July 2, 2013


BYOB restaurants would also be new to me. I thought the point of restaurants wasn't that they gave you a place to sit but that they did the dishes for you.
posted by DU at 7:15 PM on July 2, 2013 [1 favorite]




It's almost like the places with the most stuff to be reviewed have the most people mentioning specific words!
posted by Potomac Avenue at 7:45 PM on July 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


BYOB restaurants are totally a thing; as I understand it, an alcohol license is separate from a license to sell food, and getting one is somewhat expensive and complicated. I've been to many a place that doesn't serve booze, but suggests that patrons go next door to the convenience store while waiting for a table. Then all the restaurant has to do is give you glasses and ice! No booze permit, no problem, win-win!
posted by blnkfrnk at 7:49 PM on July 2, 2013


I don't know the exact percentage but a whole lot of restaurants around here are BYOB. Pretty much all Asian restaurants are but many fancy chef owned places too. Liquor licenses are a finite commodity and are expensive for a small place to buy. It's great for the consumer since you can bring your own eight dollar bottle of wine instead of paying three times that from the restaurant.
posted by octothorpe at 8:16 PM on July 2, 2013


Heh. In NYC, "frat" overlaps with "hangover" and "prix-fix" overlaps with "tourist" and "view". And the lower east side is cheap and pricey, hipster and yuppie all at once.
posted by subdee at 8:29 PM on July 2, 2013


> Ace Hotel, Stumptown and the Breslin are the beacon of hipsterism in midtown.

Given that two of those three are Portland influenced (or directly related), I'm not surprised.
posted by mrzarquon at 8:58 PM on July 2, 2013


"Nabes"? Yeesh.
posted by yoink at 9:16 PM on July 2, 2013 [1 favorite]


I live on a block best known for pricey pasta hangover yuppies. Sounds about right.
posted by StickyCarpet at 10:11 PM on July 2, 2013


Yelp is a placeholder for a more organized and reliable review channel that just hasnt come along yet. Plus the founder is heavy into the militant side of blow-palestine-up-politics. I wait for something better
posted by Colonel Panic at 10:12 PM on July 2, 2013


I guess I will break my years-long silence and just say, hey, cool, something I made is on MeFi!
posted by keenduck at 12:16 AM on July 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


I'm glad they don't seem to have a "sketchy" map for NYC.

Seriously, stop calling neighborhoods sketchy.
posted by Ad hominem at 12:28 AM on July 3, 2013


What if they are full of caricaturists?
posted by fleacircus at 2:11 AM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


No booze permit, no problem, win-win!

I'm glad I've been warned, since I don't consider going to a restaurant and THEN having to do my own grocery shopping to be an awesome experience. If I want to get up in the middle of a meal to get someone a drink, I can eat at home with my kids.
posted by DU at 2:36 AM on July 3, 2013


Where to find Hipsters in London

Nice South London hotspots in Brixton and Peckham Rye!
posted by DanCall at 2:44 AM on July 3, 2013


Says more about Yelp users than the distributions of these keyword attributes.
posted by lathrop at 6:21 AM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


BYOB bars? That's a new one.

Not in the south. Down there they are called "set ups" because, not having a liquor licence, all they sell are mixers but most real juke joints (above the table anyway) fall under this category. Some "fancier" places offer "bottle service" or "corkage" where they'll take your bottle and then serve it back to you a drink at a time as if they were a real bar, for a fee of course, and if its a "club" and you are a "member" you can leave your bottles there. The less fancy places make their money off of cover charges and some food, the fees and mixers are pretty much a wash (not counting the other sales of illegal intoxicants - mostly liquor - and even perhaps companionship that may also be going on).

Incidentally, a variant on the juke joint is the "event hall" where liquor licences are skirted by the venue being only a place to hold "private parties" where a "cover charge" for the open bar is charged (and underaged drinking is common). Of course the "private parties" are held at regular, posted bar hours and anyone is invited, but that doesn't mean the fiction isn't perpetuated. At one such place run by a friend's uncle, patrons were told to start singing "happy birthday" if the cops showed up.
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 6:28 AM on July 3, 2013


Now back as to the post - why is it that only the same areas are shaded no matter the phrase for DC. Surely there's no such over as a hipster, yuppie, romantic, hungover, cheap noodle house? Maybe the Yelp users stick to a few areas?
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 6:31 AM on July 3, 2013


The 10th Regiment of Foot: " Surely there's no such over as a hipster, yuppie, romantic, hungover, cheap noodle house?"

Actually, Toki Underground pretty much does fit all of those criteria.
posted by schmod at 8:04 AM on July 3, 2013


Yeah, if there is an exception it's the H Street corridor. Sticky Rice pretty much fits that bill too!
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 8:36 AM on July 3, 2013


Toki Underground is hipster?
posted by MisantropicPainforest at 11:34 AM on July 3, 2013


The same areas, dense in bars and restaurants of all varieties, are hotspots for most of the words.

But the most romantic spot in London seems to be relatively off the beaten track, on Upper Street in Islington. What is it?
posted by PJMcPrettypants at 2:30 PM on July 3, 2013


San Francisco terms seem to cover most of the same regions except for hipster (mission) and frat (north beach / marina). Funny, and not surprised.
posted by lkc at 7:18 AM on July 6, 2013


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