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Earplugs and PVA Glue
July 13, 2013 7:22 PM   Subscribe

The Thread Wrapping Machine
posted by Confess, Fletch (31 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
It's cool, the tech nerd machinist in me loves it. But....

I wanted to create an externalised joint that would enable me to combine a big range of different materials that normally would require very time consuming methods of jointing them together. At the same time a decorative pattern appears with the different colours of the thread.

You mean like nails or screws? I guess I'm just saying a better proof of concept video is out there if the makers want to go for it...
posted by RolandOfEld at 7:41 PM on July 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


You mean like nails or screws?

Ever tried to drive a nail through a piece of steel? Or glass? They used wood for convenience/ availability, I guess, but in theory any two materials could be "bound" in this manner...for...art projects, I guess?

Anyway, I spent the whole video cringing at what might happen if someone got their thumb all wrapped up.
posted by GrumpyDan at 7:51 PM on July 13, 2013


It looks more complicated than I would have expected for a thread wrapping machine. I wouldn't rule out the possibility that it's opening a portal to a parallel universe where the inserted objects are already fused.
posted by justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow at 8:05 PM on July 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Ever tried to drive a nail through a piece of steel? Or glass?

Of course there's a use case, I just don't think they did a great job of illustrating it in this video.
posted by RolandOfEld at 8:06 PM on July 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


If I had one of those I'd be out of thread in an hour just wrapping shit."ooh a banana, lemme wrap that", "ooh a bag of funions", "ooh my arm, lemme wrap that too".
posted by Ad hominem at 8:06 PM on July 13, 2013 [7 favorites]


OSHA sense tingling...
posted by NortonDC at 8:15 PM on July 13, 2013 [10 favorites]


This seems like a shitty version of a braiding machine.
posted by ryanrs at 8:27 PM on July 13, 2013 [5 favorites]


PVA glue is the ultimate art supply for making stuff cheap and fast. We used to go through buckets of in the puppet shop.
posted by velebita at 8:33 PM on July 13, 2013


They may see a thread wrapping machine, but I see a finger removal machine.
posted by InsertNiftyNameHere at 8:34 PM on July 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Those braiding machine videos are wonderful. If they installed a working braiding machine at like MoMa I would sit and watch it all day.
posted by mochapickle at 9:04 PM on July 13, 2013 [3 favorites]


No hand or eye protection? Idiots.
posted by Sternmeyer at 9:09 PM on July 13, 2013


"ooh a bag of funions"

That's Funyuns, old boy. Funions are atoms or molecules with extra/missing electrons, but yet a certain joie de vivre.
posted by blueberry at 9:34 PM on July 13, 2013 [5 favorites]


mochapickle: "Those braiding machine videos are wonderful. If they installed a working braiding machine at like MoMa I would sit and watch it all day."

If you're ever in St. Louis, you're in luck.
posted by notsnot at 10:00 PM on July 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


I built and sold lamps for a time. I would hand wrap various synthetic materials like Kevlar or Nomex around steel frames. I didn't use any adhesive, and the filaments held just fine. I certainly fantasized about "wrapping machines" while hand wrapping!

Also, do the wrappers in this video ever make nice looking things?
posted by Tube at 10:01 PM on July 13, 2013


I approve of this, but only if the machine is nicknamed "Christo."
posted by 1f2frfbf at 10:04 PM on July 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


Seconding ryanrs' post above. Carbon fiber braiding machines are awesome.
posted by intermod at 10:11 PM on July 13, 2013


The "ore" instead of "or" typo is making me twitch.
posted by mrbill at 10:17 PM on July 13, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also: the end result looks like Spider-Man got fed up with the IKEA assembly instructions.
posted by mrbill at 10:19 PM on July 13, 2013 [11 favorites]


I approve of this, but only if the machine is nicknamed "Tupac."
posted by MrMoonPie at 10:23 PM on July 13, 2013 [2 favorites]


This is what it looks like when I try to sew something pretty. I was pretty excited to see this for some reason and then oddly deflated that the thread didn't look pleasing (to me) and the connectrorized( favorite family word) part looked wobbly.
posted by slothhog at 10:46 PM on July 13, 2013


I wanted to create an externalised joint that would enable me to combine a big range of different materials that normally would require very time consuming methods of jointing them together.

Like bolts? Drill two holes and you are done. (Drilling through steel is easy and learning how takes a lot less work than hiring a guy to help you heave your thing through a thread wrapping machine.)
posted by DU at 2:53 AM on July 14, 2013


Video of the shoelace braider at the St Louis museum.

I looked at the carbon fiber braiders and thought, damn, cool future tech awesome robot machine, but the shoelace machine was made in 1870 and uses the same technique of alternately roving spools. So cool!
posted by seanmpuckett at 5:13 AM on July 14, 2013 [2 favorites]


I thought it was really cool.

There's other things you could do with it that would make it more structurally sound. Like coating all the odd threads with compound A and all the even threads with compound B that are the two parts you mix to get superglue (or at least the stuff at Home Depot comes that way).

There are probably plastic materials out there that will bond and melt together under heat and pressure and be strong in the end. I'm thinking this would be really fun to do with different colors of saran wrap cord (just aim a couple blowdriers into the middle where the thing is getting wrapped to melt it together - it would give a cool tie dye effect!)
posted by ishrinkmajeans at 6:46 AM on July 14, 2013 [1 favorite]


Man, the Lilliputians are going to love this!
posted by Jpfed at 7:03 AM on July 14, 2013


"Like coating all the odd threads with compound A and all the even threads with compound B that are the two parts you mix to get superglue (or at least the stuff at Home Depot comes that way)."

That's not superglue. You're probably thinking of an epoxy. Superglue is cyanoacrylate and water (vapor in the air, or notably on skin) is the curing agent.
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich at 7:26 AM on July 14, 2013


Ok epoxy then.
posted by ishrinkmajeans at 7:57 AM on July 14, 2013


I can attest to the underlying theory (string, as binders). I once sat around my campfire and repaired the wooden tree of a pack saddle, using a 30' length of suspension line--alternating half-hitches all along the break. One of the bars on the tree was cracked when Jasper the Flying Mule decided to roll over with it on his back. The repair was solid, and I used that saddle for years before I finally sold it.

I still have fun playing with strings and strips of leather.

Good on these guys for coming up with something that's fun to watch, as well as...um...having some possible practical applications.
posted by mule98J at 8:02 AM on July 14, 2013 [1 favorite]


They're about two steps away from reinventing fiberglass, it looks like.

Makers are going to need to start hiring interns to do lit review pretty soon.
posted by backseatpilot at 9:42 AM on July 14, 2013 [2 favorites]


It's like a clockwork Judith Scott.
posted by sonascope at 10:08 AM on July 14, 2013


Makers are going to need to start hiring interns to do lit review pretty soon.
No joke. The guys who make sails for America's Cup boats and other highly competitive racing have some interesting patents in place covering processes for manufacturing resin impregnated textiles that have been formed into specific shapes.
posted by b1tr0t at 10:55 AM on July 14, 2013


If they can make this work with string cheese they will be billionaires.
posted by elizardbits at 2:10 PM on July 14, 2013 [1 favorite]


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