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Happy Hanukkah!
December 10, 2001 12:25 AM   Subscribe

Happy Hanukkah! Check out the online menorah. Don't know what the holiday is? Take a lesson in Judaism 101.
posted by jacobw (24 comments total)

 
I think whoever invented second day shipping deserves a Nobel prize.
posted by chipr at 2:13 AM on December 10, 2001


Well, thanks, jacobw! And talking about er, shipping, I loved reading this story about how Hanukkah was celebrated on the USS Roosevelt, somewhere in the Arabian Sea, overlooking Afghanistan.
posted by MiguelCardoso at 2:44 AM on December 10, 2001


More interesting was the bit at the end of the story about the two Jews left in Afghanistan. Two! Oh, and the weirdo choice of spelling that the Jerusalem Post has chosen for the English transliteration of "hanukka." (Yipes!)
posted by Dreama at 5:00 AM on December 10, 2001


I have a hard time believing that they are really thye last two Jews in Pakistan. Jewish communities have stayed on and survived in harsh conditions before (Spain, Iran, China). Still, an interesting story.
posted by rodii at 5:45 AM on December 10, 2001


The Warm Glow of Hope: Lighting of National Menorah Kindles a Symbol of Freedom [from the Washington Post].
posted by Carol Anne at 5:50 AM on December 10, 2001


Dreama:

Here in Sephardi Portugal it's Hanukka, Ránuca or Chanukka. And the greeting is Hanuca Tova! I've seen Chanukkah, Hannuka and just about every possible variation; so I don't think you're casting your "Yipes!" net widely enough!
posted by MiguelCardoso at 6:04 AM on December 10, 2001


After a few gifts for the kids, I gave my wife the ultimate in Channukah gift-foolery: a pot holder, oven mitt, and dish towel with dreidels on it! Got it at Bed, Bath, and Beyond but why they aren't featuring it on their web site is a great loss to me!

Giving the ultimate in postmodern gifts is as great as getting one! My wife really loved it!
posted by Taken Outtacontext at 6:30 AM on December 10, 2001


I witnessed my first menorah-lighting last night. I am as godless a heathen as they come, but if I had to choose a religion to be part of, it would be Judaism. I find it so much richer than the Catholicism I grew up with. I'd still have problems with the big-dead-guy-in-the-sky thing, but from a historical point of view, you can't get a richer culture.
posted by jpoulos at 6:37 AM on December 10, 2001


Jpoulos, welcome to our little fold. While I don't have official powers of conversion, I have metafilter powers of conversion. Now, when can we begin Hebrew classes for you?
posted by Taken Outtacontext at 6:41 AM on December 10, 2001


Thanks, T.O., but I'll prefer just to hang back and watch. I'm really just in it for the food... :-)
posted by jpoulos at 6:48 AM on December 10, 2001


Tis true, jpoulos, that latkes have incredible power, but just wait until you get a hold of some hamantashen. (Note for the record that I'm keeping mum on the topic of gefilte fish!)
posted by Dreama at 7:10 AM on December 10, 2001


I knew I'd marry my wife when she tried to impress me with her version of a Passover Sedar: latkes with curry. While I shuddered at the thought (and mildly informed her that latkes are a Hannukah tradition, not Passover), this little gesture endeared her to me.

I still won't let her near the curry on any Jewish holiday though.
posted by Taken Outtacontext at 7:31 AM on December 10, 2001


Judaism is such an amazing faith. And, like jpoulos, I'm not one, but I'm just in it for the food.

I made latkes and applesauce last night. And grilled pork tenderloin because hey, I'm doomed anyway, might as well go to Hell on a full stomach. :)
posted by ebarker at 8:18 AM on December 10, 2001


Latkes? Hamentashen? One of the things I definitely miss about the University of Chicago: the annual Latkes vs. Hamentashen Debate, followed, of course, by all-you-can eat servings of...latkes and hamentashen. I always go for the latkes, myself. (Scroll down a little.)
posted by thomas j wise at 9:13 AM on December 10, 2001


Note! Rabbinic authorities agree: you can't fulfill the Mitzvah by looking at a computer screen!
posted by outsider at 10:11 AM on December 10, 2001


Oh yeah, we are making latkes tonight....!
posted by jessamyn at 11:35 AM on December 10, 2001


For our gentle, gentile guests: what's not to like about getting hooked on playing Dreidel, already? :)
posted by MiguelCardoso at 12:35 PM on December 10, 2001


I'm giving this as a present for Hanukkah.
posted by JDC8 at 5:51 AM on December 11, 2001


I made latkes and applesauce last night. And grilled pork tenderloin because hey, I'm doomed anyway, might as well go to Hell on a full stomach. :)

FYI I (assuming the above makes it necessary), Judaism is the only one of the major Western faiths which doesn't preach a monopoly over heaven for its believers. And you can still be Jewish and eat pork and get into heaven. So relax. Sort of.

FYI II: Hanukkah celebrates a victory in a war against evil Greek-influenced Westerners.
posted by ParisParamus at 6:09 AM on December 11, 2001


Barbara Ellen of the Observer asks: "Why are the best Christmas songs so melancholy? Is it because the writers, mostly Jewish, never quite felt part of the festivities?" Tina Plottel chimes in with more such tunes (via Spike).
posted by Carol Anne at 12:22 PM on December 11, 2001


Paris, I always remember being told (after pestering the teacher) in Hebrew school that there was no real afterlife/heaven/hell in Judaism. I don't recall anything as vivid as angels on clouds or eternal flames. YMMV, as I grew up in a reform temple.


The subtext in Carol Anne's second link is disturbing.
posted by chiheisen at 6:45 PM on December 11, 2001


The text, too. But actually, it's only natural for Jews to feel good, on some level, about undermining the competing religion. Then again, how observant were any of those songwriters? Maybe the undermining went in the other direction?
posted by ParisParamus at 7:19 PM on December 11, 2001


chilsen: I'm no expert, but I believe you were misinformed. But no clouds or flames. Or at least, no clouds.
posted by ParisParamus at 7:22 PM on December 11, 2001


The whole Jews and Christmas music link is further observed by noting that the top 3 selling Christmas recordings of all time (in the US) are by Barbra Streisand, Neil Diamond and Kenny G. What do those three have in common? Well, if ya have to ask. . .
posted by Dreama at 12:03 AM on December 12, 2001


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