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20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized
August 23, 2013 1:26 AM   Subscribe

When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colours that surround us today. This gallery of talented artists helps us remember that. Via r/ColorizedHistory.
posted by cthuljew (72 comments total) 56 users marked this as a favorite

 
I liked this more than I thought I would. Charlie Chaplin's face in particular. And Walt Whitman looks like an oil painting. But colorization still feels wrong.
posted by chavenet at 1:38 AM on August 23, 2013


Man...Einstein's got some totally bitchin' calves.
posted by GoingToShopping at 1:40 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


GoingToShopping: "Man...Einstein's got some totally bitchin' calves."

Just wait 'til you get to Hepburn.
posted by chavenet at 1:42 AM on August 23, 2013 [6 favorites]


It seems like it should be a gimmick, but for me, sometimes the addition of color brought a breathtaking immediacy to photos of things that felt a bit lost to history. In particular, that colorized photo of the capitol in Nashville during the Civil War was strangely stirring. Very cool post.
posted by Edgewise at 1:48 AM on August 23, 2013 [18 favorites]


Edgewise: I know what you mean. The one that did it for me was of Mark Twain.
posted by cthuljew at 1:50 AM on August 23, 2013


The Mark Twain one was one of the few that vaguely looked like a modern image. The Oscar II and 'Old Gold' ones also stood out. Most of the others have been colourised in a way that makes them look like they were taken using one of the early colour processes or some kind of modern 'vintage' treatment. Which lessens the impact really.
posted by pipeski at 2:12 AM on August 23, 2013 [6 favorites]


Thanks, GoingToShopping, because I really wanted to leave the comment "Dang, lookit Einstein's gams!" but it would've been the first comment so I clicked away. We should form an Einstein's legs appreciation society. I guess we can appreciate the legs of other scientists, too. Maybe.
posted by Mizu at 2:32 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I like the one of Joseph Goebbels. When you see photos of the Nazi propaganda minister in black and white, it seems like a long time ago. When you see him in color, you get a better feeling that he could be anyone you passed on the street this morning.. a bit more formally dressed perhaps, but just some average, ordinary guy, which is a more accurate picture I think.
posted by three blind mice at 2:32 AM on August 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


If you like this, check out this previous post.

(I can't believe that was posted 9 years ago!)
posted by Acey at 2:34 AM on August 23, 2013


1930s-40s USA in color
posted by kliuless at 2:46 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Say what you will about the unemployed lumber worker, but he's got a really good looking wife. And that has to count for something.
posted by InsertNiftyNameHere at 2:50 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Is Audrey Hepburn trying to figure out what that curious thing that everyone else calls a "stove?" Kinda reminds me of Paris Hilton not knowing that you shouldn't put metal stuff in a microwave oven. If they can come up with a photo of A.H. looking puzzled by a laundromat, that will make me lose all my faith in her. And fuck Goebbels, that prick.
posted by InsertNiftyNameHere at 2:57 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Say what you will about the unemployed lumber worker, but he's got a really good looking wife. And that has to count for something.

{Looks at lumber worker} Unemployed writer, Portland/Brooklyn, circa 2013?

More seriously, it is interesting that he had his social security number tattooed onto his arm.
posted by Wordshore at 3:15 AM on August 23, 2013 [7 favorites]


The rock frenzy one actually works better as B&W. In color, it looks ironic because in the modern world boys do not scream about saxophone players lying on the stage.

Also, the Taylor one is funny because she's seductive and cleaveagy but apparently still can't reveal her bellybutton.
posted by DU at 3:23 AM on August 23, 2013


The lumberman's wife looks like "oh lord, he's doing his shirtless pose again".
posted by DU at 3:24 AM on August 23, 2013 [10 favorites]


Twain's shoes are beautifully cut along the heel cup. Such character in the folds of that custom leather. I want a pair.
posted by troll at 3:25 AM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


10. ‘Old Gold’, Country store, 1939

That is just incredible. The amount of work that must've gone in to it. Mind boggling.

For what? Kudos on the internet? Well Jordan J. Lloyd you have my kudos.
posted by MarvinJ at 3:28 AM on August 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


Is Audrey Hepburn trying to figure out what that curious thing that everyone else calls a "stove?"

I was curious to see if she was the P. Hilton of her era (from vaguely remembering a radio show about her), and well, she so very much wasn't.
By 1944, Hepburn had become a proficient ballet dancer. She had secretly danced for groups of people to collect money for the Dutch resistance. "The best audience I ever had made not a single sound at the end of my performances," she remarked.[21] After the Allied landing on D-Day, living conditions grew worse and Arnhem was subsequently devastated by Allied artillery fire under Operation Market Garden. During the Dutch famine that followed in the winter of 1944, the Germans had blocked the resupply routes of the Netherlands' already-limited food and fuel supplies as retaliation for railway strikes that were held to hinder German occupation. People starved and froze to death in the streets; Hepburn and many others resorted to making flour out of tulip bulbs to bake cakes and biscuits.[13][22] One way that Hepburn passed the time was by drawing; some of her childhood artwork can be seen today.[23] When the country was liberated, United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration trucks followed.[24] Hepburn said in an interview that she fell ill from putting too much sugar in her oatmeal and eating an entire can of condensed milk.[25] Hepburn's war-time experiences sparked her devotion to UNICEF, an international humanitarian organisation, in her later career.
(Wikipedia)
posted by titus-g at 3:42 AM on August 23, 2013 [14 favorites]


I really like the expressions of the two white guys at the front of the saxophone performance. Those two faces encompass all music.
posted by forgetful snow at 3:45 AM on August 23, 2013 [11 favorites]


We've talked about the country store photo before, and the thread had a link to a different colorized version, as well as a link to a different shot of the same store. But I could swear we also had a post about somebody who thought they had tracked down the location of the place, with present day photos... but I can't seem to find that post if we did.
posted by taz at 3:48 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Those two faces encompass all music.

I would include the third guy on the right, who is must certainly be holding an invisible orange off-frame.
posted by troll at 3:58 AM on August 23, 2013


Here's those pix, taz.
http://www.panoramio.com/user/1811082/tags/Gordonton
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 3:58 AM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


They all demonstrate skill I think, certainly better than most could do [and much better than I] though saturation seems to be the order of the day for a few. But they are also somehow disconcerting. The photographers composed those pictures knowing red was black and blue was white and it brings to mind the Ted Turner sponsored colorization with it's absurd halo effect. Or the [copyright forfend] colorizing of an Ansel Adams.

Well done on the part of the post proccessing artists, it's attentive work worth a look and worthy of an examination despite that the world was black and white back then.

I'd be interested to see the same treatment with selective colorization of civil rights demonstrations from when.
posted by vapidave at 4:01 AM on August 23, 2013


Hepburn's war-time experiences sparked her devotion to UNICEF, an international humanitarian organisation, in her later career.

Yup, she was asked to play Anne Frank in the 1959 movie but was like hell no, that's way too close to home.
posted by Melismata at 4:34 AM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


Say what you will about the unemployed lumber worker, but he's got a really good looking wife. And that has to count for something.

Only the wife? He looks like a movie star. Something interesting about that picture compared to many of the others is that couple don't look as if food poverty has been an issue for them. Compare the very scrawny British soldiers, or Japanese archers, who don't look as they grew up surrounded by generous gallons of milk. But just imagine how strong you would have to be to string and draw one of those bows! *faints* I bet your average hyper-muscled gym person couldn't do that.

Interesting also how the colourists have mostly chosen blue eyes for everyone, whereas properly blue eyes are rare enough I take note in real life when I meet someone with them. I very much doubt Chaplin had blue eyes.

Loving the Mark Twain - so vital. His personality just jumps out of that image.
posted by glasseyes at 4:53 AM on August 23, 2013


"W.H. Murphy and his associates demonstrate the soundness of the bulletproof vest and the squareness of their jaws."
posted by Rustic Etruscan at 5:07 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


I really love the Twain one but not because of Twain (although I love him too, separately). The "guy in a suit in a fancy chair on a well-mown lawn surrounded by an herbaceous border" is EXACTLY what my grandparents house was like when I was little. I was always amazed by their back yard, which was tiny but well-mown and it was mostly plant-filled border. And we'd sit out there in our Sunday clothes and eat Santa Claus cookies.
posted by DU at 5:10 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


Browsing the ColorizedHistory page, this one really jumps out at me.
posted by Holy Zarquon's Singing Fish at 5:10 AM on August 23, 2013 [7 favorites]


Physically colorizing photos is a really satisfying activity, if you happen to want to pick up a weird outdated hobby, by the way.
posted by odinsdream at 5:13 AM on August 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


I never understand the whole "color makes it seem like today" thing. My ex and I are both inveterate WWII fans, and he loves that whole genre of WWII in COLOR stuff that runs on the cable channels, but it just seems slightly surreal and off to me. It's an artform to itself, I suppose, but it's less about reality than a fantasy of inserting ourselves into the past.

Then again, I grew up with a photography obsessed father who regarded color photography as a cheesy gimmick for dopes, insisted that we all shoot in B&W and process and print our own photos, and looked at the Polaroids my cousins shot in abject horror.

"Yeah, those pictures are magical now, but wait thirty years till they're all washed out and blue-green," he'd say as I watched myself come into view on one of those oddly framed plasticky photos.

It's what you're used to, I suppose.

Amusingly, though, I paged through a cousin's photo album a while back and all the pictures were washed out and blue-green, while all my albums of lovely square B&W pictures are pretty much the same as they were approximately one million of your human years ago.
posted by sonascope at 5:16 AM on August 23, 2013 [5 favorites]


InsertNiftyNameHere: "Say what you will about the unemployed lumber worker,"

He looks like a hipster. Or, hipsters look like him.
posted by notsnot at 5:19 AM on August 23, 2013


These are interesting, in part because of the variations in technique and quality. Some of them (the Hindenburg in particular) seem to have been only partially colorized, sort of like the girl in red from Schindler's List. Others look more hand tinted, some look like they were in color from the beginning, while others look like they were commissioned by Ted Turner 25 years ago.
posted by TedW at 5:20 AM on August 23, 2013


stupidsexyFlanders, thank you for that link of the modern pics of the store. Those are pretty cool.

Interesting also how the colourists have mostly chosen blue eyes for everyone, whereas properly blue eyes are rare enough I take note in real life when I meet someone with them. I very much doubt Chaplin had blue eyes.

I remember a post a while ago about some B&W video footage that was colorized by mixing four "layers" of the video in the different basic colors and so the result was a color version that "translated" the tones in the b&w video to actual color equivalents (as opposed to having someone paint over them). Isn't this how these pics were colorized? If not, are these complete 'interpretations'?
posted by micayetoca at 5:26 AM on August 23, 2013


I never understand the whole "color makes it seem like today" thing. My ex and I are both inveterate WWII fans, and he loves that whole genre of WWII in COLOR stuff that runs on the cable channels, but it just seems slightly surreal and off to me. It's an artform to itself, I suppose, but it's less about reality than a fantasy of inserting ourselves into the past.

Then again, I grew up with a photography obsessed father who regarded color photography as a cheesy gimmick for dopes, insisted that we all shoot in B&W and process and print our own photos, and looked at the Polaroids my cousins shot in abject horror.

"Yeah, those pictures are magical now, but wait thirty years till they're all washed out and blue-green," he'd say as I watched myself come into view on one of those oddly framed plasticky photos.

It's what you're used to, I suppose.

Amusingly, though, I paged through a cousin's photo album a while back and all the pictures were washed out and blue-green, while all my albums of lovely square B&W pictures are pretty much the same as they were approximately one million of your human years ago.


One of the interesting side effects of digital photography is the number of people who shoot black and white now (or rather, shoot color and then convert to black and white). I wonder if, in the long term, people won't think of black and white as old-timey.

I also enjoy the nostalgia for shitty-looking color prints. Whatever works!
posted by Elementary Penguin at 5:30 AM on August 23, 2013


Here is a video showing the process of colorizing.
posted by pixie at 5:48 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


I didn't realize how much the 1939 unemployed lumber worker looked like a young Jon Hamm without the color.

And Nikola, you handsome devil, you can have my airborne bloomers in RGB or grayscale any day of the week you like.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 5:54 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


So many of the pictures my parents took on cheap film in the late 1970's and early 1980's have faded to magenta. I've scanned and corrected a few, but I still have this weird mental image of my infancy and early childhood being spent on Mars or some other bizarre planet with a redish atmosphere.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 6:00 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


The real takeaway here is that Walt Whitman is Gandalf.
posted by Curious Artificer at 6:00 AM on August 23, 2013 [9 favorites]


And Nikola, you handsome devil, you can have my airborne bloomers in RGB or grayscale any day of the week you like.

Tesla:

"It's 1894, and a tall, handsome, mysterious man is sitting in the ornate, elegant dining room at Delmonico's in New York. He's surrounded by admirers - nouveau riche and old money alike - and they're all whispering about the amazing feats they have seen him perform with electricity: including sending 250 volts coursing through his body, lighting up the surface of his skin from within. The man is Nikola Tesla, inventor of alternating current, and he's widely regarded by the people in the room as one of the greatest geniuses alive.

Fast forward to 1943. Tesla, impoverished, is living in a hotel room. He's alone. He's lost contact with his friends and his family. And, perhaps worst of all, he's largely stopped inventing. In the end, the man who once electrified audiences dies alone--his name already slipping into obscurity and his only friends the pigeons behind the New York Public Library."
posted by Seymour Zamboni at 6:02 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


These are amazing. My only other experience with colorization was the terrible tinting they used to do. But the crispness of the photographs and the very realistic coloring makes the subjects seem so real.
posted by tafetta, darling! at 6:12 AM on August 23, 2013



Interesting also how the colourists have mostly chosen blue eyes for everyone, whereas properly blue eyes are rare enough I take note in real life when I meet someone with them. I very much doubt Chaplin had blue eyes.


While in the USA they're apparently rare-ish (one in six), in the UK and parts of Europe they're by far the majority. I have no idea what colour eyes Chaplin had, but all else being equal, there's a very good chance they were blue.
posted by forgetful snow at 6:23 AM on August 23, 2013


These are great! The past may well be a foreign country, but the color makes it look just like home.
posted by Uther Bentrazor at 6:52 AM on August 23, 2013


Tesla, Tesla, Tesla. You Serbian devil, you. Rrrrrrow!
posted by St. Peepsburg at 6:58 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]



-I very much doubt Chaplin had blue eyes-

--I have no idea what colour eyes Chaplin had, but all else being equal, there's a very good chance they were blue.--


From the few proper color pictures I've seen of Chaplin in his final years, it looks to me like he probably had dark blue eyes, maybe with darker rims. But it's often hard to tell in small 1970's pictures, especially in a man in his late 70's with his eyelids beginning to droop, so grains of salt all around.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 7:08 AM on August 23, 2013


I feel like one day someone will be doing something similar with our pictures, only they'll be de-saturating the color and removing the Instagram filters to see what life really looked like.
posted by wallaby at 7:15 AM on August 23, 2013 [14 favorites]


Looking at the thumbnails on /r/ColorizedHistory, it seems like the majority of colorized photos have a certain sameness about them. I think it's the desaturated colors and what appears to be a narrow color gamut with very limited reds; like a strong Gaussian blur filter would reduce most of those images to a dull olive green. I don't know if that look is deliberate, or if there's some technical limitations that prevent a more Kodachrome-like appearance.

Granted, it takes a lot of craftsmanship, time, and love to colorize a photo, and as a previous poster said, the only rewards are props and upvotes. The work is amazing, and the Nashville photo is stunning.
posted by elmwood at 7:19 AM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


"11. Joseph Goebbels scowling at photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt after finding out he’s Jewish, 1933"

Goebbels was Jewish!?!
posted by ogooglebar at 7:27 AM on August 23, 2013 [12 favorites]


Too late to edit, but compare the thumbnails at /r/colorizedhistory to /r/itookapicture, /r/earthporn, and/or /r/photographs, and you'll see that I mean about the limited color gamut and olive green-heavy palate. It's as if red, orange and yellow were thought not to exist. It's impressive work, nonetheless.
posted by elmwood at 7:29 AM on August 23, 2013


fwiw, I've read elsewhere that Chaplin's eyes where dark blue.
posted by edgeways at 7:43 AM on August 23, 2013


Wow, I love a lot of these. But as I was going through the reddit thread, I came across this picture. It isn't the most stunning example of colorization, but it was striking to me nonetheless. The person in the photo is my great uncle, Raymond Bowman. When I was younger, I used to love looking at time/life photos from the 40s and 50s, and had seen that photo and the others in the series without knowing anything about them. One day, I was at my grandmother's house and she started telling me about my grandfather's brother, who had died during world war 2. She went on to tell me that a photographer had been there when he died, and that the photos he took were published in life magazine. He was shot while on a balcony in Germany around the time that the war in Europe had ended. The family had been notified of his death in a way that left them wondering if it was true or not. But someone in his unit told them to look at the latest issue of Life magazine. They saw the pictures, and even though the faces were obscured they could tell it was my great uncle. He always wore a pin on his uniform with his initials, and they could see it in the photos. Eventually they were able to get copies of the photos without the faces obscured. As she was telling me the story, I suddenly realised I knew exactly the photos she was talking about... I had seen them in several time/life books. What a weird feeling to have seen those gruesome photos and find out later that it was a relative of mine. Here's an interview with my grandmother telling the story.
posted by milkcrateman at 8:18 AM on August 23, 2013 [97 favorites]


"So many of the pictures my parents took on cheap film in the late 1970's and early 1980's have faded to magenta. I've scanned and corrected a few, but I still have this weird mental image of my infancy and early childhood being spent on Mars or some other bizarre planet with a redish atmosphere."

Perhaps you did?
posted by 1367 at 8:25 AM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


Edgewise: "It seems like it should be a gimmick, but for me, sometimes the addition of color brought a breathtaking immediacy to photos of things that felt a bit lost to history. In particular, that colorized photo of the capitol in Nashville during the Civil War was strangely stirring. Very cool post"

I feel just the same. Could have been yesterday. Btw, JL Borges used to say that we are the real ancients. Looking at these pictures, I can really relate to that. The collection is just beautiful. Thanks !
posted by nicolin at 8:31 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


The brilliant readers at Shorpy figured out who the Handsome Tattooed Man is.

Portland is right on the nose.
posted by OHSnap at 8:36 AM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


Nothing new with colorizing B/W pictures, colorizing photographs was always available from the inception of photography. Early hand colored photographs date from the 1860's. Actual color photographs were made starting 1861, but commercial viability began in 1930's. Of course to routinely hand color commercial b/w photographs before 1930's would have been too expensive.

On the other hand black and white photographs made by artists as a choice, much like artists who made/make black and white etchings, lithographs, should have their work respected as such and left alone, imo. Colorizing them by hand or computer seems gimicky and silly imo..
posted by snaparapans at 9:01 AM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


My mother and aunt's black-and-white senior portrait packages in the late 1960's came with one hand-tinted copy, but all they colored was the hair, eyes, lips, rouge, and what showed of the dresses. According to Mom, they didn't even use the right colors for the dresses or the lipstick. The effect was a little funereal.
posted by The Underpants Monster at 9:06 AM on August 23, 2013


These are fantastic.

Nikola Tesla's kind of hot.
posted by SpecialSpaghettiBowl at 9:18 AM on August 23, 2013 [4 favorites]


It's so beautiful how the fresh color makes these look like someone shot them yesterday on an iPhone! That quality renders the famous people ones terrifying -- you realize how real history is.

(Also, ogooglebar, aren't there rumors that Hitler himself was Jewish? Kind of like how all the most homophobic Republican senators are totally super gay?)
posted by Mooseli at 10:00 AM on August 23, 2013


(Also, ogooglebar, aren't there rumors that Hitler himself was Jewish? Kind of like how all the most homophobic Republican senators are totally super gay?)

We'll probably never know for certain about Hitler (it doesn't look as if his nephews will be doing DNA testing any time soon). I actually misunderstood the caption about Goebbels at first, and in the instant before I re-interpreted the sentence, I glanced back at the photo and the expression on his face took on an entirely different meaning. It's as if he's thinking, "Shit! I'm in it now. How the fuck do I get out of this one?" No wonder he's gripping his armrests so tightly. Like he's about to be garrotted by the guy with the beard.
posted by ogooglebar at 10:19 AM on August 23, 2013


Blue eyes: in the UK and parts of Europe they're by far the majority.

I spent my afternoon in Bristol on the bus and in the city centre, intrigued enough by this to look around and check who had blue eyes. At a rough estimate, including children, about a fifth of the white people (children's eyes tend to be lighter.) I find that clear, blue-eyed look quite striking, so as I said, I tend to notice it, and I don't think it's that common.

Checking some figures online, and the map above, they talk about 'light eyes', which surely refers to blue, grey, golden, green and all the colours of hazel until it registers brown. As far as I recall blue eyes result from the absence of any colour in the iris, whereas the appearance of all the other colours including grey is an effect of greater or lesser amounts of melanin. However, I can't find an article that exactly reproduces what I thought I'd read about this, and those I did find seemed to be more private blog opinion pieces than anything scientific. Not that it matters, eh.

I've never been to Scandanavia, so have no idea if blue eyes are so common there you don't even notice them! But I do know there aren't as many blond people there as stereotype would have you believe (don't ask me how.)
posted by glasseyes at 12:44 PM on August 23, 2013


I really like the expressions of the two white guys at the front of the saxophone performance. Those two faces encompass all music.

Is that George W Bush?
posted by 4ster at 12:48 PM on August 23, 2013


Handsome tattooed man is damn handsome. I fancy the woman's dress is bright red and yellow chequers, and regret the colourist didn't go there.
posted by glasseyes at 12:51 PM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


The DC car accident stood out to me partly because some neighborhoods of the city still look like that (one of its better qualitites) and partly because it'd be a miracle to see an "accident" today that caused so little damage.
posted by psoas at 1:35 PM on August 23, 2013 [1 favorite]


My favorites tend to be the ones where the person doing the coloring somehow managed to resist the urge to give the person laser eyes. I just can't understand what would possess someone to ruin an otherwise very good coloring by wanting to make the eyes pop like flashlights. Most people's eyes don't do that, even if they have blue eyes. It really becomes tiring after the first dozen civil war generals sporting Elijah Wood eyes.
posted by Rhomboid at 2:23 PM on August 23, 2013 [2 favorites]


Is Audrey Hepburn trying to figure out what that curious thing that everyone else calls a "stove?"

It looks like she's just checking on something in the oven...
posted by bardophile at 7:30 PM on August 23, 2013


I just realized for the first time ever that Audrey Hepburn and Katharine Hepburn are two distinct people. Mind blown.
posted by threeants at 8:42 PM on August 23, 2013 [3 favorites]


That first photo of the abandoned boy -- his expression just about broke my heart.
posted by Celsius1414 at 8:27 AM on August 25, 2013


It looks like she's just checking on something in the oven...

Perhaps checking the male gaze on her cookies.
posted by dhartung at 1:50 PM on August 25, 2013 [4 favorites]


Of all things, the one that grabbed my attention most is the trash can in the Audrey Hepburn photo, lined with newspapers. Is this what people did before plastic trash bags? And I guess before paper grocery bags were ubiquitous? I never stopped to think about it before.
posted by HotToddy at 5:40 PM on August 25, 2013 [3 favorites]


Lining the trashcan with newspapers is indeed a thing. My dad is 91 and lined his wastebaskets and the big trash can that goes out to the curb with newspapers until he got a tablet and switched to the online edition.
posted by jamaro at 10:01 PM on August 25, 2013 [2 favorites]


When I was younger, I used to love looking at time/life photos from the 40s and 50s, and had seen that photo and the others in the series without knowing anything about them.

We had a coffee table book sized Time/Life History of World War II that I used to pore over when I was in grade school in the 1950s. In many pictures in that book, but, especially in that series of photographs of Capa's, I had my first encounter with the concept of Death. In three pictures, Raymond Bowman lies still in an ever enlarging pool of blood. .

That series of pictures really made an impact. The sight of blood, even in black and white, is so powerful. I think of them often, in fact, they came to mind just within the last week -- and I had not seen any of those photographs for decades, not until just now when I clicked on milkcrateman's name on the sidebar.


And, having looked for the entire series, I find the entire article to which milkcrateman linked.

And here is a picture of the original article in LIFE.

Robert Capa's most famous photograph is from the Spanish Civil War and the subject of much controversy.

See also Special report: How my father's face turned up in Robert Capa's lost suitcase

Ironically, Robert Capa (fka Endre Friedman) was himself killed in Viet Nam in 1954 in the First Indochina War.
posted by y2karl at 8:44 PM on August 26, 2013


The group's better artists' were asked to collaborate on colorizing the March on Washington, and their results were featured on NPR. It's interesting because some images were colorized by different artists, so you can see different takes on what the day looked like.

See also: r/Colorization, Samm Dove Colorization tumbr, and History in Color (Facebook front for a Redbubble storefront, where you can see those images w/o using FB) and a few other sites, featured alongside images from r/ColorizedHistory on io9 today.
posted by filthy light thief at 7:18 PM on September 11, 2013


And more iconic/historic images colorized well on a DP Review post about the work of artist Sanna Dullaway.
posted by filthy light thief at 7:24 PM on September 11, 2013


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