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October 3, 2013 6:31 PM   Subscribe

TREEHOUSE OF HORROR XXIV "The Simpsons" announced that the 'couch gag' for this year's Halloween (three weeks early) episode would be 'created by Guillermo Del Toro'. What has been pre-released to YouTube is a three minute deconstruction of all the elements of a usual Simpsons opening sequence AND MORE, with almost uncountable references to horror movies (and Guillermo Del Toro movies - and Futurama).
posted by oneswellfoop (82 comments total) 32 users marked this as a favorite

 
One of the publications on the supermarket checkout line is The Ghost of Newsweek.
posted by JHarris at 6:37 PM on October 3, 2013 [8 favorites]


Nice touch having Stephen King's "likeness" writing on the walls while Bart gets the chalkboard.

-oxford commas are the earlobes of language for Survivor Types
posted by vozworth at 6:48 PM on October 3, 2013


Woooooah. That makes me want to start watching The Simpsons again! Hey, wait a minute, stupid advertizing!
posted by eggkeeper at 6:49 PM on October 3, 2013


The couch gags are the worst thing about the double-digit seasons of The Simpsons. That is to say that they are the best thing, which is bad.

If the folks at The Simpsons were ever to remember that the couch gag is a throwaway, and put even half as much effort into the actual show, the latter might become almost watchable.
posted by Sys Rq at 6:49 PM on October 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


best
posted by philip-random at 6:51 PM on October 3, 2013


I appreciated the special guest appearance by hyno-toad. Nice to see him getting some work.
posted by LoopyG at 6:51 PM on October 3, 2013 [12 favorites]


Richard Matheson was a nice touch.
posted by cazoo at 6:52 PM on October 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


I liked it.

It occurs to me that I stopped watching the show itself once I discovered it wasn't available on Hulu Plus on my Apple TV. At least there's It's Always Sunny. Although I download that off the back of a truck anyway, so maybe I don't actually have a point.
posted by DoctorFedora at 6:53 PM on October 3, 2013


I liked it, but fuck a zombie Simpsons.
posted by azarbayejani at 6:56 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


A reference to a thing, by itself, isn't funny or creative or interesting.

It just means that the creator has seen that thing (from that other thing). And if the viewer recognizes it, all it means is that the viewer, too, has seen that thing (from that other thing). "Remember that other thing?" it says. Maybe the viewer answers yes, maybe they don't even notice it go by.

I guess what I'm saying is I'm tired of referential "humor" that is basically a series of things maybe I saw elsewhere previously. Yes I saw that movie, yes I recognize that writer. Referring to something is too easy, now do something with it that makes it funny or creative or interesting (note: subbing in Simpsons characters isn't enough).
posted by 2bucksplus at 6:57 PM on October 3, 2013 [40 favorites]


2bucksplus: "A reference to a thing, by itself, isn't funny or creative or interesting.

It just means that the creator has seen that thing (from that other thing). And if the viewer recognizes it, all it means is that the viewer, too, has seen that thing (from that other thing). "Remember that other thing?" it says. Maybe the viewer answers yes, maybe they don't even notice it go by.

I guess what I'm saying is I'm tired of referential "humor" that is basically a series of things maybe I saw elsewhere previously. Yes I saw that movie, yes I recognize that writer. Referring to something is too easy, now do something with it that makes it funny or creative or interesting (note: subbing in Simpsons characters isn't enough)
"

remember that time Family Guy
posted by DoctorFedora at 7:00 PM on October 3, 2013 [32 favorites]


mmmm... not sure about Del Toro referencing his own work so much e.g. the big ending which had no joke (way too much cultural referencing with no jokes or weak jokes in lame-era Simpsons)
posted by Bwithh at 7:01 PM on October 3, 2013


I appreciated the special guest appearance by hyno-toad. Nice to see him getting some work.

ALL GLORY TO THE HY- oh fuck it, I can't be bothered.

Nice couch gag; I'd watch the episode if they'd gotten del Toro to direct the whole thing.
posted by Zonker at 7:01 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I guess what I'm saying is I'm tired of referential "humor" that is basically a series of things maybe I saw elsewhere previously. Yes I saw that movie, yes I recognize that writer. Referring to something is too easy, now do something with it that makes it funny or creative or interesting (note: subbing in Simpsons characters isn't enough).

Couldn't agree more. That "couch gag" felt like Stage Seventeen of the meltdown of all culture into the Vortex of Referentiality.
posted by Dr. Wu at 7:04 PM on October 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


A reference to a thing, by itself, isn't funny or creative or interesting.

I absolutely agree. Typically, this sort of thing annoys me, and even irrationally angers me, and I kind of grumbled through most of this, saying "Yes, yes, del Toro directed Hellboy and Pan's Labyrinth and so on. Yes, I recognize those things."

But, somehow, I got legitimately excited when I caught the Phantom of the Paradise reference. So, I dunno. Now I don't know what I think. About the gag, or myself, or anything.
posted by branduno at 7:09 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


You have to watch the things they're not referencing!
posted by box at 7:10 PM on October 3, 2013 [13 favorites]


Say what you will, but the hypnotoad is a really nice guy.
posted by laconic skeuomorph at 7:12 PM on October 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


If you're tired of things which refer to things which exist, then you're tired.
posted by ovvl at 7:17 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Look, it had Ray Bradbudry drawing with a marker on a big tattooed guy. SOLD.
posted by GuyZero at 7:25 PM on October 3, 2013 [13 favorites]


Twenty-Four?! Damn... Just... Just let go, already.
posted by xedrik at 7:30 PM on October 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


The Treehouse of Horror episodes were always my favourites, and I have not watched the Simpson's since about... Season 10.

Are the THoH ones still good, or is is just more Zombie Simpsons?
posted by KokuRyu at 7:37 PM on October 3, 2013


Largely that reminded me of just how sad that Pan's Labyrinth made me.
posted by Verdant at 7:41 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


I am the Mr Creosote of once gorging on referential humor ("Bring me more Futurama, Venture Bros.! I will have six Parks & Recreation and Community! One of each episode of Archer!") and now I have well and truly had a gutful and this Simpsons opening is a lot like a wafer thin mint.
posted by turbid dahlia at 7:41 PM on October 3, 2013 [7 favorites]


The studied absence of Kang and Kodos leaps out like a cigar-entailbulated toad.
Who can forget their "hearts and minds?"
posted by hexatron at 7:46 PM on October 3, 2013


The studied absence of Kang and Kodos leaps out like a cigar-entailbulated toad.

They're actually there. Some weird sea mine thing knocks them into a cooling tower at 2:04-2:05.
posted by FJT at 7:57 PM on October 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


This is where I get to name drop my friend Charles, who recorded the theremin you hear towards the end!
posted by usonian at 7:58 PM on October 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


Twenty-Four?! Damn... Just... Just let go, already.

There is a chance that this could be the last season of The Simpsons. The contracts are up this year.

That said, I think there'd be a HUGE marketing push if it were ending, so it's probably not going to.
posted by Sys Rq at 8:03 PM on October 3, 2013


Are the THoH ones still good

Based on the pre-synopses I've read:

"Oh The Places You'll D'oh" ... a Dr. Seuss-themed rhyming segment that hopes to be more horrifying than Sen. Ted Cruz' "Green Eggs & Ham" - good luck with that.

"Dead and Shoulders" ... no, this is just wrong - it recycles the premise of Futurama's "Put your Head on my Shoulder".

"Freaks No Geeks" ... "Mr. Burns’ travelling carnival, the Burnsum & Bailey Circus, which pays a visit to Springfield in the 1930s with its stars, Homer the Strong Man and Marge the Trapeze Artist"

yep, that opening looks like the highlight...
posted by oneswellfoop at 8:04 PM on October 3, 2013


Treehouse of Horror XXIV, eh? If the characters had aged along with the show, Bart would currently be only two years younger than Homer's stated age (36) when the show began.
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:05 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


They forgot one.
posted by R. Schlock at 8:19 PM on October 3, 2013


If the show had been off the air for the past decade this clip would have filled me with joy. Self-reference is great in a reunion special.
posted by justsomebodythatyouusedtoknow at 8:21 PM on October 3, 2013


You have to watch the things they're not referencing

Damnit, that felt like a sale.
posted by The Whelk at 8:21 PM on October 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


If there really was a 24 hour law-free period like The Purge, I would love to have Matt Groening held at gunpoint until he can recite the plot line of any single Simpsons episode within the past decade.

I'd let him go once he admits that he hasn't seen the show in years and couldn't even explain how it gets on the air.
posted by dr_dank at 8:41 PM on October 3, 2013


What was the one where Homer had black eyes and red smoke coming out of his head? It's right on the tip my tongue...
posted by anazgnos at 8:43 PM on October 3, 2013


You know what was especially nice about Futurama? It had several perfectly nice, beautiful, emotionally satisfying endings. The Simpsons is something that meant a lot to me growing up, but I've almost completely forgotten it now. I have a kind of lazy, years long debate going with a friend; I think Futurama is more honest and human than The Simpsons was (is) and he thinks I just don't remember much of The Simpsons. Scenes like this suggest he's right.

But there are too many scenes like that in Futurama (most of which aren't on youtube), and "Meanwhile" did have a beautiful sense of finality. Maybe we're both right; or the two shows are just different things. I dunno.

I recall moments from Futurama quite a bit, though. I've retained almost nothing of The Simpsons.
posted by byanyothername at 8:53 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


byanyothername: for whatever it's worth, I shared your opinion right up until a recent rewatch of seasons 1-4. It really was a smart/decent/human show back then, more so than even futurama at its best.
posted by You Can't Tip a Buick at 9:04 PM on October 3, 2013


The original of me appears from 2:05 - 2:07.
posted by zippy at 9:14 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


The Simpsons was extraordinarily great for far longer than most shows even get a chance. I'll happily watch anything from Season 2-3 (it really didn't find its legs until partway through S2) until about Season 8 or 9. That's longer than some people give it, but despite some missteps there were still some very solid episodes until then. Most other shows would be lucky to have a few good seasons, but five or six is about the standard for successful sitcoms these days. And The Simpsons had those years and put those years up against any other long running sitcom and it seems like a masterpiece. Unfortunately, it kept going when most shows would have ended and now you see nothing but a string of celebrity "Hi Homer! We're the Zac Brown Band/Lady Gaga/Robert Patterson!" attempts to drive up viewership because its the guy that you know from the other thing. But you can't discount what it was and how it changed what TV comedy could be.
posted by fishmasta at 9:14 PM on October 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Aside from the completely uninterestingness of just referencing a bunch of random shit, the pacing felt way off to me.
posted by empath at 9:25 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


This graph of IMDB data indicates it drops off after Season 9 and sorta ends up in a holding pattern until the end of time. Worst episode ever is apparently "Lisa Goes Gaga"
posted by hellojed at 9:33 PM on October 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


I think Futurama is more honest and human than The Simpsons was (is)

I can't even see a sentence like that without "If it takes forever, I will wait for you" starting in my brain.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 9:40 PM on October 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I know it's cool these days to hate on the Simpsons, but I'm going to say that it's still a watchable show that has at least a good episode or two every season. Which is still better than at least half the drivel that's on TV these days.
posted by FJT at 10:08 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


I'm glad I read to the end of the comments (at least for now) because, well, FJT. Yes.
posted by stevil at 10:14 PM on October 3, 2013


Also, that's not a "couch gag" - that's the entire opening.
posted by stevil at 10:20 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


guys, a good episode once a season or two it not worthy of the Simpsons or your eyes. Watch some Louis or Parks and Rec or Community.

Simpsons was at its best when it wasn't a topical show but a character-driver show trying to work out timeless jokes. It was even good when it was a self-aware show parodying other media and absorbing it into a new irreverence. It's been shitty for about a decade now. Let it die. We're long past dignity.
Do you have any idea how hard it is to convince people to watch old simpsons episodes now? Folks assume it's on par with the shit they churn out these days. Is that what you want?

and yeah
i like this opening. long live del toro
posted by es_de_bah at 10:22 PM on October 3, 2013


You think maybe he helped them brainstorm a list of crap to stick in there, as opposed to 'creating' the whole sequence himself? That would explain the repeated adoring tributes to HIS MOVIES in there, maybe?
posted by damehex at 10:40 PM on October 3, 2013


I can't even see a sentence like that without "If it takes forever, I will wait for you" starting in my brain.

Futurama is the foundation of my marriage. My now-wife and I first discovered the show in the first month of our relationship. We watch the show every night when we go to bed, and have done so for the last nine years. But once every few months we start watching an episode at random, and realize we don't remember this one, until we realize we are watching Jurassic Bark, and then we turn it off. We haven't watched it in at least five years. Ugh, that episode.
posted by Elementary Penguin at 10:49 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


We started showing our kids (ages 12 & 9) old Simpsons, but we're sticking exclusively to seasons 4-8. They love it. We sort of keep it as a treat, and have been doling them out one or two at a time. The episodes hold up well, even if the topical references are well before our kids were born. Of course, they love classic Looney Tunes, too, and the topical references in those predate my youth, and I'm 50. Same with The Three Stooges. The good stuff is still funny.

The new stuff...meh. This opening seemed overlong. I didn't hate it, but it didn't exactly have me doubled over with laughter, either.
posted by mosk at 10:51 PM on October 3, 2013


it's still a watchable show that has at least a good episode or two every season

So it's good -- good, not great* -- as much as 10% of the time.

Which is still better than at least half the drivel that's on TV these days.

And worse than the other half.

* George Bush, Two Bad Neighbors
posted by Sys Rq at 11:21 PM on October 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Finally figured out what the black car that Maggie's driving is from, 1977's The Car. Now I can sleep.
posted by Purposeful Grimace at 11:35 PM on October 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


A reference to a thing, by itself, isn't funny or creative or interesting.

Tell that to 95 percent of the internet.
posted by pracowity at 11:59 PM on October 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


pracowity: "A reference to a thing, by itself, isn't funny or creative or interesting.

Tell that to 95 percent of the internet
"

NO U.gif
posted by DoctorFedora at 12:31 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


anazgnos --

What was the one where Homer had black eyes and red smoke coming out of his head? It's right on the tip my tongue...

The Devil's Backbone
posted by Karlos the Jackal at 12:54 AM on October 4, 2013


At the core of humor-by-reference is the migration of things between different spheres of importance. Energy is derived by the juxtaposition. Let me explain.

1. When a relatively obscure thing is referred to by a prominent property, if you knew of the obscure thing beforehand, it is affirming because your personal tastes have been justified. "Did the Simpsons just make a MST3K reference? Awesome!"

Speaking of which.... MST3K does humor-by-reference frequently using a scattershot approach, referring to so many things in each episode that they're bound to hit a few you felt like only you knew of before. MST3K is well-written enough, however, that they always seem to do justice to whatever properties you hear them refer. When a guy in a thin moustache looking like Tim Conway appears on screen and Joel says "I'm Dorf!" it's always a nearly exact resemblance.

2. When a really popular and mainstream thing is mentioned on a less mainstream thing, in such a way that it implies approval of the less-mainstream by the more-mainstream, it is affirming because the big thing has signalled recognition of a property assumed beneath its dignity. When Elizabeth Taylor did the voice of Maggie's first word on Simpsons, for instance. The voluntary lowering is an essential part of it.

It's always one or the other. So, when an obscure property refers to, or implies endorsement of, a popular show, it isn't funny because what's the point? (It can be funny for other reasons, like offering an insightful parody, but not just for being a reference.)

This also means, as Simpsons has evolved in importance from being a scrappy cartoon on the fledgling Fox network to the venerable zombie juggernaut it is now, its relationship to references has changed. I think that kind of lessens the impact of this sequence overall.
posted by JHarris at 1:07 AM on October 4, 2013 [5 favorites]


Man, Metafilter, you are all fun hating monsters. It was a funny video! With lots of amusing references! Yeah, The Simpsons has long since outlasted its welcome, but it still soldiers on delivering entertainment and ratings. And this little gag was pretty beautiful. All I was missing was some punching robots.
posted by Nelson at 2:17 AM on October 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


In response to whoever mentioned that the Simpson never has sweet endings I have a very vivid memory of an episode from my childhood that left an impact on me: Homer and Marge biking into the sunset to the tune of "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head." Anyone know what episode that's from?
posted by timsneezed at 3:50 AM on October 4, 2013


Homer and Marge biking into the sunset to the tune of "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head." Anyone know what episode that's from?

That's from Duffless. It's after Homer goes straight back to Moe's bar after a difficult month of not drinking, then realises what a dive it really is and that he'd rather spend the day with his wife.
posted by eykal at 4:26 AM on October 4, 2013


It's after Homer goes straight back to Moe's bar after a difficult month of not drinking, then realises what a dive it really is and that he'd rather spend the day with his wife.

I don't think that realization stuck with him.
posted by Elementary Penguin at 4:39 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Hmmm count me as disappointed - I guess I was expecting to see something along the lines of the ones that were done by Banksy or the one that had the evolution sequence.
posted by bitteroldman at 4:50 AM on October 4, 2013


In response to whoever mentioned that the Simpson never has sweet endings I have a very vivid memory of an episode from my childhood that left an impact on me: Homer and Marge biking into the sunset to the tune of "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head." Anyone know what episode that's from?

The ending of Lisa The Vegetarian is pretty sweet too, Remember the Simpsons started as a riff on the Cosby era family sitcom, it had a brand of actual earned emotions running through it from the start ( Summer of 5'9, for example, is a straight ahead after school special, but it works because it takes the characters problems, no matter how filtered through the cartoon universe, seriously.)

Anyway I liked the Chef Wiggum Kaliju, I wonder what it's code name is.
posted by The Whelk at 5:16 AM on October 4, 2013


( this is why Futurama eventually fell away for me, they started hitting the PATHOOOOOS button too hard, too much, for characters that didn't feel like they had earned it.)
posted by The Whelk at 5:18 AM on October 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


Excellent.
posted by Room 641-A at 5:46 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Seeing the Hypnotoad was cool. Seeing Winslow from Phantom of the Paradise was awesome.
posted by davelog at 6:01 AM on October 4, 2013


The worst thing about this thread is learning that I'm almost as old as Homer is supposed to be.
posted by roll truck roll at 6:20 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


In response to whoever mentioned that the Simpson never has sweet endings I have a very vivid memory of an episode from my childhood...

How about the one that discusses Maggie's birth? It's told as a flashback, prompted by Bart and Lisa asking why they don't have as many baby pictures of Maggie in the house; and you learn that right before she was conceived Homer was actually doing well enough financially that he could quit the power plant and get a "dream job" at a bowling alley - but when Maggie was born he had to ask for his old job back, and Burns humiliated him by putting a sign reading "Don't Forget You're Here Forever" over his old desk. At the end, Homer tells them, that's why they don't have as many pictures of Maggie - they're at work, "where I could use the most cheering up."

And then it shows you the sign today - Homer has strategically placed photos of Maggie all over it, partially obscuring the words, so now it looks like it reads "Do It For Her."
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 6:23 AM on October 4, 2013 [6 favorites]


Man, Metafilter, you are all fun hating monsters. It was a funny video! With lots of amusing references! Yeah, The Simpsons has long since outlasted its welcome, but it still soldiers on delivering entertainment and ratings. And this little gag was pretty beautiful. All I was missing was some punching robots.

Exactly.

If you need it, you have whatever permission to just simply enjoy this couple of minutes of fun animation.
posted by Wordshore at 7:10 AM on October 4, 2013


"for whatever it's worth, I shared your opinion right up until a recent rewatch of seasons 1-4. It really was a smart/decent/human show back then, more so than even futurama at its best."

Around season seven I had a date with a Simpsons person and we went to a party that was mostly Simpsons people and King of the Hill people. King of the Hill was new, and I remember saying that one thing I liked about King of the Hill was that it had some of the heart that was missing from recent seasons of The Simpsons. My date didn't really talk to me again for the rest of the night.

Worst. Date. Ever.


posted by Room 641-A at 7:57 AM on October 4, 2013


We haven't watched it in at least five years. Ugh, that episode.

Bender's Big Score makes it okay.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 8:09 AM on October 4, 2013


I am way too cool to watch The Simpsons, although I used to watch them when they were cool.

That is all.
posted by IAmBroom at 8:14 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I still watch Simpsons. Neither it nor I are cool.
posted by blue_beetle at 8:46 AM on October 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


I would watch the simpsons, but i forget. Even with an onion in my belt.
posted by hexatron at 10:45 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


There's also the "awwwww" ending where Bart thanks Marge for getting him Lee Carvallo's Putting Challenge instead of Bonestorm.
posted by Challahtronix at 11:03 AM on October 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Del Toro explained the opening concept to Entertainment Weekly:
“I really wanted to land the connections between the [show’s] set pieces and the titles and some of the most iconic horror movies, and intersperse them with some of my stuff in there for pure joy. For example the idea that Ms. Krabappel could be outside the school with Alfred Hitchcock which is a reference to the sequence in The Birds that happens outside of the school in Bodega Bay. To use Chief Wiggum as the Cyclops from Harryhausen, dipping the [Lard Lad] donut in a water tank, to have the nuclear spill from Mr. Burns’ plant create zombies — all of this stuff seems to make sense to interconnect. If Homer really gets a radioactive isotope, he could turn into a reaper from Blade. Or the famous shot that is always in the titles — Maggie driving and then you pull back and there’s Marge driving, right? But in this case Maggie is driving, and she’s driving the car from the horror movie from the 70s called The Car, which is one of my favorite guilty pleasure B-movies. And what if Lisa is in the music class, but she’s in the music class with every Phantom of the Opera ever made? It was a unique opportunity.”
So give Del Toro 99% of the blame/credit for the excess; he said he was inspired by Mad magazine’s Mort Drucker, Will Elder and Harvey Kurtzman. “They would try to cram so many references in,” he says. “You as a kid could spend an afternoon on your bed with your magnifying glass going through a frame of Mad magazine and finding all these references to this and that.”

And yes, way too much "Pan's Labyrinth", but he kept a "Pacific Rim" mecha vs. kaiju battle quietly in the background at :12.

And I personally liked that the TV screen with the credits at the end acted like a bug zapper on the flying pixies.
posted by oneswellfoop at 11:49 AM on October 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


( this is why Futurama eventually fell away for me, they started hitting the PATHOOOOOS button too hard, too much, for characters that didn't feel like they had earned it.)

I absolutely agree with this. I was a blubbering wreck at the end of "Luck of the Fryrish" and "Jurassic Bark," but Hermes and Li'l Bender? I thought that was just milking it.

Of course, I also liked what Guillermo Del Toro did here, so what the hell do I know apparently.
posted by MrBadExample at 12:45 PM on October 4, 2013


A lot of Futurama: TNG episodes seem to have been created by drawing random characters out of a hat and coming up with a plot that centers on them. Bender and Amy hooking up, the Farmsworth/Mom/Zoidberg flashback episode, Hermes/Bender flashback episode, Turanga Munda/Zapp...

I mean, I like the new episodes about as much as the old ones, but it's a very different show in a lot of ways.
posted by Elementary Penguin at 1:52 PM on October 4, 2013


And here's a (probably) complete labeling of all the references in the Treehouse XXIV sequence (with special labeling for DelToro's many self-references).
posted by oneswellfoop at 11:58 AM on October 5, 2013


Finally got around to watching this thing, and wow!
posted by Artw at 4:41 PM on October 5, 2013


From the comments in onefellswoop's link:
Um, yes, hello, while Stephen King indeed wrote The Shining , the phrase "All Work And No Play Makes Jack A Dull Boy" does not appear in the original novel, thus making the appearance of King writing the phrase meaningless.

Worst. Reference. Ever.
posted by Sys Rq at 4:55 PM on October 5, 2013 [1 favorite]


The Geek Pedantry in those comments at io9 is (a) strong and (b) hilarious.
posted by oneswellfoop at 5:04 PM on October 5, 2013


And now, DelToro is designing covers for the 'Penguin Horror' book series.

CAN THIS MAN BE STOPPED? (Or is this the sad result of not immediately giving him a "Pacific Rim" sequel to make?)
posted by oneswellfoop at 6:37 PM on October 5, 2013


As noted in the io9 article, /film comments catch a few more missed references.
posted by filthy light thief at 8:57 PM on October 5, 2013


The marketing with this one worked on me - I rewatched it several times, even made guests who were visiting watch it, and then for the first time in a long time actually planned my evening around watching an episode of tv when it was coming on. Might be that we got rid of cable a month or so ago.... But there was something very nostalgic about sitting down to watch a Treehouse of Horror, commercials and all.

And it was great. Not season 4/5/6 great, but this show still makes me crack up occasionally, and the Treehouse always does. Now just keep doing these BEFORE Halloween from now on and not make us wait until stupid baseball is done.

One of us. One of us. One of us.
posted by Big_B at 11:56 AM on October 7, 2013


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