Scooby-Doo! Mystery Inc: the gang is back together, and better than ever
November 4, 2013 4:21 AM   Subscribe

The Meddling Kids + Sidekicks + Mysteries formula for cartoon series is not terribly unique, but Scooby-Doo has been at it for 11 iterations. Until the latest series, it has been a campy episodic series for Saturday mornings, with the occasional campy movie. The kids come across a mystery, then one way or another, they solve it. You learn about the villain behind the crimes, but never about the crime-solvers. All that changed with the newest series, Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated, which some folks consider to be the best Scooby-Doo series ever, with an over-arching story, character development (spoilers!), and a ton of geeky references, as picked apart in depth on TV Tropes.
posted by filthy light thief (67 comments total) 53 users marked this as a favorite

 
The series ran on Cartoon Network in the US, and the CN website has interactive material, including full episodes from the second (and final?) season of Mystery Inc. You can catch the second season on Daily Motion and the two seasons are streaming elsewhere, including Netflix and Amazon Instant Video.
posted by filthy light thief at 4:22 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


The show is amazing, the perfect incarnation of Scooby-Doo. And I should hope the second season is final, they did a good job of closing up all the loose ends.
posted by JHarris at 4:24 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I see they're back to their Skeptical (capital S) roots - the supernatural is just a cover for criminals trying to scam someone - and hey, Matthew Lillard (and Casey Kasem!) gets a paycheck, so I may have to run this down.
posted by Slap*Happy at 4:37 AM on November 4, 2013 [4 favorites]


the best Scooby-Doo series ever,

Yes. I know the word "epic" gets overused, but the 2nd season ending really was that. It made me jump up and yell. Definitely watch the whole thing start to finish.
posted by Wolfdog at 4:38 AM on November 4, 2013


No, I'm sorry, it's not the best, because Velma is suddenly in love with Shaggy and that's just wrong, dudes.

I'm speaking as a middle-aged woman who can count Velma as one of her extremely formative lesbian role models - Velma was nerdy, Velma had a bitching sweater, Velma was so very dykey.

And when, in Scooby Doo and the Witch's Ghost, she hangs out with a pagan goth-rock girl trio, and I was in heaven.

So now that she's trying to get him to change his style, wears little bows in her hair, keeps on asking him out...no, Velma, stop. Just stop. Accept his alternative lifestyle choices involving food and platonic canine besties. And find yourself a cute little nerd girl who will eat up all your science talk.

In other words, call me.
posted by Katemonkey at 4:42 AM on November 4, 2013 [36 favorites]


And find yourself a cute little nerd girl who will eat up all your science talk.

Hang in 'til later in the series!
posted by Wolfdog at 4:44 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I see they're back to their Skeptical (capital S) roots - the supernatural is just a cover for criminals trying to scam someone

I don't want to give anything away, but that's not the whole story....
posted by JHarris at 4:45 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


I might give it a pass, then - that was the strongest and best message of the original series. Question and investigate for yourself, and even the scariest monster or ghost is something you can understand and control without any magic powers or totems - unless you count the '70s-era Harlem Globetrotters.
posted by Slap*Happy at 4:53 AM on November 4, 2013 [5 favorites]


It would be great if they would make the setting for this latest iteration Washington State so that Shaggy can finally come clean as to the cause of his insatiable appetite.
posted by three blind mice at 4:56 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


see they're back to their Skeptical (capital S) roots
Technically, I feel like every Scooby-doo has been about non-supernatural jerks trying to make money by concocting fake monsters to exploit the overly-credulous. It's just that sometimes you have to consider the show a piece of performance art where the overly-credulous are the kids in the audience and the jerks are the writers.
posted by roystgnr at 5:01 AM on November 4, 2013 [8 favorites]


I might give it a pass, then - that was the strongest and best message of the original series.

I don't think you'll be disappointed by what happens later on. There is the supernatural involved, but its nature is much more profound than you see in a kid's cartoon. The episode villains, themselves, are human. But what is Scooby-Doo himself, a talking dog, if not something supernatural?
posted by JHarris at 5:03 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


(And this is speaking as someone who agrees with you about Scooby-Doo and skepticism overall.)
posted by JHarris at 5:06 AM on November 4, 2013


No, I'm sorry, it's not the best, because Velma is suddenly in love with Shaggy and that's just wrong, dudes.

...no, Velma, stop. Just stop. Accept his alternative lifestyle choices involving food and platonic canine besties. And find yourself a cute little nerd girl who will eat up all your science talk.


Did you watch the second season? Later in the show she gets very close with a cute little nerd girl.
posted by Gordafarin at 5:11 AM on November 4, 2013


Is Shaggy still dating the dog?
posted by Artw at 5:21 AM on November 4, 2013 [4 favorites]


The definitive version of the Scooby-Doo gang is the one from The Venture Bros.
posted by COBRA! at 5:23 AM on November 4, 2013 [12 favorites]


see they're back to their Skeptical (capital S) roots

Previously
posted by Artw at 5:23 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


Sooooo... nobody wants to talk about traps?
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 5:36 AM on November 4, 2013 [22 favorites]


But what is Scooby-Doo himself, a talking dog, if not something supernatural?

A talking animal exists in almost every Hanna-Barbera cartoon, ever. I always assumed this was just an element of the universe in which the stories existed, much like how everyone in the Muppet movies just acknowledge a race of sentient arbitrary felt torsos has always lived among them.

So now that she's trying to get him to change his style, wears little bows in her hair, keeps on asking him out...no, Velma, stop. Just stop. Accept his alternative lifestyle choices involving food and platonic canine besties. And find yourself a cute little nerd girl who will eat up all your science talk.

I find it kind of interesting how in the original series, it wasn't ever really directly addressed that Fred and Daphne were a couple. Much like the "Velma is gay" jokes, it was just a gag about them always pairing up and evolved into an easy leap of logic. I always find it interesting that people are more passionately involved with the "true character" of Shaggy and Velma, despite those having always been head-canon at best.

The thing is, though, I love the Velma/Shaggy dynamic in Mystery Inc., because it addresses that really big issue: Shaggy and Velma are simply much, much better characters than the other two and I give a lot more of a shit about them dealing with conflicting interests. Fred and Daphne are boring so the writers were just "yeah, I guess they're the 'normal' ones; let's have them as a couple." Shaggy and Velma have quirks and dealing with each others' quirks is how you actually look at a relationship in a narrative. I am writing all of this about a children's cartoon that people came up with when they were high.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 5:45 AM on November 4, 2013 [14 favorites]


"Look away, Daphne! We all promised each other that we would never speak of this!"
posted by eriko at 5:46 AM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


I watched a more recent one lately (don't know how recent, though), and in it Scooby was having actual worded conversations with Shaggy, sounding like an annoying adolescent using more modern expressions and sarcastic humour.

This annoyed the hell outta me, because Scooby is supposed to be a dog who can bark out a few words here and there and not a human who looks and sounds like a dog with a measurable IQ.

then again, i am getting old and cranky, so there's that as well.

----

also, I heard a story that Casey Kasem, who has done the voice of Shaggy forever, requested that the writers incorporate vegetarian cuisine in some of Scooby and Shaggy's food feasts. Which I think is kinda cool (not like the whole horrid "cookies are a sometimes food" that they did to Cookie Monster, but that's another story)
posted by bitteroldman at 6:13 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


When I first started half-watching this (the kids love it, more than any other version of Scooby-Doo, which is saying something), I didn't think much of the "tweaks" to the premise. Story arcs? Yawn. Fanserving relationships? Whatever. Fred in particular being a parody of the character? Meh. Lewis Black as the shadowy Mr. E? Pandering to the grownups.

Then the damnedest thing happened. The writing overcame the inherent stupidity (from an adult perspective) (and I say that lovingly -- the original is, for all its greatness, also inherently stupid) of the premise. Fred is the best character of the series because of his over-the-top characterization. The Shaggy-Velma relationship makes sense within the context of the show. Scooby works much better out of the center of every bit than I thought he would. Only Daphne is a letdown (and that, I think, largely because with five characters to deal with, someone almost certainly has to be either the Zeppo or the Mary Sue). The story arc was just interesting and fanservicey and ridiculous and that-world-plausible enough to work, too.

By the second season, I was "forcing" the kids to watch as soon as a new one popped up on the DVR. If you (like me) are dismissive of it without giving it a chance, I urge you to revisit the show via Netflix or whatever, because it is well worth the time.
posted by Etrigan at 6:19 AM on November 4, 2013 [5 favorites]


Yeah, poor old Daphne isn't really given anything extra in the way the others are. On the other hand everyone liked Velma better already anyway.
posted by Artw at 6:31 AM on November 4, 2013


I've had this show highly recommended to me by friends, so it's been on my list of Things to Investigate for a while. Thanks for the final push over the edge -- I'll probably watch it tonight!
posted by Narrative Priorities at 6:35 AM on November 4, 2013


I love Mystery Incorporated because it works across so many levels of in-jokes.

Fred is a monomaniacal jock who just happens to love traps more than anything else in the world including ascots and Daphne. He's kinda a leader figure because he's charismatic but Velma and Daphne actually come up with the bulk of the plans.

Shaggy (and Scooby) are cowardly but mainly because they have a finely tuned sense of self-preservation but when the chips are down they actually show up and display a good deal of bravery they just are never foolhardy. This seems like a major shift in their characterization.

Velma is the hardcore skeptic who despite the show being set in a retro anachronistic setting has an amazing degree of agency. She wants to solve mystery so she solves mysteries, she wants to have a relationship so she drives the relationship despite Shag's inability to commit to anyone other than Scooby.

Daphne is great because while on the surface she seems like she's been updated the least out of the characters and she's still pretty boy crazy she's also got a surprising amount of agency, she actually comes up with plans and executes them instead of just being the eyecandy damsel in distress. I also like how the show kinda shows that even though she has the potential to be a ditzy dilettante like her parents her siblings so that she has remarkable potential as well.

I like that there is a blending of creepy supernatural in the metaplot along with the adults are bad guys combined with the idea that most adults are inept (the sheriff, mayor and the rest of the parents are neglectful at best) and it really emphasizes the theme that sometimes kids gotta do stuff for themselves.
posted by vuron at 6:51 AM on November 4, 2013 [12 favorites]


My wife and I started watching this over the weekend, fans of the general "mysteries of spooky monsters and ghosts" premise, but cautious after our childhood nostalgia for The New Scooby-Doo Movies was dashed upon the rocks of reality when we saw a few shows recently (the Cass Elliot episode just made us sad). So we came in with low expectations, and were overjoyed to find that it didn't suck at all, and was actually pretty funny. Then we read about the series, the various guest appearances, and glowing reviews of the second season, we were hooked. It's not as culturally dense as The Venture Bros, but it's also more kid-friendly, so we're not concerned while watching it with our little one running around.


vuron: the idea that most adults are inept (the sheriff, mayor and the rest of the parents are neglectful at best)

I disagree on this. I think adults come across as greedy in various forms and means: the villains are almost all driven by profits, or revenge for lack of profits, while the sheriff (voiced by Patrick Warburton, who plays the role in such a way that I imagine the sheriff as a relative of Brock Sampson) and the mayor are interested in keeping ghouls and monsters around, as they could serve as additional tourist attractions for their town. But this doesn't get hammered in, so the show doesn't come across as preachy on that point.
posted by filthy light thief at 7:22 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Well the Mayor sees supernatural adventure tourism as a major driving force for employment in his town and the Sheriff agrees with that plus the Sheriff doesn't like meddling kids showing him up.

But I was talking more about how the parents with the possible exception of Velma's mom who is fairly helpful at times pretty much neglect their kids especially in the 2nd or 3rd episode where the mystery machine is broken down and the cell phones still work but they won't come rescue the kids.

Now arguably the incompetence of the adults is probably tied to the underlying malaise on the town as a result of other forces and the finale apparently indicates that in not so many words but still it's up to the kids to save the day.
posted by vuron at 7:27 AM on November 4, 2013


But I was talking more about how the parents...

Not sure how far you've gotten in the series, but the parents are revealed to have motives of their own beyond simple incompetence. That doesn't negate your thesis -- it's still up to the kids to save the day -- but it takes it in a different direction.
posted by Etrigan at 7:32 AM on November 4, 2013


"Mystery Solvers Club State Finals" is one of the most enjoyable TV episodes of the past few years.
posted by jason_steakums at 7:46 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


HARLAN ELLISON PLAYS HIMSELF PEOPLE
posted by The Whelk at 8:09 AM on November 4, 2013 [9 favorites]


I don't have much to add except to mention that I was surprised when I met French people who knew Scooby-Doo, but it turned out they were referring to scoubidou, which is another name for a lanyard. But they also know it as a song, whose singer was sued for copyright infringement by the man who ended up raising the orphans of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, who were executed in America as Russian spies in the 50s. [Facts taken from real life, not a Scooby-Doo episode.]
posted by benito.strauss at 8:39 AM on November 4, 2013


Is this the series that totally leaves out the "those creepy _____ were actually just Mr.______ trying to _____ for his business"? Becuase I didn't find out about this until my five year old had watched several episodes and a buddy of mine mentioned it. That's what I always loved about the old ones - none of it was real - the ghosts, the zombies, the glowing monster. It was always a human behind it. The few I saw (after being told about it) was clearly "there are monsters and they are real!"

I can see above that maybe I missed the point, that this is just a much more developed show. Is this an Adultified Where are you?
posted by Big_B at 8:45 AM on November 4, 2013


I have loved Scooby-Doo since I was a kid, and I can't say enough about how much I heart this latest incarnation. It's like my desires and thoughts about what a perfect Scooby-Doo show would be drifted out of my soul and coalesced into this show.

I wish Netflix would hurry the hell up and get the 2nd season already. And I also wish my desires and thoughts about a 3rd, 4th, and 5th season would hurry up and coalesce into physical reality....
posted by lord_wolf at 8:55 AM on November 4, 2013


So the Scooby Doo show used to be like Murder She Wrote, and now its like Homicide: Life on the Street?
posted by Bwithh at 8:56 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


HARLAN ELLISON PLAYS HIMSELF PEOPLE

HP Hatecraft!
posted by Artw at 9:06 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


Is this the series that totally leaves out the "those creepy _____ were actually just Mr.______ trying to _____ for his business"?

No. That was the previous series. This is the series that forgets that whole sordid business and restores the unmaskings to their proper level of prominence.
posted by baf at 9:26 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I am writing all of this about a children's cartoon that people came up with when they were high.

Did you read the descriptions of all the shows in the first link? There was a lot of smoking going on at Hanna-Barbera throughout the 70's.
posted by Curious Artificer at 9:26 AM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


Velma is suddenly in love with Shaggy and that's just wrong, dudes.

Now see, as a child, I always thought that Velma and Shaggy were a thing. There were always hints of it, just as there were hints of Fred and Daphne.

That may have operated from my own strong innate need to see relationships everywhere (when my stepdaughter developed what sounded like a crush when she was in grade school, my husband asked me when I started "liking" boys and I didn't even have to think, I said, "preschool"--I still remember their names and what they looked like). I identified VERY strongly with Velma as a chubby smart girl with glasses (didn't get the dyke subtext because it wasn't in my own lexicon) so of COURSE she would have to have a boyfriend.

And years later my college friends pointed out my marked preference for dating guys who looked like Shaggy, so there's that--I think I had sort of a low-key crush on him myself.

I haven't seen the new iteration at all but I think I'll be Netflixing pretty soon, based on this post.

(Although, I have to say, the thing that ticks ME off, just based on the AV Club's photo, is that they made Velma's new incarnation too skinny. Guess you can't put out a decent role model for chubby kids anymore. *sigh* And I won't even talk about the stupid little hair bow.)
posted by dlugoczaj at 9:44 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Three words: Hot. Dog. Water. Trust me on this.

Best of all, she's played by the adorable Linda Cardellini, who played Velma in the mostly regrettable live-action movies, and is best known as Lindsay Weir!
posted by mgrichmond at 9:50 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


Velma is a bit sexier (technically pretty much all the characters are) so I can see how that would be a little frustrating but I kinda see parallels to her and Willow on Buffy, which pretty much informs all teen shows just like scooby doo informed Buffy, where she was pretty much a bookish nerd character that we are supposed to ignore in favor of Daphne/Buffy but who really develops as a character especially when she realizes her childhood crush on Shaggy/Xander is not going to be reciprocated due to his emotional immaturity.

Being a children's show they probably aren't going to ever introduce an character arc where she's explicitly a lesbian but she's still a great character and role model.
posted by vuron at 9:57 AM on November 4, 2013


So kids nowadays get this, and I got Scrappy-Doo? That does it. Everybody. Off my lawn.
posted by Sing Or Swim at 9:58 AM on November 4, 2013 [8 favorites]


The Whelk: HARLAN ELLISON PLAYS HIMSELF PEOPLE

TWICE! That's right, he re-appears in the second season.
posted by filthy light thief at 10:09 AM on November 4, 2013


My only real issue with Shaggy/Velma is that Shaggy probably has like, Hidden Treasures and Sprinkle Spangles cereal crumbs and mothballs in his pubic hair. I just can't imagine him dating anyone. It's better than whatever the relationship garbage that was supposed to be going in Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island (which is a totally rad movie and I love the music).

I'm surprised that they haven't just turned Modren Velma into a Daria clone.

I used to be huge into Scooby-Doo in the late eighties and early nineties but haven't kept up since Zombie Island. I'm watching the first episode of Mystery Incorporated, and it seems decent so far. I was like, "HOLY SHIT IS VELMA DATING SHAGGY OH MY GOD". It was the biggest surprise of of the past several years for me. My life is not very exciting.

(Also, is that the DEVILS guy from Seinfeld?)
posted by Redfield at 10:16 AM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


So kids nowadays get this

After reading the entire TV Tropes entry, I can't imagine this actually being a show for kids.
posted by anastasiav at 10:29 AM on November 4, 2013


I have exposed actual kids to the show. It works.
posted by Artw at 10:33 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


My 5 & 6 year old sons love it and actually grasp the arc of S1 pretty well. I'd only watched a little bit with them and thought it was pretty clever (one of my fave scenes), but when a facebook friend commented about how the S2 finale brought her to tears, I knew there had to be something special going on, and have been meaning to watch it through.
posted by gimli at 10:45 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


There was a thread a few months ago about the Venture Bros. that turned into some animation recommendations in general. I had strong feelings about Scooby-Doo Inc in that thread... Feelings which haven't changed since.
posted by sparkletone at 10:59 AM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


After reading the entire TV Tropes entry, I can't imagine this actually being a show for kids.

Like all great kids' shows (e.g., The Muppet Show), it works on both levels. I look forward to my kids rediscovering Mystery Inc. in 20 years.
posted by Etrigan at 11:45 AM on November 4, 2013


(Also, is that the DEVILS guy from Seinfeld?)

Patrick "Puddy" "The Tick" "Brock Samson" Warburton, yes.
posted by Etrigan at 11:49 AM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


why the hell does everyone need to be in a relationship anyway. can't they just be friends for crying out loud?

heck even all the friends in Friends ended up hooking up (or wanting to hook up) with each other in some way or another.

can't we just let our kids enjoy an exciting show about solving mysteries without the stupid romantic side stories?

pulls up socks; goes back inside
posted by bitteroldman at 12:30 PM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


Wow, I am going to start watching this immediately. I have so many fond memories as a little kid watching Scooby Doo. I also really enjoyed Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island, but I think that was the only movie I saw. I refused to watch the live action ones.

I gotta say that my favorite cross-over is this one, however.
posted by gucci mane at 1:21 PM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


can't we just let our kids enjoy an exciting show about solving mysteries without the stupid romantic side stories?

Two/three words: tween/teen drama.

Sure, the little ones might like the safe monsters and mildly spooky stuff, but the slightly older audience (probably) finds additional interest in the drama elements of the show.
posted by filthy light thief at 1:42 PM on November 4, 2013


So kids nowadays get this, and I got Scrappy-Doo?

...which is probably why this guy's blog doesn't allow comments.
posted by oneswellfoop at 2:05 PM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


I watched Scooby-Doo obsessively as a kid, and I so wanted to be Daphne when I grew up. Mostly because she had red hair and a cool outfit and a pretty name, and it seemed like everyone liked her.

The thing was, I was very much a Velma, and I knew it. I was the smart kid, and I had the exact same hair and the freckles and everything. (The glasses would come later.) And I was painfully aware that my hair was uncool and that my intelligence made me stick out in a weird way. I really hated being the weird outsider kid, and figured it was something wrong with me. So I saw Velma as I saw myself: dorky, awkward, solving all the problems but never really part of the group.

It wasn't until adulthood that I learned that other smart girls adored Velma. Everyone wanted to be Velma! I don't think I've ever met another Daphne wannabe. When I first discovered the Velma love I was stunned, because my antipathy toward her had been that strong.

It's hard to explain how weirdly awful I feel for having preferred Daphne. Like I've betrayed my fellow nerd girls, or never deserved to be among them in the first place. It's not like I hate myself for it or anything, but if I wanted to be melodramatic, I could probably make a compelling argument that all of my failures could be traced back to my Team Daphne membership.
posted by Metroid Baby at 2:10 PM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


Some of the casting is entertaining right on its own. HP Hatecraft is played by Jeffrey Combs (aka Herbert West, Reanimator), Shaggy's dad is played by Casey Kasem(aka original Shaggy), and Velma's nemesis/friend/? Hot Dog Water is played by Linda Cardellini (aka Velma from the live-action movies).

Plus, everything's better with Patrick Warburton.
posted by ckape at 4:55 PM on November 4, 2013 [4 favorites]


Mark Evanier is always a terrific read. That's a tremendously informative article, thanks oneswellfoop!
posted by JHarris at 5:40 PM on November 4, 2013


(I should have known it'd be from you, heh.)
posted by JHarris at 5:41 PM on November 4, 2013


>But what is Scooby-Doo himself, a talking dog, if not something supernatural?

A talking animal exists in almost every Hanna-Barbera cartoon, ever. I always assumed this was just an element of the universe in which the stories existed, much like how everyone in the Muppet movies just acknowledge a race of sentient arbitrary felt torsos has always lived among them.


What I meant to allude to is the fact that the show has a reason Scooby-Doo can talk, and it's related to the supernatural element in the show (which I don't want to spoil).
posted by JHarris at 9:03 PM on November 4, 2013


Some of the casting is entertaining right on its own. HP Hatecraft is played by Jeffrey Combs (aka Herbert West, Reanimator), Shaggy's dad is played by Casey Kasem(aka original Shaggy), and Velma's nemesis/friend/? Hot Dog Water is played by Linda Cardellini (aka Velma from the live-action movies).

What knocks my socks off is that Fred is voiced by Frank Welker... who played Fred in the original 1969 cartoon. And nearly every other series since.

He also voices Scooby!
posted by Gordafarin at 3:06 AM on November 5, 2013 [4 favorites]


N'thing this show. I hated how mistreated it was, and how long it took them to actually just finish the second season. Velma _is_ sexed up a little bit more, her relationship with shaggy is over farily quickly. The characters are great, the monsters are actually kinda scary.

It has great action with no regard for the sheer amount of damage and destruction that happen. It doesn't let the plot get in the way of the fun.

It definitely has rubber masks, and duplicitous grown-ups. The story arcs are good (though sometimes convoluted), the episodes stand on their own, and the parents are a nice touch, and having the kids be grounded in a town, rather than just some touring bohemians gives it a nice realistic edge and backdrop for the narrative.

Its _so_ much better than the old harlem globetrotters/3 stooges/scrappy stuff that its not even funny. It could have had a much better audience if it had been sandwiched up near adult swim time, like adventure time/regular show.
posted by lkc at 4:09 PM on November 5, 2013


lkc: The characters are great, the monsters are actually kinda scary.

I was impressed by the tear-away face of the ghost Of Alice May, as it actually startled me.
posted by filthy light thief at 2:10 PM on November 6, 2013


Inspired by this thread, I sought out the show, and am now hooked. Fairly intelligent, and smartly animated as well.
posted by ZeusHumms at 9:52 AM on November 8, 2013


Me too. It's great fun. One silly question. Is Crystal Cove on the west or east coast? Just so I can tell whether they're going north or south whenever they're driving along the coast.

I'm guessing east due to the Lovecraft, Sleepy Hollow vibe but Scooby and the gang always seemed Californian to me.
posted by gnuhavenpier at 11:39 AM on November 9, 2013


What follows is spoilers.




---
In the last episode, the gang is invited to attend at Miskatonic (!) University. That's in Massachusetts, which they say is on the other side of the country. That implies they are in California, or somewhere else on the West Coast.
---
posted by JHarris at 2:20 PM on November 9, 2013


Sing Or Swim: So kids nowadays get this, and I got Scrappy-Doo?

"Look away, we promised not to talk of him" (rough quote from The Siren's Song)
posted by filthy light thief at 4:04 PM on November 9, 2013 [1 favorite]


My wife and I started watching this thanks to this thread! and when Don Knotts showed up as an extra five minutes into the first episode, we were hooked. So thanks, filthy light thief.
posted by Elementary Penguin at 3:19 PM on November 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


There are some of those visual "throwback character extras" throughout the series. Mama Cass is sitting in the audience of one episode.
posted by filthy light thief at 8:44 PM on November 10, 2013 [1 favorite]


"I can't hear you, I'm too comfortable" is my new "go away" phrase.

("Time to worship the Velma" is pretty good, too)
posted by filthy light thief at 10:22 AM on November 16, 2013


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