Dark side of the Moon
December 11, 2013 11:28 AM   Subscribe

Watch from Space as the Moon Orbits Around the Earth

• The moon orbits the Earth at an average speed of 2,300 miles an hour (3,700 kilometers an hour).
• Take a tour of the moon.
• Another view from a satellite: a lunar and terrestrial eclipse on the same day.
posted by bluefly (27 comments total) 19 users marked this as a favorite

 
"You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it. From out there on the moon, international politics looks so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, 'Look at that, you son of a bitch.'"
--Edgar Mitchell, Apollo 14
posted by entropicamericana at 11:32 AM on December 11, 2013 [19 favorites]


Awesome. that may be my favorite view from space ever, seeing the earth as it rotates, the moon as it orbits. just. wow.
posted by OHenryPacey at 11:38 AM on December 11, 2013


Ain't gravity a thing?
posted by planetesimal at 11:39 AM on December 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Juno is the partiest probe in a while. I mean HAM geekfest. Related ISS HAMgasm.
posted by Ogre Lawless at 11:53 AM on December 11, 2013


My God, it's full of awesome.
posted by Gelatin at 11:58 AM on December 11, 2013


Ain't gravity a thing?
posted by planetesimal at 2:39 PM on December 11


Eponysterical!
posted by Gelatin at 11:59 AM on December 11, 2013


Even if I didn’t feel a special attachment to Juno (which I saw launch @ a NASATweetup in ’11) I’d find this incredibly moving.

Especially the part where the Earth is “moving toward us.” There’s this odd excitement as it gets bigger and bigger, and the nature of the imaging makes it seems as if Earth is shimmering and squirming, and boy, that place is really is small and fragile, blue and beautiful, and ALIVE, ain’t it?

Good girl, Juno, good girl. Have a fine rest of the trip out there.
posted by NorthernLite at 12:03 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


My. Thanks.
posted by nat at 12:12 PM on December 11, 2013


nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnNNNNNNNYYYYOOOOOOWWWWWnnnnnngggggggggggggggggggg
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 12:18 PM on December 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


Back on the Apollo 15-17 missions, as the crew returned to Earth, a single astronaut on each mission performed a space walk to achieve several film canisters from the scientific bay of the Service Module.

This video hints at what that must have been like, though obviously the Apollo crews were not as far out as the Juno spacecraft. Imagine floating out there, so far from Earth that you can hide by putting up your thumb and the only thing preventing you from floating off into that deep black was a single cord you easily fit your hand around. What a humbling experience that must have been.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 12:28 PM on December 11, 2013


Man, the far side of the moon is weird looking compared to the side we see.
posted by rmd1023 at 12:30 PM on December 11, 2013 [2 favorites]


That's nice. I still say the EPOXI video of the Moon transiting the Earth is better.
posted by Rob Rockets at 12:41 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


How was the Moon formed?
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 12:51 PM on December 11, 2013


John Glenn was a Democrat!
posted by Captain Chesapeake at 1:09 PM on December 11, 2013


Imagine floating out there, so far from Earth that you can hide by putting up your thumb and the only thing preventing you from floating off into that deep black was a single cord you easily fit your hand around. What a humbling experience that must have been.

.
.
It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn't feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.
Neil Armstrong

posted by BozoBurgerBonanza at 1:09 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Watch from Space as the Moon Orbits Around the Earth

While it certainly is true the Moon orbits the Earth, that's not what the video shows. JPL accurately titled the video "Earth and Moon Seen by Passing Juno Spacecraft." and it appears to have been recorded during a close approach within 3 LD, a very short time, most likely only a few hours.

What you see is the apparent position of the Moon moving due to the position of the satellite changing. The Moon only moves about 12 degrees per day around the Earth, this video shows the moon moving probably 120 degrees in just a few hours.
posted by charlie don't surf at 1:39 PM on December 11, 2013


From what I understand, this is the approved method in which to go back in time. Careful, Juno!
posted by blurker at 2:11 PM on December 11, 2013


That's nice. I still say the EPOXI video of the Moon transiting the Earth yt is better.

That video is in the original article, as well. It's what prompted me to make this post!
posted by bluefly at 2:33 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


Here's another video of the HI JUNO signal, this time with the other signals picked up on the flypast - much more atmospheric, I think, as it doesn't filter out the planetary emissions.
posted by Devonian at 2:43 PM on December 11, 2013


At the closest point on the flyby, it was only 600 km from the Earth.

from Spotting Juno:
This slingshot will give Juno a 70% boost in velocity to just under 12km/s relative to Earth, just slower than Pioneer 10’s current motion relative to the Sun of 12.1km/s.

At that speed, Juno will be back out past the Moon in about 10 hours after flyby.
I always wondered how satellites could speed up when flying by planets, since gravity works the same moving toward and away from the planet. It's the planet's motion in orbit that boosts the satellite's speed, not the planet's gravity itself.
posted by jjj606 at 4:30 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's no moon. It's a space station.
posted by STFUDonnie at 4:38 PM on December 11, 2013 [1 favorite]


i *love* this kind of footage... thank you.

and thank you to those citing astronauts who were irrevocably changed by their sojourns into space (à la Mitchell, Armstrong, etc). and for those who are interested in more along these lines-

The Overview Effect
posted by jammy at 4:39 PM on December 11, 2013


It is so weird/awesome to watch that video and think "I was there when that happened."
posted by 4ster at 8:21 PM on December 11, 2013


this made me think about: apollo 10 coverup - music coming from the moon
posted by modbom at 11:53 AM on December 12, 2013


My favorite thing about that video?

It makes it clear just how DARK the moon's surface actually is.

Dozens of times I've been told that moon rock is a really dark grey, about the color of asphalt. But it never seems to look that way in pictures... until now!
posted by otherthings_ at 1:42 PM on December 12, 2013


New Moon thread: China reaches for the Moon
posted by homunculus at 9:49 AM on December 13, 2013


Santa and the Moon, an article which "reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children’s books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands."

From the really awesome Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza.
posted by bluefly at 9:33 AM on December 18, 2013


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