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January 3, 2014 6:50 PM   Subscribe

Reverse-Engineering Daft Punk's 'One More Time' [SLYT]
posted by schmod (29 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite

 
Making of "The Prodigy - Smack My Bitch Up" in Ableton basically the same thing
posted by lemonjel at 6:57 PM on January 3 [4 favorites]


What did they deny? And why would they deny it?
posted by glhaynes at 7:20 PM on January 3


Presumably, they denied violating Eddie Johns copyright on More Spell On You by taking that short sample to make the entire brass section for One More Time. I'm not entirely convinced he's got the right sample, but it's a pretty close approximation. Presumably you deny it because it's expensive to rectify.
posted by pwnguin at 7:29 PM on January 3


This makes Sample Manipulation look more complicated than playing and recording the music yourself...
posted by oneswellfoop at 7:31 PM on January 3


Related.
posted by Sys Rq at 7:35 PM on January 3 [1 favorite]


I wish he took the time to edit out the plethora of fuck ups he made chopping samples to make a 30 second video instead of a 7+ minute one.
posted by lemonjel at 7:37 PM on January 3 [1 favorite]


The first three chords of the hook are basically right but the fourth is wrong. Send this man to the Hague
posted by Rustic Etruscan at 8:11 PM on January 3 [5 favorites]


Videos like this one always make me want to fall down the Ableton rabbit hole but I don't know where to start. I am more intimidated by MIDI and drum machines than I have any reason to be.
posted by Spiced Out Calvin Coolidge at 8:24 PM on January 3


Presumably, they denied violating Eddie Johns copyright on More Spell On You by taking that short sample to make the entire brass section for One More Time. I'm not entirely convinced he's got the right sample, but it's a pretty close approximation. Presumably you deny it because it's expensive to rectify.

Every article about Daft Punk denying using that sample leads back to the same source, which is not really reliable and don't even contain a proper quote.

I haven't managed to find the liner notes of the album, but I'd be surprised if it wasn't included there.
posted by ymgve at 8:31 PM on January 3


7 minutes of fuckups and wrong fourth chord or not, I still love finding out where samples come from. Thanks for the post!
posted by spitefulcrow at 9:58 PM on January 3


I read somewhere that Thomas Bangalter's father (Daniel Vangarde) produced that Eddie Johns track - can anyone verify that?
posted by bashos_frog at 10:56 PM on January 3


This makes Sample Manipulation look more complicated than playing and recording the music yourself...

Um, ever try to do orchestration for a string and horn section and then hire an entire string and horn section? Not to mention the rhythm section...
posted by MeanwhileBackAtTheRanch at 12:31 AM on January 4 [1 favorite]


Um, ever try to do orchestration for a string and horn section and then hire an entire string and horn section? Not to mention the rhythm section...

Somehow I don't think Eddie Johns had significantly easier access to the resources required to do this.
posted by Brocktoon at 12:50 AM on January 4


> 7 minutes of fuckups and wrong fourth chord or not, I still love finding out where samples come from. Thanks for the post!

If you like that sort of thing, you would probably like this video.

It's for rap, not electronica so there's no watching screencasts though.
posted by Gev at 6:56 AM on January 4 [2 favorites]


Yeah, whoops. Totally lost me at the bungled fourth measure. If you're gonna take the time to demonstrate how computer audio producers do their thing, then do it right and have a plan. These kinds of videos always annoy me because they remind how these people aren't musicians as much as they are simply really good with computers. Is that why Random Access Memories sucked? They should've stuck with computers and sampled other peoples music.
posted by ReeMonster at 7:52 AM on January 4


Um, ever try to do orchestration for a string and horn section and then hire an entire string and horn section? Not to mention the rhythm section...

Yeah, being a trained musician is such a pain in the ass! Fuck these people who devote their lives to honing and perfecting a craft which has been beautifully developed over centuries of musical history. They should all be in marketing/branding anyway.
posted by ReeMonster at 7:54 AM on January 4


This makes Sample Manipulation look more complicated than playing and recording the music yourself...

This makes writing electronic music look so much easier than rock music. It takes me about 6 hours to get a dumb 5 chord song out with lyrics that rhyme and don't sound stupid. Then there's teaching your song to your band mates, one of whom can't play the part you had in mind, one of whom thinks the song would sound better with like, a totally different chord progression, and a drummer who can't get the rhythm right. Hours of practice later, you're ready for the soul crushing tedium of take after take after take for eight different main tracks (obviously we are talking about an extremely rough demo here) and then several months of mixing and going back to do more takes because no ones satisfied with their instrument's sound. Congratulations, you now have a recording of a song that you are totally sick of hearing and playing. Go put it on your web site and get some gigs.

This year I bought myself a bunch of new gear for Christmas and my resolution this year is to make more electronic music.
posted by Random Person at 8:01 AM on January 4 [3 favorites]


This makes writing electronic music look so much easier than rock music.

It makes turning your compositions into recordings easier. But writing is still hard. There are no computer programs that make up for a bad sense of melody. This guy was not creating something new, he was just recreating something that had previously been made. Likewise, composing music from pieces of other songs, when done creatively is really very difficult because by only using other people's samples, you are effectively limiting your palette in a pretty serious way. That's why I admire Hank Shocklee and Sir Jinx (and Daft Punk and Edan and a million other artists) so much. They made amazing textures using bars of other people's music.

But heck, goofin' around with a virtual synthesizer is fun as heck. Highly recommended.
posted by to sir with millipedes at 8:22 AM on January 4


This year I bought myself a bunch of new gear for Christmas and my resolution this year is to make more electronic music.

Don't! Keep struggling. Find better musicians who are more in line with your sensibilities and who don't need as much spoon-feeding and personal practice. Make rehearsals more efficient by finding guys who can either read music that you provide, or who are good enough to take what you tell them and play it by ear without a fight. Find musicians who KNOW what sound they want to make before they even get to the studio, and have the inner-drive to make sure THEY sound right before you even begin tracking, so that they don't come back months later saying, "I wanna do it again." In other words, don't give up on humanity, just find better humans, or figure out how YOU can improve your songwriting craft and your communication of your ideas to other musicians.
posted by ReeMonster at 8:24 AM on January 4


I thought the video was pretty awesome, especially the speed at which he built the new track. He knows his tools very well.

At first I was also impressed with the faithfulness to the original. But when I went back and listened to the original, I was surprised at how much more refined the Daft Punk version sounded. It's a somewhat convincing argument that One More Time uses the same source material, but there's still a lot of work needed to move the song from what he's got to what Daft Punk made. It almost sounds like they took a very similar approach to cutting up this sample, but then recorded all new parts for the song with modern technology. That's a fascinating way to create music.
posted by grog at 9:20 AM on January 4 [1 favorite]


Yeah he's in the wrong key and the fourth measure doesn't hold the note long enough. But it still seems pretty obvious DP used the sample, they just massaged it better than this guy did.
posted by schoolgirl report at 9:32 AM on January 4


This year I bought myself a bunch of new gear for Christmas and my resolution this year is to make more electronic music.

Don't! Keep struggling. Find better musicians who are more in line with your sensibilities and who don't need as much spoon-feeding and personal practice. Make rehearsals more efficient by finding guys who can either read music that you provide, or who are good enough to take what you tell them and play it by ear without a fight. Find musicians who KNOW what sound they want to make before they even get to the studio, and have the inner-drive to make sure THEY sound right before you even begin tracking, so that they don't come back months later saying, "I wanna do it again." In other words, don't give up on humanity, just find better humans, or figure out how YOU can improve your songwriting craft and your communication of your ideas to other musicians.
posted by ReeMonster at 8:24 AM on January 4 [+] [!]


Or, maybe do both and put this sort of false dichotomy on the curb, where it belongs?

I make dance music on my computer and release it on iTunes and Beatport. I'm not a DJ, and I don't sample other people's songs (I'm by no means anti-sampling but I've tried it and it just doesn't work for me). I sit there with Ableton Live and a MIDI keyboard and come up with my own melodies, chords, synth bass lines, etc, etc.

I also play drums and sing in an honest-to-goodness, 4-chords-and-the-truth, RAWK band with no synths, samples, or drum loops within earshot.

Both of these activities give me no end of pleasure, and I see no contradiction in enjoying these two very different approaches to making music.
posted by tantrumthecat at 10:23 AM on January 4 [5 favorites]


Dude's warp technique is kinda weird - he puts a single warp marker on the end and tries to stretch the whole track into time with just that. It'd be so much easier, and the end product so much crisper, if he put warp markers on all the important downbeats and tweaked them individually. Still, he found the sample and (mostly) got it to work, so who am I to say.

I am more intimidated by MIDI and drum machines than I have any reason to be.

Good news, then - this demo doesn't use MIDI or drum machines. If the basic idea of chopping up audio like this makes sense to you, go start listening for the best parts of your favorite songs and putting them together. Maybe look up a copy of the Ultimate Breaks & Beats set for some nice drums. It's fun!
posted by echo target at 12:25 PM on January 4 [1 favorite]


Don't! Keep struggling.

Why? There's more to art than suffering and snobbery, ReeMonster.
posted by Sys Rq at 1:29 PM on January 4 [3 favorites]


Dude's warp technique is kinda weird

What exactly is the point of "warp" anyway? I have never played with samples so I have no idea what he's even trying to accomplish there...
posted by grog at 4:24 PM on January 4


This video reminds me of the re-edit of More Spell On You by Social Disco Club.
posted by t3h933k at 6:14 PM on January 4


What exactly is the point of "warp" anyway? I have never played with samples so I have no idea what he's even trying to accomplish there...
posted by grog at 4:24 PM on January 4 [+] [!]


Basically, warping allow you to change the timing and tempo of a piece of audio without changing the pitch.
posted by tantrumthecat at 8:06 PM on January 4 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I'm kind of surprised everyone is going crazy for that video. This one from 2008 is far better (sample editing starts at 1:56).
posted by O9scar at 11:57 PM on January 4 [1 favorite]


I love learning more about the tracks behind the curtains here with Daft Punk, and also with the R&B/Funk jams the Beastie Boys knew so much about. It brings a novel element to the enjoyment of the music that seemed so old and used-to, one of internal discovery after all these years.
posted by oceanjesse at 9:04 AM on January 5


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