Skip

Our year in weather, 2013 edition.
January 30, 2014 2:35 PM   Subscribe

A one-year timelapse of global weather, described.

The visualization, comprised of imagery from the geostationary satellites of EUMETSAT, NOAA and the JMA, shows an entire year of weather across the globe during 2013, with commentary from Mark Higgins, Training Officer at EUMETSAT.

The satellite data layer is superimposed over NASA's 'Blue Marble Next Generation' ground maps, which change with the seasons.
posted by pjern (13 comments total) 28 users marked this as a favorite

 
Wow.. It didn't occur to me that something like this could exist. Fascinating!
posted by Captain Chesapeake at 2:45 PM on January 30


Beautiful, fascinating and wonderous! It feels like we're at the beginning of a golden age with technology.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 3:05 PM on January 30


It feels like we're at the beginning of a golden age with technology.

Yes. We'll be able to watch, in real-time and with unparalleled clarity, as we wreck our world. Good times ahead!
posted by Thorzdad at 3:13 PM on January 30 [8 favorites]


Drying of the Aral Sea.
posted by Smedleyman at 4:59 PM on January 30 [1 favorite]


I could watch this for hours and probably will. Awesome.
posted by billiebee at 5:53 PM on January 30


>Beautiful, fascinating and wonderous! It feels like we're at the beginning of a golden age with technology.

That was my thought, too. Amazing. I've always wanted to see something like this.
posted by KokuRyu at 6:19 PM on January 30


Yes. We'll be able to watch, in real-time and with unparalleled clarity, as we wreck our world. Good times ahead!

The world is already wrecked. I think what we are going to see is ways that we are going to reduce or reverse the damage. Think about it: when I was a kid there were no balleen whales where I live. They had been hunted to extinction. However, they have come back to the waters north of Seattle, thanks to a whaling ban.

And no, I don't buy the idea that a population explosion is going to ruin things. A small percentage of the human race in the North used up a massive amount of resources. We in the North are just going to have to learn how to share, or the new, growing populations are going to MAKE us share.

Anyway, if you don't have hope, well, nothing is ever going to change.
posted by KokuRyu at 6:22 PM on January 30 [5 favorites]


That is fantastic. The typhoons in the western Pacific were quite amazing. It is pretty cool to watch them veer off to the north and northeast toward Japan where they get sheared apart and absorbed into the prevailing westerlies.
posted by Seymour Zamboni at 6:31 PM on January 30


Great find... I sent it off to my teacher people....
Thanks!
posted by HuronBob at 7:15 PM on January 30


So awesome. So many things to look at, areas to concentrate on, i know I will watch again and again. I can remember enough of last year's weather patterns (i geek out that way) for this to really fascinate.
posted by OHenryPacey at 7:23 PM on January 30


Fantastic! Downloaded and saved for permanent viewing. Their YouTube channel has lots more!
posted by woodblock100 at 11:11 PM on January 30


Anyway, if you don't have hope, well, nothing is ever going to change.

Dude. It's so like not cool to have hope and shit. Anyone who likes anything is a pathetic dupe of the Man.
posted by aught at 8:09 AM on January 31


Metafilter: Anyone who likes anything is a pathetic dupe of the Man.
posted by stbalbach at 9:44 AM on January 31 [2 favorites]


« Older Potterverse Worldbuilding   |   And this is my column this week. Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments



Post