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Upvoting the news
March 31, 2014 11:32 AM   Subscribe

Alex Leavitt at Medium.com looks at reddit's breaking news threads from the Aurora shooting to the Boston bombings. Leavitt will present "Upvoting Hurricane Sandy: Event-Based News Production Processes on a Social News Site"at the SIGCHI (society for professionals, academics and students who are interested in human-technology & human-computer interaction) conference next month.
posted by roomthreeseventeen (13 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite

 
[SERIOUS]
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 11:58 AM on March 31 [7 favorites]


this is a great post, upvote for visibility. Look forward to hearing the sigchi presentation.
posted by rebent at 12:51 PM on March 31 [3 favorites]


Please note that this is a self post that I receive no karma for.

Edit front page? Really?! wow!
posted by hellojed at 12:59 PM on March 31 [14 favorites]


(Insert GIF meme here)
posted by glaucon at 1:13 PM on March 31


Man, the reddit Boston bombing debacle was so fucking sad and shameful.
posted by Sangermaine at 1:27 PM on March 31 [5 favorites]


Please note that this is a self post that I receive no karma for.

Edit front page? Really?! wow!


I'm going to repost this two weeks later for even more favourites than hellojed.
posted by Talez at 1:30 PM on March 31 [2 favorites]


Here is the rundown on the reddit boston bomb debacle from the subredditdrama sub.
posted by bukvich at 2:10 PM on March 31 [1 favorite]


Here is the rundown on the reddit boston bomb debacle from the subredditdrama sub.

Remember Katrina where the media, police and national guard ran with the story of rampant looting and criminality and brought military tactics to health and food emergencies. Didn't that get traced back to some wing-nut on a radio call-in show or something? New media problems are old human problems.
posted by srboisvert at 2:18 PM on March 31 [2 favorites]


Afaik reddit's upvoting works well enough. It's their moderation that has deteriorated into censorship in important default subreddits, maybe they need down voting for default subreddit status or something.
posted by jeffburdges at 3:10 PM on March 31


Man, the reddit Boston bombing debacle was so fucking sad and shameful.

Personally, and linking to my own thing here, i think the "Whatever" response after it was realized they had fucked up was just as face-welded-to-palm as the actual accusation.

It's their moderation that has deteriorated into censorship in important default subreddits, maybe they need down voting for default subreddit status or something.

Also you know, the fact that they do stuff like that and then when someone calls them out on letting abuse or racism or whatever fly they just delete everything and say no further discussion is allowed.

this debacle was a great example of that, which ended with the askreddit mods just nuking everything because it was "drama" and letting the asshole who started it all walk.
posted by emptythought at 3:29 PM on March 31


I can only imagine. My first brush with trying to navigate online interaction with news gathering was manning an IRC channel for the '94 NorthRidge earthquake. Oh, masses, masses and immediate social media!

Also, upboat.

That Boston marathon thread was a nightmare, though. Well intentioned beards gone... wrong.
posted by cavalier at 3:48 PM on March 31 [1 favorite]


The Medium post is great but the actual PDF article is painful to read -- hard-to-understand regression statistics (and I say this as someone who knows what a multinomial logistic regression is) and an implicit assumption that statistically significant = real. Is it just that researchers are professionally required to present their results in contrived ways? Or is it just me?
posted by leopard at 4:49 PM on March 31


You need to make a distinction between the national Reddit and the Boston subreddit.

The former was busy giving the NY Post photos of suspects who turned out to be innocent high-school kids. The latter was busy organizing pizza-delivery drives for first responders and providing info on ways to help the injured and announcing vigils and the like.

Maybe the difference is that the local Redditors were, well, local, had been directly affected by the tragedy and had more important things to worry about (like whether the subway was running) than trying to crowdsource suspects.
posted by adamg at 7:00 PM on March 31 [3 favorites]


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