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Apparently, "Whatever" happens one time out of five
April 16, 2014 3:24 PM   Subscribe

Last month, Beverage Industry published their 2014 US Beer Category Report, and Dylan Matthews at Vox.com has compiled the numbers into their favorite thing: charts! There's a few interesting details, but the biggest one is that not only is Bud Light one out of every five beers purchased in America, but sells more than all import, craft, cider and malt beverage sales combined.
posted by Punkey (72 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
To be fair, the graph is labelled "Cases of Beer or Beer-Like Beverage". The second of those is the category I would place Bud Light in.
posted by gimonca at 3:43 PM on April 16 [11 favorites]


This Bud's for you. I won't drink the stuff, unless it's a summer evening and it's the only beer available.

Craft beers FTW!
posted by Artful Codger at 3:44 PM on April 16


It's not like most of my favorite breweries could maintain even a fraction of that production, so this doesn't bother me a bit. And hey, at least Bud Light is union-made. It could be a lot worse.
posted by asperity at 3:45 PM on April 16 [9 favorites]


No PBR on the list - there must be an error!
posted by nostrada at 3:46 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


Well, I don't really care if imports, ciders, and craft beers aren't that big a share of market/production. I can only drink about a beer a night, anyway.
posted by GenjiandProust at 3:47 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


Or even just drink a regular Budweiser, America.
posted by 2bucksplus at 3:48 PM on April 16


The thing is that when I drink Budweiser I typically have a dozen of them. When I drink something better it is usually just one or two.
posted by Literaryhero at 3:56 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


Budweiser or Budweiser?
posted by fnerg at 3:59 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


I'm never quite sure how I feel when I see stats like this, but I always know how I'm supposed to feel. Depending on the attitude of the person who points them out, it's either (A) "Ha! Look at all the people drinking Bud light! Stupid classless morons!" or (B) "Ha! Barely anyone orders 'craft' beers - stupid pretentious beer snobs!"

Frankly as an amateur brewer and beer connoisseur (OK, snob... *sigh*), I'm much more "meh" about the issue. The beer I prefer is never, ever going to be the most popular one. Like... ever. I'm fine with that, popularity is orthogonal to how good it is. But at the same time I can't bring myself to look down my nose at people who genuinely enjoy Bud Light for whatever reason. I mean, you like what you like. I would hate the hell out of it if someone sat there and judged what I drank. Plus, honestly, if you toss an ice cube or two in a light beer, it can be damn refreshing on a hot summer night.
posted by Joey Buttafoucault at 4:04 PM on April 16 [13 favorites]


"...you like what you like....

Yep, you nailed it........

And, it's an apples to oranges comparison anyway.... pretty pointless...
posted by HuronBob at 4:17 PM on April 16


The beer I prefer is never, ever going to be the most popular one.

The thing that slightly surprised me is that Bud Light beats all non-macrobrews combined, but it's slightly less surprising after thinking about it for a bit. I still know bars around my town, which is a major craft brew haven, that only have Bud and Bud Light on tap. Plus, Bud and Bud Light probably rack up a ton of sales in 30-pack form, and once you account for all the Millers and Coors doing the same thing, craft/microbrew/import/malt sales are going to be pretty low in comparison. Like 2bucksplus, I'm slightly disappointed it's not just regular Bud, but at least it's not Coors Light.
posted by LionIndex at 4:28 PM on April 16


posted by Punkey

eponBrewsterical
posted by George_Spiggott at 4:29 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


Bud Light and similar products always make me think of Douglas Adams' "Nutri-Matic" machine.

"The way it functioned was very interesting. When the Drink button was pressed it made an instant but highly detailed examination of the subject's taste buds, a spectroscopic analysis of the subject's metabolism and then sent tiny experimental signals down the neural pathways to the taste centers of the subject's brain to see what was likely to go down well. However, no one knew quite why it did this because it invariably delivered a cupful of liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea beer."

I'm actually not a beer snob (I think)... I drink mostly lagers and when it comes to craft beers I usually stick with Pilsners and Koelschs. But I just never ever find myself in a situation where I would actively choose Bud Light or something like it. In fact I'd probably choose water instead if there was no alternatives. It's not that it's horrible or digusting... it's more a complete absence of any form of appeal.
posted by Hairy Lobster at 4:31 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


I find this not at all surprising. I work in a public park and the cans and bottles thrown on the ground are mostly Bud Light. I have this ongoing fantasy of writing to them and getting a grant just because they're (indirectly) causing all this mess.
posted by sciencegeek at 4:36 PM on April 16 [3 favorites]


I have had one Bud Light in my life and can't imagine drinking another. It wasn't actively disgusting, just lacking in any particular virtue. If I'm going to indulge, I'll actively indulge, or else water is fine.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 4:41 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


It's interesting to get some perspective, I think. I've been to Stone's brewery - the damn thing is huge, but even then it's only a tiny, tiny sliver of the overall beer production. Plus, the first link has some pretty encouraging news for craft beer.

I also secretly want Randall Munroe to join forces with Vox.com to make ridiculously silly yet news-topical infographics. For example, if a case is 24 16 ounce containers, Americans bought enough Bud Light in 2013 to almost - but not quite - fill the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center with Bud Light; if the entire annual sales of Stone was forced through the Hoover Dam through the powerplant, spillways and jet flow gates, it would be a half-second torrent of hoppy goodness, and the annual sales of Four Loko could fit in an oil tanker in Medium Range Tanker class and promptly sunk to the bottom of the sea.
posted by Punkey at 4:45 PM on April 16 [4 favorites]


This is definitely one of those "no one I know voted for Nixon" things for me. I can think of one or maybe two people I know who might drink that stuff so my cohort must be wildly divergent from the general beer drinking population.
posted by octothorpe at 4:46 PM on April 16


Bud Light makes a perfectly fine base for a cerveza preparada, but another beer just as boring that costs half as much will work just as well in most cases.
posted by peeedro at 4:46 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


I don't know how widespread it is, but I can go to the store and just buy a Bud Light Chelada in a can, ready to go.
posted by LionIndex at 4:55 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


What's also surprising to me is how dominant light beers are in general. To save anyone else from doing the computation: 67% of that chart is light beers. If we exclude the ciders and malt things and only look at the beers, that fraction is 69%. Bud Light and Coors Light alone combine for 39% of the beers.

I couldn't find a full set of equivalent data for Canada (the closest thing the US has to a control group), but this report (pdf) has data for the top 10 beers, accounting for 55% of the market in 2010 (pg 12). In that list, the only light beers are Bud Light and Coors Light and they make up only 16% of the market.
posted by mhum at 5:03 PM on April 16


Even before clicking on the links I knew it would be a power-law sort of a situation. I've tended bar, and Bud Light is the sort of default to a pretty broad cross-section of society: the guy who doesn't particularly like beer (but won't drink liquor -- Bud Light manages to have alcohol but not be particularly strongly flavored in any of the 'beer' dimensions), the cheap guy, the guy who isn't particularly adventurous, the guy who orders 'a beer' without being specific and pisses off the bartender.

Some people get comfortable with it from their first introduction to beer at a kegger and just never branch out. I've seen someone order a pitcher of Bud Light when all the other pitchers on draft were the same price -- literally any other choice would be more interesting and no more expensive, yet this idiot still chooses Bud Light. People are creatures of habit, and one of those habits for the American drinking public is Bud Light. I'm not saying we should all be drinking craft beers (I like many of them, but if I'm having more than one or two beers, then I'm switching to something lower ABV and less expensive), but there are plenty of alternatives to Bud and Bud Light in the fairly inexpensive but eminently drinkable domestic market segment. Try a PBR or an Old Style for a change.
posted by axiom at 5:04 PM on April 16 [4 favorites]


If you had bet me that Bud Light LIME outsells Sam Adams... I would have lost a bet. Bud Light Lime? Really?

As a one-time grad student, I deeply understand the appeal of cheap, middle-of-the-road beers (Miller Lite was the popular option, in my circle) and I am not at all surprised that the top of the chart is dominated by domestic, reasonably priced, reasonably boring beers. But Bud Light Lime? I honestly didn't even think they still made that. Why would you make that? What is wrong with you Budweiser?
posted by artichoke_enthusiast at 5:05 PM on April 16


The Bud Light Platinum branding confuses me since at 6% alcohol, it's not only stronger than Bud Light (4%), but also normal Budweiser (5%).

Labatt's seems to be pushing Bud hard here in Canada, I've noticed a reduction in Blue ads, and many more Bud ads.
posted by Harpocrates at 5:08 PM on April 16


I will drink really shitty wine with no problems-- crap red wine and soda? Excellent summer beverage.

But I just can't do shitty beer. I don't know what it is.
posted by dogheart at 5:09 PM on April 16


(To clarify: I mean soda as in coke or dr. Pepper, not soda as in soda water.)
posted by dogheart at 5:10 PM on April 16


the guy who orders 'a beer' without being specific and pisses off the bartender.

That's actually a thing that real people do in real life and not just on TV?
posted by jason_steakums at 5:13 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


One time my neighbors won a Budweiser contest and the Clydesdales, pulling their beer wagon, preceded by an oom-pah band, came down my street to deliver the beer to my neighbors. There was a little golf cart that scurried after them with two dudes who took turns jumping out to scoop the horse poop.

It was fully as awesome as you would expect eight gigantic horses pulling an old-time beer wagon accompanied by an oom-pah band on the residential side streets of a random American city in the middle of the afternoon in the 2010s to be. By which I mean it was CRAZY AWESOME.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 5:15 PM on April 16 [24 favorites]


Though Bud Light is the top selling beer in America, it isn't top selling in the world. According to Drinks Business, it's Snow Beer. Here's the list in it's entirety (without having to click through each page):

1) Snow Beer (China)
2) Tsingtao (China)
3) Budweiser (US)
4) Yanjing (China)
5) Bud Light (US)
6) Corona Extra (Mexico)
7) Skol (Brazil, though sort of complicated)
8) Heineken (Netherlands)
9) Coors Light (US)
10) Brahma (Brazil)

Also interesting is how many of these are owned by AB InBev. Brahma, Corona, and The Buds are directly owned, while Skol is distributed by AB InBev ONLY in Brazil.
posted by FJT at 5:18 PM on April 16 [3 favorites]


I bump those sales because I like to order Bud Light just to make the snobs freak out and spend an hour ranting at me for drinking it and obviously ruin their whole evening because someone is daring to drink peasant beer and sending them into over the top apoplexy when I say I can't taste the difference.
posted by Ghostride The Whip at 5:26 PM on April 16 [8 favorites]


So you spend time in the company of people who take offense at something only someone with a loose screw would take offense at, and then you choose your beer on the basis of what will offend them rather than what you like? What a curious sort of existence to lead... and by choice, yet.
posted by George_Spiggott at 5:30 PM on April 16 [4 favorites]


How is Bud Light like sex in a canoe?
It's fucking close to water.
posted by exogenous at 5:36 PM on April 16 [3 favorites]


Apparently, if you draw a Venn diagram, the region where the "violently hates beer" and "likes to pee a lot" circles overlap is huge.
posted by sourcequench at 5:53 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


More people need to try the offerings of Starr Hill.
posted by 4ster at 5:56 PM on April 16 [5 favorites]


I'm not a fan of Bud Light (High Life would be my cheap domestic of choice) but I have had some thoughts as to the role beers like it have in history.

If we were to use a time machine and let brewers of centuries ago sample a Budweiser, I think they would feel as if they were sampling beer from God's own stash. So delicate! Crisp! Clean! Lightly flavored! While we consider it watery and (rightly) devoid of personality, I think many of us would have difficulty choking down something with as much "personality" as the product of a 1650's brewmaster.

The same with baked goods. We all know that Wonder bread is a joke, but give a sample to a 17th century french baker and they would marvel at how refined and delicate and fluffy and white and pure it is. They would think it were made from actual angel (or at least the clouds they sit on) and be amazed they could eat a piece without chipping their teeth on something, uh, wholesome. But for us, white bread is a product to ridicule--the more rustic the better, you see.

Always greener, yada yada yada.
posted by sourwookie at 6:38 PM on April 16 [5 favorites]


More people need to try the offerings of Starr Hill.

Agreed. Don't think I've tried one I haven't liked.
posted by rtha at 7:04 PM on April 16


sourwookie: " So delicate! Crisp! Clean! Lightly flavored! "

And also consistent from batch to batch, and shelf-stable, which is how the big industrial brewers like Budweiser came to dominate the market. There was a lot of absolutely shit beer when brewing was a handmade, small-process art and subject to the whims of nature. Budweiser and its ilk made it possible for people to get a consistent-quality product, and today's craft brewers use techniques and equipment pioneered by the big corporate guys to get consistent high quality.

I have no beef with people who prefer the taste of other beers -- I do myself, although I don't mind drinking a Budweiser -- but when people are like "BUDWEISER RUINED BEER! IT'S THE WORST THING EVER TO HAPPEN TO BEER!" it's just like, STFU ignoramus, or I'm going to pour Natty Lite down your throat.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 7:05 PM on April 16 [7 favorites]


I've definitely heard the brewers at Budweiser are actually incredibly skilled and occasionally turn out killer beers on their own time.

It's beer for people who don't like beer.
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth at 7:08 PM on April 16


If it is required of me to have a beer, it's usually Miller or Coors light. Occasionally a Guinness.

I have tried craft beers while out with Ralph (the places we go sample them out) and frankly....well, I'm not really much of a beer drinker, I suppose.

All this talk makes me think of the punch line of an old joke:

"sir, your horse has diabetes."
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies at 7:38 PM on April 16 [2 favorites]


I'm a beer snob. I don't have any problem with people drinking beer that I think is bad, but what I don't like is bad beer companies making things harder for the brewers whose beer I like.

Everything is stacked against the microbrews, in the US. Well, not everything. Some states have beer laws that advantage the microbrews to an extent. But the three-tier distribution system really screws small brewers. Everything about the system incentivizes the distributors and stores to devote most of their capacity to just a few companies. Beer Wars is a pretty good film on the subject, quite watchable.

I worry when I see the big beermakers trying to horn in on the craft beer market by buying small breweries or making pale-imitation "craft" beers of their own like ShockTop. The craft beer market is such a tiny sliver. I don't think they're really after that tiny bit of money. I think they're trying to buy insurance that the craft beer "fad" won't become bigger and bigger. Which, frankly, I think would be great.
posted by gurple at 7:47 PM on April 16 [1 favorite]


Representin' for the West-coast hops mafia, bizzles!

\x/
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey at 7:50 PM on April 16


I think they're trying to buy insurance that the craft beer "fad" won't become bigger and bigger.

Could be, but look at Goose Island. When AB InBev bought them, they built a big fancy new brewery that's where they're producing all their mass-distributed stuff, like 312. But the original facility's now devoted to all the other projects, like their "Sisters" beers, and oh my goodness Gillian was like a party in my mouth. Too expensive for anything but a special occasion, but I'd never even have been able to get hold of the thing without the AB InBev intervention.

Still, even something as large as Goose Island is small enough by their standards to be basically a vanity project.

Side note: if you're ever near a macro brewery that offers tours, do it. Absolutely fascinating how brewing's done on such a large scale and with such consistency.
posted by asperity at 7:56 PM on April 16


The only mass-market beer I've ever enjoyed much is Miller Genuine Draft, or I guess even more commonly MGD Lite, but apparently (or are they) those are folded in on the chart with Miller High Life. Allegedly it along with Budweiser is a beer Americans no longer love. Yet back in, oh, the 90s it seemed like it was the only beer that everyone would say yes to drinking, at least in my somewhat staid circles.

I do love me some craft beers but mostly around here it's hard to get. We do have in almost every bar the Wisconsin-only New Glarus brand.

Now, what's on that list that I drink? Oh, some Woodchuck or Angry Orchard as I definitely enjoy a cider now and then, and Mike's Hard varieties were a frequent buy at one point (not ashamed to say my favorite was the Pomegranate Punch, which seems to have disappeared from the line-up), the odd Corona, Newcastle Brown Ale ... and that's it. Everything else I like, e.g. the New Glarus line, local brewer (no awards in a while, though) Gray's, even the "too corporate" Leinenkugel line, and so on down the more obscure road, just not on the list. I did like Goose Ilsland brews and 312 in particular when it came out.

I did, by the way, enjoy the movie Drinking Buddies with Anna Kendrick, Jake Johnson, Olivia Wilde, and Ron Livingston in a sort of low-key mismatched love quadrangle. Set in Chicago and largely filmed there and particularly at Revolution Brewing Co. I don't think it really explained much about the craft brewing business -- it's an improv indie people story -- but it gave you the vibe. Have not found any of the Revolution product locally, though, and I'm just over the Wisconsin border.
posted by dhartung at 8:52 PM on April 16


I can go to the store and just buy a Bud Light Chelada in a can, ready to go.

Try the Modelo brand for a much more satisfying experience, IMO.
posted by telstar at 9:03 PM on April 16


Is it just a regional thing where Boulevard Unfiltered Wheat has seemed like the most ubiquitous of the craft beers (well, until the Duvel acquisition last year)? It seems like even the bars with the slimmest selections around the midwest have always had Boulevard on tap for a few years now.
posted by jason_steakums at 9:29 PM on April 16


I'm slightly disappointed it's not just regular Bud, but at least it's not Coors Light

I haven't had either bud light or coors light in many years, but I still remember coors light tasting like a beer while bud light tasted like slightly flavoured fizzy water. Has the recipe changed? Coors light was much better when I tried them.
posted by Hoopo at 9:36 PM on April 16


I raise an eyebrow at the idea Smirnoff Ice is a "beer-like beverage".
posted by ninebelow at 2:32 AM on April 17


I've definitely heard the brewers at Budweiser are actually incredibly skilled and occasionally turn out killer beers on their own time.



Legend Brewery in Richmond, VA, celebrating their 20th year of making tasty brews this year, was founded by second-generation AB brewmaster Tom Martin.
posted by gimli at 5:02 AM on April 17


But Bud Light Lime? I honestly didn't even think they still made that. Why would you make that? What is wrong with you Budweiser?

I don't drink Bud Light. My tastes run to the actually-beery. But goddamn if I won't guzzle a gallon of BLL on a summer day at the beach or the park, or bring a tallboy into the shower after a day of getting sweaty. It's mostly-indistinguishable from Gatorade, with the bonus of just a touch of alcohol.
posted by uncleozzy at 5:18 AM on April 17


I think this is because so much American craft beer is wildly over-hopped and unsubtle. I know there are good beers somewhere on those craft beer shelves but it's like finding a non-crazy Republican. It's hard work and often leaves you disappointed.
posted by srboisvert at 5:22 AM on April 17 [3 favorites]


ninebelow: "I raise an eyebrow at the idea Smirnoff Ice is a "beer-like beverage"."

It's a flavored malt-based brew so yeah, "beer-like". They're not talking about the taste, just the brewing process. No vodka involved.
posted by octothorpe at 5:23 AM on April 17 [1 favorite]


I think this is because so much American craft beer is wildly over-hopped and unsubtle. I know there are good beers somewhere on those craft beer shelves but it's like finding a non-crazy Republican. It's hard work and often leaves you disappointed.

That was certainly my experience visiting the US for the first time in about a decade. I'm a "beer snob" too, and my god, every beer I tasted was OMG HOOOOPS MOAR HOPS SO MUCH HOPITAHOPITA.

If you don't, like, adore IPAs and hops, it felt like you were shit out of luck at a lot of craft brew places I visited. I can see why people turn towards a good, clean consistent beer and write off craft beers entirely if they don't know any better.

That trend is starting to make its way over here to the UK now after already infecting Canada.
posted by generichuman at 5:39 AM on April 17 [1 favorite]


FJT: Though Bud Light is the top selling beer in America, it isn't top selling in the world. According to Drinks Business, it's Snow Beer.

Great list, FJT. Always a good quiz for beer fans. Typical responses from US and Australian quaffers will be the big US brands, Heineken, Corona, and (after some prompting about big international markets) Tsingtao. But I've never heard even one guess of "Snow".

Has anyone on this thread tried (or even seen) Snow Beer?
posted by Chipeaux at 5:49 AM on April 17


I've definitely heard the brewers at Budweiser are actually incredibly skilled and occasionally turn out killer beers on their own time.
See also: AC Golden Brewing (Exhibit 1, Exhibit 2)
posted by jferg at 6:01 AM on April 17 [1 favorite]


It's a flavored malt-based brew so yeah, "beer-like". They're not talking about the taste, just the brewing process. No vodka involved.

WTF? I Googled this and it turns out that yes, in the US a Smirnoff Ice is a citrus-flavoured malt beverage whereas in the rest of the world it involves, er, Smirnoff. Next you'll be saying the US version of Newcastle Brown is made out of berries.
posted by ninebelow at 6:46 AM on April 17


I just don't get why Bud Light, specifically. I understand the appeal of something light, but Bud products taste skunky to me. Miller Lite or Coors Light deliver the same qualities, without that note of "been sitting on the loading dock in the sun for three days."
posted by Chrysostom at 6:46 AM on April 17


If you don't, like, adore IPAs and hops, it felt like you were shit out of luck at a lot of craft brew places I visited

I really do think we've passed Peak Hops--an awful lot of breweries are making pilsners and sours and wood-aged stouts instead of yet-another-DIPA these days--but the bread-and-butter for a lot of craft brewers is still the hop bomb. They're "easy" in that an aggressive hop schedule can cover a multitude of sins, and they'll sell to hopheads chasing the next rush.

We're not out of the woods yet--the "session IPA" trend is worrying, in that we're getting highly unbalanced 4% abv pale ales--but I think we're headed in that direction.

(That said: I'm a big hops fan, but I prefer big aroma and flavor to straight-up bitterness; one of the breweries that does that really well, in my opinion, is Lagunitas, which saw insanely rapid expansion in 2013).
posted by uncleozzy at 6:48 AM on April 17 [3 favorites]


WTF? I Googled this and it turns out that yes, in the US a Smirnoff Ice is a citrus-flavoured malt beverage whereas in the rest of the world it involves, er, Smirnoff.

I think that because of the arcane and complicated rules for alcohol sales in various US states, it's easier to sell something that's officially a beer than something that's liquor based even if they have the same alcohol content.
posted by octothorpe at 6:58 AM on April 17


Once while living in St Louis, I got to take a private tour of the pilot brewery that's inside the AB plant on Arsenal Street. It's a fascinating facility, 9 stories tall where they move the beer down floor by floor through the production process. On the bottom floor was a small bottling line. They weren't bottling any test beer that day, so they ran the machine and filled the bottles with carbonated water. It was hot as hell that day, so I asked our tour guide if it was okay to take one of the beer bottles filled with water and drink it. He obliged, so I popped the top and chugged it. Sure as hell, it tasted exactly like Bud Light.
posted by slogger at 7:33 AM on April 17 [1 favorite]


See also: AC Golden Brewing

They really do produce some good beers. I feel sort of dirty about buying them given Coors's labor practices and all, but their Framboise Noir was delightful and I always enjoy Colorado Native. The latter's done quite a bit to improve the state's hops production all on its own.
posted by asperity at 9:12 AM on April 17


I like craft beers. I like cheap beers. I like malt liquor. I even like Budwiser.

I don't like light beer.
posted by jonmc at 10:12 AM on April 17


I like beer.
posted by Gee Your Hair Smells Terrific at 11:04 AM on April 17


I like beer. (too!)
I like the beer I make.
I like the beer I buy.
I buy craft beers and I buy Lone Star (started by Adolphus Busch, owned by Pabst, made in a Miller factory) when that is what I need. Sometimes an American lager is the thing I need. I have drunk them cold on hot days. I have drunk them warm out of the trunk of the car deep in the desert as the night time temperature is dropping. I have no qualms about buying beer from a huge brewing concern. If I am somewhere with Bud/Miller/Coors as the only choices, I go first for Miller, second for Coors and third for water. Budweiser products give me a (potentially psychosomatic) headache, but I can't figure out why. I originally thought I might have a rice thing, but I have read that all three use corn and rice. They all also use hops extracts instead of whole hops, so it isn't that either. All my research has done has made me want to try brewing a beer with a large amount of basmati rice in it. That nutty flavor of basmati MUST be able to come through and work well with the properly designed beer. A basmati brown ale? I don't know, but I gotta do something with it. Maybe this fall.

Living in Texas and having the in-laws that I do, that list didn't surprise me. It is what it is. Percentage of market share for craft beers isn't important to me, access to them is. And I do have access to them. What really freaked me out about that list was Shiner. That beer deserves to be the small regional shit beer that it is, not one that I find in a bar in the Nashville airport, next to Yuengling and without a single locally produced beer on tap.

Worst beer I have had recently . . . Boulevard's Sorachi Ace. That was worse than any Miller, Coors or Budweiser (headache included) product I have EVER drank. Swill.
So now . . . I won't mock a B/M/C drinker, but if any of my friends drink Sorachi Ace . . . fair game.
Best beer I have tried recently? Deep Ellum Brewing Company's IPA. I am not a hop head. I hate the overhopped, unbalanced beers that dominate American craft beer. Somehow Deep Ellum manages to make a beer with a massive hop load that is great. I compared it to Sculpin and Lagunita's IPA and, in my opinion, was significantly better. (Also, the brewer was the second person to respond to a Homebrew forum discussion on cloning it and gave the grain bill and hop loads to the asker. Classy.)
posted by Seamus at 11:39 AM on April 17


Budweiser products give me a (potentially psychosomatic) headache, but I can't figure out why.

I have a friend who reports the same thing.

What really freaked me out about that list was Shiner. That beer deserves to be the small regional shit beer that it is, not one that I find in a bar in the Nashville airport, next to Yuengling and without a single locally produced beer on tap.

I like Shiner, and I'm glad it's available in Pennsylvania now. YMMV.
posted by Chrysostom at 12:30 PM on April 17 [2 favorites]


Worst beer I have had recently . . . Boulevard's Sorachi Ace.
As someone for whom Boulevard is my "hometown" brewery, I feel obligated to point to out that Sorachi Ace is made by Brooklyn Brewery and that it would be a shame to besmirch Boulevard's good name with such accusations.

:->
posted by jferg at 3:07 PM on April 17 [2 favorites]


That's actually a thing that real people do in real life and not just on TV?

Sadly, yes. A polite bartender will respond "WHAT KIND?" through gritted teeth, battling the urge to whack the customer upside the head with a speed opener. An impolite or busy bartender will just grab the worst swill available and hand it over.
posted by axiom at 8:40 PM on April 17 [1 favorite]


Budweiser products give me a (potentially psychosomatic) headache, but I can't figure out why.

I get the same thing from Coors products and, strangely, Bass Ale. Not sure if it's corn or rice or the yeast or just my stupid brain, but thankfully it's not too hard to stay away from those.
posted by uncleozzy at 6:39 AM on April 18


Christ. I know it is Brooklyn Brewery and swear I went back and changed that after I mistyped it.
I like Boulevard. I apologize to Boulevard for the horrible slight.
posted by Seamus at 8:47 AM on April 18 [2 favorites]


I like Shiner, and I'm glad it's available in Pennsylvania now. YMMV.

Hell, yeah! The best part about life is that there's no arguing taste.
Well, unless you are looking for something fun to do to pass the time.
posted by Seamus at 12:35 PM on April 18


Just bought a case of Bud Light Lime because of this thread. Turns out I like it, because I like drinking lighter lagers with lime and this means I don't have to bother cutting up fruit. Just toss in some tabasco and good to go. Also, lower calorie is good for me right now. Thanks thread.

Also, you caused me not to buy the new Yuengling Summer Wheat which seems to be getting good reviews so go to hell thread. Been waiting for a sub-$30 case of decent hefeweizen and I think this might be it.
posted by Drinky Die at 1:26 PM on April 18 [2 favorites]


I can tell you the newly revived Yuengling ice cream - it's what kept them going through Prohibition - is excellent.
posted by Chrysostom at 1:44 PM on April 18 [1 favorite]


What did I just say about calories?

/stealthily opens shopping list tab in browser.
posted by Drinky Die at 1:49 PM on April 18


Bud Light Lime, Unlikely Hope
According to friends, family members, and court documents, when the police came for him in February 2010, America’s last king of beer was holed up in his mansion, grievously addicted to drugs, gripped by paranoia, beset by hallucinations, and armed with hundreds of high-powered weapons, including several .50-caliber machine guns.
Which is all to say that Bud Light Lime came to us from the edge of an abyss.
posted by Drinky Die at 4:49 PM on April 19 [1 favorite]


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