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Ah yes, the old rumpscuttle and clapperdepouch (aka "fadoodling")
July 18, 2014 7:19 PM   Subscribe

31 Adorable Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse from the Last 600 Years Lexicographer Jonathon Green’s comprehensive historical dictionary of slang, Green’s Dictionary of Slang, covers hundreds of years of jargon, cant, and naughty talk. He has created a series of online timelines (here and here) where the words too impolite, indecent, or risqué for the usual history books are arranged in the order they came into fashion. (If you don’t see any words on the timelines, zoom out using the bar on the right.) We’ve already had fun with the classiest terms for naughty bits. Here are the most adorable terms for sexual intercourse from the last 600 or so years.
posted by mikeand1 (30 comments total) 33 users marked this as a favorite

 
If you'd fadoodle on my noodle, I'd dance the kipples on your nipples.
posted by Flunkie at 7:23 PM on July 18


dear liza, dear liza..
posted by jonmc at 7:27 PM on July 18 [1 favorite]


Okay, "Join giblets" is awesome.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 7:43 PM on July 18 [3 favorites]


The backdoor gentleman, a well-known navigator of the windward passage, plays backgammon with the browning sisters, coming in by the tradesman's entrance.
posted by BungaDunga at 7:48 PM on July 18 [2 favorites]


Ride a dragon upon St. George

Now that just sounds like slashfic.
posted by Zalzidrax at 7:51 PM on July 18 [7 favorites]


"Horizontal Refreshment" is my second favorite Starland Vocal Band song.
posted by Metroid Baby at 7:51 PM on July 18 [5 favorites]


Nudge nudge, say no more, say no more.
posted by BungaDunga at 7:54 PM on July 18


I wonder whether these are actually slang or, in context, one-off jokes and nonce words etc. 'Put the devil into hell' is surely an allusion to The Decameron, for example.
posted by Segundus at 7:56 PM on July 18 [2 favorites]


Okay, "Join giblets" is awesome.

I dunno, makes me miss Fafblog all over again.
posted by JHarris at 7:58 PM on July 18 [5 favorites]


So many unfortunate mental images.
posted by zarq at 8:02 PM on July 18 [1 favorite]


Joining paunches is way better than dancing the kipples, if you know what I mean.
posted by Chuffy at 8:21 PM on July 18 [1 favorite]


"Give someone a green gown"? Jeez. You might want to consult a physician.
posted by yoink at 8:36 PM on July 18 [2 favorites]


"Uphill gardening". I was looking for some Britslang to complement "cornhole" and found that one. Would an Australian recognize it? I went with "pillow biter", which is also hilarious.
posted by Nelson at 8:45 PM on July 18


Yeah, sorry, making a witty comment on this thread is a little too easy...kind of like shooting fish in a barrel.

Which also happens to be my term for it.
posted by uosuaq at 8:45 PM on July 18 [2 favorites]


posted by BungaDunga

If this isn't eponysterical nothing is.
posted by Dip Flash at 8:51 PM on July 18 [4 favorites]


Arrive at the end of the sentimental journey

And then close the book if you know what I mean.
And then reflect upon its relationship to The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy if you know what I mean.

Wait...what do I mean?
posted by yoink at 8:54 PM on July 18 [7 favorites]


"Getting ashes hauled" is a phrase I heard as recently as 20 years ago (from someone born in the 1920s).

One source points to blues songs for the idea that you have to take out the trash once in a while--ladies too! (and while not blues, I tip my hat to Fats Waller; SLYT).
posted by datawrangler at 8:54 PM on July 18


Yoink: "give someone a gren gown" derives from the result, on a young rural lady's clothing, of a roll in the hay. Or grass.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to show the llama the lift shaft.
posted by Decani at 8:59 PM on July 18 [11 favorites]


Getting ashes hauled is a phrase I know only from books, and had always assumed that it was linked linguistically to "hauling ass," perhaps a bowdlerized version more fit for print.
posted by Dip Flash at 9:17 PM on July 18


Finding an Alternate Route to the Indies (1560)
Attending the Rump Parliament (1648)
Flying a Kite in a Thunderstorm (1752)
Spreading the Alarm Through Every Middlesex Village and Farm (1775)
Holding These Truths to be Self-Evident (1776)
Sending in Lewis and Clark (1803)
The Madness of King George (1810)
The Full Mary Todd Lincoln (1860)
posted by PlusDistance at 9:30 PM on July 18 [16 favorites]


Wait...what do I mean?

I think you mean "fluffing the Garfield". IYKWIM.
posted by Greg_Ace at 11:31 PM on July 18


Say no more!
posted by lon_star at 12:36 AM on July 19


Surprised that 'banging away like a belt-fed mortar' doesn't feature.
posted by GallonOfAlan at 12:58 AM on July 19 [2 favorites]


Occupy Wall Street is ten times funnier when you discover "occupy" was Elizabethan slang for sexual congress.
posted by longbaugh at 1:25 AM on July 19 [5 favorites]


Princum prancum!
Right click -> Add to Dictionary
posted by horopter at 4:43 AM on July 19


Arrive at the end of the sentimental journey

Oh, God. I'll never hear the song the same way again....

Gonna take a sentimental journey
Gonna set my heart at ease
Gonna make a sentimental journey
To renew old memories....

posted by magstheaxe at 5:31 AM on July 19


I see your Sterne, and raise:
"Pray, my dear, quoth my mother, have you not forgot to wind up the clock ? ---- "
posted by doctornemo at 5:34 AM on July 19


What, no 'How's your father'?

(Uphill gardening is my favourite!)
posted by sneebler at 8:09 AM on July 19


Sterne also gets mileage and double entendre laughs from "Give a green gown."
posted by charlesminus at 12:20 PM on July 19


Early United States history was full of these. In fact, they have been misinterpreted into the notion that we had a Revolutionary War.

The Stamp Act. 1765.
The Gaspee Affair. 1772.
Battle of Point Pleasant. 1774.
Midnight Ride. 18th April, 1775.
Welcoming the Minutemen Brigade 1775.
Ring the Liberty Bell 1776.
Battle of Long Island 1776.
Lafayette comes. 1777.
Crossing the Delaware. 1777.
Keeping Warm in Valley Forge. 1778.
Storming King's Mountain. 1780.
Surrendering your Yorktown 1781.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 4:11 PM on July 19 [2 favorites]


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